Museum of the Shenandoah Valley

Museum of the Shenandoah Valley The mission of the Museum of the Shenandoah Valley is to preserve and enrich the cultural life and heritage of the Valley. #theMSV
(345)

#theMSV Museum of the Shenandoah Valley (MSV) is dedicated to preserving and enriching the cultural life and heritage of the Valley. This regional history complex includes a house dating to the eighteenth century, seven acres of spectacular gardens, and a 50,000-square-foot museum featuring changing exhibitions, a permanent display of miniature houses, and an expansive gallery exploring the history and decorative arts of the Shenandoah Valley. The MSV also includes a Museum Store (admission not required). The galleries are open year-round; the house and gardens April through December. The MSV sits on land originally claimed by Winchester founder James Wood in 1735. The property was passed through generations of Wood and Glass families until being acquired by Wood descendant and MSV benefactor Julian Wood Glass Jr. (1910–1992) between 1952 and 1955. Glass and his partner at the time, R. Lee Taylor (1924–2000), worked together to transform the site and its Glen Burnie House—built in 1794 by James Wood’s son Robert—into a country retreat where the couple entertained in high style. Admission is not needed to visit the Museum Store. Every Wednesday the site is open free of charge to individuals and families (fees apply for groups of 10 or more). The Museum is open year-round, and the gardens are open seasonally (April though October). The site is closed Mondays.

Sign up for Art @ Happy Hour: June today! Grab your favorite beverage and enjoy the evening discussing art that is in th...
06/08/2020

Sign up for Art @ Happy Hour: June today! Grab your favorite beverage and enjoy the evening discussing art that is in the MSV collection, along with sculptures of Roman gods and goddesses.

Slots are filling so get your virtual seat today https://bit.ly/ArtatHappyHourJune.

Over the past several years, MSV Collections Staff has been working diligently to better preserve and make accessible ou...
06/06/2020
The Guild Guide: Exploring Winchester’s LGBTQ History | The Museum of the Shenandoah Valley

Over the past several years, MSV Collections Staff has been working diligently to better preserve and make accessible our institution’s rich LGBTQ history. Check out what Curator of Collections Nick Powers has to say about the collection in his latest blog post!

Read his blog here: https://bit.ly/JuneBlogPride

Over the past several years, MSV Collections Staff has been working diligently to better preserve and make accessible our institution’s rich LGBTQ history. by Curator of Collections Nick Powers In late 2019, we established the Glen Burnie Queer Studies Collection. This collection houses the everyd...

While times are tough right now, we just wanted to show you some beautiful flowers to brighten your day! Don't forget th...
06/06/2020

While times are tough right now, we just wanted to show you some beautiful flowers to brighten your day!

Don't forget that the MSV gardens are OPEN and you can see these gorgeous flowers in person today! We hope that you are having an awesome Saturday. #theMSV #gardens #flowers #shenandoahvalley

06/05/2020
#FieldTripFriday Veggie Garden

It is time to grow your vegetables! Listen to what Youth/Family Programs Manager Curry Schiavone has to say about the history of the vegitable garden!

This month, to celebrate Pride, #TravelThursday will be following the adventures of MSV benefactor Julian Wood Glass Jr....
06/04/2020

This month, to celebrate Pride, #TravelThursday will be following the adventures of MSV benefactor Julian Wood Glass Jr. (1910-1992) and his partner R. Lee Taylor (1924-2000). During their time as a couple from the 1950s through the 1970s, Julian and Lee traveled extensively both across the country and around the world. Today, we are sharing a few snapshots from a cruise that left New York bound for the Strait of Gibraltar and the south coast of France. Unfortunately, there are no inscriptions on the photos to tell us when this trip took place, but it was probably sometime in the 1960s. Check out those tan lines!

#MuseumFromHome #Traveling #Adventure

06/04/2020

Checkout what Horticultuarlist Chantal Ludder found this morning in the MSV Gardens. First one of the year!

A little sugar for your tea? I bet you don’t have a sugar cutter in your cabinet. Today we have sugar packets or sugar c...
06/04/2020

A little sugar for your tea? I bet you don’t have a sugar cutter in your cabinet. Today we have sugar packets or sugar cubes but in the 1700s and early 1800s, people would clip clumps of sugar from blocks or cones wrapped in paper. Sugar was expensive and was produced by enslaved Native Americans and enslaved Africans in the West Indies.

Take some time to think about what you know about the 1700s. Who would have used this sugar cutter? Who would the tea and sugar be served to? Who would have been serving it?

#MuseumFromHome #ThrowbackThursday #theMSV #history

We are so excited to welcome you back to our gardens. MSV staff has been receiving guests at our gatehouse, seen here ju...
06/03/2020

We are so excited to welcome you back to our gardens. MSV staff has been receiving guests at our gatehouse, seen here just before its first coat of red paint, since its construction in 1997. R. Lee Taylor even dressed as Colonel James Wood for the inaugural occasion. Rain or shine, the gardens are ready for you. #WoodGlassWednesday #TheMSV #MuseumFromHome

We have some GREAT news, the gardens are open! Hop in your car, social distance, and enjoy the beautiful MSV Gardens. Th...
06/03/2020

We have some GREAT news, the gardens are open!

Hop in your car, social distance, and enjoy the beautiful MSV Gardens.

They are open Tuesday–Sunday from 10 a.m.–5 p.m. and Wednesday from 10a.m.–8 p.m.

We hope to see you soon!

The MSV has partnered with Virginia Avenue Charlotte DeHart Elementary School and Arte Libre VA to provide Art Kits to m...
06/03/2020

The MSV has partnered with Virginia Avenue Charlotte DeHart Elementary School and Arte Libre VA to provide Art Kits to more than 100 school-aged children without internet access at home. These children are among those most impacted by the COVID 19 pandemic with the loss of free or reduced lunches as well as a disruption in their education.

Your donations to the MSV Fund allow us to provide these kids with weekly at-home Art Kits that will help them practice reading, writing, and math. Thank you!

To donate: http://bit.ly/MSVfund

06/03/2020
#TakeALookTuesday Table

We are so happy to bring another great #TakeALookTuesday by our awesome Director of Education Mary Ladrick!

This week each of you will be looking at a 1750 Cardtable that we have here in the MSV collection. Before watching, think about what you might need to be able to play cards during the 1750's. Put your comments below with what you think you might need!

#MuseumFromHome #theMSV #collections #cardplaying #shenandoahvalley

#blackouttuesday
06/02/2020

#blackouttuesday

06/01/2020
#MakerMonday: Pottery Sculpting

Do you enjoy creating with clay? Check out this interesting video by Youth and Family Programs manager Curry Schiavone as he talks about how to trim the base of the bowl.

Let us know what you are making from home!

#MuseumFromHome #pottery #theMSV #MadeAtTheMSV #creative

The Julian Wood Glass Jr. Collection includes many significant pieces of English furniture. This marble-slab table exemp...
06/01/2020

The Julian Wood Glass Jr. Collection includes many significant pieces of English furniture. This marble-slab table exemplifies the English interest from the late 1700s through the early 1800s in the art and architecture of the ancient world. The design of the table borrows directly from one owned by London banker and collector Thomas Hope. The author of Household Furniture and Interior Decoration in 1807, Hope helped popularize the “antique” taste (a popular term to describe ancient Greek and Roman designs) in Regency England.

The likely original inspiration for both tables was a drawing of the Tomb of Marcus Agrippa in Rome by London architect Charles Heathcote Tatham. Tatham travelled to Italy in 1794 and drew famous monuments in intricate detail—including their decorative elements—for use by his countrymen and women back home.

Pier Table, maker unknown in the style of Thomas Hope (English, 1768-1831) after a design by Charles Heathcote Tatham (English, 1772-1842), London, England, 1805-1810. Mahogany, marble. Collection of the Museum of the Shenandoah Valley, Julian Wood Glass Jr. Collection, 0295. Photo by Ron Blunt.

Folk artist Isaac S. “Billy” Landis (1906-1990) of Mount Jackson was a quiet, introspective man. In fact, most people di...
05/29/2020

Folk artist Isaac S. “Billy” Landis (1906-1990) of Mount Jackson was a quiet, introspective man. In fact, most people didn’t know he created ceramic sculptures until late in his life or following his death. From his basement studio, Landis made decorative jugs, face pitchers, and figural groups like the ones depicted here. The figural groups in particular depict everyday life and historical subjects related to the Shenandoah Valley. When Landis did sign a piece, it was often with a small, incised key. This was likely a reference to his mother’s maiden name, Mary Key Landis (1872-1942).

Fieldworkers at Lunch Break by Isaac S. “Billy” Landis (1906-1990), Mount Jackson, Shenandoah County, VA, about 1960. Signed with an incised key at the rear of the piece. Earthenware. Collection of the Museum of the Shenandoah Valley, 2001.0013.074.

Detail of the key signature on Fieldworkers at Lunch Break.

The Indian Family Setting up Camp attributed to Isaac S. “Billy” Landis (1906-1990), Mount Jackson, Shenandoah County, VA, mid-1900s. Earthenware. Collection of the Museum of the Shenandoah Valley, 2001.0013.075.

Face Pitcher attributed to Isaac S. “Billy” Landis (1906-1990), Mount Jackson, Shenandoah County, VA, about 1970. Earthenware. Collection of the Museum of the Shenandoah Valley, 2001.0013.091. Photo by Ron Blunt.

05/29/2020
Oldest Building at MSV

Do you know what the oldest structure that is still standing at the MSV? Learn more about this location and when it was made in this weeks #FieldTripFriday video! #MuseumFromHome #theMSV

What toys did you play with growing up? Were they complicated or simple? Bikes, iPads, and game consoles are popular one...
05/28/2020

What toys did you play with growing up? Were they complicated or simple? Bikes, iPads, and game consoles are popular ones today with lots of different parts and mechanical components. You may have seen examples deconstructed in Things Come Apart.

But on this #ThrowbackThursday take a closer look at this children’s toy with only three parts (one doesn’t survive). This toy is from the late 1800s and was carved from wood. The “top” sits in the handle, and is wrapped with string. When the string is pulled, the top drops off and spins freely. Let us know your favorite toys in the comments below!

Our next virtual stop keeps us over the state line in Jefferson County, West Virginia. This view of a local fishing spot...
05/28/2020

Our next virtual stop keeps us over the state line in Jefferson County, West Virginia. This view of a local fishing spot is part of a painting series Ohio-born artist Garnet Jex (1895-1979) began in the 1920s depicting the state’s Eastern Panhandle. A surviving letter accompanying the painting from Jex to its then owners identifies the scene as “along the Shenandoah, a short distance north of State route 9 – the Hillsboro, Va – CharlesTown, W.Va road.” In today’s terms, the location is just a stone’s throw away from Millville and Moulton Park along the Shenandoah River. You can learn more about this painting and its origins on the MSV Collections Blog.

A Fishing Camp Along the Shenandoah by Garnet Jex (American, 1895-1979), Millville area, Jefferson County, WV, about 1959. Signed lower right: “JEX”. Oil on canvas. Collection of the Museum of the Shenandoah Valley, 2008.0003. Photo by Ron Blunt.

#TravelThursday #MuseumFromHome #theMSV #shenandoahvalley #ArtWork

05/28/2020
Tea Kettles

Have you been drinking a lot of tea while in #quarantine? Do you still use a tea kettle when making your tea?

We have some beautiful tea kettles in our collection that we would like to share with you! Listen to what Curator of Collections Nick Powers has to say about the tea kettles in our collection. #theMSV #shenandoahvalley #heritage #community

05/27/2020
Things Come Apart Tour

While the MSV is temporarily closed to the public, here’s a peek inside the galleries at the fascinating exhibition “Things Come Apart.”

Organized by photographer @ToddMcLellan and the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service (SITES), “Things Come Apart” reveals the technology and design behind devices that are part of everyday life.

Click to watch the full tour https://youtu.be/mOo6anMhTTs! #thingscomeapart #photography #technology #theMSV #shenandoahvalley

Here is an in depth tour of the exhibit "Things Come Part" that is currently at here at the MSV. Deputy Director of Arts & Education Nancy Huth talks about t...

Thinking of joining the MSV? Or do you need to renew your membership? Now is the perfect time! For a limited time, use d...
05/27/2020

Thinking of joining the MSV? Or do you need to renew your membership? Now is the perfect time!

For a limited time, use discount code ART15 to join or renew and receive 15% off your membership. Get your membership today so you will be ready for the opening of BIG BUGS in June.

To get your membership click here https://bit.ly/JointheMSV.

Have you ever had your fortune told? Were you happy with the predictions? In 1894 Susan Glass was told that she would ha...
05/27/2020

Have you ever had your fortune told? Were you happy with the predictions? In 1894 Susan Glass was told that she would have a love affair that would end unhappily, marry for ambition and not be happy, and that she was overall too inquisitive.

We have a friend in the gardens who keeps our flowers pollinated. Look at this beautiful little bee enjoying the beautif...
05/27/2020

We have a friend in the gardens who keeps our flowers pollinated. Look at this beautiful little bee enjoying the beautiful sun! #theMSV #nature #gardens #beauty #pollinator

05/26/2020
#TastefulTuesday: Stuffed Avocados

Stuffed Avocados—This recipe is true to 1960s plating traditions. It’s colorful and goes the extra mile with a bed of lettuce as a base (all that is missing is the elaborate Jell-O Salad). This is best served immediately before the avocado browns. #museumfromhome #themsv #tastytuesday #vintagerecipe

Do you have your cookout menu set for Memorial Day weekend? Try your hand at homemade Tomato Catsup! This recipe from th...
05/20/2020

Do you have your cookout menu set for Memorial Day weekend? Try your hand at homemade Tomato Catsup! This recipe from the Wood Glass Family Papers includes tomatoes, onions, pepper, cinnamon, vinegar, and more. Be careful, though, the recipe indicates that it will be very hot.

#WoodGlassWednesday #theMSV #history #shenandoahvalley #cooking

05/19/2020
#TakeALookTuesday Shadows

This week’s #TakeALookTuesday video gives you a “little” Louisiana history.
Any guesses on what you might see?
#MuseumFromHome #theMSV #shenandoahvalley

05/19/2020
#TastefulTuesday Maryland Cream Waffles

Maryland Cream Waffles—Written by Julian Wood Glass Jr. in R. Lee Taylor’s copy of “The Joy of Cooking,” ca. 1960. This recipe makes the fluffiest homemade waffles. It’s incredibly easy and you can change things up by adding cinnamon, vanilla, or chocolate chips to the batter. #museumfromhome #themsv #tastytuesday #vintagerecipe

This view of Harpers Ferry, West Virginia falls into a category of art often mistakenly referred to as “sandpaper painti...
05/18/2020

This view of Harpers Ferry, West Virginia falls into a category of art often mistakenly referred to as “sandpaper painting.” More accurate terms include “monochromatic painting” (for the black-white color scheme) or “marble dust painting” (for materials used in the ground).

Achieving the distinctive black and white effect was a multi-step process. To prepare the ground, an artist first applied a glue adhesive onto a thick paperboard surface. He or she then carefully sifted a thin layer of marble dust onto the board before the adhesive dried. Finally, the artist drew an image onto the marble dust ground using charcoal or black pastel.

Monochromatic painting was a popular pastime for amateur artists—most frequently women—in the northeastern United States in the mid-1800s. Artists usually copied prints of famous American landmarks or natural features to learn more about national treasures they might never see in person. A few popular subjects were Niagara Falls, George Washington’s tomb at Mount Vernon, Harpers Ferry, and Natural Bridge, among others. This example was copied from an 1838 print titled Harpers Ferry (From the Potomac side) after an original drawing by English artist William Henry Bartlett (1809-1854).

Harpers Ferry, unknown American artist, 1840s. Charcoal and/or pastel on marble-dusted paperboard. Collection of the Museum of the Shenandoah Valley, gift of David M. Maxfield, 2013.11.01.

The weather is getting warm again! The flowers are starting to bloom, turtles are beginning to travel around, and kids a...
05/16/2020

The weather is getting warm again! The flowers are starting to bloom, turtles are beginning to travel around, and kids are starting to play outside more. We have a friend of ours in the MSV gardens who loves flowers and turtles. We hope that you have just as much of fun as our friend here is on this Saturday!

We are sure that you have been doing a lot of connecting digitally with your friends and family during this crazy time. ...
05/16/2020

We are sure that you have been doing a lot of connecting digitally with your friends and family during this crazy time. #technologymw Today we wanted to show you some amazing art by! This is a piece from the "Things Come Apart" exhibition that is here at the MSV.

Organized by photographer Todd McLellan and the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service , “Things Come Apart” reveals the technology and design behind devices that are part of everyday life.

“iPhone5” by Todd McLellan, 2012, courtesy of SITES and Todd McLellan.

MuseumWeek #technology #digitalcommunication

05/15/2020
#FieldTripFriday Glen Burnie House

Have you ever been to the Glen Burnie House here at the Museum of the Shenandoah Valley? Do you know the history?

This weeks #FieldTripFriday brings us to the Glen Burnie House where Youth/Family Programs Manager Curry Schiavone talks about the history of this beautiful building. #theMSV #shenandoahvalley #history #FieldTrips

Like many folk artists, Edward “Ed” Ambrose (1913-1999) portrayed subjects that were part of his everyday life. For Ambr...
05/15/2020

Like many folk artists, Edward “Ed” Ambrose (1913-1999) portrayed subjects that were part of his everyday life. For Ambrose, this most often meant the people and places of Stephens City south of Winchester where he lived. This grouping depicts the tools (and pet!) of blacksmith Samuel Atwood “At” Rust (1860-1947).

In 1883, Rust began renting the blacksmith’s shop formerly operated by Branson T. Argenbright on Stephen City’s Main Street (the building next to today’s Newtown History Center). He continued working there through at least 1940, where the U.S. census listed him as a blacksmith.

Ambrose mentioned this carving group in a 1975 interview and discussed his inspiration for it: “There is also a blacksmith shop which is almost completed. There’s an old smith around here with a good name for his job, Atwood Rust. I’m going to make a sign for my blacksmith shop saying A. Rust, Blacksmith.” Rust had died by the time Ambrose gave his interview, but clearly the artist never forgot the blacksmith with the funny name!

“A. Rust, Blacksmith” Figural Group attributed to Edward “Ed” Ambrose (1913-1999), Stephens City, VA, mid-1900s. Wood (probably pine), paint. Collection of the Museum of the Shenandoah Valley, 2001.0013.824.a-m.

#FolkArtFriday #theMSV #history #art #FolkArt #community

The climate of the Shenandoah Valley can have a big impact on our collection. Some of the pieces most susceptible to the...
05/15/2020

The climate of the Shenandoah Valley can have a big impact on our collection. Some of the pieces most susceptible to the elements are out outdoor sculptures.

For example, these stone busts are most likely to be damaged through freeze/thaw cycles when water seeps through their porous surface, freezes, and expands to crack the stone.

We have also made sure that our outdoor installations are all anchored to the ground so our gusty valley winds do not knock anything over. #ClimateMW #theMSV #shenandoahvalley #community #weather #FridaysForFuture

05/14/2020
#ThrowbackThursday

Here’s a #HistoryMystery on #ThrowbackThursday! Take a close look at these spoons. Can you tell what the 1830s one is made of? Does the material remind you of anything? #theMSV #shenandoahvalley

Address

901 Amherst St
Winchester, VA
22601

Opening Hours

Tuesday 10:00 - 17:00
Wednesday 10:00 - 20:00
Thursday 10:00 - 17:00
Friday 10:00 - 17:00
Saturday 10:00 - 17:00
Sunday 10:00 - 17:00

Telephone

(888) 556-5799

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when Museum of the Shenandoah Valley posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Contact The Museum

Send a message to Museum of the Shenandoah Valley:

Videos

Category

Our Story

#theMSV The Museum of the Shenandoah Valley (MSV) is dedicated to preserving and enriching the cultural life and heritage of the Valley. This regional history complex includes a house dating to the eighteenth century, seven acres of spectacular gardens, and a 50,000-square-foot museum featuring changing exhibitions, a permanent display of miniature houses, and an expansive gallery exploring the history and decorative arts of the Shenandoah Valley. The MSV also includes a Makerspace Studio (open Tuesday and Sunday; admission required) and a Museum Store (admission not required). The galleries are open year-round; the house and gardens are open April through December. At 214 acres, the MSV is the largest green space and only remaining working farm in the City of Winchester. Fundraising is underway for The Trails at the MSV, a project that will open 90 acres of the MSV landscape as a free-admission public park with more than three miles of trails for walking, hiking, and biking through woods, wetlands, and farm fields. The galleries are open year-round, and the house and gardens are open seasonally (April though December). The site is closed Mondays.

Nearby museums


Comments

We will wait for the gardens to be open and look forward to the summer activities! ❤️ 🙋‍♀️🙋‍♂️
‪Look at this new pottery just fired in our kiln! ‬ ‪#madeatthemsv #MSVMakerSpace #theMSV #museumoftheshenandoahvalley ‬
How do you view art? Thank you Taubman Museum of Art for partnering with us on this exhibition.
Turtle!
I love volunteering at the MSV! I never knew a museum could be so interesting on so many levels!
A few pics from the photography group yesterday!
Beautiful gardens
Beautiful gardens.
I'll have to come visit when i come back from my travels
Wow, I have been here several times and yet never noticed the Museum Store. How could I have missed such a treasure trove? So many beautiful, unique items; I'll be shopping here now.
Sharing a photo collage I made of the recent Maxfield Parrish exhibit, and feeling so blessed to be able to visit the museum and beautiful gardens. Also, hoping to visit much more in this new year!
We had the best time at Yappy Hour! Thank you so much for putting this together. Our pup just put himself back to bed after eating breakfast- he's still tired from all the fun! Will there be any more events like this in the future?