Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Smithsonian's Archives of American Art ​The Archives of American Art is the world’s preeminent and most widely used research center dedicated to collecting, preserving, and providing access to primary sources that document the history of the visual arts in America.
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Since 1954, the Archives has collected roughly 16 million letters, photographs, diaries, oral history interviews, sketches, scrapbooks, business records, and other documents that support the study of the history of the visual arts in America. Smithsonian Privacy Statement: http://www.si.edu/privacy/
Smithsonian Terms of Use: http://www.si.edu/termsofuse/

Operating as usual

05/06/2021

Conceptual artist Ken Gonzales-Day was interviewed from his studio in Los Angeles, California, on July 31, 2020 by Josh T. Franco for the Archives’ Pandemic Oral History Project.

As a professor of photography, art theory, and humanities at Scripps College and a practicing artist, Gonzales-Day shares the challenges of teaching from home and accessing his studio during quarantine. Research is an important part of his practice which examines the historical construction of race, specifically the history of lynching in California. He also shares how pandemic related social distancing has impacted his current series of portraits.

The Pandemic Oral History Project gives voice to the arts community during one of the most turbulent periods in modern history and creates a permanent record of this extraordinary moment. This series of 85 interviews of American artists and art world figures living and working through the events of 2020 is now available on the Archives’ website and YouTube channel. To watch the full interview with Ken Gonzales-Day today, visit: s.si.edu/Gonzales-Day_POH

#AmericanArtInPandemic #ArchivesPandemicOHProject #OralHistory

“And people criticize my doing the same thing, but I don't care because it's like-almost, to me, this form is like a can...
05/05/2021

“And people criticize my doing the same thing, but I don't care because it's like-almost, to me, this form is like a canvas, a three-dimensional canvas, anyway. In a certain stage of my life I decided, if I don't do this now, I will never make it. The time was right to make big pieces. And also, I like the idea of dancing around the piece when I put the glaze on. You get the big brush and you walk around. . . . [Y]ou try to put the brush and you move around so you could see the whole thing-not all at once but when you move: can see, can see, can see.” —Toshiko Takaezu

Toshiko Takaezu was a ceramicist and educator known for her closed forms, born in Hawaii to parents who immigrated from Japan. In her oral history interview she discusses her commitment to the closed form she is known for and shares that in her large family she called herself the “navel child” as she was “right in the center” of 5 older and 5 younger siblings. Visit our website to read the full interview: s.si.edu/TakaezuOH
#AAPIHM #AsianPacificAmericanHeritageMonth

📷: Photograph of Toshiko Takaezu walking among artwork, 1979. Toshiko Takaezu papers, 1937-2010.

“And people criticize my doing the same thing, but I don't care because it's like-almost, to me, this form is like a canvas, a three-dimensional canvas, anyway. In a certain stage of my life I decided, if I don't do this now, I will never make it. The time was right to make big pieces. And also, I like the idea of dancing around the piece when I put the glaze on. You get the big brush and you walk around. . . . [Y]ou try to put the brush and you move around so you could see the whole thing-not all at once but when you move: can see, can see, can see.” —Toshiko Takaezu

Toshiko Takaezu was a ceramicist and educator known for her closed forms, born in Hawaii to parents who immigrated from Japan. In her oral history interview she discusses her commitment to the closed form she is known for and shares that in her large family she called herself the “navel child” as she was “right in the center” of 5 older and 5 younger siblings. Visit our website to read the full interview: s.si.edu/TakaezuOH
#AAPIHM #AsianPacificAmericanHeritageMonth

📷: Photograph of Toshiko Takaezu walking among artwork, 1979. Toshiko Takaezu papers, 1937-2010.

🚨 Calling all college art history instructors! 🚨 The Archives of American Art is accepting applications for an August/Se...
05/05/2021

🚨 Calling all college art history instructors! 🚨 The Archives of American Art is accepting applications for an August/September virtual workshop series focused on incorporating primary sources into your classes. Applications due May 19. More details available here: s.si.edu/twps2021

(Workshops are BYO 🐴)

📸 Art students making sculptures of a horse, circa 1910. Albert Laessle papers.

#ArtHistory #PrimarySources #Archives #AmericanArt

🚨 Calling all college art history instructors! 🚨 The Archives of American Art is accepting applications for an August/September virtual workshop series focused on incorporating primary sources into your classes. Applications due May 19. More details available here: s.si.edu/twps2021

(Workshops are BYO 🐴)

📸 Art students making sculptures of a horse, circa 1910. Albert Laessle papers.

#ArtHistory #PrimarySources #Archives #AmericanArt

05/04/2021

"I just can't imagine that most of the goddesses aren't really wanting to intervene at this point."

In June of last year, artist and folklore scholar Kay Turner spoke with Josh Franco as part of our Pandemic Oral History Project, talking homemade altars, memorials, and goddesses.

The Pandemic Oral History Project gives voice to the arts community during one of the most turbulent periods in modern history and creates a permanent record of this extraordinary moment. This series of 85 newly conducted interviews of American artists and art world figures living and working through the events of 2020 is now available on the Archives’ website and YouTube channel. To watch the full interview with Turner, visit: s.si.edu/Turner_POH

#KayTurner #AmericanArtInPandemic #ArchivesPandemicOHProject #OralHistory #Goddesses

Yasuo Kuniyoshi was a Japanese born American painter, printmaker and photographer based in New York City. Kuniyoshi was ...
05/03/2021

Yasuo Kuniyoshi was a Japanese born American painter, printmaker and photographer based in New York City. Kuniyoshi was born in Okayama, Japan. In 1906 he came to the United States and a year later began studying at the Los Angeles School of Art and Design. In 1910 he moved to New York and took courses at the National Academy of Design, the Independent School of Art, and the Art Students League, where he studied with Kenneth Hayes Miller. He was married to fellow artist Katherine Schmidt from 1919 to 1932. After traveling throughout Europe, they moved to the Woodstock, New York, in 1927 and took part in the Woodstock Art Colony. Kuniyoshi studied and later taught at the Art Students League summer school there.

By 1930 Kuniyoshi had established himself as an internationally known painter and graphic artist. In 1935, he received a Guggenheim fellowship and married Sara Mazo. In New York City he taught at the Art Students League, the New School for Social Research, and served as the first president of the Artists Equity Association from 1947 to 1950. Kuniyoshi was active in social organizations, especially Japanese American organizations, such as the Japanese American Committee for Democracy. Although Kuniyoshi was barred from becoming a citizen due to American immigration laws at the time, he viewed himself as American and took an active role in the war effort during World War II, even working with the U.S. Office of War Information department to design posters.

The Whitney Museum of American Art held a retrospective for Kuniyoshi in 1948, making him the first living artist to be honored in such a fashion at the museum. Yasuo Kuniyoshi died of cancer in 1953 and was survived by his second wife Sara Mazo Kuniyoshi who preserved the legacy of his work. Check out the fully digitized collection on our website: s.si.edu/Kuniyoshi.

#AAPIHM #ArchivesAmericanArt #YasuoKuniyoshi

📸 Yasuo Kuniyoshi papers, 1906-2016, bulk 1920-1990

Yasuo Kuniyoshi was a Japanese born American painter, printmaker and photographer based in New York City. Kuniyoshi was born in Okayama, Japan. In 1906 he came to the United States and a year later began studying at the Los Angeles School of Art and Design. In 1910 he moved to New York and took courses at the National Academy of Design, the Independent School of Art, and the Art Students League, where he studied with Kenneth Hayes Miller. He was married to fellow artist Katherine Schmidt from 1919 to 1932. After traveling throughout Europe, they moved to the Woodstock, New York, in 1927 and took part in the Woodstock Art Colony. Kuniyoshi studied and later taught at the Art Students League summer school there.

By 1930 Kuniyoshi had established himself as an internationally known painter and graphic artist. In 1935, he received a Guggenheim fellowship and married Sara Mazo. In New York City he taught at the Art Students League, the New School for Social Research, and served as the first president of the Artists Equity Association from 1947 to 1950. Kuniyoshi was active in social organizations, especially Japanese American organizations, such as the Japanese American Committee for Democracy. Although Kuniyoshi was barred from becoming a citizen due to American immigration laws at the time, he viewed himself as American and took an active role in the war effort during World War II, even working with the U.S. Office of War Information department to design posters.

The Whitney Museum of American Art held a retrospective for Kuniyoshi in 1948, making him the first living artist to be honored in such a fashion at the museum. Yasuo Kuniyoshi died of cancer in 1953 and was survived by his second wife Sara Mazo Kuniyoshi who preserved the legacy of his work. Check out the fully digitized collection on our website: s.si.edu/Kuniyoshi.

#AAPIHM #ArchivesAmericanArt #YasuoKuniyoshi

📸 Yasuo Kuniyoshi papers, 1906-2016, bulk 1920-1990

Rose season is around the corner! Pour a glass and take yourself on a virtual getaway with the Erle Loran papers to the ...
05/02/2021

Rose season is around the corner! Pour a glass and take yourself on a virtual getaway with the Erle Loran papers to the Pavillon Cézanne, Aix-en-Provence, circa 1928. #VirtualGetway #RoseSeason #ArchivesAmericanArt 🍷✈️🌞

📸 Erle Loran papers, 1912-1999

Rose season is around the corner! Pour a glass and take yourself on a virtual getaway with the Erle Loran papers to the Pavillon Cézanne, Aix-en-Provence, circa 1928. #VirtualGetway #RoseSeason #ArchivesAmericanArt 🍷✈️🌞

📸 Erle Loran papers, 1912-1999

As a member of the Archives of American Art family, please join us in celebrating the 51st anniversary of our incorporat...
05/01/2021

As a member of the Archives of American Art family, please join us in celebrating the 51st anniversary of our incorporation into the Smithsonian Institution today! 🥳

Since joining the Smithsonian in 1970, we've continued to expand our reach and broaden our audience of loyal friends, art lovers, and curious minds just like you. Cheers to another 51 years of collecting, preserving, and sharing the history of American art!

To help us celebrate, please consider making a gift today: www.aaa.si.edu/support

📸: Smithsonian Institution Building, exterior, 1990. Photograph by Jeffrey Wayne Tinsley. Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 11-009, Smithsonian Photographic Services Collection.

#Smithsonian #archives #americanart

As a member of the Archives of American Art family, please join us in celebrating the 51st anniversary of our incorporation into the Smithsonian Institution today! 🥳

Since joining the Smithsonian in 1970, we've continued to expand our reach and broaden our audience of loyal friends, art lovers, and curious minds just like you. Cheers to another 51 years of collecting, preserving, and sharing the history of American art!

To help us celebrate, please consider making a gift today: www.aaa.si.edu/support

📸: Smithsonian Institution Building, exterior, 1990. Photograph by Jeffrey Wayne Tinsley. Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 11-009, Smithsonian Photographic Services Collection.

#Smithsonian #archives #americanart

To round out this month full of unrealized projects, we’re excited to celebrate one that was fully completed 51 years ag...
04/30/2021

To round out this month full of unrealized projects, we’re excited to celebrate one that was fully completed 51 years ago this Saturday. On May 1, 1970, the Archives of American Art officially became a part of the Smithsonian Institution! 🎉

Friends like you support the work of our collectors, archivists, digitization specialists, and oral historians to increase and diffuse knowledge of American art history across the country and around the world.

To make a gift to the Archives today, visit: www.aaa.si.edu/support

📸: Image from a pamphlet commemorating the Archives of American Art joining the Smithsonian Institution, May 4, 1970.

#Smithsonian #archives #americanart

To round out this month full of unrealized projects, we’re excited to celebrate one that was fully completed 51 years ago this Saturday. On May 1, 1970, the Archives of American Art officially became a part of the Smithsonian Institution! 🎉

Friends like you support the work of our collectors, archivists, digitization specialists, and oral historians to increase and diffuse knowledge of American art history across the country and around the world.

To make a gift to the Archives today, visit: www.aaa.si.edu/support

📸: Image from a pamphlet commemorating the Archives of American Art joining the Smithsonian Institution, May 4, 1970.

#Smithsonian #archives #americanart

Children, I come back today To tell you a story of the long dark way That I had to climb, that I had to know In order th...
04/30/2021

Children, I come back today
To tell you a story of the long dark way
That I had to climb, that I had to know
In order that the race might live and grow.
Look at my face—dark as the night—
Yet shining like the sun with love’s true light.
I am the child they stole from the sand
Three hundred years ago in Africa’s land.

“The Negro Mother,” Langston Hughes

This poem by Langston Hughes was illustrated by Prentiss Taylor in an eponymous 1931 collaborative volume, the first publication of their cooperative venture, Golden Stair Press, which issued broadsides and pamphlets by Harlem Renaissance luminaries.

Hughes (1901–1967) was a writer and activist who forever altered American literature through his social justice advocacy in poetry, prose, and plays. Taylor (1907–1991) was a lithographer, illustrator, and painter who had a varied career along the east coast; he was a pioneering art therapist and educator.

See more of their collaborative work in Taylor’s papers: s.si.edu/PrentissT

#NationalPoetryMonth #LangstonHughes #PrentissTaylor #HarlemRenaissance

Children, I come back today
To tell you a story of the long dark way
That I had to climb, that I had to know
In order that the race might live and grow.
Look at my face—dark as the night—
Yet shining like the sun with love’s true light.
I am the child they stole from the sand
Three hundred years ago in Africa’s land.

“The Negro Mother,” Langston Hughes

This poem by Langston Hughes was illustrated by Prentiss Taylor in an eponymous 1931 collaborative volume, the first publication of their cooperative venture, Golden Stair Press, which issued broadsides and pamphlets by Harlem Renaissance luminaries.

Hughes (1901–1967) was a writer and activist who forever altered American literature through his social justice advocacy in poetry, prose, and plays. Taylor (1907–1991) was a lithographer, illustrator, and painter who had a varied career along the east coast; he was a pioneering art therapist and educator.

See more of their collaborative work in Taylor’s papers: s.si.edu/PrentissT

#NationalPoetryMonth #LangstonHughes #PrentissTaylor #HarlemRenaissance

04/29/2021

"I can understand breaking our habits in order to be able to get ready for a new habit because...we was going to have to do it anyway." --Lonnie Holley

Lonnie Holley was interviewed from Grocery on Home in Atlanta, GA on July 29, 2020 by Josh T. Franco for the Archives' Pandemic Oral History Project. He speaks of making computer art, sculpture, and music, as well as his long relationship with the Smithsonian and the pandemic as scary, but an opportunity break habits.

The Pandemic Oral History Project gives voice to the arts community during one of the most turbulent periods in modern history and creates a permanent record of this extraordinary moment. This series of 85 newly conducted interviews of American artists and art world figures living and working through the events of 2020 is now available on the Archives’ website and YouTube channel.

#LonnieHolley #ThumbsUpToMotherUniverse #AmericanArtInPandemic #ArchivesPandemicOHProject #OralHistory

Happy International Dance Day! We’re celebrating with a magazine clipping featuring a black and white reproduction of a ...
04/29/2021

Happy International Dance Day! We’re celebrating with a magazine clipping featuring a black and white reproduction of a mural with a Cuban dancer and caricatures of notable figures, designed by Abril Lamarque in 1939.

#InternatinoalDanceDay #ArchivesAmericanArt

📸 Abril Lamarque papers, 1883-2001

Happy International Dance Day! We’re celebrating with a magazine clipping featuring a black and white reproduction of a mural with a Cuban dancer and caricatures of notable figures, designed by Abril Lamarque in 1939.

#InternatinoalDanceDay #ArchivesAmericanArt

📸 Abril Lamarque papers, 1883-2001

The Archives is honored to be the trusted repository for records documenting so many unrealized, suspended, completed, a...
04/28/2021

The Archives is honored to be the trusted repository for records documenting so many unrealized, suspended, completed, and revisited projects by American artists. We rely on donors like you to help us collect, preserve, and share these projects!

One such work is Paul Ramírez Jonas’s 50 States Summits Project. In 2002, educator and social practice artist Paul Ramirez Jonas (b. 1965) began traveling to the highest point of every state in the US. He would hike, climb, or drive up to an apex and take a photograph of himself waving a red and white flag reading, “Open.” His images subvert traditional practices of explorers “discovering” and imposing their nation’s flag upon “unchartered” land.

The project is suspended not by the pandemic, according to the artist, but by the birth of his daughter. He made his way through nearly half of the states before the pause, and is keeping the project “open,” as it happens.

Your support makes it possible for us to share all the stories of American art embedded in our collections with future generations around the world! To donate today, visit: www.aaa.si.edu/support

📸: Page from a hiking guide, circa 2002. Paul Ramírez Jonas papers, circa 1989–2014.

#PaulRamirezJonas #socialpracticeart #americanart #hiking

The Archives is honored to be the trusted repository for records documenting so many unrealized, suspended, completed, and revisited projects by American artists. We rely on donors like you to help us collect, preserve, and share these projects!

One such work is Paul Ramírez Jonas’s 50 States Summits Project. In 2002, educator and social practice artist Paul Ramirez Jonas (b. 1965) began traveling to the highest point of every state in the US. He would hike, climb, or drive up to an apex and take a photograph of himself waving a red and white flag reading, “Open.” His images subvert traditional practices of explorers “discovering” and imposing their nation’s flag upon “unchartered” land.

The project is suspended not by the pandemic, according to the artist, but by the birth of his daughter. He made his way through nearly half of the states before the pause, and is keeping the project “open,” as it happens.

Your support makes it possible for us to share all the stories of American art embedded in our collections with future generations around the world! To donate today, visit: www.aaa.si.edu/support

📸: Page from a hiking guide, circa 2002. Paul Ramírez Jonas papers, circa 1989–2014.

#PaulRamirezJonas #socialpracticeart #americanart #hiking

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Our Story

Since 1954, the Archives has collected over 20 million letters, photographs, diaries, oral history interviews, sketches, scrapbooks, business records, and other documents that support the study of the history of the visual arts in America. Smithsonian Privacy Statement: http://www.si.edu/privacy/ Smithsonian Terms of Use: http://www.si.edu/termsofuse/


Comments

Remembering Mail Art. enjoy.
One of our great resources!
Rachel Handler Procures Girls; Check Flight Logs to Little Saint James (Epstein Island) 3133 Q !!mG7VJxZNCI 20 Mar 2019 - 10:30:24 PM >>5800566 http://www.rachelchandler.us How many 'girls' were waiting for their return to the boat? Who owned the boat? What does a 'handler' procure? Is the 'handler' [one of many] connected to Epstein? Flight logs reveal many hidden artifacts. [RC] Q >>5800988 WHO IS RACHEL CHANDLER? Q
This is a show I'm not going to miss. Flowers in American Art, on from now till October in Washington, DC
ART150, a collective of over 20 artists living and working at 150 Bay Street, the historic landmark building in the heart of downtown Jersey City’s Powerhouse Arts District (PAD), will hold a public group art exhibition the weekend of May 5th & 6th, 12:00-6:00 PM This is a free event. Shipping Station, 58x36 inches, Graphite on canvas
Una revista muy especial! Thank you for your awesome writing! Shalom