Stonewall Jackson's Headquarters Museum

Stonewall Jackson's Headquarters Museum Headquarters of General Stonewall Jackson during the Civil War, the home today operates as a historic house museum run by the local historical society.

A visit to Stonewall Jackson's Headquarters Museum is a must for Civil War enthusiasts. The Hudson River Gothic Revival-style house was built in 1854 and has been lovingly restored and furnished much as it was while Jackson led Confederate operations during the Civil War. Among the hundreds of period artifacts and memorabilia you will experience in this museum, including Jackson's prayer book and camp table, and Ashby's revolver, is the beautifully reproduced gilded wallpaper donated in 1993 by actress, Mary Tyler Moore. It was Moore's great grandfather, Lt. Col. Lewis T. Moore, who provided this home to Jackson and his wife during their stay in Winchester.

July 1856, attempting to deal with the crushing loss of Ellie, his first wife and their stillborn son, Jackson set sail ...
07/27/2017

July 1856, attempting to deal with the crushing loss of Ellie, his first wife and their stillborn son, Jackson set sail for a six month tour of Europe. He would visit numerous countries, Italy scored highly, and spent a day at Waterloo, retracing Napoleon's movements there. He returned refreshed and finally began to emerge from the depression her untimely death had caused him.

The Center for Civil War Photography
07/27/2017

The Center for Civil War Photography

THOMAS JONATHAN JACKSON

A letter dated January 21st, 1863 and signed by T.J. Jackson at Caroline County, VA and addressed to Col. A. R. Boteler reads:

"My dear Col. --- Your letter respecting the condition of the valley has been received.

Though I have been relieved from command there, and may never again be assigned to that important trust; yet I feel deeply when I see the patriotic people of that region again under the heel of a hateful military despotism. There are the homes of those who have been with me from the commencement of the war in Virginia who have repeatedly left their families and brothers in the hands of the enemy and braved the dangers of battle and disease. There are those who have so devotedly labored for the relief of our suffering sick and wounded. Well may you feel deeply interested in the welfare of such a constituency, and well may they be attached to you for your devotion to their interests & security. In this course time permits me to thank you for the great assistance which you rendered me by having supplies for the troops promptly forwarded, and for the various other ways in which you contributed to their comfort and efficiency, and to the defence of that important section of the state. Not only myself, but also other people there, and the country owe you a lasting debt of gratitude.

I am Col. --- very truly your friend --- (Signed) T. J. Jackson.”

Alexander R. Boteler (1815-1892) was graduated from Princeton College in 1835; before the Civil War, Boteler was a slave-owning planter and mill owner and a spokesman for the view that the Union and slavery should both be preserved; elected as the candidate of the Opposition Party to the Thirty-sixth Congress (March 4, 1859-March 3, 1861); when the Civil War came, he joined the Confederacy, serving as a member of the first Confederate Congress and as a voluntary military aide (with the rank of colonel) to Stonewall Jackson, JEB Stuart, and Robert E. Lee; chosen by the State convention a Representative from Virginia to the Confederate Provisional Congress November 19, 1861; elected from Virginia to the Confederate Congress, serving from February 1862 to February 1864; pardoned after the war's end on Aug. 20. 1866. He wrote a piece titled "Stonewall Jackson's Discontent."

Jackson's letter may have been in response to "Yankee" deprivations at Boteler's family home called "Fountain Rock," located a mile southwest of Shepherdstown, Va. (now WV). That home was burned to the ground in July 1864.

T.J. Jackson, detail from National Archives 111-B-1867.
T.J. Jackson, print on a Brady & Co. mount
Two page letter to Col. A. R. Boteler, courtesy of Early American History Auctions
Col. Alexander Robinson Boteler, courtesy of West Virginia & Regional History Collection

Southern Historical Society
07/21/2017

Southern Historical Society

Donated to VMI by President Zachary Taylor in 1850, these four guns were christened as "The Four Apostles: Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John" by Episcopal rector Col. William Nelson Pendleton and the seminary students "because they spoke a powerful language"
On July 21, at the First Battle of Manassas, the battery helped defend the critical position at Henry House Hill. The brigade's stand would earn it, and its commander, the sobriquet "Stonewall." During the Union retreat, the battery even received a visit from Confederate president Jefferson Davis, who had traveled to Manassas to witness the fight personally. After the victory, they acquired a new complement of cannon that the Confederates had captured from the Union troops.

OTD July 21, 1861 a legend was born. Awaiting the Federals assault on the Manassas battlefield Thomas Jonathan Jackson w...
07/21/2017

OTD July 21, 1861 a legend was born. Awaiting the Federals assault on the Manassas battlefield Thomas Jonathan Jackson would soon become 'Stonewall'. A humble, devout Presbyterian, Jackson was never comfortable with the nickname, undoubtedly the most famous nickname in American military history. BTW July 21, 1861 was Anna Jackson's 30th birthday.

Southern Historical Society
07/21/2017

Southern Historical Society

July 21, 1861, at the Battle of First Manassas

All the soldiers in the unit were from the Shenandoah Valley and adjacent areas. In April of 1861, the 2nd, 4th, 5th, 27th and 33rd Virginia Infantry Regiments, plus the Rockbridge Artillery Battery, were organized into a brigade.

Their commander was Gen. Thomas J. Jackson. His severe training program and ascetic standards of military discipline turned these raw but enthusiastic recruits into an effective military organization. The unit was Virginia’s First Brigade until July 21, 1861, when, at the Battle of First Manassas, it and its general received the nickname “Stonewall”. Barnard E. Bee made his immortal remark between 2:30 and 3:00 P.M., when, looking for more of his brigade to rally for the final phase of the battle. “Yonder stands Jackson like a stone wall Rally behind the Virginians!”

Hallowed Grounds
07/20/2017

Hallowed Grounds

DESTINATION MANASSAS

Near Ashby’s Gap
July 19, 1861
Artwork by John Paul Strain

In July 1861 President Abraham Lincoln decided that the Federal Army needed to seize the city of Richmond, Virginia which was the Confederate capitol and prevent the rebel congress from meeting and organizing resistance. To do this he sent the Union field commander General Irvin McDowell and his volunteer army of 37,000 men to march south and invade Virginia. The Federal Army was quite confident that they would make short work or any resistance and quickly end the southern rebellion.

A prominent socialite who was a southern sympathizer, Mrs. Rose O’Neal Greenhow sent word to confederate General Pierre Gustave Beauregard of the impending invasion. Beauregard issued orders to all the southern forces in the area to quickly gather and intercept the invading Federal Army. Brigadier General Thomas J. Jackson received orders to move his 1st Brigade of the Army of the Shenandoah from Winchester to Manassas by four o‘clock on July 19th, a distance of about 60 miles. Jackson force marched his troops and covered the miles so quickly his men would soon be known as “The Foot Cavalry”. The march was sometimes conducted at the double-quick step and included wading the Shenandoah River and climbing the Blue Ridge Mountains at Ashby’s Gap. He Bivouacked his men at two o’clock in the morning and an aid asked the general if guards needed to be posted. Jackson replied, “No, let the poor fellows sleep, I will guard the camp myself.” The next morning standing along side his horse Little Sorrel Jackson watches as the troops wake up from their short rest and prepare for the day’s march. The brigade would reach Manassas by 4 o’clock and join with other southern units. On July the 21st the Battle of Manassas would be fought between 29,000 Confederates and 37,000 Federal soldiers.

The first part of the battle went well for the Federals and southern units began to waver and break. But holding a key position at the Henry House Hill was Jackson’s brigade. Below the hill was General Barnard Bee’s Georgians who were taking heavy losses. To bolster his men General Bee seeing Jackson’s strong line said to his men, “Look! There stands Jackson like a stone wall. Let us resolve to die here and we shall conquer.” Shortly afterward Bee was mortally wounded but his words would forever be remembered. From that time onward Thomas J. Jackson became “Stonewall”. The tide of battle turned and the confederates counter attacked the astonished Federals causing them to flee for life and limb. The legend of Stonewall Jackson had been born.

Civil Warscapes
07/15/2017

Civil Warscapes

The raincoat Stonewall Jackson was wearing the night he was wounded at Chancellorsville - May 2, 1863.

On display at the VMI Museum in Lexington, Virginia.

Jackson's Headquarters wishes another local hero, and fellow warrior a Happy Birthday.  General Daniel Morgan, American ...
07/06/2017

Jackson's Headquarters wishes another local hero, and fellow warrior a Happy Birthday. General Daniel Morgan, American Revolutionary War leader, born today, July 6, 1736 was buried here in Winchester, after dying on his birthday in 1802.

National Museum of Civil War Medicine
07/02/2017
National Museum of Civil War Medicine

National Museum of Civil War Medicine

"Generals oversee battles. Soldiers fight. Civilians hide. Surgeons amputate. What does a medical director do during a battle? More specifically: what did Dr. Hunter McGuire do at Gettysburg?"

Looking for some interesting summer reading? Check out our gift shop for books on Jackson, Winchester and local Civil Wa...
07/01/2017

Looking for some interesting summer reading? Check out our gift shop for books on Jackson, Winchester and local Civil War topics. Stop by anytime the Headquarters is open for access to the gift shop where some of the best prices in the area are to be found.

Wishing a Happy 150th Anniversary to all our Canadian friends from Jackson's Headquarters. Jackson honeymooned in Quebec...
07/01/2017

Wishing a Happy 150th Anniversary to all our Canadian friends from Jackson's Headquarters. Jackson honeymooned in Quebec City.

Southern Historical Society
07/01/2017

Southern Historical Society

★★★ Gen Jackson and Gen Lee at Malvern Hill July 1 ★★★

Before long, the battle was at red heat. Generals Lee, Jackson, and Ewell with their staffs were in the rear of Jackson's line, on their horses, and concealed by· a strip of wood. A staff officer came up hurriedly and reported that some of our guns were being badly used up by the enemy's fire. The General prepared to go in person to see about it when General Lee protested, saying that Crutchfield was there and would know what to do. Although General Jackson generally considered a suggestion of General Lee equivalent to an order, he did not on occasions like this. He at once started off, taking Pendleton and myself. As soon as we rode in view we became the object of the enemy's pointed attentions, First came a shell, striking near us and ricocheting over our heads with a shriek, then a round shot which passed between the General and Pendleton, and next, with better aim, a shell which struck right in front of the General, exploded, and threw a shower of dirt over the whole party, while the General's horse squatted to the ground with fright. The situation was getting painfully monotonous, and yet the General paid no attention and rode on "into the jaws of death." He got little farther, for a staff officer came up like a charge of cavalry and with a. salute said, "General, General Lee presents his compliments and directs that you return at once." The General quietly turned and obeyed the order. Courage is a good thing, but there are times, thought General Lee, one might have too much of it.
by Henry Kyd Douglas

The beginning of a great partnership.....
06/29/2017

The beginning of a great partnership.....

On the Shoulders of Giants
Frayser's Farm, June 30, 1862
Artwork by Mort Kunstler

On June 30, 1862, a Richmond artilleryman was witness to one of the first meetings between Lee and Jackson. Confederates were driving McClellan's army southward. The conference between the two Southern generals was, as always, short and direct. Jackson then saluted and left to take his divisions toward White Oak Swamp.

Another of Mort's great artwork depicting Stonewall.
06/22/2017

Another of Mort's great artwork depicting Stonewall.

Jackson and Staff
Artwork by Mort Kunstler

Book early for the Jackson seminar and spend a great weekend in the beautiful Shenandoah Valley.
06/22/2017

Book early for the Jackson seminar and spend a great weekend in the beautiful Shenandoah Valley.

We have a block of rooms at the Country Inn & Suites for the following events:

Highland Games, July 6 & 7. $119 per night.
Stonewall Jackson Seminar, August 18 & 19 $95
Civil War Ball, September 22 & 23 $99

The hotel is at 141 Kernstown Commons Blvd
Winchester, VA 22602
(540) 869-7657 Ext. 2

If you are booking a room for any of these events, please reserve your room early, so we don't lose the rooms. Thank you.

Hallowed Grounds
06/18/2017

Hallowed Grounds

Iron Horses, Men of Steel
Winchester, Virginia, June, 1861
Artwork and Comments by Mort Kunstler

Before I ever completed the painting, Jackson Commandeers the Railroad in 1999, I knew I wanted to do a sequel showing another part of the operation. This great event of moving locomotives and railroad equipment overland and through towns had never been depicted and would be a natural follow-up to the scene showing the disassembling of the locomotives in the Martinsburg railroad yards.

In my research for the previous painting, I learned about the taking apart of locomotives and how to move them. Winchester was the natural choice for me as the setting for this new painting since it was the largest town between Martinsburg and Strasburg, where the locomotives were reassembled and put back on the tracks. Since Loudoun Street has been featured in my paintings Jackson Enters Winchester and After the Snow, I wanted to portray this new scene in a completely different way that would not be reminiscent of the other two. I finally came up with the idea of using a high perspective which enables the viewer to see down the entire street. This presented a whole new set of problems, which, in the beginning, seemed almost insurmountable. Using a different perspective meant that I had to find out additional information on what buildings were in Winchester during the Civil War, what they looked like and who occupied them. Added to this was the magnitude of the event that required me to portray crowds of people that would have turned out to witness the spectacle.

The forty-horse team used to pull the stripped-down boiler was rigged four abreast and driven, artillery style, by a rider who controlled his four horses. Since thoroughbreds, quarter horses, mules, etc. were conscripted for the arduous movement, some owners refused to part with their mounts, unless they drove them personally. The result was a joint military-civilian operation. Artillery riders with their distinctive red markings are in key positions in the lineup as outriders are available for troubleshooting. The rest of the equipment - cowcatchers, lights, cabs, stacks - were transported by wagons and oxcarts.

Looking north, on the left side of the street in the distant background, is the columned, three-story Taylor Hotel, the featured building in my first painting of Loudoun Street, Jackson Enters Winchester.

On the extreme right side of the painting is a building that was an auction house run by C. B. Rouss. The building no longer exists and has been replaced with a parking lot. However, the Senseny Building, just to the north, still stands in all its glory. It has been fully restored and is now known as the Feltner Building, the corporate headquarters for the F & M National Bank. The open area with the tree and iron fence around it is the courtyard in front of the Winchester Courthouse that was featured in my other Loudoun Street painting, After the Snow.

Going further back on the right side of the street is Rouss Avenue, known as Railroad Avenue during the war. It is the narrow street on the other side of the fence between the courtyard and the three-story Taylor Confectionery and Bakery. Taylor's was torn down and replaced in 1902 by the F & M Bank, a building which still stands today. Loudoun Street, once know as the Old Valley Pike, is today a main street featuring a beautiful walking mall with many of the buildings seen in this painting still intact. All of the names on the signs and the locations of the various businesses are as accurate as could be ascertained and would not have been possible without the help of Ben Ritter, the most knowledgeable historian of Civil War Winchester.

I hope that this painting captures an event of epic accomplishment and helps instill a spirit of learning from the past and inspire preserving what we have in the present for future generations.

Defending the Heritage
06/16/2017

Defending the Heritage

Stonewall Jackson was beside Richard Taylor as the Louisiana Brigade advanced under heavy artillery fire near Winchester. When some of the troops ducked, Taylor rasped at them, “What the hell are you dodging for?” Jackson stared reproachfully at Taylor, saying there was no excuse for such language, especially on Sunday.

He placed his hand on Taylor’s shoulder and commented, “I am afraid you are a wicked fellow.”

~✟Robert✟~

Photo: General Richard Taylor

Jackson's Headquarters is open seven days a week, April 1st through October 31st.  Monday to Saturday, 10 am to 4 pm. an...
06/12/2017

Jackson's Headquarters is open seven days a week, April 1st through October 31st. Monday to Saturday, 10 am to 4 pm. and Sundays 12 noon to 4 pm. Come visit and see one of Winchester's best kept secrets, a true Civil War 'must see'.

Cedar Creek and Belle Grove National Historical Park
06/12/2017

Cedar Creek and Belle Grove National Historical Park

In a swift feat of marching, deception, counter-marching and sheer boldness, Jackson had conducted one of the most audacious and brilliant campaigns in American military history. It was a campaign of complex movements in which Jackson bewildered the Federals with swift, surprising marches and sudden, unexpected assaults. In one period of 48 days, Jackson marched his troops an astonishing 646 miles. His army never numbered more than 17,000 troops, the battles were not large, and the casualties were relatively light. (Shenandoah 1862 p.9)This campaign prevented 60,000 Federal soldiers occupied in the Valley rather than advancing on Richmond in conjunction with McClellan’s Peninsula Campaign. The 1862 Shenandoah Valley Campaign made “Stonewall” Jackson the most celebrated soldier in the Confederacy (until he was eclipsed by General Robert E. Lee) and greatly lifted the morale of the Southern homefront.

One British observer noted that Jackson’s campaign was, “a chapter in history which is without parallel.”

Image: Stonewall Jackson, LOC

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415 N Braddock St
Winchester, VA
22601

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