National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution

National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution The National Air and Space Museum on the National Mall in Washington, DC and the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, VA display the world’s largest collection of aviation and space artifacts.
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The Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum maintains the world's largest and most significant collection of aviation and space artifacts, encompassing all aspects of human flight, as well as related works of art and archival materials. This page represents both the National Mall location in Washington D.C, and the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, VA. Together, these facilities welcome more than eight million visitors a year, making it the most visited museum in the country. We encourage you to share your visits using #airandspace. Please feel free to share thoughts about our posts, ask us questions, or tell us about your visit.

As a public health precaution due to COVID-19, both of our locations, along with all Smithsonian museums and the Nationa...
03/12/2020
Smithsonian Museums and the National Zoo To Close March 14

As a public health precaution due to COVID-19, both of our locations, along with all Smithsonian museums and the National Zoo, will temporarily close to the public starting Saturday, March 14. We will provide updates on social media and on our website.

As a public health precaution due to COVID-19 (coronavirus), all Smithsonian museums in the Washington, D.C., metropolitan area and in New York City, including the National Zoo, will temporarily close to the public starting Saturday, March 14. The health and safety of Smithsonian visitors, staff and...

03/12/2020

Both National Air and Space Museum locations remain open, however some exhibits and activities are not available, including the Public Observatory, IMAX theaters, Observation Tower, and hands-on interactives and touchscreens.

The following events have been canceled or postponed:
- Women in Aviation and Space Family Day
- Spitzer Space Telescope lecture
- Apollo 13 NASS Member Event
- When Did the Universe Begin lecture
- Stargazing nights at the Observatory

Full statement: https://s.si.edu/3cTdecC

03/12/2020
STEM in 30

Live Q&A with an expert on exoplanets. Tune in right now!

Teachers do your students have questions about exoplanets? How about the telescopes being used to find them, including the The European Extremely Large Telescope, the Kepler Telescope, and NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite - TESS . Tune in to ask questions about NASA Exoplanets from Dr. Luke Sollitt from the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the Planetary Science Institute. Submit your questions and we will answer as many as we can get to.

This episode brought to you by the generous support of Safran

Today in 1933, the U.S. Navy airship USS Macon was christened. Macon operated as a flying aircraft carrier deploying Cur...
03/11/2020

Today in 1933, the U.S. Navy airship USS Macon was christened. Macon operated as a flying aircraft carrier deploying Curtiss F9C-2 Sparrowhawks during the early 1930s: s.si.edu/2tk4g2w #IdeasThatDefy

03/11/2020

As a public health precaution, tonight’s "Understanding the Climate Crisis" lecture has been postponed and Saturday’s "Women in Aviation and Space Family Day" has been canceled. Visit our website for more information and updates: https://airandspace.si.edu/covid-19-message

During World War II, the Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASP) flew a total of 60 million miles performing a variety of m...
03/10/2020

During World War II, the Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASP) flew a total of 60 million miles performing a variety of missions. By December 1944, the WASP had flown every type of military aircraft manufactured for WWII. However, although the WASP proved that women could capably fly all types of military aircraft, their inclusion in military aviation became a matter of waiting for official acceptance which would not be forthcoming for decades. The WASP were granted retroactive military status in 1977, and their contributions during World War II were recognized with the Congressional Gold Medal on this day in 2010.

The WASP Congressional Gold Medal is on display at the Udvar-Hazy Center: https://s.si.edu/2msb5L1 #BecauseOfHerStory #WomensHistoryMonth

📷: Members of the WASP are pictured at Lockbourne Army Air Field in World War (National Air and Space Museum Archives)

Today in 2011: Space Shuttle Discovery (STS-133) landed at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, completing its 39th and final fl...
03/09/2020

Today in 2011: Space Shuttle Discovery (STS-133) landed at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, completing its 39th and final flight. The longest-serving orbiter, Discovery flew more missions than any of its sister ships, spending altogether 365 days in space.

Learn more about Discovery, now on display at the Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, VA: https://s.si.edu/331TGy6

Image credit: NASA

On this day in 1910, Raymonde de Laroche of France became the first woman to earn a pilot's license. In honor of #Intern...
03/08/2020

On this day in 1910, Raymonde de Laroche of France became the first woman to earn a pilot's license. In honor of #InternationalWomensDay, let's go to France, Belgium, New Zealand, Russia, and California to learn about five inspiring women in aerospace history from around the world. Read the blog: https://s.si.edu/2mCT8vh

On this day in 1969, Apollo 9 lunar module Spider separated from command module Gumdrop for the first solo flight of the...
03/07/2020

On this day in 1969, Apollo 9 lunar module Spider separated from command module Gumdrop for the first solo flight of the lunar module (in Earth orbit). Jim McDivitt and Rusty Schweickart flew the lunar module for over 100 miles while David Scott remained in the command module. After six hours of separation, the LM and CM lunar module rendezvoused and docked.

More on Apollo 9: https://s.si.edu/2IuMHEA

03/07/2020

Learn about exoplanets and how we discover them in the latest episode of STEM in 30, our webcast series for middle school students.

Happy Birthday to the world’s first woman in space! More on our blog about Valentina Tereshkova, born this day in 1937 i...
03/06/2020

Happy Birthday to the world’s first woman in space! More on our blog about Valentina Tereshkova, born this day in 1937 in Russia, and the history of women in the Russian space program: https://s.si.edu/2lTYU8G

Image Caption: Soviet cosmonaut Valentina Vladmirovna Tereshkova in the spacecraft Vostok 6. #WomensHistoryMonth

30 years ago today, our Lockheed SR-71 Blackbird entered our collection in style. On its final flight, it set a new spee...
03/06/2020

30 years ago today, our Lockheed SR-71 Blackbird entered our collection in style. On its final flight, it set a new speed record, flying from Los Angeles, California, to Washington, DC, in 1 hour, 4 minutes, 20 seconds, averaging 3,418 kph (2,124 mph). After it arrived at Washington Dulles International Airport, the aircraft was turned over to the Smithsonian and is now on display at our Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Virginia: https://s.si.edu/2h3IuJY

NASA's newest rover finally has a name: Perseverance! In a new blog, Museum scientist John Grant explores the difference...
03/05/2020

NASA's newest rover finally has a name: Perseverance!

In a new blog, Museum scientist John Grant explores the differences between Curiosity and Perseverance, and what the new Mars rover hopes to learn about the Red Planet: https://s.si.edu/38qV5zp

Today in 1936, German dirigible LZ 129, the Hindenburg, made its first flight. The Hindenburg was the pride of the Deuts...
03/04/2020

Today in 1936, German dirigible LZ 129, the Hindenburg, made its first flight. The Hindenburg was the pride of the Deutsche Zeppelin-Reederei line. More on our blog: https://s.si.edu/2ENEgTH

Command module Columbia is home! After two years touring the country on the "Destination Moon" traveling exhibition, the...
03/03/2020

Command module Columbia is home! After two years touring the country on the "Destination Moon" traveling exhibition, the Apollo 11 command module has returned to Air and Space. It will be on display at the Udvar-Hazy Center in Virginia for about a year until it is moved downtown to be readied for display in the upcoming Destination Moon exhibition at the Museum in DC. #AirSpacePhoto

More on Columbia: https://s.si.edu/2VFw68D

Today in 1969, the first Concorde supersonic transport (SST), Concorde 001, made its maiden flight at Toulouse, France w...
03/02/2020

Today in 1969, the first Concorde supersonic transport (SST), Concorde 001, made its maiden flight at Toulouse, France with test pilot André Turcat at the controls. The Concorde could fly at twice the speed of sound, so fast that the aircraft's aluminum skin would heat up and expand during flight. You can see a Concorde on display at the Udvar-Hazy Center. Our Concorde, "Fox Alpha," was the first production Concorde delivered to Air France. https://s.si.edu/32NeFEW

Today in 1912, U.S. Army Captain Albert Berry made the first parachute jump from a powered airplane, a Benoist pusher-ty...
03/01/2020

Today in 1912, U.S. Army Captain Albert Berry made the first parachute jump from a powered airplane, a Benoist pusher-type airplane. Read more about the jump in this piece from the Air & Space magazine: https://s.si.edu/2F4UPfD

Photo: SI-A-33652-E from Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum Archives

The Tuskegee Army Air Field became the vital center for training African Americans to fly fighter and bomber aircraft du...
02/29/2020

The Tuskegee Army Air Field became the vital center for training African Americans to fly fighter and bomber aircraft during World War II. Serving in the 99th Fighter Squadron and the 332nd Fighter Group, the "Tuskegee Airmen" made a pioneering contribution to the war and the subsequent drive to end racial segregation in the American armed forces: https://s.si.edu/2TpAI02 #BlackHistoryMonth
📷: The first class of pilots to earn their wings and graduate from the Advanced Flying School in Tuskegee, Alabama in 1942.

You probably know that Leap Year has to do with the time it takes the Earth to orbit the Sun (365.242190 days, not 365),...
02/29/2020

You probably know that Leap Year has to do with the time it takes the Earth to orbit the Sun (365.242190 days, not 365), but did you know that Leap Day doesn't always happen every four years?

We explore the complexity of Leap Year on the blog: https://s.si.edu/38bTopk

Dr. Mae Jemison has earned many titles during her vibrant scientific career: engineer, doctor, Peace Corps officer, teac...
02/28/2020

Dr. Mae Jemison has earned many titles during her vibrant scientific career: engineer, doctor, Peace Corps officer, teacher, and astronaut. Jemison became the first African American woman to travel in space as a crewmember of the Endeavour in 1992.
During her time working on Endeavour, Jemison conducted a variety of experiments testing bone cells, weightlessness, and motion sickness. She continued her career in science after leaving NASA, and has been a champion for women and minorities in STEM.
Her name tag from her Space Shuttle flight suit is part of the Museum collection. #BlackHistoryMonth

02/27/2020
Balloon Science (E.Z. Science Episode 5)

From the earliest days of flight to today’s cutting-edge research, balloons play an important role in aerospace. In the latest episode of EZ Science, Dr. Ellen Stofan and Dr. Thomas Zurbuchen discuss how NASA uses balloon science to better understand our planet and universe.

ABOUT THE SERIES: In our #EZScience video series with NASA, Museum director Dr. Ellen Stofan and NASA associate administrator for science Dr. Thomas Zurbuchen talk about the latest in planetary science and exploration.

Yesterday we launched Smithsonian Open Access. Now, over 1,300 images of Air and Space artifacts, from Amelia Earhart’s ...
02/26/2020

Yesterday we launched Smithsonian Open Access. Now, over 1,300 images of Air and Space artifacts, from Amelia Earhart’s Lockheed Vega to John Glenn’s Friendship 7 capsule, are now yours to download, remix, reuse, and share. Learn more: http://si.edu/openaccess

"Katherine, and countless unsung heroes just like her, carried the nation’s space program forward, despite pervasive opp...
02/25/2020
Katherine Johnson - Continues to Inspire

"Katherine, and countless unsung heroes just like her, carried the nation’s space program forward, despite pervasive opposition at all levels of society. Katherine went where her skills were needed—even if she wasn’t invited. To borrow a phrase from Shirley Chisolm (who became the first black woman elected to Congress the same year Katherine calculated the trajectories for the first Moon landing), they didn’t give her a seat at the table, so she brought a folding chair. And in that quiet tenacity, she forged a legacy that will inform and inspire generations of young women looking for their own space in history."

Museum director Ellen Stofan reflects on Katherine Johnson's legacy.

On February 24, 2020, Katherine Johnson passed away at the age of 101, after a long life of learning and teaching—and quietly helping the United States reach our destiny in space.

02/25/2020
Smithsonian

Smithsonian

The Smithsonian's treasures belong to you. Now you can download, transform and share the Smithsonian’s Open Access content for any purpose, for free, without further permission from the Smithsonian.

We can't wait to see how you get creative with about 2.8 million Smithsonian collection images, 3D models, data and research.

Tune in to our #SmithsonianOpenAccess event tonight at 7:15 p.m. ET at si.edu/OpenAccess.

Today in 2011, Space Shuttle Discovery launched on its final flight - the STS-133 mission to the International Space Sta...
02/24/2020

Today in 2011, Space Shuttle Discovery launched on its final flight - the STS-133 mission to the International Space Station. STS-133 was Discovery's 39th mission, and brought its time-in-space total to 365 days. See Discovery at the Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Virginia: https://s.si.edu/2fCqp4R

We join in honoring the memory of pioneering mathematician Katherine Johnson, who passed away today at age 101. Starting...
02/24/2020

We join in honoring the memory of pioneering mathematician Katherine Johnson, who passed away today at age 101. Starting with aircraft in 1953, Johnson was responsible for key calculations that helped ensure the success of numerous programs including projects Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo. Her career with NASA (and its predecessor NACA) would last through work on the Space Shuttle in the 1980s. You can read more about Johnson in this blog written at the time the movie "Hidden Figures,” which told the story of Johnson and her "computer" colleagues, was released: https://s.si.edu/2mgfYpp

Image credit: NASA

30 years ago today, Pioneer 11 crossed the orbit of Neptune, becoming the fourth spacecraft to travel beyond the outermo...
02/23/2020

30 years ago today, Pioneer 11 crossed the orbit of Neptune, becoming the fourth spacecraft to travel beyond the outermost planets of our solar system.

We lost contact with the spacecraft in 1995, leading Pioneer project manager Fred Wirth to say “Pioneer 11 will travel as a ghost ship in our galaxy."

Good news! We just extended the application for our Teacher Innovator Institute. 👩‍🏫👨‍🏫Want to spend two weeks in DC thi...
02/21/2020

Good news! We just extended the application for our Teacher Innovator Institute. 👩‍🏫👨‍🏫

Want to spend two weeks in DC this summer learning from our educators about how to use Museum resources in your classrooms? Did we mention it's free?

Apply by March 1: https://s.si.edu/2EtFTqh

Dale L. White Sr. was best known for his 1939 “Goodwill Flight” with Chauncey Spencer from Chicago to Washington, DC, to...
02/21/2020

Dale L. White Sr. was best known for his 1939 “Goodwill Flight” with Chauncey Spencer from Chicago to Washington, DC, to make the case for African American participation in flight training, both civilian and military. His flight illustrated the challenges that African Americans faced in reaching equality and the inconsistency in how pioneers like White were treated. Learn more about this pioneering pilot: https://s.si.edu/37OxCb0

Today in 1962: John H. Glenn Jr. became the first American to orbit the Earth in this Mercury capsule he named Friendshi...
02/20/2020

Today in 1962: John H. Glenn Jr. became the first American to orbit the Earth in this Mercury capsule he named Friendship 7. Glenn's flight was the third crewed mission of Project Mercury, following two suborbital flights by astronauts in 1961. Glenn orbited the Earth three times and splashed down in the Atlantic Ocean 4 hours, 55 minutes, and 23 seconds after launch. See Friendship 7 on display in the Boeing Milestones of Flight Hall at the Museum in Washington, DC: https://s.si.edu/2EZzm2X

Today in 1982, the Boeing 757 flew for the first time.📷: Eastern Air Lines 757 on a later flight
02/19/2020

Today in 1982, the Boeing 757 flew for the first time.

📷: Eastern Air Lines 757 on a later flight

Today in 1977: Space Shuttle Enterprise made its first "captive-inactive" flight atop a Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircr...
02/18/2020

Today in 1977: Space Shuttle Enterprise made its first "captive-inactive" flight atop a Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center in California.

90 years ago today, Clyde Tombaugh discovered Pluto when he compared a photographic plate from January 29 to one taken J...
02/18/2020

90 years ago today, Clyde Tombaugh discovered Pluto when he compared a photographic plate from January 29 to one taken January 23 (pictured here) and noticed an irregularity.

He did this using an instrument called a "blink comparator," which allows users to rotate a small dial to flip a mirror back and forth between the beams from two microscopes, "blinking" between the two plates. Tombaugh knew where to look (and photograph) because Percival Lowell had predicted years earlier that something was lurking in that part of the sky. More on the discovery of Pluto: https://s.si.edu/324950g

On this day in 1911, Fred Wiseman departed on the first airmail flight sanctioned by the U.S. Post Office. His cargo: a ...
02/17/2020

On this day in 1911, Fred Wiseman departed on the first airmail flight sanctioned by the U.S. Post Office. His cargo: a sack of coffee, fifty copies of the local newspaper, and three letters.

Fred Wiseman, a successful automobile racing driver from Santa Rosa, California, began construction of the airplane in October 1909 in San Francisco. It was based on elements of Wright, Curtiss, and Farman designs, three of the most successful manufacturers of the day. Successful test flights were made in the spring of 1910, making it the first airplane built in California to fly.

The Wiseman-Cooke aircraft is on display at the Smithsonian's National Postal Museum: https://s.si.edu/2V4VX6j

First president to fly in an airplane: Theodore Roosevelt (1910)First sitting president to fly in an airplane: Franklin ...
02/17/2020
Presidents in Flight

First president to fly in an airplane: Theodore Roosevelt (1910)
First sitting president to fly in an airplane: Franklin Roosevelt (1943)
First sitting president to fly in a helicopter: Dwight Eisenhower (1957)

Explore more on presidents in flight: https://airandspace.si.edu/stories/editorial/presidents-flight

The National Air and Space Museum Archives' collections feature documents and images of the United States presidents, as they relate to aviation and space flight, from George Washington to George H.W. Bush.

In 1983, Guy Bluford became the first African American in space on STS-8. He had a doctorate in aerospace engineering an...
02/15/2020

In 1983, Guy Bluford became the first African American in space on STS-8. He had a doctorate in aerospace engineering and flew F-4C fighters for the Air Force in Vietnam. Bluford’s in-flight jacket from STS-8 is on display at the Museum in DC. Learn more about Bluford: s.si.edu/2Vc9gSH #BlackHistoryMonth

Space Shuttle kiss! 😘 When Enterprise met Discovery: In April 2012, the space shuttles posed nose to nose outside the Ud...
02/14/2020

Space Shuttle kiss! 😘

When Enterprise met Discovery: In April 2012, the space shuttles posed nose to nose outside the Udvar-Hazy Center as we welcomed Discovery to our collection and said farewell to Enterprise.

Today we announced that our annual trophy for lifetime and current achievement will be renamed the Michael Collins Troph...
02/13/2020

Today we announced that our annual trophy for lifetime and current achievement will be renamed the Michael Collins Trophy to honor Apollo 11 astronaut Michael Collins' contributions to aviation and space and service to our museum. Next month, we will present the 2020 Collins Trophy to the following recipients:
🏆 The 2020 Michael Collins Trophy for Lifetime Achievement will be awarded to scientist and former JPL director Charles Elachi.
🏆 The 2020 Michael Collins Trophy for Current Achievement will be awarded to the Hubble Space Telescope team.

02/13/2020

The Lockheed SR-71 Blackbird, the world's fastest jet-propelled aircraft, was at the pinnacle of aviation technology developments during the Cold War. On its last flight, the Blackbird on display at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center set a speed record by flying from Los Angeles to Washington, DC, in 1 hour, 4 minutes, and 20 seconds, averaging 2,124 miles per hour. Join SR-71 navigator, Col. Walter Watson as he discusses the Blackbird, it's missions, and his role in the program.

Address

Independence Ave At 6th St, SW
Washington D.C., DC
20560

Metrorail/Metrobus (www.wmata.com) and DC Circulator (www.dccirculator.com) stops are located near the Museum. Metrorail: The Museum is located two blocks from the L'Enfant Plaza Metrorail station (Blue/Orange and Yellow/Green lines). Metrobus stops at the Independence Avenue entrance of the Museum. DC Circulator stops on the 7th Avenue side of the Museum.

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