DAR Museum

DAR Museum DAR Museum looks at the American experience through objects and art of the American home from the Colonial Era to the early 20th century. The Daughters of the American Revolution created DAR Museum in 1890 to further its mission: promote historic preservation, education, and patriotism.
(48)

Museum admission is FREE. For visitor or events information, please visit www.dar.org/museum.

Operating as usual

How would you wear this silver bar pin set with an oval carnelian? Can you see it used at the neck of a shirt, on a jack...
04/05/2021

How would you wear this silver bar pin set with an oval carnelian? Can you see it used at the neck of a shirt, on a jacket lapel, to hold a scarf in place, or for something else? Carnelian can range from a yellow-orange stone to reddish orange like this one. The wide variety of colors can even have a brownish tinge. Romans associated carnelian with courage and some people believe it has healing powers for the blood.

We always love looking for and spotting the details in museum pieces! The two front legs of this 19th century sofa inclu...
04/01/2021

We always love looking for and spotting the details in museum pieces! The two front legs of this 19th century sofa include cornucopias, animal paws, and casters. And don't forget the studs around the upholstery! Are there any other details that stand out to you?

03/30/2021
Looking to the Ladies: Engaging Women of Louisiana

Calling all folks from Louisiana… plus anyone who wants to know more about the awesome women from that state! Our recent lecture, "Looking to the Ladies: Engaging Women of Louisiana" is now on YouTube!

Public and private engagement is key to the success of a society. Women have continually found ways to overcome obstacles and contribute to their community. ...

03/29/2021
Video 1.mov

You don't have to wait until we reopen our galleries to start learning more about the collection. Just download the SMARTIFY app today and start browsing the collection. Enjoy this preview of how easy it is to scan an object in the museum and learn more. Access to the collection is now a lot easier!

This week's staff pick: more information on Lydia Maria Child, who we highlighted this week!Read more about Lydia Maria ...
03/26/2021
Lydia Maria Child: Home Economy and Human Rights – Smithsonian Libraries / Unbound

This week's staff pick: more information on Lydia Maria Child, who we highlighted this week!

Read more about Lydia Maria Child's important work and advocacy in this blog post courtesy of the Smithsonian!

Lydia Maria Child: Home Economy and Human Rights Erin Rushing December 21, 2020 Leave a Comment Long before Fannie Farmer, Betty Crocker, or Martha Stewart, Lydia Maria Child provided American women with tips and tricks for running a smooth household. Her most successful book, The Frugal Housewife:....

Born in Massachusetts in 1802, Lydia Maria Child became a teacher and wrote children’s books, including The Little Girl’...
03/24/2021

Born in Massachusetts in 1802, Lydia Maria Child became a teacher and wrote children’s books, including The Little Girl’s Own Book. She also started a children’s magazine called Juvenile Miscellany before dedicating herself to the abolitionist cause. Her 1833 book, An Appeal in Favor of That Class of Americans Called Africans, criticized the inequality in education and jobs for Black people. This book and her subsequent work promoted the abolitionist movement and persuaded many people to join. Her writing also supported women’s rights and Native American rights.

How's this for a transformation Tuesday? Prior to the recent renovation of the current study gallery, objects from the p...
03/23/2021

How's this for a transformation Tuesday? Prior to the recent renovation of the current study gallery, objects from the permanent collection had to be viewed alongside current exhibitions. This limited access to and the number of objects from the collection visitors could view. Today, the study gallery exhibits nearly 4 times as many objects compared to before, greatly increasing access to the collection.

Spring is here, which means flowers galore! While we wait for flowers to bloom, let this pink rose with blue forget-me-n...
03/22/2021

Spring is here, which means flowers galore! While we wait for flowers to bloom, let this pink rose with blue forget-me-nots make you think of springtime. Made about 1810-1825, the flowers and leaves on this purse are embroidered with silk thread. The purse was formed using a bias-cut strip of cream-colored silk that has been gathered front and back onto medallions made of cardboard. The medallion on the other side is embroidered with violets. At the top of this circular purse is an opening where a drawstring would have been threaded through channels on each side.

This week's staff pick: an article highlighting the importance of material culture in American history, and the female c...
03/19/2021
How to Preserve a Piece of Abolitionist History

This week's staff pick: an article highlighting the importance of material culture in American history, and the female conservator that performed the important work to conserve this material culture!

Here is a blog post from the Getty Center Museum that provides some insight on the conservation of an important abolitionist daguerreotype.

A Getty conservator discusses how she protects a rare and important photograph

03/18/2021

Madame C.J. Walker was America's first female self-made millionaire who used her voice and philanthropy to promote civil rights and equality. She also advocated for woman's suffrage and equal access to the ballot box. And she will be joining us this Saturday at our Historical Tea!

Do you have questions for Madame C.J. Walker? Make sure to purchase your $5 ticket for the museum's Historical Tea today!

https://historical-tea-votes-for-women.eventbrite.com

Happy St. Patrick's Day!This day has seen its fair share of traditions. From wearing shamrocks in honor of Saint Patrick...
03/17/2021

Happy St. Patrick's Day!

This day has seen its fair share of traditions. From wearing shamrocks in honor of Saint Patrick to cooking corned beef and cabbage, traditions vary and have changed over time! So, in the tradition of wearing green, here are some green objects in the museum's collections.

03/16/2021
Redware on the Fire: Cooking with Earthenware

When you think of cooking on a fire, do you think of cast iron? Many people used it, but another common type of cooking vessel was redware. It takes skill to cook with ceramics and not break them! View our Virtual Tuesday Talk from February to learn more!

Cast iron skillets and copper saucepans probably come to mind when you picture food preparation at an eighteenth-century hearth. However, some of the earlies...

March is National Flour Month. Flour is an ingredient in a lot of recipes. Do you have a favorite flour to bake with? Wh...
03/15/2021

March is National Flour Month. Flour is an ingredient in a lot of recipes. Do you have a favorite flour to bake with? What is your favorite recipe with flour? One of ours is Queen Cakes from our manuscript cookbook written by Hannah Bloomfield Giles around 1780. Try out this recipe adaptation on your own!

Did you know that the museum's Period Rooms used to be office and meeting spaces? Once Administration Building was compl...
03/11/2021

Did you know that the museum's Period Rooms used to be office and meeting spaces? Once Administration Building was completed at National Headquarters, all of the offices moves there, leaving many empty rooms to be converted into the Period Rooms! Let's start at the beginning of the alphabet and do a comparison of these beloved portions of our museum:

Then: The Alabama State Room, 1920, Office
Now: The Alabama Period Room, 2017, 1840s Parlor

Interested in learning more about our Period Rooms? Join us for a virtual tour, or take a look at our online exhibit here: https://www.dar.org/museum/dar-museum-period-rooms

This is part of our Before and After series where we will look at the transformation of the museum spaces over time. Keep an eye out next month for the next addition to the series!

Born in 1728 in Massachusetts, Mercy Otis Warren was a writer of poetry, history, and satirical plays. She used her writ...
03/10/2021

Born in 1728 in Massachusetts, Mercy Otis Warren was a writer of poetry, history, and satirical plays. She used her writing to promote American independence, became an influential advocate for independence, and expressed her strong political views throughout her life. In 1805 when she was 77, she wrote History of the Rise, Progress, and Termination of the American Revolution, the books for which she is best remembered. A more detailed summary of her life and achievements can be found here:

https://www.mountvernon.org/library/digitalhistory/digital-encyclopedia/article/mercy-otis-warren-1728-1814/

Have you reserved your spot for today's lecture? There's still time!Join the DAR Museum and Curator of Exhibitions Willi...
03/09/2021
Welcome! You are invited to join a webinar: Looking to the Ladies: Engaging Women of Louisiana. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email about joining the webinar.

Have you reserved your spot for today's lecture? There's still time!

Join the DAR Museum and Curator of Exhibitions William Strollo as he discusses the contributions of women in Louisiana and the Louisianan Period Room.

We hope you can join us TODAY at 12PM on Zoom or stream on YouTube Live!

Public and private engagement is key to the success of a society. Women have continually found ways to overcome obstacles and contribute to their community. Recent changes to the Louisiana Period Room at the DAR Museum highlight some of the more notable contributions women made in the state's histor...

On this International Women's Day, we honor and commemorate all of the female makers, both named and unnamed, whose item...
03/08/2021

On this International Women's Day, we honor and commemorate all of the female makers, both named and unnamed, whose items are found in the museum's collections. We celebrate their contributions to daily life and to our greater worldwide story!

Do you want to learn more about these influential women? Explore our online catalog, peruse our online exhibits, or attend a virtual tour! How will you be commemorating International Women's Day?

Image: Ladle, 1776-1777.
Maker: Hester Bateman, Silversmith

This week's staff pick: a resource in honor of Women's History Month.  The Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) part...
03/05/2021
Black Women's Suffrage | DPLA

This week's staff pick: a resource in honor of Women's History Month.

The Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) partnered with libraries and cultural institutions to create the Black Women's Suffrage Digital Collection. This collection includes oral histories, historic documents, ephemera, photographs, and so much more. Use this extensive collection to learn more about these important women and their quest for equal voting and civil rights.

The Black Women’s Suffrage Digital Collection is a collaborative project to provide digital access to materials documenting the roles and experiences of Black Women in the Women’s Suffrage Movement and, more broadly, women’s rights, voting rights, and civic activism between the 1850s and 1960.

Did you know you could get teapots in whimsical, and sometimes delicious-looking,  designs in the 1700s and 1800s? Which...
03/03/2021

Did you know you could get teapots in whimsical, and sometimes delicious-looking, designs in the 1700s and 1800s? Which of these shapes would you choose for your tea table: a cauliflower (1760s), a pineapple (1760s), or a house (1830s)?

The DAR Museum has a lot of programs to offer this month! Check out our online Calendar of Events to see all of our offe...
03/02/2021
Calendar of Events

The DAR Museum has a lot of programs to offer this month! Check out our online Calendar of Events to see all of our offerings for Women's History Month. We hope you can join us for one (or all) of our virtual events!

Current Museum Events Visit the DAR Museum from the comfort of your own home! During these free live tours, museum educators will guide you through several parts of the museum using pictures of the exhibits and collections objects. You will be able to ask questions and have them answered in real tim...

Another staff pick: resources courtesy of the New York Public Library!The New York Public Library created The Woodson Pr...
02/26/2021
The Woodson Project

Another staff pick: resources courtesy of the New York Public Library!

The New York Public Library created The Woodson Project in honor of Dr. Carter G. Woodson. This project includes digital archives, resources, book lists, and so much more. There are resources for everyone! We already searched the resources and will definitely be using the Databases & Digital Archives for Researching Black History, which you can find under the Amplifying Black Voices section. Hopefully this list will help you to begin, or continue, your research!

The Woodson Project is a series of events, posts, and book lists on subjects including empowering Black families, amplifying Black voices, exploring Black identity and intersectionality, and discovering Black influencers in STEAM. The project was created by branch staff from across NYPL to honor Dr....

One of this week's staff picks: the important work of identifying both the contributions of Black men and women in histo...
02/25/2021
Research Spotlight: Finding Colonial Williamsburg's Black Archaeologists

One of this week's staff picks: the important work of identifying both the contributions of Black men and women in history, and identifying the Black men who excavated and unearthed history.

Check out Colonial Williamsburg's efforts to do just that as they highlight the Black archaeologists who worked to uncover the historic site.

Twenty-twenty was an excellent year to be an archaeologist. Direction from the CDC that we gather only outdoors, and that we maintain social distance required only minor tweaks to excavation protocols. Over the last 15 months, Colonial Williamsburg’s archaeologists have charged ahead, spreading ou...

How many Pisces do we have out there? Your sign is the fish, and so just for you we present this fish-shaped glass pickl...
02/24/2021

How many Pisces do we have out there? Your sign is the fish, and so just for you we present this fish-shaped glass pickle dish. Stamped on it are the words, "Patented June 4th 1872." James and Thomas Atterbury of Birmingham, Pennsylvania, filed for their "new and useful Design for Glassware," specifically the "design for ornamentation of glass dishes."

Hannah Farnum of Concord, New Hampshire filled her sampler with several alphabets and a memorial to George Washington.  ...
02/23/2021

Hannah Farnum of Concord, New Hampshire filled her sampler with several alphabets and a memorial to George Washington. She chose to honor his memory with the words of Phillis Wheatley, the first published African American poet. The verse, “Through thickest gloom look back immortal shade On that confusion Which thy deth has made” is the first two lines from her poem titled "On the Death of Dr. Samuel Marshall. 1771" which appeared in Phillis Wheatley’s book "Poems on Various Subjects, Religious and Moral" published in 1773.

As the world continues to rely on virtual learning, the DAR Museum continues to explore new avenues for sharing the coll...
02/22/2021

As the world continues to rely on virtual learning, the DAR Museum continues to explore new avenues for sharing the collection. Collection items are now available for you to explore from the ease of your phone. Select collection items are now accessible on Smartify, the world's most downloaded museum app. Here, you will be able to view collection items, read articles about museum objects, and listen to an audio tour. When you visit the museum, you will be able to scan objects in the Study Gallery using the Smartify app and get information on that object instantly. Download the app today and give it a try!

This week's staff pick: a look at the history of pottery, specifically the face jug.In the mid-1800s a distinctive style...
02/19/2021
Facing History: Lessons from the Potter’s Wheel

This week's staff pick: a look at the history of pottery, specifically the face jug.

In the mid-1800s a distinctive style of ceramic vessel was made by enslaved African potters in South Carolina. These face jugs, as we call them today, may have had religious and symbolic meanings to these enslaved Africans. The jugs helped to preserve a part of this group’s culture. We cannot identify the enslaved men and women who made these jugs originally, but we do know of one potter who continues the tradition today. Read this article about Jim McDowell, and the history of face jugs.

Jim McDowell, known to many simply as “the Black Potter,” is a ceramicist who specializes in stoneware face jugs.

Here's a riddle for you...The museum has a deck of riddle cards from the 1800s... but not the answers! Can you help us s...
02/18/2021

Here's a riddle for you...

The museum has a deck of riddle cards from the 1800s... but not the answers! Can you help us solve this one?

"What is that which is lengthened by being cut at both ends?"

The custom-made design of this silk fabric was commissioned by Caroline Scott Harrison, First Lady of the United States ...
02/17/2021

The custom-made design of this silk fabric was commissioned by Caroline Scott Harrison, First Lady of the United States and first NSDAR President General. The pattern is composed of cornstalks representing her home state of Indiana and orchids, one of her favorite flowers. She had the fabric made into a dress worn for a portrait painted by Daniel Huntington. Although the original dress deteriorated, the fabric was reproduced by Scalamandré Silks in 1956 and this faithful replica of her dress was made with the fabric. Harrison also commissioned the fabric for her inaugural ball gown which is in the collection of the National Museum of American History. The fabric of that gown features Indiana bur oak tree leaves and was designed by an Indiana artist, Mary Williamson. Learn more about the inaugural gown here:
https://americanhistory.si.edu/collections/search/object/nmah_523792

This painting by Henry Inman depicts the Roman goddess Ceres and a Native American woman on either side of a crest. With...
02/16/2021

This painting by Henry Inman depicts the Roman goddess Ceres and a Native American woman on either side of a crest. Within the crest is a field ready for harvest. This image was painted by Inman in 1833 when banks across the country commissioned notable artists to create art for their bank notes and certificates. Including Ceres, the goddess of agricultural fertility, could imply that the bearer was successful and wealthy. Similar imagery was found on notes issued by Farmer's Bank.

This week's staff pick: an opportunity to preserve your personal history.The National Museum of African American History...
02/12/2021
Capturing Your Family’s Oral History

This week's staff pick: an opportunity to preserve your personal history.

The National Museum of African American History and Culture highlights how oral histories, or the recording and preserving of interviews and memories, is an important way to remember and study African American history. There has been a concerted effort by historical sites like the Smithsonian and the Library of Congress to collect oral histories of Black men and women who lived through Jim Crow and the Civil Rights era. You can view some of those histories here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL9oAGmKpC2PWWWPRQGVvqjkcrr95P2eFT

The NMAAHC also created resources so that you can conduct oral histories in your own family! Check out the blog and fill out the checklist to get started on preserving the stories and lives of the people most important to you.

Oral History, or the practice of recording and preserving memories and experiences, enables us to capture the wisdom of our living libraries before they pass away and “burn to the ground.” Unlike other methods of record keeping, oral histories provide a personal account of pivotal events from in...

Did you know that the museum's Main Galleries have gone through many changes since the museum's founding? The main galle...
02/11/2021

Did you know that the museum's Main Galleries have gone through many changes since the museum's founding? The main galleries were dedicated in 1950 and featured a larger gallery space displaying decorative art pieces and a "Parlor Section" with furniture and artwork. Major renovations took place in 1987, 1990, and 2018. The flooring changed from linoleum to wood, new lighting was installed, and a glass partition was added to create two gallery spaces: the Study Gallery and the Main Gallery.

The first image was taken in 1955 and shows what the galleries would have looked like when first opened. The second image was taken in 2020 and shows the glass partition and our most recent rotating exhibition "Illuminating Design: The Decoration and Technology of E.F. Caldwell and Co."

You can learn more about the renovations here: https://blog.dar.org/history-dar-museum-gallery

This is part of our Before and After series where we will look at the transformation of the museum spaces over time. Keep an eye out next month for the next addition to the series!

Address

1776 D St NW
Washington D.C., DC
20006

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when DAR Museum posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Contact The Museum

Send a message to DAR Museum:

Videos

Category


Comments

Hi! Is there a way to watch a recorded video of this past event?
Would someone please email me a copy of the paintings donated to the DAR Museum by the Estate of Margaret Wilmot? I have seen two posted on the Museum Facebook site. Have any others been purchased through her Bequest? I'd like a better quality image than what I have been able to print from Facebook. Thanks! Margaret Wilmot was an Associate Member of our Chapter and her cousin, Claire Pryor, a member of our Chapter was administrator of the estate. Please private message me and I will give you my email address. Thanks!
Diana West, Museum Docent, gave a very interesting virtual presentation to the Emory Road DAR Chapter, Powell, TN.
Thank you for the wonderful games and virtual puzzles!!! It is wonderful to be able to change the number of puzzle pieces, too. Leigh in MT
Anyone have any info on this fabric collection?
A new video from our intrepid education team. Remember, to subscribe to our new YouTube channel - there's some serious stuff on it as well.
I was wondering if you could identify these. At first I thought they were slave collars or manacles of some kind, but they don't have any way to open or tighten. Could they be old logging chains? My 2nd great grandfather sold timber and shipped to Natchez. Thank youl
Thank you to the wonderful Docent who gave my daughter a one on one tour of the museum this morning which she thoroughly enjoyed. She didn't know the name of our ancestor--Hugh Moss from Goochland County, Va. we are also descended from at least 3 others from Virginia and Connecticut. Hope to get to your Museum next year.