DAR Museum

DAR Museum DAR Museum looks at the American experience through objects and art of the American home from the Colonial Era to the early 20th century. The Daughters of the American Revolution created DAR Museum in 1890 to further its mission: promote historic preservation, education, and patriotism.
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Museum admission is FREE. For visitor or events information, please visit www.dar.org/museum.

Operating as usual

Are you planning virtual drinks with friends or family this fall?  Maybe this 4” tall silver cup will inspire you to mak...
11/13/2020

Are you planning virtual drinks with friends or family this fall? Maybe this 4” tall silver cup will inspire you to make Irish coffee, hot buttered rum, mulled wine or perhaps a cold drink that will warm you up. The cup was made by Adolphe Himmel who emigrated from Germany and worked as a silversmith in New Orleans. He made it between 1852 and 1861 and sold it though the New Orleans silver retailer, Hyde and Goodrich

Etiquette Pop Quiz Answer: B or C, Engraved or Handwritten. The 1847 book “A Hand-Book of Etiquette for Ladies” states t...
11/12/2020

Etiquette Pop Quiz Answer: B or C, Engraved or Handwritten.

The 1847 book “A Hand-Book of Etiquette for Ladies” states that, “A lady’s visiting card should be… engraved in script characters, small and neat… Never have your card printed; a written card, though passable, is not perfectly au fait. If you write them, never first draw a line across the card to guide you.”

Both engraving and printing at this time are actually a kind of printing; the difference is in the material. A printer uses moveable type, the same kind as for books and newspapers, while an engraver etches your name on a copper plate. Both methods involve spreading ink on the metal and transferring it to paper, but engraving gives you a more elegant result with finer lines than printing.

This is an engraved visiting card from Catherine Daingerfield Willis Murat, grandniece of George Washington and a Princess of France (after her husband, Prince Murat’s death, Louis Napoleon made her a Princess). Her c.1850s card reads, “S.A. la Princesse Achille Murat"". S.A. stands for Serena Altesse, which means serene highness.

Etiquette Pop Quiz!When you visit someone in the mid-1800s, you are supposed to bring a supply of “calling cards” or “vi...
11/12/2020

Etiquette Pop Quiz!
When you visit someone in the mid-1800s, you are supposed to bring a supply of “calling cards” or “visiting cards” with your name on them. Should they be:

A. Printed
B. Engraved
C. Handwritten

This is a wooden card case with tortoiseshell veneer from the 1850s. Check back later today to see the card that went inside it!

We hope you can join us TODAY at 12:00PM Eastern for our virtual lecture, They Were Good Soldiers: African Americans Ser...
11/10/2020
Welcome! You are invited to join a webinar: They Were Good Soldiers: African Americans Serving in the Continental Army, 1775-1783. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email about joining the webinar.

We hope you can join us TODAY at 12:00PM Eastern for our virtual lecture, They Were Good Soldiers: African Americans Serving in the Continental Army, 1775-1783. Author John Rees will discuss Black soldiers’ acceptance, service, and experiences during and after the War for American Independence, focusing on those who served in Continental regiments. Join via Zoom or stream it from our YouTube channel!

The role of African-Americans, most free but some enslaved, in the regiments of the Continental Army is not well-known; neither is the fact that relatively large numbers served in southern regiments and that the greatest number served alongside their white comrades in integrated units. John Rees wil...

Did you know that November is Native American Heritage Month? What started as a day-long celebration of the many culture...
11/09/2020
National Native American Heritage Month

Did you know that November is Native American Heritage Month? What started as a day-long celebration of the many cultures of America expanded into a month-long celebration beginning in 1990. Throughout the month events, programs and exhibits highlight the traditions and ancestry of Native Americans. On November 12 the webinar “Why We Serve: Native Americans in the United States Armed Forces” is free from the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian. Look for this webinar and many more special events throughout the month here:

Paying tribute to the rich ancestry and traditions of Native Americans.

Enoch Huntington was born on October 19, 1767, in Middletown, Connecticut. He is the son of Enoch and Mary (Gray) Huntin...
11/06/2020

Enoch Huntington was born on October 19, 1767, in Middletown, Connecticut. He is the son of Enoch and Mary (Gray) Huntington. Enoch graduated from Yale College in 1785 and was an eminent lawyer in Middletown. He married November 6, 1791, Sarah Ward, daughter of Grove Ward of Middletown, and had four children. He died in Middletown in 1826. This miniature was painted in the 1790s by Benjamin Trott.

Launched on November 5, 1892, the USS Olympia was the flagship of Commodore George Dewey at the Battle of Manila Bay, in...
11/05/2020

Launched on November 5, 1892, the USS Olympia was the flagship of Commodore George Dewey at the Battle of Manila Bay, in 1898. This May 1898 naval battle was part of the Spanish-American War in which American forces aided revolutionary forces in the Philippines, Dominican Republic, and Cuba in their fight for independence from Spain. After almost four months of fighting a halt to hostilities was announced. All parties signed a treaty in December 1898 and the United States became protectorates of Guam, Puerto Rico, and the Philippines. This medal was made from one of the USS Olympia's propellers and commemorates the famous naval engagement that caused a major blow to Spain's Pacific fleet.

What do you do to alleviate stress? How about a nice walk around the neighborhood! These two young women from this ca. 1...
11/04/2020

What do you do to alleviate stress? How about a nice walk around the neighborhood! These two young women from this ca. 1810 painting have the right idea. Take a member of your household, or a friend virtually, and enjoy a physically distanced walk on a crisp fall day.

As the weather gets nippy, do your feet get cold? Thomas Jefferson suffered from cold feet and wore these slipper socks ...
10/30/2020

As the weather gets nippy, do your feet get cold? Thomas Jefferson suffered from cold feet and wore these slipper socks in addition to his socks. These have the number 6 on them along with his initials--laundry and inventory marks--so we know he had at least six pairs. They were probably knit by enslaved women in the Jefferson household.

Here’s a craft project to try. This picture of an anchor wrapped in a vine of roses with the inscription “Hope” beneath ...
10/29/2020

Here’s a craft project to try. This picture of an anchor wrapped in a vine of roses with the inscription “Hope” beneath it (2” x 4”) is an example of perforated paper embroidery that was popular in the mid-to-late 19th century. Using patterns published in magazines or purchasing paper with preprinted designs, women made small pictures by stitching through the holes with wool or silk thread. Other examples in the collection are simply stitched with “Happy New Year”, “Memory”, or a name. Adding a ribbon to the back made them into bookmarks or gifts for friends.

John Weed and Lucretia Canfield were married on this day in 1847 by Peter Compton. The Weeds lived in Towanda, Pennsylva...
10/28/2020

John Weed and Lucretia Canfield were married on this day in 1847 by Peter Compton. The Weeds lived in Towanda, Pennsylvania, where John lived at the time. The couple had at least four children (2 girls and 2 boys) who lived to at least 18 years old. John worked as a carpenter until after 1870 when Lucretia died and John fell on hard times. According to extant records, John remained dependent on others for help until his death in 1887. Both he and Lucretia were buried at Le Reysville Cemetery, in Bradford County, Pennsylvania. This marriage certificate marked the occasion of their marriage by Peter Compton "Minister of Gospel," on the 28th of October 1847.

On National American Beer Day, we take a moment to reflect on the goodness of this beverage that has been on tap for mil...
10/27/2020

On National American Beer Day, we take a moment to reflect on the goodness of this beverage that has been on tap for millennia. As you enjoy a crisp, refreshing lager, or a thick, flavorful stout, remember to partake with dignity and decorum. Don’t be like Toby the sailor. He’s had a bit too much already!

Another beautiful item on loan to the E.F. Caldwell & Co. exhibition from Hillwood is this unusual thermometer. It was m...
10/26/2020

Another beautiful item on loan to the E.F. Caldwell & Co. exhibition from Hillwood is this unusual thermometer. It was made for Mrs. Post sometime in the 1920s and is made out of gilded bronze and lapis lazurite. Fashioned like a classical column, the glass thermometer is supported by sphinxes and topped by an eagle with spread wings.

Answer: A. You can switch between facing two different directions without moving your chair. This is especially helpful ...
10/22/2020

Answer: A. You can switch between facing two different directions without moving your chair.

This is especially helpful if you are sitting at a desk and then want to speak to someone in the room. Corner chairs were usually sat in by men; a woman who wanted to use the desk would probably choose a different chair. This late 1700s corner chair was made in New England out of mahogany.

Trivia Time! What was the advantage of a corner chair, like this one made in the late 1700s? A. The sitter can switch be...
10/22/2020

Trivia Time! What was the advantage of a corner chair, like this one made in the late 1700s?

A. The sitter can switch between facing two different directions without moving the chair
B. Ladies can spread out their skirts while sitting
C. Men can sit down without taking off their sword

Check back a little later for the answer!

Fashion magazines say we will see more shoes with bows this fall.  That’s nothing new for the DAR Museum shoe collection...
10/21/2020

Fashion magazines say we will see more shoes with bows this fall. That’s nothing new for the DAR Museum shoe collection. This selection of shoes with bow details reveals the enduring popularity of decorative bows in a variety of materials. Arranged chronologically and clockwise from the upper left corner, these bows are made of silk cord (1795-1805), silk ribbon (1830 – 1840), kid leather (1885), and silk fabric (1910).

With this poker chip box in hand, you would never lose another game! This magnificent item is on exhibition in Illuminat...
10/20/2020

With this poker chip box in hand, you would never lose another game! This magnificent item is on exhibition in Illuminating Design, It was made for Marjorie Merriweather Post between 1919 and 1920 out of gilded bronze, mahogany, kingwood and ebony. The poker chips are stained mother of pearl. This item was the work of many hands at Caldwell. The design department cleverly fashioned this box to resemble a writing desk. It displays technical skill in the detailed herringbone marquetry created by one of Caldwell’s cabinetmakers. The entire ensemble is enhanced by mounts made by the casting and gilding departments. Decorators, headed by Miss Timmes, likely dyed the poker chips in the required color. This item is on generous loan from Hillwood, Mrs. Post’s fabulous estate.

On October 19, 1781, British General Lord Cornwallis agreed to terms of surrender at Yorktown, Virginia. Before the day ...
10/19/2020

On October 19, 1781, British General Lord Cornwallis agreed to terms of surrender at Yorktown, Virginia. Before the day was over, his nearly 8,000 troops marched out of the town and surrendered their arms to General Washington and his nearly 17,000 American and French force. This 19th century lithograph depicts a less ceremonial version of the surrender. According to the Articles of Capitulation, “at two o’clock precisely, with shouldered arms, colors cased, and drums beating a British or German march. They are then to ground their arms, and return to their encampments, where they will remain until they are despatched to the places of their destination.”

New records are always being added to genealogy sites, and sometimes we can solve old mysteries about our objects. We su...
10/15/2020

New records are always being added to genealogy sites, and sometimes we can solve old mysteries about our objects. We suspected the Mary Horsburgh who made this was the daughter of John and Agnus near Dundee, but recently added records let us identify many of the other initials on the sampler. Mary's brothers, paternal grandparents, aunts and uncles are now confirmed. The married women appear with their maiden initials, and the relatives who had died before the sampler was made are stitched in black thread. We haven't identified Mary's maternal relatives, so the remaining initials are probably aunts and uncles on that side. Perhaps in a few more years, we will be able to put names to them too.

Another desk accessory from Illuminating Design! It is a heavy gilded bronze and marble paperweight made between 1917 an...
10/14/2020

Another desk accessory from Illuminating Design! It is a heavy gilded bronze and marble paperweight made between 1917 and 1918. The worthy depicted on it is a profile plaque of the French king Louis XIV. The image is based upon an original portrait bust by Gian Lorenzo Bernini (1598-1680) at the Palace of Versailles. Having such an item on your desk might give the feeling of nobility, at the very least it will keep papers from blowing away.

#illuminatingdesign

We hope you join the museum at noon EST for our  lecture “Tying It All Together: A Look at Fashionable Neckwear in the M...
10/13/2020

We hope you join the museum at noon EST for our lecture “Tying It All Together: A Look at Fashionable Neckwear in the Mid-19th Century.” Use the link to register, or watch it stream live on the museum's YouTube channel:

🔗https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_y9UKnxQJSHCsUZzLmqkuTQ

We hope to see you there!

Image: Daguerreotype portrait of a woman in New Orleans, 1850s.

October is National Cookbook Month!  What is your most loved and well-used cookbook?  Here is one from the DAR Museum’s ...
10/12/2020

October is National Cookbook Month! What is your most loved and well-used cookbook? Here is one from the DAR Museum’s collection, The Cook Not Mad, or Rational Cookery, from 1830. Although it includes many recipes of English origin the anonymous author scoffs at foreign influences in American cooking. This book contains all types of receipts (recipes) including, as the sub-heading states, Not Only the Art of Curing Various Kinds of Meats and Vegetables for Future Use, but of Cooking in its General Acceptation, to the Taste, Habits, and Degrees of Luxury, Prevalent with the American Publick, in Town and Country. To Which are Added, Directions for Preparing Comforts for the SICKROOM; Together with Sundry Miscellaneous Kinds of Information, of Importance to Housekeepers in General, Nearly All Tested by Experience. Now, can your cookbook do all that?
Read it here: http://digital.lib.msu.edu/projects/cookbooks/html/books/book_07.cfm

The autumnal colors of this block, from an 1851 signature quilt,  match well with the mournful tone of the inscription, ...
10/08/2020

The autumnal colors of this block, from an 1851 signature quilt, match well with the mournful tone of the inscription, an excerpt from a Longfellow poem: "Art is long and time is fleeting/And our hearts tho stout and brave/ still like muffled armies are beating /Funeral marches to the grave." It was signed by Ellen L. Brumfield who inscribed her age, "77 years." The quilt was assembled by Martha Lee of Berks Co., Pennsylvania, for her niece.

Founded in 1714, Worcester College retains some of its earliest buildings. This early 19th century lithograph shows the ...
10/07/2020

Founded in 1714, Worcester College retains some of its earliest buildings. This early 19th century lithograph shows the center of the historic campus, including what is today referred to as The Hall. Today, this building (center) houses the college’s library. Below these buildings is depicted several people, real and allegorical. Among them are the founders of the college, benefactors, and representations of areas of study, such as medicine, law, and history. Some of the more recent, notable alumni of the college include Supreme Court Associate Justice Elena Kagan and actress Emma Watson.

This beautiful item is on display in Illuminating Design. Can you guess what it is? Looking like an envelope opener, it ...
10/06/2020

This beautiful item is on display in Illuminating Design. Can you guess what it is? Looking like an envelope opener, it is actually a page turner or paper knife. A reader didn’t really turn pages with this, instead its rounded edges cut pages apart in an “uncut” book. After a book’s pages had been bound, bookbinders sometimes left the edges untrimmed. The untrimmed edges will result in pages still connected together. In order to turn the pages, the reader needed to separate them. The page turner expertly accomplished this without tearing the page. This example is made out of gilded bronze, porcelain and celluloid and dates between 1910 and 1914. You can read more about page turners here.

The Enterprise Manufacturing Company of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania patented this cast iron bank on September 21, 1875. K...
10/05/2020

The Enterprise Manufacturing Company of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania patented this cast iron bank on September 21, 1875. Known for making coffee grinders, cherry pitters and apple peelers, the company took advantage of the 1876 Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia to produce souvenir banks of historical landmarks. This 9.5” tall replica of Independence Hall was exhibited during the exposition along with toys by other local manufacturers.

10/02/2020
Tuesday Talk: The Black Craftspeople Digital Archive

Did you miss the chat with Dr. Tiffany Momon about the Black Craftspeople Digital Archive? You're in luck, we recorded it! Find out about this important project and how you can contribute.

William Strollo, DAR Museum Curator of Exhibitions, chats with Dr. Tiffany Momon, Visiting Assistant Professor of History at The University of the South, Sew...

October is National Cookie Month. We think this 1740-1780 Staffordshire tortoiseshell ware platter would hold an abundan...
10/01/2020

October is National Cookie Month. We think this 1740-1780 Staffordshire tortoiseshell ware platter would hold an abundant selection of cookies. What cookies would you serve on this platter?

Here is another accessory from Illuminating Design! E.F. Caldwell made this chess set for the 1934 Architectural League ...
09/29/2020

Here is another accessory from Illuminating Design! E.F. Caldwell made this chess set for the 1934 Architectural League Exposition in New York City. It is made out of polished and painted aluminium, glass and celluloid. Each color represents a different style. The red pieces have a traditional look while the silver pieces are modernist or Art Deco. Industrial arts expositions represented important venues that introduced modernism to the general public.

The colorful silk ribbons in this table cover were originally made to tie bundles of cigars together for sale in stores ...
09/28/2020

The colorful silk ribbons in this table cover were originally made to tie bundles of cigars together for sale in stores and to advertise cigars. Printed with the names of cigar makers, each ribbon is about ¾” wide by 12” long. They were frequently made in gold and yellow, but could also come in red, white, blue, green, orange and purple. In the late 19th and early 20th century, women used them to make decorative household items that included table covers, pillow covers and quilts.

September is National Rice Month. Rice was cultivated in places like the Caribbean and Africa before it was brought to t...
09/25/2020
Rice in the Lowcountry · African Passages, Lowcountry Adaptations · Lowcountry Digital History Initiative

September is National Rice Month. Rice was cultivated in places like the Caribbean and Africa before it was brought to the Carolinas and Georgia. Planting, cultivating and harvesting rice was very labor intensive, and was accomplished with enslaved people. People from African countries knew how to plant rice and taught their enslavers the process. In the 18th and 19th centuries, rice became an integral part of the economy in the Lowcountry, especially Charleston, South Carolina, due to the fertile tidewater area and because enslaved people provided a cheap workforce. Rice became an important crop as a result of the knowledge, labor and skills of enslaved people. Use the link to read more.

Generalized patterns of rice production in Africa, eighteenth-nineteenth centuries, based on Littlefield, 1995, courtesy of the South Carolina Geographic Alliance.

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Would someone please email me a copy of the paintings donated to the DAR Museum by the Estate of Margaret Wilmot? I have seen two posted on the Museum Facebook site. Have any others been purchased through her Bequest? I'd like a better quality image than what I have been able to print from Facebook. Thanks! Margaret Wilmot was an Associate Member of our Chapter and her cousin, Claire Pryor, a member of our Chapter was administrator of the estate. Please private message me and I will give you my email address. Thanks!
Diana West, Museum Docent, gave a very interesting virtual presentation to the Emory Road DAR Chapter, Powell, TN.
Thank you for the wonderful games and virtual puzzles!!! It is wonderful to be able to change the number of puzzle pieces, too. Leigh in MT
Anyone have any info on this fabric collection?
A new video from our intrepid education team. Remember, to subscribe to our new YouTube channel - there's some serious stuff on it as well.
I was wondering if you could identify these. At first I thought they were slave collars or manacles of some kind, but they don't have any way to open or tighten. Could they be old logging chains? My 2nd great grandfather sold timber and shipped to Natchez. Thank youl
Thank you to the wonderful Docent who gave my daughter a one on one tour of the museum this morning which she thoroughly enjoyed. She didn't know the name of our ancestor--Hugh Moss from Goochland County, Va. we are also descended from at least 3 others from Virginia and Connecticut. Hope to get to your Museum next year.