The Ray Bradbury Waukegan Carnegie Library, Inc

The Ray Bradbury Waukegan Carnegie Library, Inc We're creating a Ray Bradbury centered-experience in the historic Waukegan Carnegie Library to honor the creativity of Bradbury, a native son of Waukegan.

We are working to create a Ray Bradbury-centered experience in the historic Waukegan Carnegie Library to celebrate the creativity of world famous author, Ray Bradbury, a native son of Waukegan.

The statue is unveiled! Congratulations to the Waukegan Public Library and all involved!
08/23/2019
Waukegan Public Library

The statue is unveiled! Congratulations to the Waukegan Public Library and all involved!

What a night! Thanks to all who celebrated the unveiling and dedication of Zachary Oxman Studios’ sculpture of Ray Bradbury with us, and a special thanks to the City of Waukegan and Waukegan Park District for their incredible support.

The Book Stall
08/22/2019
The Book Stall

The Book Stall

#Lunchread: In honor of his birthday today (8/22/20), enjoy this NPR interview with the great Ray Bradbury: http://ow.ly/gcgs50vG3NR
#amreading #Bradbury #SciFi #Farenheit451 #MartianChronicles

Center for Ray Bradbury Studies
04/05/2019

Center for Ray Bradbury Studies

Betty Ballantine (1919 – 2019), paperback pioneer
02/25/2019
Betty Ballantine (1919 – 2019), paperback pioneer

Betty Ballantine (1919 – 2019), paperback pioneer

Betty Ballantine and her husband Ian helped invent the modern paperback through their Bantam and Ballantine books. Paperbacks in America were not popular until the Ballantines improved the quality of the product and offered better titles. The pair were instrumental in establishing the market for sci...

Center for Ray Bradbury Studies
02/14/2019

Center for Ray Bradbury Studies

We say a sad farewell to publisher Betty Ballantine, who has passed away at the age of 98.

With her husband Ian Ballantine, Betty established Ballantine books in 1952, with its distinctive business model of publishing simultaneous hardcover and paperback editions of its books.

Ballantine Books did particularly well in publishing science fiction - and included Ray Bradbury's new novel FAHRENHEIT 451 in its 1953 roster of releases.

01/20/2019

We at the Ray Bradbury Waukegan Carnegie Library, Inc. are very sorry to learn that Bettina F. Bradbury, 63, daughter of Ray and Marguerite Bradbury, died on January 13, 2019. Ms. Bradbury was a television screenwriter and winner of three Daytime Emmy Awards. She was working on a memoir of her early life and is survived by two sons, Danny and Casey, her three sisters, Susan, Ramona and Alexandra, and six nieces and nephews. We send strength and comfort to everyone in her family.

Center for Ray Bradbury Studies
05/03/2018

Center for Ray Bradbury Studies

We're counting down to the premiere of the new film, coming soon from HBO - May 19th 2018!

#HBO #Fahrenheit #f451

Center for Ray Bradbury Studies
02/10/2018
Center for Ray Bradbury Studies

Center for Ray Bradbury Studies

Sixty-seven years ago, in February 1951, Ray Bradbury's story 'The Fireman' debuted in GALAXY science fiction magazine.

After some expansion, it re-appeared in book form in 1953 as... FAHRENHEIT 451.

11/30/2017
Center for Ray Bradbury Studies

Center for Ray Bradbury Studies

Dr. Phil Nichols, Senior Advisor to the Center for Ray Bradbury Studies, discovered something "wicked" while he was researching in the Center earlier this month. We posted about it a few weeks ago, but here is an opportunity for you to hear more details from Phil.

The Bradbury Center preserves many important #RayBradbury artifacts like this. Please join our preservation efforts by participating in our crowdfund campaign. (A link to our giving page is posted in the comments section.)

Also, many thanks to Mike Maitzen for directing and editing this video!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rXtSahY_ryw&feature=youtu.be

As an author, essayist, playwright, screenwriter, lecturer, poet and visionary, Ray Bradbury is known as one of America'...
10/25/2017
Donate

As an author, essayist, playwright, screenwriter, lecturer, poet and visionary, Ray Bradbury is known as one of America's greatest creative geniuses. Help us celebrate his legacy and ensure Bradbury’s impact for generations to come by donating to our museum campaign below.

The Ray Bradbury Waukegan Carnegie Library, Inc.’s goal is to celebrate the world famous author by renovating the landmarked Carnegie Library and establishing in it an exciting Bradbury experience center. This building is where Bradbury fed his “hungry imagination” as a boy. The RBWCL was incorporat...

10/11/2017

Throughout his 65-year career, Ray Bradbury explored a rich array of ideas—space travel, magic, mysticism, modern life, and oppression of thought among others—making him one of the world’s best-loved and best-known creators.

10/04/2017

More than eight million copies of Ray Bradbury's books have been sold in 36 different languages, in many different countries around the world! Which is your favorite?

Come join us in downtown Waukegan, Illinois to travel to Mars, backward and forward in time, and to places fueled by ima...
09/27/2017
Donate

Come join us in downtown Waukegan, Illinois to travel to Mars, backward and forward in time, and to places fueled by imagination. Help us create an unforgettable Ray Bradbury experience by donating below.

The Ray Bradbury Waukegan Carnegie Library, Inc.’s goal is to celebrate the world famous author by renovating the landmarked Carnegie Library and establishing in it an exciting Bradbury experience center. This building is where Bradbury fed his “hungry imagination” as a boy. The RBWCL was incorporat...

From Autograph Hound to Screenwriter, Ray Bradbury Had a Lifelong Love Affair With Hollywood
09/14/2017
From Autograph Hound to Screenwriter, Ray Bradbury Had a Lifelong Love Affair With Hollywood

From Autograph Hound to Screenwriter, Ray Bradbury Had a Lifelong Love Affair With Hollywood

The following excerpt is a chapter from Sam Weller's Listen to the Echoes: The Ray Bradbury Interviews, a companion to the author's authorized biography of Bradbury. Weller interviewed Bradbury between May 2000 and April 2011, largely in the Cheviot Hills home where Bradbury lived until his death in...

Ray Bradbury
09/01/2017
Ray Bradbury

Ray Bradbury

"In Ray Bradbury’s dystopian novel “Fahrenheit 451,” “firemen” in a not-too-distant future burn the world’s most dangerous weapon: books. The DC Public Library Foundation is doing its part to keep that day from coming, hiding copies of six incendiary novels around the city for residents to find."

Center for Ray Bradbury Studies will host the “Escape Velocity: Ray Bradbury and the American Space Program Wednesday Au...
08/23/2017

Center for Ray Bradbury Studies will host the “Escape Velocity: Ray Bradbury and the American Space Program Wednesday August 23rd at 6pm at 40 E St. Clair Street in Indianapolis, Indiana. Come out today to see Jonathan Eller give the 4th annual Bradbury Memorial Lecture.

08/22/2017

Today is Ray Bradbury's 97th birthday - celebrate his life by reading your favorite Bradbury story. We are reading "The Veldt" today. What are you reading?

Center for Ray Bradbury Studies will host the “Escape Velocity: Ray Bradbury and the American Space Program Wednesday Au...
08/18/2017

Center for Ray Bradbury Studies will host the “Escape Velocity: Ray Bradbury and the American Space Program Wednesday August 23rd at 6pm at 40 E St. Clair Street Indianapolis, Indiana. Come out to see Jonathan Eller give the 4th annual Bradbury Memorial Lecture.

Ray Bradbury
08/12/2017
Ray Bradbury

Ray Bradbury

Ray Bradbury Reveals the True Meaning of Fahrenheit 451: It’s Not About Censorship, But People “Being Turned Into Morons by TV”. Via Open Culture

In 1992, Ray Bradbury won an Emmy Award, the top honor in television, for his adaptation of his own book, The Halloween ...
07/18/2017

In 1992, Ray Bradbury won an Emmy Award, the top honor in television, for his adaptation of his own book, The Halloween Tree. The Emmy was for "Best Animated Children's Program." Here is the award in the Bradbury living room.

Ray Bradbury wrote many of his masterpieces in this basement laboratory at his home in Los Angeles, including sections o...
07/12/2017

Ray Bradbury wrote many of his masterpieces in this basement laboratory at his home in Los Angeles, including sections of Something Wicked This Way Comes.

We are saddened that Bill Touponce, who co-founded the Center for Ray Bradbury Studies and became the Center’s first dir...
06/18/2017

We are saddened that Bill Touponce, who co-founded the Center for Ray Bradbury Studies and became the Center’s first director, has passed away. Read the wonderful tribute written by his friend Jon Eller.

William F. Touponce
1948–2017

“My Friend Bill”

Our good colleague, steadfast friend, and long-time Ray Bradbury scholar William F. Touponce passed away from a sudden heart attack on 15 June 2017. Bill joined the faculty of the Indiana University School of Liberal Arts in Indianapolis (IUPUI) in 1985, and attained the academic rank of Professor of English and adjunct Professor of American Studies during his twenty-seven years with the school. In 2007 Bill co-founded the Center for Ray Bradbury Studies and became the Center’s first director. During his four-year tenure as director, he established The Collected Stories of Ray Bradbury and a scholarly annual, The New Ray Bradbury Review. He retired from the faculty in 2012, but continued to pursue his scholarly interests as Professor Emeritus right up until his passing.

Bill was born in Pittsfield, Massachusetts, on August 7, 1948. He grew up in the rugged hills of western Massachusetts, just a few miles from the legendary Arrowhead Farm where, almost a century earlier, Herman Melville composed Moby Dick. Bill grew up in the working-class culture of this old mill town, never dreaming at the time that he would pursue a career in the world of literary scholarship. Bill’s father was a versatile carpenter for the town, more of a millwright by trade, a colorful New Englander of French descent who could build just about any kind of structure or repair almost any piece of municipal equipment or infrastructure. Bill and his father even refurbished an old animal husbandry shed on the family farm and turned it into a place where they lived for a time. Bill often recalled the enjoyment he found in caring for the animals and newborn stock on the farm, and in learning trade skills from his father. But Bill also led a somewhat itinerant life in his youth—occasionally living with his father, and at other times living with his mother in town. These adventures prompted Bill to leave high school prior to his senior year and enlist in the United States Army.

Bill was initially assigned to administrative staff duties with a helicopter unit at Fort Riley, Kansas, and deployed with that unit for a year of combat operations in the Republic of Vietnam. He soon assumed duties on perimeter defense and eventually as a door gunner with his helicopter unit, earning the Air Medal for missions flown in support of ground troops. After completion of his combat tour, he was reassigned to the Defense Information School at Fort Benjamin Harrison in Indianapolis, before leaving the army to continue his education. By this time he had completed his high school equivalencies and soon began studies at Hampshire College in Amherst, Massachusetts, taking advantage of the inexpensive undergraduate programs that favored returning students of limited means. Hampshire College had reciprocal arrangements with several prestigious colleges and universities in the Amherst area, and these opportunities further enriched his undergraduate education experiences. Bill completed his B.A. from Hampshire in 1974, and continued on to the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, where he was awarded a three-year graduate fellowship. Bill took intensive studies in creative writing, Greek, and French, earning his M.A. (1977) and his Ph.D. (1981) in Comparative Literature.

He began to build his reputation in comparative literature at Tamkang University, Tamsui, Taiwan, where he was appointed an Assistant Professor from 1981 to 1985. During these years he married Julie, and their daughter Dorothy was born in Taiwan. From 1981 to 1984 he also served as associate editor of the Tamkang Review. After winning a 1985 National Endowment for the Humanities summer fellowship in Children’s Literature at the University of Connecticut, Bill moved his family to Indianapolis to join the Department of English at IUPUI, where his son Nathan was born. Here he took charge of the relatively new program in Children’s Literature, developed a very popular science fiction film course, and helped establish the technology standards for the IUPUI campus film studies facility.

During his first two decades at IUPUI, Bill published books on three masters of science fiction—Ray Bradbury, Frank Herbert, and Isaac Asimov—and reached a wide audience of research scholars, students, and classroom teachers. His Bradbury books radiated out from his dissertation studies, and include his early monographs Ray Bradbury and the Poetics of Reverie: Fantasy, Science Fiction and the Reader (1984, expanded 1998), and Ray Bradbury (1989). His two Twayne's United States Authors Series volumes, Frank Herbert (1988) and Isaac Asimov (1991), became reference standards for those two important authors. In 2004 I had the privilege of co-authoring Ray Bradbury: The Life of Fiction with Bill. The Life of Fiction was the first university press-published study of Bradbury, and it was runner-up for the 2005 Locus Award for Best Nonfiction Book in the Science Fiction and Fantasy Field.

During the first decade of the new century Bill wrote introductions and volume essays for seven special limited press editions of Bradbury’s works; these included an edition of the pre-production text of Ray Bradbury’s screenplay for the 1956 Warner Brothers production of Moby Dick (2008). In 2007, we co-founded the Center for Ray Bradbury Studies within the Institute for American Thought, and Bill agreed to take on the direction of this new and exciting enterprise. During his four-year tenure as director, he established The Collected Stories of Ray Bradbury multi-volume series, and a scholarly journal, The New Ray Bradbury Review.

Throughout his career Bill Touponce was an innovative and groundbreaking scholar, motivated by a desire to bring pioneering concepts of texts and their meaning into the classroom. In retirement, he returned to his scholarly foundation in comparative literature to write Lord Dunsany, H. P. Lovecraft, and Ray Bradbury: Spectral Journeys (2013), an illuminating new study of Modernism and its impact on major fantasy writers of the twentieth century.

Over the last quarter century, my own essays, introductions, and books on Ray Bradbury benefitted greatly from Bill’s sage counsel and critical insights. If he hadn’t done the crazy thing and actually proposed a Collected Stories edition to recover the elusive original versions of Ray Bradbury’s earliest tales, those very different versions of Bradbury’s art would have remained lost in time. I’m honored to have continued this series through three volumes, and I wish he could see the future volumes ahead.

William Dean Howells, the “Dean” of American letters at the turn of the twentieth century, had to pen a similar memorial on the death of his close friend, Mark Twain, in 1910. Howells recalled that his friend was “something of a puzzle, a great silent dignity,” and a similar magisterial image comes to mind when I think of Bill Touponce through the years. Bill was also a perceptive critic of literature and life, and my remembrance of him also echoes another Howellsian memory of Twain and “the intensity with which he pierced to the heart of life, and the breadth of vision with which he compassed the whole world, and tried for the reason of things….”

Bill was an insightful thinker, a studied reader of sacred texts from the great religions of the world, and a humble appreciator of the life force. Our mutual friend, Phil Nichols, tells me that on the day he passed away, Bill wrote on his page about the bird’s nest recently built above the front door of his home. It is fitting that Bill would appreciate that small and precious moment of life, just as his own grasp on this world was about to slip away. Bill Touponce—he was, and is, my friend.

—Jon Eller, director, Center for Ray Bradbury Studies

06/15/2017

Did you know that Ray Bradbury's inspiration to write horror novels came from Edgar Allan Poe?

06/06/2017

Did you know that in high school Ray Bradbury joined the poetry and drama clubs thinking he would become an actor? We are thankful that he chose a lifetime of writing instead of acting!

05/30/2017

Did you know that Ray Bradbury never drove a car because he was traumatized from witnessing a horrific car crash when he was just 15 years old?

Something Wicked This Way Comes Revisited
05/28/2017
Something Wicked This Way Comes Revisited

Something Wicked This Way Comes Revisited

In our latest edition of Nostalgia Bomb, we take a look back at Disney's 1983 adaptation of Ray Bradbury's Something Wicked This Way Comes.

05/24/2017

Did you know that before Ray Bradbury could afford his own phone, he would give out the number of the pay phone across the street from his house to editors and publishers? He would write at home with the windows open and run across the street if he heard the phone rang!

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Can you tell me what year Ray Bradbury came to Waukegan to sign books. I have an autographed copy of Dandelion Lion and fond memories of my dad and I standing in line. I think it was in the 1990's. Do you recall the year?