Naval History & Heritage Command

Naval History & Heritage Command The OFFICIAL Fan Page of The Naval History & Heritage Command, The History Program of The Department of The Navy - www.history.navy.mil. Welcome to the Naval History and Heritage Command’s Facebook Fan Page sponsored by the U.S.
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Navy. This page is intended to provide updated information and discussion on the Naval History and Heritage Command. Please visit our official homepage at www.history.navy.mil. While this is an open forum, it's also a family friendly one, so please keep your comments and posts clean. In addition to keeping it family friendly, we ask that you follow our posting guidelines here. Comments and posts that do not follow these guidelines will be removed: - We do not allow graphic, obscene, explicit or racial comments or submissions nor do we allow comments that are abusive, hateful or intended to defame anyone or any organization. - We do not allow solicitations or advertisements. This includes promotion or endorsement of any financial, commercial or non-governmental agency. Similarly, we do not allow attempts to defame or defraud any financial, commercial or non-governmental agency. - We do not allow comments that suggest or encourage illegal activity. - Apparent spam will be removed and may cause the author(s) to be blocked from page without notice. - You participate at your own risk, taking personal responsibility for your comments, your username and any information provided. - For Official Use Only (FOUO), classified, pre-decisional, proprietary or business-sensitive information should never be discussed here. Don't post personnel lists, rosters, organization charts or directories. This is a violation of privacy. For information about Operations Security, contact the Naval OPSEC Support Team at [email protected]. The appearance of external links on this site does not constitute official endorsement on behalf of the U.S. Navy or Department of Defense. You are encouraged to quote, republish or share any content on this page on your own blog, website or other communication/publication. If you do so, please credit the command or the person who authored the content as a courtesy (photo or article byline can be U.S. Navy or MC2 Joe Smith, for example). Thank you for your interest in and support of the men and women of the Naval History and Heritage Command. For more information, visit the DoD Social Media user agreement at http://dodcio.defense.gov/SocialMedia/UserAgreement.aspx.

Mission: The Naval History and Heritage Command, located at the Washington Navy Yard, is responsible for the preservation, analysis, and dissemination of U.S. Naval history and heritage. It is composed of many activities including the Navy Department Library, the Navy Archives, the Navy art and artifact collections, underwater archaeology, Navy history, nine museums, USS Constitution repair facility and the historic ship Nautilus.

01/22/2021
National Museum of the United States Navy

The National Museum of the United States Navy is creating a series of STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art and Math) videos that are interactive for viewers of all ages.

For their pilot episode, NMUSN Educator Mike, explains the ins and outs of understanding radar, how it was developed, and why it was used by the Navy. This educational video also incorporates a demonstration portion that you can follow along with at home!

Check out the video below for our first STEAM Saturday! Our Education Department will be focusing on the ins and outs of understandng radar, how it was developed, why it was used by the Navy, a demonstration you can do at home, and much more! #NMUSN #STEAM #SteamSaturday #Virtual #Radar

🗣Calling all Lego enthusiasts and creators! Hampton Roads Naval Museum is hosting a virtual Lego Shipbuilding competitio...
01/22/2021
2021 Virtual LEGO Event: Submissions due by January 31, 2021

🗣Calling all Lego enthusiasts and creators! Hampton Roads Naval Museum is hosting a virtual Lego Shipbuilding competition at the end of this month. Submissions are due by January 31st!

Details and guidelines for both competitions are available here: https://bit.ly/37qFSAX

It's time to start building! 🔨

The Hampton Roads Naval Museum has hosted a Lego Shipbuilding event on the first Saturday of February for the past nine years. Unfortunately, this year the event will be cancelled due to COVID—but we’re going virtual! Submissions using your own LEGO bricks are due by January 31, 2021; details ca...

As we continue commemorating the 30th Anniversary of Operation Desert Storm we've linked the blog, "Storm Warning: The M...
01/22/2021

As we continue commemorating the 30th Anniversary of Operation Desert Storm we've linked the blog, "Storm Warning: The Minesweeping in Mina al-Ahmadi – Part Three," which is a part of our five-part blog series written by NHHC's Director, RADM Samuel Cox (ret.)

At the time Desert Storm began, NHHC Director Sam Cox was an active duty Lieutenant Commander, serving as an assistant intelligence officer on the staff of Vice Adm. Stan Arthur who commanded the U.S. Seventh Fleet and U.S. Naval Forces Central Command embarked on the command ship USS Blue Ridge (LCC 19) operating in the Arabian Gulf.

To read part three of this series, click here: https://go.usa.gov/xAvR8

#OTD in 1968, North Vietnamese Army troops laid siege to the U.S. Marine combat base near the isolated village of Khe Sa...
01/21/2021
H-017-1: U.S. Navy Operations in Vietnam

#OTD in 1968, North Vietnamese Army troops laid siege to the U.S. Marine combat base near the isolated village of Khe Sanh. The 6,000 Marine defenders endured near constant rocket and artillery attacks, sometimes over 1,000 rounds per day. Learn more here:
https://bit.ly/3o5uqQy

H-Gram 017, Attachment 1 Samuel J. Cox, Director NHHC 27 March 2018 On 21 January 1968, a force of well over 20,000 North Vietnamese Army (NVA) troops laid siege to the U.S. Marine combat base near the isolated village of Khe Sanh, located about seven miles from the Laotian border and about 15 miles...

Join the Naval History and Heritage Command as we Spotlight interesting and unique artifacts from the collection of the ...
01/20/2021
Artifact Spotlight: WWII Naval Aviator

Join the Naval History and Heritage Command as we Spotlight interesting and unique artifacts from the collection of the U.S. Navy. Learn more about the personal equipment of Naval Aviators from WWII and how they influenced Aviators today!
https://bit.ly/3rhvhjH

Join the Naval History and Heritage Command as we Spotlight interesting and unique artifacts from the collection of the U.S. Navy. Learn more about the perso...

#OTD January 19, 1943 – USS Swordfish sank the 4,122-ton army cargo ship Myoho Maru, which was part of the Japanese Solo...
01/19/2021

#OTD January 19, 1943 – USS Swordfish sank the 4,122-ton army cargo ship Myoho Maru, which was part of the Japanese Solomons reinforcement convoy, while USS Greenling damaged a Japanese cargo ship north of Rabaul. Swordfish earned eight battle stars for her service during World War II. On Swordfish’s 13th war patrol, the submarine was ordered to patrol the Nansei Shoto area until completion of scheduled air strikes. She acknowledged receipt of the orders on Jan. 3, but no further communication was ever received from her. On Feb. 15, after repeated attempts to contact her by radio had failed, she was reported as presumed lost, the victim of unknown causes. Greenling conducted 12 war patrols, earned 10 battle stars, and received a Presidential Unit Citation for her outstanding war service.

Although a great deal has been written about the U.S. Navy accomplishments in the Pacific during WWII, the critical cont...
01/19/2021
Chester Nimitz and the Development of Fueling at Sea

Although a great deal has been written about the U.S. Navy accomplishments in the Pacific during WWII, the critical contribution of fueling at sea during this period has been frequently overlooked.

Yet fleet oilers, mostly those of the new Cimarron (AO 22) class, accompanied every task force during this period, providing underway refueling for both the carriers and their escorts.

Admiral Chester Nimitz is considered to be one of the earliest pioneers of the technique. Learn more about his role by clicking below!

© 1993 by Thomas Wildenberg

To commemorate the 30th Annivesary of #OperationDesertStorm we would like to share the first blog of this series. "Storm...
01/18/2021

To commemorate the 30th Annivesary of #OperationDesertStorm we would like to share the first blog of this series. "Storm Season: War Clouds Form Over the Sands of Mina al-Ahmadi – Part One"

Click here to learn more: https://go.usa.gov/xAdaG

"Early on the morning of 17 January 1991, USS Wisconsin, acting as Tomahawk Strike Warfare Commander for the Persian Gul...
01/17/2021

"Early on the morning of 17 January 1991, USS Wisconsin, acting as Tomahawk Strike Warfare Commander for the Persian Gulf, directed the sequence of Tomahawk launches that initiated the opening of hostilities in Operation Desert Storm."

For her participation in #OperationDesertStorm, USS Wisconsin (BB 64) received the Combat Action Ribbon (17 January-28 February 1991), the Navy Unit Commendation I17 January-28 February 1991) and the Southwest Area Service Medal (18 August 1990-13 March 1991.)

Read more about USS Wisconsin (BB 64) and her time in service here: https://go.usa.gov/xAm6W

"Hussein's repeated rejection to abandon the invasion and leave Kuwait led to the commencement of combat operations on J...
01/17/2021

"Hussein's repeated rejection to abandon the invasion and leave Kuwait led to the commencement of combat operations on January 18, 1991. The subsequent bombardment by air assets and the effects of the economic embargo decimated Iraq's military infrastructure and morale, degraded communications and supplies, and devastated weapons arsenals.

After the 38-day air campaign, ground troops began sweeping through Kuwait in blitzkrieg fashion. In a mere 100 hours, the Iraqi army was crushed. Iraqi soldiers surrendered by the thousands. Kuwait was free again."

As we commemorate the 30th Anniversary of Operation Desert Storm, we've compiled a list of notable people, pictures, Naval ships, and other materials related to the Operation. Take a look at the link below to see our collection: https://go.usa.gov/xAmMQ

As we continue celebrating the tradition of the New Year's Deck Logs, don't forget the contest is still going on, and yo...
01/17/2021

As we continue celebrating the tradition of the New Year's Deck Logs, don't forget the contest is still going on, and you still have time to submit your entries.

Click on the link below for additional contest information. The link also includes a very creative entry sent in from USS Bunker Hill (CG 52). Take a look: https://go.usa.gov/xAyuJ

Watch this short video on the story of CDR Ernest E. Evans, a naval officer who posthumously received the Medal of Honor...
01/16/2021
Artifact Spotlight - USS Johnston and CDR Ernest E. Evans (Medal of Honor)

Watch this short video on the story of CDR Ernest E. Evans, a naval officer who posthumously received the Medal of Honor for his actions at the Battle off Samar in 1944.

You can also see the new painting honoring him at the Naval War College Museum

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0HkEYSXk3F4&feature=youtu.be

This video showcases a new painting in the museum collection and tells the story of CDR Ernest E. Evans, a naval officer who posthumously received the Medal ...

Today is the day! Join the @USNavyHistory and NHHC Director, Samuel Cox for their Second Saturday Webinar Series about #...
01/16/2021

Today is the day!

Join the @USNavyHistory and NHHC Director, Samuel Cox for their Second Saturday Webinar Series about #OperationDesertStorm today at 11:00 a.m. EST. Click the link below to be directed to the page.

Hope to "see" you there!

https://bit.ly/35FhNFu

Here's to 50 more wonderful years, USS MOUNT WHITNEY LCC 20!
01/16/2021

Here's to 50 more wonderful years, USS MOUNT WHITNEY LCC 20!

⚓ The crew of U.S. Sixth Fleet command and control ship USS MOUNT WHITNEY LCC 20 celebrate the ship's 50th anniversary during a small ceremony held in Gaeta, Italy, Jan. 14. 🎉 🎉 🎉

Join the Naval Historical Foundation and NHHC Director, Samuel Cox for their Second Saturday Webinar Series (although, i...
01/15/2021

Join the Naval Historical Foundation and NHHC Director, Samuel Cox for their Second Saturday Webinar Series (although, it's on the third Saturday this month.)

Tune in to the website below on Saturday, January 16th at 11:00 a.m.EST for their Live Webinar on operation Desert Storm.

This series is titled, The Navy In Operation Desert Storm: A Thirty-Year Retrospective. It will feature historical perspectives from ODS veterans and will be followed by commentary and a Live Q & A!

Hope to "see" you there!

https://www.navyhistory.org/second-saturday-webinar-series/

In an effort to inspire and connect Sailors with their rich history and heritage, we have partnered with the Navy Expedi...
01/15/2021

In an effort to inspire and connect Sailors with their rich history and heritage, we have partnered with the Navy Expeditionary Combat Command (NECC) to commemorate their 15th Anniversary and, "bridge the gap between sea and shore."

Click on our photoblog link below which shows each branch of NECC and describes a little bit about what they do and who they are: https://go.usa.gov/xAVgn

Watch this video to learn about CDR Ernest E. Evans, a naval officer who posthumously received the Medal of Honor for hi...
01/15/2021
Artifact Spotlight - USS Johnston and CDR Ernest E. Evans (Medal of Honor)

Watch this video to learn about CDR Ernest E. Evans, a naval officer who posthumously received the Medal of Honor for his actions at the Battle off Samar in 1944, and the new painting in his honor now at the @NavalWarCollege Museum
https://bit.ly/3oG7XKO

This video showcases a new painting in the museum collection and tells the story of CDR Ernest E. Evans, a naval officer who posthumously received the Medal ...

Closing out our virtual week of the 33rd Annual Surface Navy Association Symposium, we will leave you with an insightful...
01/15/2021

Closing out our virtual week of the 33rd Annual Surface Navy Association Symposium, we will leave you with an insightful post on the history of the Surface Warfare Officer.

"The United States Navy is known for a colorful and illustrious history with opportunities in numerous warfare communities. But since its inception, the Navy has been known for fighting on the high-seas, and surface warfare remains our heart and soul."

Click the link below to read more about our founding Officers: https://go.usa.gov/xAmzc

In this weekend's H-Gram, NHHC Director Samuel Cox discusses the 30th Anniversary of #Operation DesertShield and #Operat...
01/15/2021

In this weekend's H-Gram, NHHC Director Samuel Cox discusses the 30th Anniversary of #Operation DesertShield and #OperationDesertStorm.

"Two U.S. amphibious ships, Guam (LPH-9) and Trenton (LPD-14) were tasked to steam from their station in the Gulf of Oman toward Somalia as fast as they could. We struggled to try to get intelligence about Mogadishu to Guam and Trenton, which didn’t have the same communication and intelligence capability as the aircraft carriers."

Director Cox gives us a glimpse into his time serving in both Operation Desert Shield and Operation Desert Storm. Click the link below to read a more in-depth version of his experiences during both Operation Desert Storm and Desert Shield. https://go.usa.gov/xAmwf

San Francisco was one of the most decorated warships of World War II, earning 17 Battle Stars and the Presidential Unit ...
01/14/2021

San Francisco was one of the most decorated warships of World War II, earning 17 Battle Stars and the Presidential Unit Citation. Check out our page covering the ship’s entire lifespan, including commissioning in 1934, major battles such as the Naval Battle of Guadalcanal, and as a memorial in San Francisco’s Golden Gate Park. Click below for more information and share which ship you think should be featured next!

https://go.usa.gov/xAP8q

#OTD January 14, 1911 – Battleship USS Arkansas (BB 33) is launched. Arkansas serves with the British Grand Fleet in Wor...
01/14/2021
Arkansas (BB 33)

#OTD January 14, 1911 – Battleship USS Arkansas (BB 33) is launched. Arkansas serves with the British Grand Fleet in World War I. In World War II, she participates in the Normandy Invasion, then relocates to the Pacific in 1944. After the war, Arkansas becomes a target ship during the Bikini Atoll Atomic bomb tests. #PlatformsMatter
Talk about a naval marvel! Get all the facts on the USS Arkansas by clicking below!

USS Arkansas, a 26,000 ton Wyoming class battleship, was built at Camden, New Jersey. Commissioned in September 1912, she spent her first seven years of service with the Atlantic Fleet. In 1913, Arkansas cruised in the Mediterranean, and in 1914 she participated in the U.S. intervention in Mexico. D...

Check out our latest edition of Navy History Matters! It's our weekly compilation of articles, commentaries, and blogs r...
01/13/2021

Check out our latest edition of Navy History Matters! It's our weekly compilation of articles, commentaries, and blogs related to history and heritage.

https://go.usa.gov/xAEwv

This week NHHC is participating in the 33rd Annual Surface Navy Association Symposium. Unlike years past, this year's sy...
01/13/2021
Battle of Iwo Jima

This week NHHC is participating in the 33rd Annual Surface Navy Association Symposium. Unlike years past, this year's symposium will be fully virtual while still offering the same great dialogue between keynote speakers.

Our very own, Director Samuel Cox, RADM (ret.) will be speaking on the Naval Heritage Program panel about Iwo Jima.

Follow our Live Tweet of the panel tonight at 6:00 p.m. EST on our Twitter page at @usnhistory

If you want to brush up on your Iwo Jima knowledge before the panel, we've included a link to our page of Iwo Jima content. Click below!

Background Operation Detachment, the amphibious assault on Iwo Jima, had its genesis in the 29 September–1 October 1944 strategic planning conference of senior Pacific theater commanders and Joint Chiefs of Staff representatives in San Francisco. Securing Luzon, the largest of the Philippine Islan...

John A. Dahlgren is often called the "father of American naval ordnance." Over a period of 15 years, from 1847 to 1862, ...
01/13/2021

John A. Dahlgren is often called the "father of American naval ordnance." Over a period of 15 years, from 1847 to 1862, he designed and produced several large-caliber naval guns including a boat howitzer and the eponymous Dahlgren gun—which would later become the most common cannon mounted on board U.S. Navy ships during the Civil War.

Learn more about Admiral Dahlgren here: https://go.usa.gov/xAUnH

In February 1776, as master’s mate of Hornet, Joshua Barney took part in Commodore Hopkins’s descent upon New Providence...
01/12/2021
Joshua Barney

In February 1776, as master’s mate of Hornet, Joshua Barney took part in Commodore Hopkins’s descent upon New Providence. Later he served on Wasp and was made a lieutenant for gallantry in the action between that vessel and the British brig Tender.

While serving on Andrew Doria, he took a prominent part in the defense of the Delaware River. Lieutenant Barney was taken prisoner several times and several times exchanged. In 1779, he was again taken prisoner and was imprisoned in Hill Prison in England until his escape in 1781.

Learn more about Joshua Barney here:

Joshua Barney was born in Baltimore, Maryland, on 6 July 1759, and died in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 1 December 1818, having served with distinction in the Navy during both the American Revolution and the War of 1812. In February 1776, as master’s mate of Hornet, he took part in Commodore Hopkins....

Do you know how the @USNavy was able to provide fresh fruits and vegetables to 3.6 million service men and women through...
01/12/2021

Do you know how the @USNavy was able to provide fresh fruits and vegetables to 3.6 million service men and women throughout the Pacific during #WWII ? Find out how the ingenuity of a few Sailors kept our forces healthy: https://go.usa.gov/xAUN6

Sailors have always respected the power of the ocean—especially in heavy seas. Although Navy ships are made to withstand...
01/11/2021

Sailors have always respected the power of the ocean—especially in heavy seas. Although Navy ships are made to withstand a certain degree of bad weather, they are not indestructible. Weather-related incidents have caused massive destruction and loss of life all throughout recorded history.

Read a short history on some of the Navy’s most significant weather-related incidents, including the powerful storm on March 15–16, 1889, in Apia, Samoa, and the massive typhoon northeast of Samar on Dec. 18, 1944, that capsized three destroyers and killed approximately 790 personnel. This page also provides related readings, World War II weather reports, additional resources, and selected imagery.

Learn more here: https://go.usa.gov/xAUBc

#OTD Jan. 11, 1820 - the schooner Lynx, commanded by Lt. J.R. Madison, departed St. Mary’s, GA, bound for Kingston, Jama...
01/11/2021

#OTD Jan. 11, 1820 - the schooner Lynx, commanded by Lt. J.R. Madison, departed St. Mary’s, GA, bound for Kingston, Jamaica, to continue her service suppressing pirates. Lynx was never seen or heard from again, and no trace of the ship or her 50-man crew was ever found.

Before the ship’s disappearance, Lynx had been very successful at conducting pirate interdiction operations. On Oct. 24, 1819, Lynx captured two schooners and two boats in the Gulf of Mexico, filled with pirates and booty and, 11 days later, on Nov. 9, found another pirate boat in Galveston Bay and seized that one as well. Lynx remained off the southern coast through the end of the year before departing on her final voyage. The disappearance of Lynx remains one of the continuing mysteries of American sea service.

Learn more about Lynx here: https://go.usa.gov/xAUTg

#OTD In 1943, Submarine Trigger (SS 237) sinks the Japanese destroyer, Okikaze, off Yokosuka, Japan.Japanese destroyer, ...
01/10/2021
Trigger I (SS-237)

#OTD In 1943, Submarine Trigger (SS 237) sinks the Japanese destroyer, Okikaze, off Yokosuka, Japan.

Japanese destroyer, Okikaze, approached USS Trigger (SS 237), and the submarine fired three torpedoes from 1,500 yards. One hit under the well deck and folded the destroyer's forecastle up at a 45-degree angle; and another hit the target's stern. Soon Okikaze sank on an even keel.

Trigger received 11 battle stars for World War II service and the Presidential Unit Citation for her fifth, sixth, and seventh war patrols. Click the link below to read more about USS Trigger and her time in service.

(SS-237: dp. 1,552 (surf.), 2,415 (subm.); 1. 311'8

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805 Kidder Breese St SE
Washington D.C., DC
20374-5060

The new DC Circulator Union Station to Navy Yard Metro route will operate every ten minutes, Monday through Friday - 6:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. Additional service will be available during Nationals home game days - including late evening and weekends. For Metro schedules and updates please visit the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority website at www.wmata.com . For DC Circulator schedules, please visit www.dccirculator.com

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Comments

Rebounding after arson fire: CSS Chattahoochee engines have been conserved, are now inside National Civil War Naval Museum.
How did people in the crows nest on top of the USS South Carolina BB26 communicate with the bridge?
Hello, I am hoping someone here can help me. I have come across a certificate for my grandfather. It is for an organization call 'SPAN'. The certificate reminds me of the Shellback certificate my father had. I don't find any information right off online. Can anyone tell me what this is?
I was stationed at Mactan in 1966 with the USAF and the USS Yorktown paid a visit to Cebu, apparently the first time since WW2. I have several more photos of the ships if you want them. I have no problem if any you want to copy them.
This is a postcard that belonged to my paternal grandmother. She & grandpa came to the States in between 1910 and 1913. Grandma loved keeping her postcards from Scotland and had quite a collection. This was just one of many that she had.
A special encore presentation of Episode 47 of NO HOME FOR HEROES - History's Military Mysteries: Missing In Action is now available at your favorite podcast site and also featured on iHeartRadio. This episode, hosted by the former Chief, Naval Historian at the Naval History and Heritage Command, Rick Stone, is titled "MIA Ghosts Trapped on the Bottom of Pearl Harbor." It is now posted at https://tunein.com/podcasts/History-Podcasts/NO-HOME-FOR-HEROES-p1191391/ and is also available on Apple podcasts and any popular platform where you like to listen to podcasts. Enjoy! If you want to see how a Pearl Harbor MIA was actually found, check out Episode 7 - "Shaking the Tree Searching for Seaman Elm." You detectives out there will love this episode!
I'm helping my friend Doug learn more about his Great Uncle's WW2 military service and we are trying to determine what the attached medal/ribbon might be. He was Water Tender 1st Class serving aboard the USS Morris and was killed by a Kamikaze on April 6th 1945. Colors are Blue-White- Red-Yellow-Green with one (seemingly) bronze star. Thank you for your help!
To the Naval History and Heritage Command. Dear Sir or Madam, my name is Jacopo Martelli. I am interested in topics related to history and military strategies. I would like to ask you if you have this historical map: ( 17° ) La Battaglia delle Midway tra il 4 Giugno – 7 Giugno 1942. https://www.history.navy.mil/research/library/online-reading-room/title-list-alphabetically/b/battle-of-midway-3-6-june-1942-combat-narrative.html as a higher resolution file ( pdf or other formats ). Because I can’t read the notes. They are too blurry. Thank you for your help. Yours faithfully. P.s From which book this map was extrapolated so I try to look for it in some Italian library. Thanks.
During WW2, the great American writer John Steinbeck was aboard a US Navy destroyer as a World War II war correspondent for the New York Herald Tribune. The famous writer of "Of Mice and Men" and the "Grapes of Wrath" penned a description of US Navy destroyer life that exemplifies the attitude and service of those who served aboard the famous Tin Cans of the US Navy. "Destroyer by John Steinbeck A destroyer is a lovely ship, probably the nicest fighting ship of all. Battleships are a little like steel cities or great factories of destruction. Aircraft carriers are floating flying fields. Even cruisers are big pieces of machinery, but a destroyer is all boat. In the beautiful clean lines of her, in her speed and roughness, in her curious gallantry, she is completely a ship, in the old sense. For one thing, a destroyer is small enough so that her captain knows his whole crew personally, knows all about each one as a person, his first name and his children and the trouble he has been in and is capable of getting into. There is an ease on a destroyer that is good and a good relationship among the men. Then if she has a good captain you have something really worth serving on. The battleships are held back for a killing blow, and such a blow sometimes happens only once in a war. The cruisers go in second, but the destroyers work all the time. They are probably the busiest ships of a fleet. In a major engagement, they do the scouting and make the first contact. They convoy, they run to every fight. Wherever there is a mess, the destroyers run first. They are not lordly like the battleships and the men who work them are seamen. In rough weather they are rough, honestly and violently rough. A destroyerman is never bored in wartime, for a destroyer is a seaman’s ship. She can get under way at the drop of a hat. The water under fantail boils like a Niagara. She will go rippling along at thirty-five knots with the spray sheeting over her and she will turn and fight and run, drop depth charges, bombard, and ram. She is expendable and dangerous. And because she is all these things, a destroyer’s crew is passionately possessive. Every man knows his ship, every inch of it, not just his own station."