American Revolution Institute

American Revolution Institute Promoting knowledge and appreciation of the achievement of American independence with library, museu
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The Battle of Jersey—not in New Jersey, but on one of the Channel Islands between France and Britain—took place on this ...
01/06/2024

The Battle of Jersey—not in New Jersey, but on one of the Channel Islands between France and Britain—took place on this day, January 6, 1781. (The American colony of New Jersey was named for the island of Jersey, but we digress …)

Small but strategically important, Jersey lies just 14 miles from the French coast. During the American Revolution, it was situated on the primary sea route to the French naval base at Brest. The British-controlled island and the British privateers it harbored posed a serious threat to French ships, so on January 6, 1781, a French force attempted to seize Jersey for the second time during the war. Fighting between the French troops and British soldiers and local militiamen raged through the streets and main square of the island’s capital, St. Helier. While the British ultimately won the day and repulsed the French invasion, both the British commander, Maj. Francis Peirson, and the French commander, Philipe Charles Félix Macquart, Baron de Rullecourt, were killed during the battle.

This minor engagement became one of the best remembered of the Revolutionary War in Great Britain because of John Singleton Copley’s dramatic painting of the death of Major Peirson. Completed in 1783, the painting celebrated heroic sacrifice and national glory and helped bolster confidence in the British empire as it was losing its American colonies.

Copley’s painting of Major Peirson and the Battle of Jersey made our list of 10 great Revolutionary War paintings. See more at https://www.americanrevolutioninstitute.org/treasures-of-the-american-revolution/revolutionary-war-paintings/

Image: The Death of Major Peirson, 6 January 1781, by John Singleton Copley, 1783. Oil on canvas. Tate Britain

In war, outcomes can come down to bold decision making. By the end of this day in 1777, American forces would be rewarde...
01/03/2024

In war, outcomes can come down to bold decision making. By the end of this day in 1777, American forces would be rewarded by Gen. George Washington’s decision to attack from what could easily have been perceived as a place of weakness.

Following the First Battle of Trenton in New Jersey on December 26, 1776, American soldiers were on the defensive at nearby Assunpink Creek, pinned down by British troops under Gen. Lord Cornwallis. But intelligence showed Cornwallis’s rearguard at Princeton to be thinly held, so Washington decided to circumvent the main British force and strike at its rear.

In the ensuing chaotic fight, American Brig. Gen Hugh Mercer was killed and Washington himself took command to prevent the Americans being routed, at times being just thirty yards from the British line. Washington’s presence combined with fresh soldiers forced most of the British troops to withdraw from Princeton. The remnants of the British garrison—for a time seeking shelter in Nassau Hall at the College of New Jersey (later Princton University)—soon surrendered.

The victory at Princeton, combined with that of the First Battle of Trenton, provided a much-needed morale boost to the cause of American independence. After what had been a dismal 1776, the Americans could look towards 1777 with the knowledge that they could face the British and defeat them.

Image:
Comte J. Onfroy de Breville (JoB), “The Battle of Princeton (January 3, 1777).” In Washington, the Man of Action by Frederick Trevor Hill (New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1914).

Join us on Tuesday, January 9 at 6:30 p.m. EST, for our first author’s talk of the new programming season as we welcome ...
01/02/2024

Join us on Tuesday, January 9 at 6:30 p.m. EST, for our first author’s talk of the new programming season as we welcome Abby Chandler, associate professor of history at the University of Massachusetts Lowell. Drawing from her recent book, Seized with the Temper of the Times: Identity and Rebellion in Pre-Revolutionary America, published by Westholme Publishing, Professor Chandler shows how the Stamp Act riots in Rhode Island and the Regulator Rebellion in North Carolina tell a broader story about the evolution of American political thought in the decades surrounding the American Revolution, while exploring the local and transatlantic tensions that infused the two events and how the identities of the two colonies evolved in the coming decades.

This program will be held in-person at Anderson House and will last approximately 45 minutes. Registration is requested and virtual options are available. A recording of this program will be made available at a later date.

Learn more and register at: https://bit.ly/3RK8qLP

Happy New Year 2024! While we look forward to the new year, the American Revolution Institute also reflects back upon ou...
01/01/2024

Happy New Year 2024! While we look forward to the new year, the American Revolution Institute also reflects back upon our revolutionary past, and in 2024, we will mark the semiquincentennial of the year 1774—including the 250th anniversary of the passage of the Coercive Acts by the British Parliament (known as the Intolerable Acts in America), and in response, the convening of the First Continental Congress in Philadelphia six months later. During that critical time, Britain’s American colonists were finally and irrevocably alienated from the British government by a series of parliamentary acts designed to bring colonial resistance to taxation and regulation to an end. Those acts, and the imposition of military government to enforce them, drove the colonists from resistance to revolution. By the spring of 1775 , armed rebellion, and ultimately a war for independence, were inevitable.

Before you settle in for a long winter’s nap in 2024, why not reexamine this critical time in our history—“the long 1774”—with Mary Beth Norton, the Mary Donlon Alger Professor of American History Emerita at Cornell University? Watch Dr. Norton as she discusses her book 1774: The Long Year of Revolution, which analyzes the revolutionary change that took place during the 16 months between December 1773 and April 1775—from the Boston Tea Party to the Battles of Lexington and Concord—at:
https://www.americanrevolutioninstitute.org/video/1774-long-year-of-revolution-norton/

Image:
Aitken's General American Register and Calendar for the Year 1774, printed for R. Aitken, bookseller, stationer, and bookbinder of Philadelphia, 1773.

#1774 #250

Looking back on 2023, we’re grateful for our generous supporters, hardworking staff, and dedicated volunteers who have w...
12/31/2023

Looking back on 2023, we’re grateful for our generous supporters, hardworking staff, and dedicated volunteers who have worked together to create programs that encourage interest in and appreciation for the American Revolution and its legacy. Our museum, library, and education programs continued to grow this year, tallying …

• 380,000 visitors to our websites
• 246,000 views of more than 500 videos on our YouTube channel
• 8,500 attendees at our public historical programs, in person and virtually from around the world
• 11 recipients of our competitive library research fellowships
• 5,900 students experiencing our traveling trunks in their classrooms
• 17,000 visitors to our museum at our National Historic Landmark headquarters, Anderson House
• a Top 100 ranking in Historical Study & Teaching on Amazon for our recently published book Freedom: The Enduring Importance of the American Revolution.

We thank all of you for following and supporting our work, and wish you a very happy new year!

A new year brings a new season of historical programs, which kicks off on January 9! Highlights from our upcoming progra...
12/28/2023

A new year brings a new season of historical programs, which kicks off on January 9! Highlights from our upcoming programs include an author’s talk by Abby Chandler discussing her new book, Seized with the Tempers of the Times: Identity and Rebellion in Pre-Revolutionary American; a lecture by historian Larry Nelson discussing the American Revolution in the West; a lecture by Matthew Skic, curator of exhibitions at the Museum of the American Revolution, discussing James Forten, a free Black Revolutionary War veteran; a battlefield tour exploring the Battle of Saratoga; and a Lunch Bite given by the Institute’s historical programs manager, Andrew Outten, highlighting a map created by the Marquis de Lafayette’s aide-de-camp, Michel Capitaine du Chesnoy, for King Louis XVI. Most of our programs are held in-person at Anderson House, but virtual options are available unless otherwise specified.

Explore all our spring historical programs at: www.americanrevolutioninstitute.org/events

Family in town and looking for something to do away from the National Mall? Head over to Dupont Circle and visit us for ...
12/27/2023

Family in town and looking for something to do away from the National Mall? Head over to Dupont Circle and visit us for free! Enjoy a tour of grand entertaining rooms across two floors of our 1905 headquarters, learn about the Society of the Cincinnati and its work in preserving the history of the American Revolution and how we came to be based in a Gilded Age mansion.

Click here to find out more about visiting us: https://www.americanrevolutioninstitute.org/visit-american-revolution-institute/

In the early morning hours of December 26, 1776, one of the most iconic American victories of the Revolution took place ...
12/26/2023

In the early morning hours of December 26, 1776, one of the most iconic American victories of the Revolution took place when George Washington’s Continental Army defeated a force of Hessian troops occupying Trenton, New Jersey. After only an hour of fighting, the Hessians surrendered the garrison. The sword of their mortally wounded commander, Johann Gottlieb Rall, was presented to Lt. Col. Josiah Parker of the 5th Virginia Regiment.

We recently added to our collections a portrait of Josiah Parker done in 1799 by French artist Charles B. J. F. de Saint-Mémin. The portrait was generously donated in honor of Dorothy Perry Kiger, a great-great-great-great granddaughter of the sitter. Josiah Parker, who grew up on his family’s plantation, Macclesfield, in southeastern Virginia, joined the fight for American independence in 1775, when he joined a patriot militia unit. By February 1776 he was commissioned a major in the 5th Regiment of the Continental Army. Aside from Trenton, Parker also fought at the battles of Princeton, Brandywine, and Germantown, and was wounded during the latter. He resigned from the army in July 1778 to tend to business matters at home but returned in 1781 to command militia troops during the British invasion of the state. His military service qualified him for membership in the Society of the Cincinnati, founded in 1783, and he joined its Virginia branch. After the war Parker served in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1789 to 1801. This chalk-on-paper profile portrait was drawn in Philadelphia during his last term in Congress.

With the war won and independence for America secured, General George Washington resigned his commission as commander in...
12/23/2023

With the war won and independence for America secured, General George Washington resigned his commission as commander in chief of the Continental Army on this day, December 23, 1783. In his address to Congress assembled in Annapolis, Maryland, he explained, “having now finished the work assigned me, I retire from the great theatre of Action; and bidding an Affectionate farewell to this August body under whose orders I have so long acted, I here offer my Commission, and take my leave of all the employments of public life.”

Washington’s resignation solidified his image as the “American Cincinnatus”—a citizen-soldier who selflessly served his country before returning to his farm. But who was Cincinnatus? Learn more about the ancient Roman hero, his influence on the 18th-century world, and how artists have pictured him, on our website: https://www.americanrevolutioninstitute.org/masterpieces-in-detail/images-of-cincinnatus/

Image: The marble statue of George Washington sculpted by Jean-Antoine Houdon in 1785-1791 that stands in the Virginia State Capitol depicts the general in his Continental Army uniform resting his left hand on a fasces, a bundle of rods that symbolized civil authority in ancient Rome, with a plow behind him. Photograph by Steven Zucker.

This week in 1783 King Louis XVI of France approved the Society of the Cincinnati in France. News quickly traveled back ...
12/21/2023

This week in 1783 King Louis XVI of France approved the Society of the Cincinnati in France. News quickly traveled back to George Washington, with Lafayette reporting on December 25, 1783: “At a King’s Council, this day was a week, it has been decided that Count de Rochambeau, his generals and colonels, and who of the admirals should be permitted to wear the Order…” Pierre L’Enfant also wrote to Washington, in French, reflecting on Louis XVI’s approval of the Society: “The permission which this powerful Monarch, the Most Christian King, has already given to his subjects to wear in his dominions the Order of the Society of the Cincinnati, is not only a strong mark of his deference, but also an unmistakable proof of the sentiments of His Majesty toward America.” In January 1784, Rochambeau, Lafayette, and others began organizing a French branch of the Society, which more than 200 French veterans of the American war would join.

📸 “Louis Seize, Roi des Français, Restaurateur de la Liberté…,” engraved by Jean-Guillaume Bervic after the painting by Antoine François Callet. Paris: Felix Hermet, Imprimeur Editeur, ca. 1880s. The Society of the Cincinnati, Gift of Paul A. Rockwell, 1959.

📸 Letter from Pierre L’Enfant to George Washington, December 25, 1783. The Society of the Cincinnati Archives.

Save the date to join us on March 14-17, as Art in Bloom DC returns to Anderson House for its 4th year! This popular eve...
12/19/2023

Save the date to join us on March 14-17, as Art in Bloom DC returns to Anderson House for its 4th year! This popular event fills our historic headquarters with floral arrangements inspired by the art and architecture of Anderson House and created by dozens of Washington’s most innovative floral designers. Explore the floral sculptures and tour the museum during public viewing hours, participate in special demo sessions with featured floral designers, and join us and the premier local florists who created the displays for an evening reception exploring these floral artworks and the collections that inspired them.

Anderson House is the exclusive venue for Art in Bloom DC, which is co-produced by the Institute, Margo Fischer of Bright Occasions, and Ashley Greer of Atelier Ashley Flowers.

More information about this unique event is forthcoming, so be sure to sign up for our mailing list to receive important updates: https://bit.ly/3TpfhdL

 , December 16, 1773, the Boston Tea Party, one of the most well-known pre-revolutionary events that had an everlasting ...
12/16/2023

, December 16, 1773, the Boston Tea Party, one of the most well-known pre-revolutionary events that had an everlasting effect on world history, occurred in Boston Harbor. To commemorate the 250th anniversary of the event, watch a recording of our recent lecture featuring Benjamin Carp of Brooklyn College discussing the raid, its context in the global story of 18th century British interests, and its legacy today.

On the night of December 16, 1773, a party of Bostonians boarded three British vessels and dumped over three hundred chests of tea into Boston Harbor. In add...

 , America’s Cincinnatus, George Washington, died after a short illness at his home, Mount Vernon. The “Saturday Decr 14...
12/14/2023

, America’s Cincinnatus, George Washington, died after a short illness at his home, Mount Vernon. The “Saturday Decr 14th 1799” diary account of Washington’s private secretary, Tobias Lear, records, “This day being marked by an event which will be memorable in the History of America, and perhaps of the world…The last illness and Death of General Washington.”

Lear’s eyewitness account notes that “about 5 o’clk” the general confided to his long-time friend and attending physician Dr. James Craik, “I die hard; but I am not afraid to go,” and that between 10 and 11 that evening, “he expired without a struggle or a sigh!”

Eulogizing Washington in 1843, Daniel Webster remarked: “America has furnished to the world the character of Washington. And if our American institutions had done nothing else, that alone would have entitled them to the respect of mankind.”

Read and learn “Why We Honor George Washington” at: https://www.americanrevolutioninstitute.org/why-we-honor-george-washington/


What does your home and how you decorate it say about you? Two scholars have recently been researching this question abo...
12/13/2023

What does your home and how you decorate it say about you? Two scholars have recently been researching this question about the first owners of our headquarters, Larz and Isabel Anderson, who assembled a diverse and important collection of artworks and furnishings for their Washington home. More than a “distinguished background” (as Larz wrote), their collection and how they displayed it was a way for the Andersons to identify themselves as cosmopolitan, intellectually curious, and well-traveled members of the cultural and political elite in America. The Andersons’ guests—from presidents and kings to military officers and Red Cross volunteers—took in their collection and its messages at frequent political, diplomatic, philanthropic, and social events held at Anderson House.

A new article by Stephen T. Moskey and Isabel L. Taube published in Nineteenth-Century Art Worldwide explores these themes through an understudied aspect of the Andersons’ collection—their Native American objects. Read more in this free online journal: https://www.19thc-artworldwide.org/autumn23/moskey-taube-on-isabel-and-larz-anderson-native-american-collection

And learn more about the 118-year history of diplomatic and cultural entertaining at Anderson House in our current exhibition, Affairs of State, closing on December 31: https://www.americanrevolutioninstitute.org/exhibition/affairs-of-state-diplomacy-and-entertaining-at-anderson-house/

Image: Photograph of the Winter Garden at Anderson House by Frances Benjamin Johnston, 1910.

AHNCA/Association of Historians of Nineteenth-Century Art

Happy 84th birthday to our museum! Did you know that it was the first museum in the country dedicated to the American Re...
12/11/2023

Happy 84th birthday to our museum! Did you know that it was the first museum in the country dedicated to the American Revolution and is one of the oldest private museums in Washington, D.C.?

On December 11, 1939, the Society of the Cincinnati opened its new headquarters building, Anderson House, as a public museum, with a sign on the front lawn posting its hours, Mondays from 2 to 4 p.m. The house had been given to the Society just a year earlier, when Isabel Anderson followed her late husband Larz’s wishes in donating their Washington home to the historical organization commemorating the American Revolution of which he had been so proud to be a member. The deed of gift specified that their home become the Society’s headquarters and a public museum. As an architectural gem and mainstay of official Washington entertaining in the Gilded Age, the already historic house was an immediate draw when it opened to the public. Over the years, a growing collection of Revolutionary War paintings, artifacts, and documents have been displayed amidst the original interiors and furnishings of the Andersons’ mansion—still a “Florentine villa in the midst of American independence” as a reporter described the house when it was built in 1905.

Experience the museum for yourself, now open six days a week. https://www.americanrevolutioninstitute.org/plan-your-visit/

Images
1: Anderson House façade, mid-1970s.
2: Anderson House façade, 1946.
3: Anderson House façade, 2012.

Looking for gifts this holiday season for the history lover in the family? That person who is all about the American Rev...
12/09/2023

Looking for gifts this holiday season for the history lover in the family? That person who is all about the American Revolution or historic houses? Look no further than our online gift shop where you can choose from a selection of mugs, books, and souvenirs relating to the American Revolution and our historic headquarters of Anderson House.

Click here to visit our online gift shop: https://www.americanrevolutioninstitute.org/american-revolution-institute-shop/

It’s difficult to imagine the experiences of soldiers and sailors who became prisoners of war during the American Revolu...
12/08/2023

It’s difficult to imagine the experiences of soldiers and sailors who became prisoners of war during the American Revolution—let alone any armed conflict. It is more difficult to imagine their experiences if they became prisoners of war twice. This was the case for American soldier and privateer William Russell during the Revolution. Following his initial capture at sea in 1779, Russell was first held prisoner at Mill Prison in England before being released. Shortly after, he was recaptured and incarcerated on the infamous prison ship Jersey in New York harbor. After his final release in March 1783, and desperate to repay debts and provide for his family, Russell joined the crew of a merchant vessel before returning home. Succumbing to subsequent trauma and illness, Russell died within a year of his homecoming.

Join us on Friday, December 15 at 12:30 p.m. EST, for a Lunch Bite object talk featuring the Institute’s historical programs manager, Andrew Outten, discussing a collection of letters written by Russell from captivity. Drawing from the letters, this presentation will focus on Russell’s experiences during his two periods of captivity by examining his attitudes, hopes, and horrors.

The presentation will be held in-person at Anderson House and last approximately 30 minutes. Registration is requested and virtual options are available. A recording of this program will be made available at a later date.

Learn more and register: https://bit.ly/3uQoqUU

This week in December 1775, American forces lay siege to Québec City—the only American attempt to secure Canada by force...
12/07/2023

This week in December 1775, American forces lay siege to Québec City—the only American attempt to secure Canada by force during the Revolutionary War.

For more than a year, the Continental Congress had been sending overtures to their northern neighbors in the hopes of garnering support for their grievances against the British government, but to little avail. In May 1775, Gen. Phillip Schuyler led preparations for an effort to secure Canada by force, to bring forth new allies and remove the threat of a northern front of the war.

Over the summer of 1775, plans materialized for two American forces to invade Quebec: one under Gen. Richard Montgomery moving via Lake Champlain, and the second under Col. Benedict Arnold by means of the back country of Maine.

On December 2, the two armies united outside of Quebec City and began establishing artillery positions a week later (as seen in this map). During a snowstorm on December 31, the Americans attacked the city but it was repulsed, with the loss of 60 men killed (included General Montgomery) and wounded, and over 420 men taken prisoner. The siege would continue into the spring of 1776, when British reinforcements drove the Americans south, eventually back across the border.

Image
Detail from a “Plan of the city and environs of Quebec…” Published by William Faden, London, 12 September 1776. The Society of the Cincinnati, The Robert Charles Lawrence Ferguson Collection

“So bold, so daring, so firm, intrepid and inflexible…and so lasting, that I can’t but consider it as an Epocha in Histo...
12/05/2023

“So bold, so daring, so firm, intrepid and inflexible…and so lasting, that I can’t but consider it as an Epocha in History.” This is how John Adams described the Boston Tea Party, one of the most well-known pre-revolutionary events. Needless to say, he wasn’t wrong. The events that occurred on the night of December 16, 1773, when a party of Bostonians boarded three British vessels and dumped over three hundred chests of tea into Boston Harbor, sent shockwaves across the Atlantic and helped spark one of the most important conflicts in world history. To commemorate the 250th anniversary of this momentous episode of the Revolution, join us next Wednesday, December 13 at 6:30 p.m. EST, for a lecture featuring Benjamin Carp, Ph.D., the Daniel M. Lyons Chair in American History at Brooklyn College and an affiliate for the history program of the Graduate Center of The City University of New York. Drawing from his book, Defiance of the Patriots: The Boston Tea Party and the Making of America, winner of the 2013 Society of the Cincinnati Prize, Dr. Carp will examine the actions of those who carried out the raid in the context of the global story of British interests in India, North America, and the Caribbean.

The lecture will be held in-person at Anderson House and last approximately 45 minutes. Registration is requested and virtual options are available. A recording of this program will be made available at a later date.

Learn more and register: https://bit.ly/46ZKMRj

Image:
Detail of “Americans throwing the cargoes of the Teaships into the river, at Boston” from History of North Americas. Illustrated by W.D. Cooper, 1789. Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, Washington, D.C.

Join Winston Churchill, Thurgood Marshall, Charles de Gaulle, Marjorie Merriweather Post, Jacqueline Kennedy, nine Ameri...
12/04/2023

Join Winston Churchill, Thurgood Marshall, Charles de Gaulle, Marjorie Merriweather Post, Jacqueline Kennedy, nine American presidents, and many more who have visited our headquarters … There’s just one more month to see our current exhibition, Affairs of State: 118 Years of Diplomacy and Entertaining at Anderson House, before it closes on December 31!

Diplomacy and entertaining have always gone hand in hand in the nation’s capital. Our headquarters, Anderson House, has played a historic role in that story during the twentieth and twenty-first centuries—but one that has largely gone untold. Since its completion in 1905, the mansion has been the site of hundreds of diplomatic, patriotic, philanthropic, and cultural events—establishing Anderson House as a uniquely sought-after destination in Washington, D.C., for heads of state, government officials, diplomats, and society leaders wanting a place to form relationships, consider challenges, and share common values. Affairs of State draws on our rich collections and those of several generous lenders to chronicle more than a century of the people and events that have given Anderson House its place in the diplomatic and cultural history of the American republic and its capital city.

Visit our website to learn more about the exhibition, watch a video tour of the gallery, download the catalog, view recordings of lectures and other programs that have explored the exhibition’s themes, and explore a related lesson plan for students.

https://www.americanrevolutioninstitute.org/exhibition/affairs-of-state-diplomacy-and-entertaining-at-anderson-house/

Happy 260th birthday to Gilbert Stuart, born on this day, December 3, 1755, in Rhode Island! Considered one of America’s...
12/03/2023

Happy 260th birthday to Gilbert Stuart, born on this day, December 3, 1755, in Rhode Island! Considered one of America’s greatest portrait painters, Stuart famously captured the likenesses of the first six presidents of the United States. A reproduction of his best-known work is very likely in your wallet—his “Athenaeum portrait”of George Washington appears on the one-dollar bill. In 1796, Stuart masterfully helped to re-brand General Washington as President Washington with his “Lansdowne portrait,” distinguishing Washington as a republican statesman in dramatic contrast to his autocratic contemporaries on the world’s stage.

Learn more about how eighteenth century artists portrayed George Washington and shaped his historical memory with our Imagining George Washington lesson plan, at: https://www.americanrevolutioninstitute.org/lesson-plans/imagining-the-revolution/imagining-george-washington/

Image:
“Lansdowne Portrait” of George Washington by Gilbert Stuart, 1796. Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery.


For more than 200 years, all most Americans have ever known about Benedict Arnold is that he committed treason—yet he wa...
12/02/2023

For more than 200 years, all most Americans have ever known about Benedict Arnold is that he committed treason—yet he was more than a turncoat. He was a superb leader, a brilliant tactician, a supremely courageous soldier, and one of the most successful military officers of the early years of the Revolutionary War. His capture of Fort Ticonderoga, his Maine mountain expedition to attack Quebec, the famous artillery duel at Valcour Island, and the turning point at the Battle of Saratoga all laid the groundwork for our independence. Join us next Thursday, December 7 at 6:30 p.m. EST, for an author’s talk featuring historian Jack Kelly discussing his new book, God Save Benedict Arnold: The True Story of America’s Most Hated Man, published by Macmillan Publishers. Although it doesn’t exonerate Arnold for his treason, the book forces a reexamination of Arnold by offering a fresh new perspective on the events and decisions that led to his momentous change of heart and the permanent stain on his character.

This author’s talk will be held in-person at Anderson House and last approximately 45 minutes. Registration is requested and virtual options are available. A recording of the program will be made available at a later date.

Learn more and register: https://bit.ly/3N6Z3nS

Greetings from the National Council for the Social Studies 2023 Conference   at the Nashville Music City Center in Nashv...
12/01/2023

Greetings from the National Council for the Social Studies 2023 Conference at the Nashville Music City Center in Nashville, Tennessee! We are set up in the exhibit hall today and Saturday to welcome thousands of social studies educators, administrators, and professionals from across the country to inspire their usage of best practices and enjoy the fellowship of others in the social studies profession. Will Kelley, one of our 2022 master teacher alumni who teaches at Kirby High School - The Blue and Gray (Memphis-Shelby County Schools), has joined us to present our Saturday workshop session “Discord, Harmony, and the American Republic” which will feature his lesson plan, He Did It His Way: How George Washington Shaped the American Presidency.

Visit Will’s lesson plan at our website at: https://www.americanrevolutioninstitute.org/master-teacher-lesson-plans/lesson-plans-revolutionary-republic/he-did-it-his-way-how-george-washington-shaped-the-american-presidency/.

Image
Will Kelley, Master Teacher 2022 from Tennessee, Beck Stephens, Master Teacher 2023 from New York, and Andy Morse, Executive Director of the American Revolution Institute meet with attendees at the National Council for the Social Studies 2023 Conference.

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