American Quarter Horse Foundation - Hall of Fame & Museum

American Quarter Horse Foundation - Hall of Fame & Museum The American Quarter Horse Hall of Fame & Museum in Amarillo, Texas, is a state-of-the-art facility designed to showcase the stars of the American Quarter Horse world, the people and horses who have earned their place as legends.
The Foundation connects horses and people through charitable giving in order to develop and support programs or initiatives that preserve our horse’s legacy and further the overall well-being of the American Quarter Horse and the people who comprise the Quarter Horse family.
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The American Quarter Horse Hall of Fame & Museum is a gem of Western art in the Texas Panhandle. Visit the many interactive and educational exhibits showcasing the American Quarter Horse and the Western lifestyle, or stop by to see the changing exhibits at the Museum.

George Tyler, or “Mister George,” as he was affectionately known by Jerry Wells, Larry Sullivant, Frank Merrill and ...
05/18/2019

George Tyler, or “Mister George,” as he was affectionately known by Jerry Wells, Larry Sullivant, Frank Merrill and countless others, appreciated fine horse flesh.

Tyler knew horses and was linked to some of the greatest in the industry. Tyler bought the best, made it better and then made a profit. Tyler discovered the brand-new American Quarter Horse Association and began fitting and showing horses. He fit and showed the King Ranch show string and also exhibited Hank Wiescamp’s Skipper W-bred horses.

“He could tell more about a horse at 100 yards than most can at 10 feet,” said Sullivant. “George could walk around any horse and tell you his good and bad points in about three seconds.”

Tyler had the opportunity to own and show some of the best Quarter Horses in the industry. In partnerships with Matlock Rose, G. B. Howell, Lester Goodson, Rex Cauble and B. F. Phillips Jr., Tyler had a hand in showing some 11 AQHA Honor Roll horses. Horses that he is associated with by either owning or exhibiting include Poco Bueno (Tyler showed him at halter), Leo San, Stardust Desire, Peppy Belle, Miss Jim 45, Leo San Siemon, Ricky Jane and Drifting Bar.

“He was the smartest horseman I ever knew,” said Rose, “and the best friend a man could have.”

Tyler died in 1983 and was inducted into the American Quarter Horse Hall of Fame in 1998.

To learn more about Tyler and other Hall of Fame Inductees, please visit aqha.com/foundation.

Biography updated as of March 1998.

Shown in every class from halter to hunt seat equitation to trail, Majestic Scotch earned multiple year-end top five pla...
05/17/2019

Shown in every class from halter to hunt seat equitation to trail, Majestic Scotch earned multiple year-end top five placings in all divisions.

Majestic Scotch was foaled in 1994 in Iowa, born to be a show horse.

For years, he dominated the show pen at an elite level in every division. From 2002 until 2010, he earned 10 world championships in western pleasure and western riding, along with seven reserve world championships in those classes, plus showmanship.

The flashy sorrel gelding was a son of One Scotch Delight and out of the Two Eyed Punk mare Two Eyed Natches, bred by Donald and Jean Bangasser of Ackley, Iowa.

In 2003, “Dickie” won his first youth world championship in western riding with Sharnai Thompson of Pilot Point, Texas. They went on to combine for three more gold trophies in youth competition and two reserve world champion titles.

“When we bought him, he really just did the pleasure and the western riding,” Sharnai says. “We added a few other events and took our time with that. He was every girl’s dream, and we went on to do great things, but the fact is, he was a great horse when we bought him. He was my dream horse.He made me who I am today. It transferred to my career and education. Dickie taught me how to win and that if you’re second, it’s OK to be mad and take that and make yourself better. Winning isn’t everything, but he made me live to a higher standard.”

He was euthanized February 14, 2013, and is buried at Highpoint Performance Horses. He was inducted into the American Quarter Horse Hall of Fame in 2017.

To learn more about Majestic Scotch and other Hall of Fame Inductees, please visit aqha.com/foundation.

Biography updated as of March 2017.

05/16/2019
AQHYA President Video Series: AQHF Scholarships

The 2018-2019 AQHYA President, Olivia Tordoff, spoke with Dr. Anna Morrison, Chief Foundation Officer, about the Foundation's Scholarship program. Learn more about how and when to apply for the Foundation Scholarships.

Olivia represents the youth of our industry so well and we cannot wait to see what the future holds for her.

#aqhfoundation #thisiswhoweare #foundationscholarships

2018-19 AQHYA President Olivia Tordoff and AQHF Chief Foundation Officer Dr. Anna Morrison visit about vast scholarship opportunities offered by the American...

“God created Dale, and Dale created reining,” said veteran trainer Dick Pieper of Dale Wilkinson.  Much of the credi...
05/15/2019

“God created Dale, and Dale created reining,” said veteran trainer Dick Pieper of Dale Wilkinson. Much of the credit for reining’s success and its modern manifestation has gone to the self-taught horse trainer from Waynesboro, Georgia.

Wilkinson is the only person to win both the National Cutting Horse Association and National Reining Horse Association futurities. He won the first NRHA Futurity in 1966 aboard AQHA Champion Pocorochi Bo, a double-bred King gelding, and again in 1975 with Clene Continental, a gelding by Continental King and out of a Bert granddaughter. Wilkinson won the 1972 cutting futurity riding Gun Smoke’s Dream by Mr Gun Smoke.

Wilkinson credited the development of his training skills to a stallion named Rondo’s King, by Saltillo out of Brownie Hargrove by King P-234.

Wilkinson trained Mr Gun Smoke on his Ohio farm. When he realized how much talent the horse had, Wilkinson traded $2,500, a trophy and a Mr Gun Smoke filly for the sorrel stallion. Mr Gun Smoke was a superior athlete and was even more successful as a sire. “Gun Smokes” have successfully competed in reining, cutting and reined cow horse events.

In 1975, Wilkinson offered his farm to Findlay College as a training center for students. He never was part of the staff, but he spent many hours teaching the horse-trainers-to-be. He sold the farm to the college in 1984 and moved to Georgia to escape the snow and cold of Ohio. The place is now the centerpiece for the college’s equine training program.

Wilkinson was inducted into the American Quarter Horse Hall of Fame in 2000, and died in 2010.

To learn more about Dale and other Hall of Fame Inductees, please visit aqha.com/foundation.

Biography updated as of December 2010.

Bred by James V. A. Carter of Clovis, California, Top Moon was foaled in 1960, the result of the only mating between AQH...
05/13/2019

Bred by James V. A. Carter of Clovis, California, Top Moon was foaled in 1960, the result of the only mating between AQHA Hall of Fame member Moon Deck and Rica Bar. The black stallion was owned by Clary Spencer of Oklahoma and a combination of partners for the majority of his life until he was sold to Larry Blackmon of Mineral Wells, Texas, in December 1982.

Top Moon sired 1,829 foals, including 1,340 starters, 795 winners and 74 stakes winners. Top Moon is known as a prolific sire within the race industry, but he was able to hold his own on Quarter Horse tracks. In his three-year career on the racetrack, he ran a speed index of 100 or greater seven times, won or placed in stakes races nine times and earned $40,637.

Top Moon’s foals did not just excel on the track; they also have made their presence known in the show ring. Sixty-two of his sons and daughters have performed in the show ring, earning 126 halter points and 1,314 performance points, three Superiors and 19 Registers of Merit.

In 1984, Top Moon died from complications that began from an ear infection. He was inducted into the American Quarter Horse Hall of Fame in 1999.

To learn more about Top Moon and other Hall of Fame Inductees, please visit aqha.com/foundation.

Biography updated as of march 1999.

Join the American Quarter Horse Hall of Fame & Museum to celebrate Museum Day!Come visit the American Quarter Horse Hall...
05/10/2019

Join the American Quarter Horse Hall of Fame & Museum to celebrate Museum Day!

Come visit the American Quarter Horse Hall of Fame & Museum on May 11 for buy one, get one admission to the Museum!

To view more details and other participating museums view online at visitamarillo.com.

Need a last minute Mother's Day gift? Support the American Quarter Horse Foundation by shopping online at smile.amazon.c...
05/08/2019

Need a last minute Mother's Day gift?

Support the American Quarter Horse Foundation by shopping online at smile.amazon.com and Amazon will donate to the Foundation.

By purchasing through AmazonSmile, you can support the Foundation every time you purchase!

The American Quarter Horse Hall of Fame & Museum will be closing at 2:30 due to the threat of severe weather this aftern...
05/07/2019

The American Quarter Horse Hall of Fame & Museum will be closing at 2:30 due to the threat of severe weather this afternoon.

We apologize for any inconvenience, and encourage you to visit us at another time.

Come visit the American Quarter Horse Hall of Fame & Museum on Museum Day for buy one, get one admission to the Museum! ...
05/03/2019

Come visit the American Quarter Horse Hall of Fame & Museum on Museum Day for buy one, get one admission to the Museum!

Museum day is May 11, to view details and other participating museums view online at visitamarillo.com.

The America’s Horse in Art Show & Sale returns in August 2019 to the American Quarter Horse Hall of Fame & Museum in A...
04/29/2019
Signature Artist Named for 2019 America’s Horse in Art - AQHA

The America’s Horse in Art Show & Sale returns in August 2019 to the American Quarter Horse Hall of Fame & Museum in Amarillo and will feature signature artist Buck Taylor.

The America’s Horse in Art Show & Sale returns in August 2019 to the American Quarter Horse Hall of Fame & Museum in Amarillo and will feature signature artist Buck Taylor.

On Hutchins’ character, Denhardt remarked, “Without any reservations, Hutchins was the grandest man it has been my p...
04/27/2019

On Hutchins’ character, Denhardt remarked, “Without any reservations, Hutchins was the grandest man it has been my privilege to know; without him, there would not have been an AQHA, started as it was, when it was.”

From his humble upbringing, Jack F. Hutchins became one of the most respected horsemen of his time. When Robert Denhardt met Hutchins in 1937, Hutchins was living in South Texas managing the Shanghai Pierce estate. He also owned five outstanding Quarter Horse Stallions and several quality mares.

In 1939, Hutchins attended the first meeting held to organize a Quarter Horse registry. He traveled to Austin, Texas with Denhardt and Bill Warren to acquire the first charter for the incorporation of AQHA.

During the 1940 meeting, Hutchins was elected Vice president and kept the position until 1942. He then served as president from 1942 through 1943.

Besides owning Quarter Horses, Hutchins owned short-running horses Babe Ruth and Danger Boy, sons of Flying Bob. The two groups of horses were kept separate and never crossbred.

Hutchins died of cancer in 1945. He was inducted into the American Quarter Horse Hall of Fame in 1985.

To learn more about Jack Hutchins and other Hall of Fame Inductees, please visit aqha.com/foundation.

Biography updated as of March 1985.

Steer wrestling horse Baby Doll Combs embodied the characteristics cowboys have always admired: determination, honesty, ...
04/26/2019

Steer wrestling horse Baby Doll Combs embodied the characteristics cowboys have always admired: determination, honesty, strength and try.

Foaled in 1947, the little mare was by Oklahoma Star Jr by foundation sire Oklahoma Star and out of a Bert mare named Miss Boctick. The bay weighed 1,030 pounds and stood 14.1 at maturity.

Newspaper headlines across the country proclaimed her as “the Baby Doll the rodeo cowboys all love” and “Baby Doll, great rodeo horse is money-making marvel.” She was even the focus of two features in Life magazine, where famous all-around cowboy Bill Linderman was quoted as saying, “Baby Doll knew bulldogging better than some of the guys who rode her.”

Combs noticed late in 1957 that Baby Doll had been putting on weight. Turns out, she had been eating for two. Checotah Star was her first and only colt.

Baby Doll Combs’ legacy came to an abrupt halt after bulldogging at a rodeo in Salina, Kansas. The tough mare broke out into a sweat and showed all the signs of colic. A veterinarian diagnosed her with a ruptured intestine. Baby Doll Combs died in the arms of her owner. Combs loaded her body into his trailer and drove the 350 miles back home to Checotah to give her a proper burial.

Baby Doll Combs was inducted into the American Quarter Horse Hall of Fame in 2004.

To learn more about Baby Doll Combs and other Hall of Fame inductees, please visit aqha.com/foundation.

Biography updated as of March 2004.

Planning on ordering your Mother a gift for Mother's Day?Support the American Quarter Horse Foundation by shopping onlin...
04/24/2019

Planning on ordering your Mother a gift for Mother's Day?

Support the American Quarter Horse Foundation by shopping online at smile.amazon.com and Amazon will donate to the Foundation.

By purchasing through AmazonSmile, you can support the Foundation every time you purchase!

Robert Lee Underwood was many things: sportsman, independent oil and gas producer and Quarter Horse breeder.In the late ...
04/24/2019

Robert Lee Underwood was many things: sportsman, independent oil and gas producer and Quarter Horse breeder.

In the late 1920s and early ‘30s, Underwood began dabbling in quarter-type horses. At the time, it was only a hobby, but the quality of his horses did not show it. Robert Denhardt visited Underwood’s ranch in the late 1930s and commented that Underwood’s broodmare band was the most uniform group of horses he had ever seen.

Underwood always thought quarter-type horses should have their own registry. So in 1939, he held an organizational meeting at his ranch. Those in attendance were W. B. “Bill” Warren, J. F. “Jack” Hutchins, James Goodwin Hall and Helen Michaelis.

AQHA was formed in 1940, and Underwood was elected second vice president in 1944 and 1945. His years as president were tumultuous times for AQHA. Two other Quarter Horse associations, the American Quarter Racing Association and the National Quarter Horse Breeders Association, had formed and were threatening the very existence of AQHA.

Underwood remained an honorary member of the board of directors until his death in 1976. Underwood died at 89, and was inducted into the American Quarter Horse Hall of Fame in 1985.

To learn more about R. L. Underwood and other Hall of Fame inductees, visit aqha.com/foundation.

Biography updated as of March 1985.

The family’s love for the wild-eyed mare was summed up by this inscription on her gravestone: “A man is lucky to hav...
04/23/2019

The family’s love for the wild-eyed mare was summed up by this inscription on her gravestone: “A man is lucky to have one great horse in his lifetime. She gave us a lifetime of greatness … we will never forget her.”

A little mare named Fillinic was born at Goodyear Farms in Arizona on July 7, 1957. Her sire, Arizona Junie, was powerfully built, and his sire, GF’s Punchinello, was a local legend known for cutting cows riderless in an Arizona feedlot. Fillinic’s dam, Alouette, was the Arizona broodmare of the year in 1950. But none of that was obvious at first glance.

What was clear was that Fillinic had sensitivity, energy – lots of it – and a temperament that Ward described as genius bordering on insanity. He recognized the potential in her, though, and eventually borrowed money from his mother to buy the mare for $3,000.

With Greg Ward as her trainer, Fillinic won the Cow Palace open hackamore championship twice, then the Cow Palace open bridle championship. Fillinic had 10 foals, and her daughters became the foundation of the Ward Ranch broodmare band. The sons and daughters of Fillinic kept up her traditions. Fillinic died in 1983 and was inducted into the American Quarter Horse Hall of Fame in 2013.

To learn more about Fillinic and other Hall of Fame inductees, please visit aqha.com/foundation.

Biography updated as of March 2013.

“When you start at the bottom there’s no place to go but up, and I decided a long time ago that if you have the abil...
04/22/2019

“When you start at the bottom there’s no place to go but up, and I decided a long time ago that if you have the ability and determination, the mode of travel is not so important.”

Dr. Charles Graham knew exactly where he was headed in life even while he attended veterinary school at Texas A&M University. His aim was to have a stallion station. In 1961, with the help of Dr. W. H. Cardwell, Graham established Elgin Veterinary Clinic and the Southwest Stallion Station. He has been co-owner of Heritage Place Sale Company in Oklahoma City since 1976 and purchased Graham Land and Cattle Company in 1987. Dr. Graham’s operation supplies American Quarter Horses to the cowboys that work at Graham Land and Cattle Company.

Dr. Charles Graham has owned, bred, co-owned, partnered or managed American Quarter Horses that have earned or sired winners of earnings in excess of $65 million. Dr. Graham’s lifestyle represents every faces of the American Quarter Horse. He is involved in every aspect of the Quarter Horse, from breeding, racing, performance and ranch horses, youth programs, horse sales and more. Being an AQHA Director at Large, a member of the Equine Research Committee and a long time supporter of the American Quarter Horse Foundation, he has continued to advise and enhance the knowledge and ability of each to perform and function at an exceptional level.

Dr. Charles Graham was inducted into the American Quarter Horse Hall of Fame in 2009.

To learn more about Dr. Charles Graham and other Hall of Fame inductees, please visit aqha.com/foundation.

Biography updated as of March 2009.

Following the footsteps of Doc Holliday, Melville Haskell left his Georgia plantation and became an Arizona rancher.When...
04/20/2019

Following the footsteps of Doc Holliday, Melville Haskell left his Georgia plantation and became an Arizona rancher.

When Haskell moved to Arizona in 1924, he wasn’t impressed with the quality of the local horses. So he and his business partner, Rukin Jelks, started breeding their own horses.

In the 1930s, “short horse” racing became more and more popular, and the two men moved from breeding quality ranch horses to breeding racehorses. Haskell and Jelks bought Thoroughbred and Quarter Horse mares and bred them to the Thoroughbreds Spotted Bull and Three Bars.

During this period of racing, Haskell was a founding member of the Southern Arizona Horse Breeders’ Association. Quarter Horse racing kept flourishing throughout the Southwest, and guidelines were needed. In February 1945, Haskell formed, organized and ran the American Quarter Racing Association with the help of Jelks, R.C. Locke and Jake Meyer.

Haskell was inducted into the American Quarter Horse Hall of Fame in 1984 and died later that year.

To learn more about Melville Haskell and other Hall of Fame inductees, please visit aqha.com/foundation.

Biography updated as of December 1984.

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