The Marion E. Wade Center

The Marion E. Wade Center The Marion E. Wade Center is a major research collection of materials by and about 7 British authors. Lewis, J.R.R. Tolkien, Dorothy L.
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Wade Center promotes cultural engagement and spiritual formation by offering a collection of resources available nowhere else in the world. We emphasize the ongoing relevance of seven British Christian authors who provide a distinctive blend of intellect, imagination, and faith: C.S. Sayers, George MacDonald, G.K. Chesterton, Owen Barfield, and Charles Williams. The Wade Center implements these go

als by:

-Assisting scholars in their study of unique materials by and about these seven authors in order to generate new understandings;

-Sharing insights with a broader audience through our numerous programs and publications;

-Supporting artistic works inspired by our authors;

-Welcoming visitors to our museum. Check out the Wade Center's blog "Off the Shelf" at: wadecenterblog.wordpress.com

In our fourth “Wonders of the Wade” video, Marilee Melvin, former executive assistant to the Wheaton College president, ...
02/16/2024

In our fourth “Wonders of the Wade” video, Marilee Melvin, former executive assistant to the Wheaton College president, gives the story behind a painting of Clyde S. Kilby, the visionary Wheaton English professor who started the Wade Collection in 1965.

The Marion E. Wade Center presents a series of 3-5 minute video vignettes called “Wonders of the Wade.” In this series we invite Wade Center staff, Wheaton College faculty, and visiting scholars to present a favorite item of theirs at the Wade Center. Each episode features a museum piece, a first edition, an unpublished manuscript, or a book from one of the Wade authors’ personal libraries, often with notes and markings in them. New episodes of “Wonders of the Wade” are published on the first and third Friday of every month. See the "Wonders of the Wade" playlist on our YouTube channel to access more videos.

Subscribe to our YouTube channel to get notifications, or watch for social media posts on Instagram and Facebook as each episode is released.

Marilee Melvin, former executive assistant to the Wheaton College president, gives the story behind a painting of Clyde S. Kilby, the visionary Wheaton Engli...

REMINDER: Join us Thursday, February 15 at 7pm CT in Bakke Auditorium for: “The Way of Dante – Purgatorio: 'The Ascent o...
02/14/2024

REMINDER: Join us Thursday, February 15 at 7pm CT in Bakke Auditorium for: “The Way of Dante – Purgatorio: 'The Ascent of Love'” with Richard Hughes Gibson.

As Sayers observed in 1955, Dante has for centuries suffered from a frustratingly persistent popular “superstition”: that he is the sadistic “Poet of Hell.” This second lecture will examine Williams’s, Sayers’s, and Lewis’s closely related efforts to correct this misperception. For our three writers, Dante was, first and foremost, a love poet, and all three (though Williams most passionately) understood love to be the principal concern of the entire “Divine Comedy.” Yet “Purgatorio” nonetheless stood out to all three for the maturity of Dante’s meditation on human love, particularly his sensitivity to how love can go awry and be put back on track. Lecture 2 will thus show how “Purgatorio” served for our three authors as a series of love lessons, and thereby a guide to virtuous living in the world. Respondent for the lecture is Nicole Mazzarella, Associate Professor of English.

A livestream of the lecture is also available here: http://tinyurl.com/45387wfh

This is the second of three lectures in the 2024 Hansen Lecture Series, “The Way of Dante.” Dr. Richard Hughes Gibson will reveal the profound influence of the medieval Italian poet Dante Alighieri on Dorothy L. Sayers, Charles Williams, and C.S. Lewis. Across the lectures, Dr. Gibson will follow Sayers, Williams, and Lewis as they read and reflect on the three stages of "The Divine Comedy," Dante’s famous allegorical trek through Hell, Purgatory, and Heaven. The series will reveal the urgent psychological, social, and theological lessons that our three authors learned from Dante and, in turn, how those lessons shaped their mature writings.

Richard Hughes Gibson is Professor of English at Wheaton College. He is the author or coauthor of three books, "Forgiveness in Victorian Literature" (2015), "Charitable Writing" (with Jim Beitler, 2020), and "Paper Electronic Literature: An Archeology of Born-Digital Materials" (2021).

“To love at all is to be vulnerable. Love anything, and your heart will certainly be wrung and possibly be broken. If yo...
02/08/2024

“To love at all is to be vulnerable. Love anything, and your heart will certainly be wrung and possibly be broken. If you want to make sure of keeping it intact, you must give your heart to no one, not even to an animal. Wrap it carefully round with hobbies and little luxuries; avoid all entanglements; lock it up safe in the casket or coffin of your selfishness. But in that casket—safe, dark, motionless, airless—it will change. It will not be broken; it will become unbreakable, impenetrable, irredeemable. The alternative to tragedy, or at least to the risk of tragedy, is damnation.”

- C.S. Lewis, “Charity,” THE FOUR LOVES

Image: Tyler Nix, unsplash dot com/photos/person-forming-heart-with-their-hands-sitjgGsVIAs

In our third “Wonders of the Wade” video, Dr. Jerry Root, Wheaton Professor of Evangelism Emeritus, discusses “The Green...
02/02/2024

In our third “Wonders of the Wade” video, Dr. Jerry Root, Wheaton Professor of Evangelism Emeritus, discusses “The Green Book,” the textbook on language that disturbed C.S. Lewis so much that he delivered a series of lectures, “The Abolition of Man,” critiquing subjectivism. This copy of the book, "The Control of Language," which really is green, contains Lewis’s own notes and annotations. Dr. Root also highlights a humorous annotation at the end of Lewis’s copy of "Don Juan" by Lord Byron.

The Marion E. Wade Center presents a series of 3-5 minute video vignettes called “Wonders of the Wade.” In this series we invite Wade Center staff, Wheaton College faculty, and visiting scholars to present a favorite item of theirs at the Wade Center. Each episode features a museum piece, a first edition, an unpublished manuscript, or a book from one of the Wade authors’ personal libraries, often with notes and markings in them. New episodes of “Wonders of the Wade” are published on the first and third Friday of every month. See the "Wonders of the Wade" playlist on our YouTube channel to access more videos.

Subscribe to our YouTube channel to get notifications, or watch for social media posts on Instagram and Facebook as each episode is released.

Dr. Jerry Root, Wheaton Professor of Evangelism Emeritus, discusses “The Green Book,” the textbook on language that disturbed C.S. Lewis so much that he deli...

REMINDER: Join us on Thursday, February 1 at 7pm CT for “'Dreaming in the Margins': Tolkien’s Engagements with The Battl...
01/31/2024

REMINDER: Join us on Thursday, February 1 at 7pm CT for “'Dreaming in the Margins': Tolkien’s Engagements with The Battle of Maldon" with Benjamin Weber.

Dr. Benjamin Weber will discuss J.R.R. Tolkien’s recently-released translation of the Old English poem "The Battle of Maldon" with reference to both Tolkien’s fiction and scholarship on Old English literature. There will be a brief summary of the poem at the beginning of the lecture; response by Dr. Jim Beitler and Q+A to follow. Co-sponsored by the Wade Center, the Old English Reading Group, the Wheaton College Tolkien Society, and the Wheaton College English Department.

Benjamin D. Weber is Assistant Professor of English at Wheaton College. He has published numerous essays on Old and Middle English literature, with a special emphasis on issues of translation and style in Old English poetry. He also facilitates the Old English Reading Group, which meets for an hour every Friday afternoon to read Old English texts together, with an emphasis on reading aloud and enjoying the beauty and the power of the literature in the original language.

Jim Beitler is a Professor of English and the Director of First-Year Writing at Wheaton College. He is the author of "Charitable Writing: Cultivating Virtue Through Our Words" (with co-author Richard Hughes Gibson), "Seasoned Speech: Rhetoric in the Life of the Church," and "Remaking Transitional Justice in the United States"—and regularly teaches courses on Tolkien, Lewis, and other fantasy writers.

This event takes place in the Wade Center's Bakke Auditorium, and is free and open to the public. You can find the livestream here: http://tinyurl.com/mrxfbjef.

REMINDER: The Marion E. Wade Center at Wheaton College presents "Truth, Story, and Pattern: Keys to Appreciating the Apo...
01/22/2024

REMINDER: The Marion E. Wade Center at Wheaton College presents "Truth, Story, and Pattern: Keys to Appreciating the Apologetic Contribution of Dorothy L. Sayers," a lecture by Amy Orr-Ewing, D. Phil, on Tuesday, January 23, 2024 at 7:00 PM CT.

Dorothy L. Sayers was regarded as one of the foremost communicators of the Christian faith alongside C.S. Lewis. Join us as Dr. Orr-Ewing examines a framework for understanding the fundamental coherence of Sayers’s work across various genres and considers her impact and contribution as a public Christian.

Amy Orr-Ewing, D.Phil. holds a doctorate in Theology from the University of Oxford and is an international author, speaker, and theologian. Her books include, "Where is God in All the Suffering?" and the bestselling, "Why Trust the Bible?" Amy has spoken at university campuses around the world, addressed Parliamentarians in the Speakers Rooms, Chapel at the UK Parliament, staffers on Capitol Hill, and at the West Wing of The White House. She is also the co-founder of REBOOT, an innovative youth initiative aimed at helping teenagers think deeply about faith, which runs in countries all over the world. Amy lives in Oxford with her husband ‘Frog’ and their three boys, JJ, Zach and Benji.

This event is free and open to the public and will take place in Bakke Auditorium at the Marion E. Wade Center, located at 351 East Lincoln Ave. in Wheaton on the northwest corner of campus. Visitor parking is located on the east side of Washington St. For more information, email us at [email protected].

Watch the livestream here:
http://tinyurl.com/mtzbtnmu

In our second 'Wonders of the Wade" video, Laura Stanifer, Wade Center Archivist, shares a signed first edition of THE H...
01/19/2024

In our second 'Wonders of the Wade" video, Laura Stanifer, Wade Center Archivist, shares a signed first edition of THE HOBBIT by J.R.R. Tolkien, and discusses how it differs from later editions.

The Marion E. Wade Center presents a series of 3-5 minute video vignettes called “Wonders of the Wade.” In this series we invite Wade Center staff, Wheaton College faculty, and visiting scholars to present a favorite item of theirs at the Wade Center. Each episode features a museum piece, a first edition, an unpublished manuscript, or a book from one of the Wade authors’ personal libraries, often with notes and markings in them. New episodes of “Wonders of the Wade” are published on the first and third Friday of every month. See the "Wonders of the Wade" playlist on our YouTube channel to access more videos.

Subscribe to our YouTube channel to get notifications, or watch for social media posts on Instagram and Facebook as each episode is released.

Laura Stanifer, Wade Center Archivist, shares a signed first edition of THE HOBBIT by J.R.R. Tolkien, and discusses how it differs from later editions.The Ma...

REMINDER: Join us on Thursday, January 18 at 7pm CT in Bakke Auditorium for "The Way of Dante - Inferno: 'Hell Outside Y...
01/17/2024

REMINDER: Join us on Thursday, January 18 at 7pm CT in Bakke Auditorium for "The Way of Dante - Inferno: 'Hell Outside Your Front Door'" with Richard Hughes Gibson.

In 1943, Charles Williams published "The Figure of Beatrice: A Study in Dante," which spurred his friend Dorothy L. Sayers to give Dante another try. Sayers was immediately captivated by "The Divine Comedy," a passion that she soon discovered C.S. Lewis shared. In this first lecture, we will join Williams, Sayers, and Lewis as they descend into Dante’s Hell in order to understand the psychology of sin in its myriad forms, and we will trace, in turn, the impact of those infernal researches on their subsequent writings, particularly Sayers’s efforts to show that Dante’s taxonomy of sin illuminated postwar English society. The respondent for the lecture is Jeremy Botts, Associate Professor of Art.

A livestream of the lecture will also be available here: http://tinyurl.com/3y7zp8x6

This is the first of three lectures in the 2024 Hansen Lecture Series, “The Way of Dante.” Dr. Richard Hughes Gibson will reveal the profound influence of the medieval Italian poet Dante Alighieri on Dorothy L. Sayers, Charles Williams, and C.S. Lewis. Across the lectures, Dr. Gibson will follow Sayers, Williams, and Lewis as they read and reflect on the three stages of "The Divine Comedy," Dante’s famous allegorical trek through Hell, Purgatory, and Heaven. The series will reveal the urgent psychological, social, and theological lessons that our three authors learned from Dante and, in turn, how those lessons shaped their mature writings.

Richard Hughes Gibson is Professor of English at Wheaton College. He is the author or coauthor of three books, "Forgiveness in Victorian Literature" (2015), "Charitable Writing" (with Jim Beitler, 2020), and "Paper Electronic Literature: An Archeology of Born-Digital Materials" (2021).

After the lecture Mark Noll, Professor Emeritus of History Wheaton College, will be signing his Hansen Lectureship Series book, "C.S. Lewis in America," available for purchase in the Wade Bookshop.

Due to inclement weather this afternoon, the Wade Center will close at 2pm. We will reopen on Tuesday, January 16 at 9am...
01/12/2024

Due to inclement weather this afternoon, the Wade Center will close at 2pm. We will reopen on Tuesday, January 16 at 9am. Stay safe and warm, everyone! Here's a picture of our very Narnian-looking lamppost today.

In partnership with the George MacDonald Society, the Wade Center is excited to announce the conference "George MacDonal...
01/05/2024

In partnership with the George MacDonald Society, the Wade Center is excited to announce the conference "George MacDonald and the Prophetic Imagination" at Wheaton College, May 29-31, 2024, in celebration of the bicentenary of MacDonald's birth (1824-1905). This three-day gathering will include an evening lecture event with Malcolm Guite, panel discussions, papers on various aspects of MacDonald's life and works, displays of MacDonald memorabilia and books, and artistic events.

To register, and view the "call for papers" see the conference website:
https://www.george-macdonald.com/gms/2024Conference.html

Hope you can join us!

Today is the day! Starting today, the Wade Center is pleased to share "Wonders of the Wade," a series of short video vig...
01/05/2024

Today is the day! Starting today, the Wade Center is pleased to share "Wonders of the Wade," a series of short video vignettes where we invite Wade Center staff, Wheaton College faculty, and visiting scholars to present a favorite item of theirs at the Wade Center. Each episode features a museum piece, a first edition, an unpublished manuscript, or a book from one of the Wade authors’ personal libraries, often with notes and markings in them.

Our first "Wonders of the Wade" features the hand-carved family wardrobe of C.S. Lewis from the Wade Center's museum, introduced by Wade Co-Directors David and Crystal Downing.

New episodes of “Wonders of the Wade” are published on the first and third Friday of every month. Enjoy!

Drs. Crystal and David Downing, Wade Center Co-Directors, present the hand-carved oak wardrobe that was in C.S. Lewis’s home in Ireland when he was growing u...

Happy birthday to J.R.R. Tolkien, born January 3, 1892. Tolkien fans around the world celebrate his birthday by raising ...
01/03/2024

Happy birthday to J.R.R. Tolkien, born January 3, 1892. Tolkien fans around the world celebrate his birthday by raising a glass of their beverage of choice at 9pm local time and toasting "The Professor!"

Photo courtesy of Douglas Gilbert.

“For Jesus Christ is unique – unique among gods and men. There have been incarnate gods a-plenty, and slain-and-resurrec...
12/25/2023

“For Jesus Christ is unique – unique among gods and men. There have been incarnate gods a-plenty, and slain-and-resurrected gods not a few; but He is the only God who has a date in history.”

- Dorothy L. Sayers, THE MAN BORN TO BE KING

Photo: Greyson Joralemon, unsplash [dot] com/photos/brown-wooden-table-dDvR7eD6pf8

“Christmas is built upon a beautiful and intentional paradox; that the birth of the homeless should be celebrated in eve...
12/20/2023

“Christmas is built upon a beautiful and intentional paradox; that the birth of the homeless should be celebrated in every home.”

- G.K. Chesterton, “The Spirit of Christmas,” BRAVE NEW FAMILY

Photo: Walter Chávez, unsplash [dot] com/photos/TEFSPAaoKlA

This Christmas season the Wade Center staff was treated to an original story by two of our student workers, Chloe DuBois...
12/18/2023

This Christmas season the Wade Center staff was treated to an original story by two of our student workers, Chloe DuBois and Elise Peterson, both juniors at Wheaton College. The story is based on Charles Dickens's "A Christmas Carol," and centers on Dr. Mortimer Stein, an ill-behaved Wade Center researcher who is visited by three ghosts who try to help him see the value of the Wade Center's authors and collections....

This Christmas season the Wade Center staff was treated to an original story by two of our student workers, Chloe DuBois and Elise Peterson, both juniors at Wheaton College. The story is based on C…

“Polar Bear was being allowed to decorate a big tree in the garden, all by himself and a ladder. Suddenly are heard terr...
12/13/2023

“Polar Bear was being allowed to decorate a big tree in the garden, all by himself and a ladder. Suddenly are heard terrible growly squealy noises. We rushed out to find Polar Bear hanging on the tree himself!

‘You are not a decoration,’ said Father Christmas.

‘Anyway, I am alight,’ he shouted.

He was. We threw a bucket of water over him. Which spoilt a lot of the decorations, but saved his fur. The silly old thing … had rested the ladder against a branch (instead of the trunk of the tree). Then he thought, ‘I will just light the candles to see if they are working,’ although he was told not to. So he climbed to the tip of the ladder with a taper. Just then the branch cracked, the ladder slipped on the snow, and Polar Bear fell INTO the tree and caught on some wire; and his fur got caught on fire.”

-J.R.R. Tolkien, THE FATHER CHRISTMAS LETTERS (letter for 1937)

Photo: Joey Genovese, unsplash [dot] com/photos/red-and-brown-round-fruit-on-brown-tree-branch-ZrFDGbt04-4

Happy birthday to George MacDonald, born December 10, 1824.
12/10/2023

Happy birthday to George MacDonald, born December 10, 1824.

Christmas merriment is afoot at the Wade during the last week of classes at Wheaton College before the holiday break. Wa...
12/08/2023

Christmas merriment is afoot at the Wade during the last week of classes at Wheaton College before the holiday break. Wade staff were treated by two of our student workers, Elise Peterson and Chloe DuBois, to a reading of their self-adapted version of "A Christmas Carol" by Charles Dickens, retold as "Yuletide at the Wade." The story centers around Dr. Mortimer Stein, a misbehaving Wade Center researcher who is visited by 3 Christmas ghosts who warn him to change his ways. This is Dr. Stein's third exploit written by the two authors. It is unclear whether or not Dr. Stein was reformed by the end of the story... Here's hoping for a Christmas miracle. ;)

“It was a sledge, and it was reindeer with bells on their harness. But they were far bigger than the Witch’s reindeer, a...
12/06/2023

“It was a sledge, and it was reindeer with bells on their harness. But they were far bigger than the Witch’s reindeer, and they were not white but brown. And on the sledge sat a person whom everyone knew the moment they set eyes on him. He was a huge man in a bright red robe (bright as holly berries) with a hood that had fur inside it and a great white beard that fell like a foamy waterfall over his chest. Everyone knew him because, though you see people of his sort only in Narnia, you see pictures of them and hear them talked about even in our world—the world on this side of the wardrobe door. But when you really see them in Narnia it is rather different. Some of the pictures of Father Christmas in our world make him look only funny and jolly. But now that the children actually stood looking at him they didn’t find it quite like that. He was so big, and so glad, and so real, that they all became quite still. They felt very glad, but also solemn.

‘I’ve come at last,’ said he. ‘She has kept me out for a long time, but I have got in at last. Aslan is on the move. The Witch’s magic is weakening.’

And Lucy felt running through her that deep shiver of gladness which you only get if you are being solemn and still.”

- THE LION, THE WITCH, AND THE WARDROBE by C.S. Lewis

Photo: Norman Tsui, unsplash [dot] com/photos/reindeer-pulling-sled-KBKHXjhVQVM

Happy birthday to C.S. Lewis, born November 29, 1898.
11/29/2023

Happy birthday to C.S. Lewis, born November 29, 1898.

“’I hope there is something left for the late-comers to eat and drink! What's that? Tea! No thank you! A little red wine...
11/23/2023

“’I hope there is something left for the late-comers to eat and drink! What's that? Tea! No thank you! A little red wine, I think, for me.’ ‘And for me,’ said Thorin. ‘And raspberry jam and apple-tart,’ said Bifur. ‘And mince-pies and cheese,’ said Bofur. ‘And pork-pie and salad,’ said Bombur. ‘And more cakes-and ale-and coffee, if you don't mind,’ called the other dwarves through the door.

‘Put on a few eggs, there's a good fellow!’ Gandalf called after him, as the hobbit stumped off to the pantries. ‘And just bring out the cold chicken and pickles!’

‘Seems to know as much about the inside of my larders as I do myself!’ thought Mr. Baggins”

-J.R.R. Tolkien, “An Unexpected Party,” THE HOBBIT
Image: Warner Bros / MGM screencap

Enjoy these autumn scenes from the Wade Center's gardens.
11/15/2023

Enjoy these autumn scenes from the Wade Center's gardens.

New blog post by David C. Downing. Last year the Wade Center was pleased to host Madeline Walsh Hamblin, who met C. S. L...
11/08/2023

New blog post by David C. Downing. Last year the Wade Center was pleased to host Madeline Walsh Hamblin, who met C. S. Lewis when she was only 13 years old....

by David C. Downing Front row: Douglas Gresham, David Gresham, Joy Davidman Gresham. Back row: C. S. Lewis, Damaris Walsh, Eva Walsh. Madeline Walsh is mostly hidden behind Joy. Photo courtesy of M…

The Wade Center will have extended hours on Saturday, November 4 for Family Weekend at Wheaton College. Stop by any time...
11/03/2023

The Wade Center will have extended hours on Saturday, November 4 for Family Weekend at Wheaton College. Stop by any time between 10am and 3pm. See you then!

"But Christianity holds that the world and its repetition came by will or Love as children are begotten by a father, and...
10/31/2023

"But Christianity holds that the world and its repetition came by will or Love as children are begotten by a father, and therefore that other and different things might come by it. Briefly, it believes that a God who could do anything so extraordinary as making pumpkins go on being pumpkins, is like the prophet, Habbakuk, Capable de tout. If you do not think it extraordinary that a pumpkin is always a pumpkin, think again. You have not yet even begun philosophy. You have not even seen a pumpkin."

-G.K. Chesterton, "Miracles and Modern Civilisation" Read the full text here: www.chesterton.org/miracles-and-modern-civilisation/

Image: Maddy Baker, https://unsplash.com/photos/gS32T4TxSJY

“Frodo woke and found himself lying in bed. At first he thought that he had slept late, after a long unpleasant dream th...
10/24/2023

“Frodo woke and found himself lying in bed. At first he thought that he had slept late, after a long unpleasant dream that still hovered on the edge of memory. Or perhaps he had been ill? But the ceiling looked strange; it was flat, and it had dark beams richly carved. He lay a little while longer looking at patches of sunlight on the wall, and listening to the sound of a waterfall.

`Where am I, and what is the time?' he said aloud to the ceiling. 'In the House of Elrond, and it is ten o'clock in the morning.' said a voice. `It is the morning of October the twenty-fourth, if you want to know.'

`Gandalf!' cried Frodo, sitting up. There was the old wizard, sitting in a chair by the open window.

`Yes,' he said, `I am here. And you are lucky to be here, too, after all the absurd things you have done since you left home.'”

- J.R.R. Tolkien, Many Meetings, THE FELLOWSHIP OF THE RING

The Wade Center welcomes visitors from Northwind Theological Seminary, here all this week researching in the Reading Roo...
10/18/2023

The Wade Center welcomes visitors from Northwind Theological Seminary, here all this week researching in the Reading Room. Several members of the group are also providing presentations on George MacDonald, C.S. Lewis, and Charles Williams. Well-met, one and all!

"Autumn is the time when the outer world is dying and man feels within himself an enhancement of creative spiritual acti...
10/04/2023

"Autumn is the time when the outer world is dying and man feels within himself an enhancement of creative spiritual activity. Many of us can still remember the subdued excitement of the October dusk through which, as children, we came home earlier from the afternoon’s exercise, to take up with renewed zest our primitive attempts to make something. In the writer’s case primitive is hardly a strong enough word. Nevertheless, he remembers vividly how the clearness of the outer air seemed to impart its quality to the tempting vision of the finished product which danced on such occasions before his prophetic soul. In autumn the whole impulse of the soul turns inward, and one would expect accordingly the motto, 'Know thyself!' Actually it is 'Look around thee!'"

-Owen Barfield, "The Transitional Seasons," ANTHROPOSOPHICAL MOVEMENT 10.2 (January 26, 1933): 10-12. www.owenbarfield.org/the-transitional-seasons/

Image: Erik Witsoe, https://unsplash.com/photos/pvoQJym18Jg

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351 E Lincoln Avenue
Wheaton, IL
60187

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