Smithsonian's Archives of American Art

Smithsonian's Archives of American Art ​The Archives of American Art is the world’s preeminent and most widely used research center dedicated to collecting, preserving, and providing access to primary sources that document the history of the visual arts in America.
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Since 1954, the Archives has collected roughly 16 million letters, photographs, diaries, oral history interviews, sketches, scrapbooks, business records, and other documents that support the study of the history of the visual arts in America. Smithsonian Privacy Statement: http://www.si.edu/privacy/ Smithsonian Terms of Use: http://www.si.edu/termsofuse/

Operating as usual

Join us tomorrow at 5:30pm for "Ingrid Wiegand and Julie Finch: On Loft Life and Space-Making in the 1970s." 📽️To regist...
01/06/2021

Join us tomorrow at 5:30pm for "Ingrid Wiegand and Julie Finch: On Loft Life and Space-Making in the 1970s." 📽️To register for the screenings of “Walking” (1975) and “Julie” (1974) and conversation with Wiegand, Finch, and curator Josh T. Franco, visit: s.si.edu/ViewfinderLoftLife

This program inaugurates the new monthly series "Viewfinder: Women's Film and Video" sponsored by the Smithsonian American Women’s History Initiative, Because of Her Story. For more information about the series, visit: WomensHistory.si.edu

🎞️Still from Ingrid Wiegand, Walking, 1975. 1 videocassette (U-Matic), Robert Wiegand papers and video art, 1953-1994. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

#BecauseOfHerStory #WomenInFilm #IngridWiegand #WomensFilms #JulieFinch #SoHoNYC #ArchivesOfAmericanArt

“I rediscovered silence. And I rediscovered slowness. And I rediscovered solitude. And that has been good. I read an eno...
01/05/2021

“I rediscovered silence. And I rediscovered slowness. And I rediscovered solitude. And that has been good. I read an enormous amount of stuff. I watched an incredible amount of movies. And I listened to an extraordinary amount of music. This I had not done for the last forever. I have never done it—like this before.” —Alfredo Jaar

In his interview for the Archives’ Pandemic Oral History Project—conducted by Ben Gillespie on July 29, 2020 at his New York City studio—Alfredo Jaar reflects on embracing the quieter aspects of life after his busy travel and exhibition schedule was brought to a halt by the pandemic. He considers the difficulty in interpreting a contemporary political moment while living through it, and shares feelings of pessimism for the future but also hope.

The Pandemic Oral History Project gives voice to the arts community during one of the most turbulent periods in modern history and creates a permanent record of this extraordinary moment. This series of 85 newly conducted interviews of American artists and art world figures living and working through the events of 2020 is now available on the Archives’ website and YouTube channel. To watch the full interview with Alfredo Jaar today, visit: s.si.edu/Jaar

#AmericanArtInPandemic #ArchivesPandemicOHProject #OralHistory

The Smithsonian’s new monthly series "Viewfinder: Women's Film and Video" begins January 7 with "Ingrid Wiegand and Juli...
01/03/2021

The Smithsonian’s new monthly series "Viewfinder: Women's Film and Video" begins January 7 with "Ingrid Wiegand and Julie Finch: On Loft Life and Space-Making in the 1970s." Join us for screenings of “Walking” (1975) and “Julie” (1974), afterward curator Josh T. Franco will invite Wiegand and Finch to discuss their art and feminist take on loft life. 🎞️🎬To register today, visit: s.si.edu/ViewfinderLoftLife

This program inaugurates the monthly virtual screening and conversation series sponsored by the Smithsonian American Women’s History Initiative, Because of Her Story. For more information about the series, visit: WomensHistory.si.edu

📽️Still from Robert and Ingrid Wiegand, Julie, 1974. 1 videocassette (U-Matic), Robert Wiegand papers and video art, 1953-1994. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

#BecauseOfHerStory #WomenInFilm #IngridWiegand #WomensFilms #JulieFinch #SoHoNYC #ArchivesOfAmericanArt

⭐The third batch of 14 interviews from the Archives’ Pandemic Oral History Project is now live!⭐Watch or listen to inter...
01/02/2021

⭐The third batch of 14 interviews from the Archives’ Pandemic Oral History Project is now live!⭐

Watch or listen to interviews with Cory Arcangel, The Bobs, Judith Bernstein, Nao Bustamante, John Corbett, Fred Eversley, Margaret Honda, Linda Lomahaftewa, Omar Mismar, Caitlin Murray, Gala Porras-Kim, Cinthya Santos Briones, Jesse Treviño, and Kay WalkingStick on the Archives’ website or YouTube channel. Visit our project page to learn more: s.si.edu/pandemic

📸 Composite screenshots of 14 video interview participants, 2020. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

#AmericanArtInPandemic #ArchivesPandemicOHProject #OralHistory

01/01/2021

Happy New Year! 🍾🎉Here's some Judith Bernstein energy to bring you into 2021. 🙌Check out her interview and other pandemic oral histories at s.si.edu/pandemic.
#HappyNewYear #2021 #JudithBernstein

12/31/2020
WendyRedStar_SocialMedia.mp4

Wendy Red Star was interviewed from her home in Portland, Oregon, on July 28, 2020. The interview was conducted by Josh T. Franco for the Archives’ Pandemic Oral History Project.

Red Star, a multimedia artist, is an enrolled member of the Apsáalooke (Crow) Tribe. One of the themes that runs through her interview is how to deal with the unknown and uncertainty of the pandemic and finding comfort and ease in the unknown. She also discusses the impact of COVID-19 on reservations and, specifically, Native American elders.

The Pandemic Oral History Project gives voice to the arts community during one of the most turbulent periods in modern history and creates a permanent record of this extraordinary moment. This series of 85 newly conducted interviews of American artists and art world figures living and working through the events of 2020 is now available on the Archives’ website and YouTube channel. To watch the full interview with Wendy Red Star today, visit: s.si.edu/RedStar

#AmericanArtInPandemic #ArchivesPandemicOHProject #OralHistory

Your support makes a direct impact on our team’s ability to take on new initiatives that expand the legacy of art in Ame...
12/31/2020

Your support makes a direct impact on our team’s ability to take on new initiatives that expand the legacy of art in America.

There's still time to make a gift 🎁 before the end of the year, visit: aaa.si.edu/support

📸 Photograph of Archives staff for "Archives Shelfie Day" on January 29, 2020.

We are grateful for the many researchers, educators, and art enthusiasts who continue to make use of our resources, brin...
12/30/2020

We are grateful for the many researchers, educators, and art enthusiasts who continue to make use of our resources, bringing inspiration and new meaning to the more than 6,000 collections housed here. We are only able to collect, preserve, and share these primary sources with the public because of YOU!

Your support ensures that our collections continue to grow, inspire, and educate audiences now and for years to come. Make a donation by the end of the year to support our mission, visit: aaa.si.edu/support

📷Photograph of Marcia Marcus with “Hazel” in gallery, not before 1966. Marcia Marcus papers, 1928–2016.

#americanart #archives

12/29/2020

“Yeah, you could say ‘I hate the Blacks, I hate the Browns. I hate the blah blah blah.’ Well, yeah, except that's not what I'm—that's not what's underneath that. What's underneath that is, you are terrified. You are absolutely terrified. And part of that terror is, you don't know who you are. You really don't.”
—Ed Bereal

Ed Bereal was interviewed from his home in Bellingham, WA on July 8, 2020 by Matthew Simms for the Archives’ Pandemic Oral History Project. Ed Bereal (b. 1937) is an assemblage artist whose work challenges anti-Black racism. In this interview, he delves into the psychology and anthropology of racism and xenophobia as well as the enduring dangers of poverty, especially as heightened by the pandemic in 2020.

The Pandemic Oral History Project gives voice to the arts community during one of the most turbulent periods in modern history and creates a permanent record of this extraordinary moment. This series of 85 newly conducted interviews of American artists and art world figures living and working through the events of 2020 is now available on the Archives’ website and YouTube channel. To watch the full interview with Ed Bereal today, visit: s.si.edu/Bereal

#AmericanArtInPandemic #ArchivesPandemicOHProject #OralHistory #QuarantineTogether #AntiRacism

We toast the ones who make our work worthwhile! 🥂As we reflect on the many accomplishments of this year, the Archives th...
12/28/2020

We toast the ones who make our work worthwhile! 🥂

As we reflect on the many accomplishments of this year, the Archives thanks all who have donated extraordinary collections of original letters, unpublished writings, personal photographs, and more, that document the lives of artists, collectors, dealers, and historians. YOU have helped us expand the depth and breadth of our collection to more than 30 million items and counting!

We remain committed to preserving and providing access to these valuable resources. Make a donation by the end of the year to support our work, visit: aaa.si.edu/support

📸Photograph of Dore Ashton on the “R.M.S. Queen Mary” with artists Adja Yunkers and John Hultberg, critic Michel Tapié, and dealer Martha Jackson, among others, 1957. Dore Ashton papers, circa 1928–2014.

#archives #americanart #collections #doreashton

🎉 Happy Kwanzaa! 🎉Today, many Americans are kicking off the 7-day celebration by observing Umoja (Unity)--one of the 7 p...
12/26/2020

🎉 Happy Kwanzaa! 🎉

Today, many Americans are kicking off the 7-day celebration by observing Umoja (Unity)--one of the 7 principles at the heart of Kwanzaa--with loved ones. For our part, the Archives is pleased to share this gem: a Kwanzaa card bearing an illustration by J. Dickerson Thompson. This holiday greeting was sent to artist and and art historian Jeff Donaldson by "Eve," who did not provide her last name, but did identify herself as "your favorite student." Donaldson taught generations of artists and scholars the history and significance of African and African American art throughout his career, and we are proud to host these ample records at the Archives. The Jeff Donaldson papers are fully digitized online, so spend some time this holiday season exploring from home!

#JeffDonaldson #Kwanzaa #HappyKwanzaa #AfricanAmericanArt #AmericanArt

📸: detail, Kwanzaa card from student "Eve" to Jeff Donaldson, December 16, 1983. Jeff Donaldson papers, 1918-2005, bulk 1960s-2005. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

🎄Happy Christmas! We're celebrating with this 1971 Christmas card from George Zoretich to James Mullen!🎄We have amazing ...
12/25/2020

🎄Happy Christmas! We're celebrating with this 1971 Christmas card from George Zoretich to James Mullen!🎄

We have amazing holiday cards in our collections, many of them handmade by artists. Some collections only contain Christmas cards, like the James Mullen Christmas Card Collection, which this card comes from. If you'd like to explore some of the more than 300 Christmas cards that we have digitized, visit our website to see some of our favorites ➡️ s.si.edu/ccards

📸: Christmas Card to James Mullen by George Zoretich, 1971. James Mullen Christmas Card Collection, circa 1955-2003.

12/24/2020

💃 “Get Up! Get up! Get up!” ala James Brown 💃

Painter DEMI was interviewed from her home studio on September 2, 2020 by Josh T. Franco for the Archives’ Pandemic Oral History Project. In her account of living through this era, DEMI shares moments of despair and joy, and highlights the importance of her faith in thriving during difficult times. She reflects on how the pandemic has influenced her choice of subjects and shares her powerful story of leaving Cuba as a child. The artist quotes James Brown here, and credits the musician with getting her to the easel in dark times.

The Pandemic Oral History Project gives voice to the arts community during one of the most turbulent periods in modern history and creates a permanent record of this extraordinary moment. This series of 85 newly conducted interviews of American artists and art world figures living and working through the events of 2020 is now available on the Archives’ website and YouTube channel. To watch the full interview with DEMI today, visit: s.si.edu/DEMI

#DEMI #AmericanArtInPandemic #ArchivesPandemicOHProject #OralHistory #Miami #painting #JamesBrown

12/22/2020

“I was raised that art should represent the places where you live, what you feel, what you believe, and it’s about time to redefine America anyway.” —Jessie Benton

Jessie Benton was interviewed from her home in Chilmark, MA, on August 10, 2020 by Josh T. Franco for the Archives’ Pandemic Oral History Project. As the daughter of the innovative painter and muralist, Thomas Hart Benton, Jessie shares her perspective on the American melting pot and this country’s current struggles for social justice. She details her experience during isolation and quarantine and reflects on the creative modes of communication that have become a new way of life.

The Pandemic Oral History Project gives voice to the arts community during one of the most turbulent periods in modern history and creates a permanent record of this extraordinary moment. This series of 85 newly conducted interviews of American artists and art world figures living and working through the events of 2020 is now available on the Archives’ website and YouTube channel. To watch the full interview with Jessie Benton today, visit: s.si.edu/Benton

#AmericanArtInPandemic #ArchivesPandemicOHProject #OralHistory #QuarantineTogether #GateDates

Sculptor Marisol Escobar was known for being elusive and reticent in interviews. But what can we learn from an artist wh...
12/21/2020

Sculptor Marisol Escobar was known for being elusive and reticent in interviews. But what can we learn from an artist who doesn’t like talking about herself? Marina Pacini explores what she does reveal in the latest entry in our Conversations Across Collections with @CrystalBridgesMuseum. Read essays on Marisol and her sculpture “The Bathers” by visiting our websites: s.si.edu/MarisolAAA and s.si.edu/MarisolCB.

📷: Robin Forbes. Marisol in her studio, ca. 1975-76 (detail). Robin Forbes slides of SoHo. Archives of American Art.

“...I felt that the one thing that art did  was link—all art—a link from one passage of time to another passage of time....
12/20/2020

“...I felt that the one thing that art did was link—all art—a link from one passage of time to another passage of time. And that those links are what keep us going.” –Beverly Pepper, oral history interview conducted by Judith Richards in 2009.

🎉Happy birthday to Beverly Pepper! Born on this day in 1922, Pepper was one of the most influential and innovative sculptors of the second half of the 20th century. Working outside and often incorporating the earth, Pepper’s work integrated landscape, plasticity, and architecture as she generated spaces for contemplation.

Read her full oral history: s.si.edu/BPepper_OH

#BeverlyPepper #BTD #Happybirthday #Womenartists #Sculptor

⭐The second batch of 14 interviews from the Archives’ Pandemic Oral History Project are now live!⭐Watch or listen to int...
12/18/2020

⭐The second batch of 14 interviews from the Archives’ Pandemic Oral History Project are now live!⭐

Watch or listen to interviews with Lita Albuquerque, LaTanya S Autry, Pepe Coronado, Chitra Ganesh, Guillermo Gomez-Peña, Edgar Heap of Birds, Nancy Hom, Trevor Paglen, Lillian Pitt, Arturo Rodriguez, Julia Santos Solomon, Consuelo Jimenez Underwood, David Velasco (audio only), and Bruce Yonemoto on the Archives’ website or YouTube channel. Visit our project page to learn more: s.si.edu/pandemic

📸 Composite screenshots of 13 video interview participants, 2020. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

12/17/2020

On August 11 of this year, artist and educator Cadex Herrera spoke with Fernanda Espinosa as part of the Archives' Pandemic Oral History Project. From his home in White Bear Lake, MN, Herrera recounted the emotional and political sources that drove him and his collaborators to create the now iconic mural of George Floyd, located in Minneapolis near the site of his murder.

The Pandemic Oral History Project gives voice to the arts community during one of the most turbulent periods in modern history and creates a permanent record of this extraordinary moment. This series of 85 newly conducted interviews of American artists and art world figures living and working through the events of 2020 is now available on the Archives’ website and YouTube channel. To watch the full interview with Cadex Herrera today, visit: s.si.edu/Herrera

#CadexHerrera #AmericanArtInPandemic #ArchivesPandemicOHProject #OralHistory

Today is the day and this is your last chance to sign up for Unboxed Lunch! 😱 We’re lightening up your week with a dive ...
12/16/2020

Today is the day and this is your last chance to sign up for Unboxed Lunch! 😱 We’re lightening up your week with a dive into the unprocessed papers of Emil Milan. 🕵️‍♀️Register now and see you at 12PM today: s.si.edu/UnboxedLunchEM

"You know, in February, we had a show that dealt with slavery—with the effects of slavery—it was an artist who was talki...
12/15/2020
Alessandra Moctezuma, Pandemic Oral History Project, Archives of American Art, 2020

"You know, in February, we had a show that dealt with slavery—with the effects of slavery—it was an artist who was talking about issues like police brutality. And the students were so engaged with this exhibit. And when I saw all of those same students participating in this [Black Lives Matter] protest, I understood why having that forum to talk about these things was so important." —Alessandra Moctezuma

Alessandra Moctezuma, professor of fine arts at Mesa College and director of the Mesa College Art Gallery, was interviewed by Fernanda Espinosa earlier this year for the Archives' Pandemic Oral History Project. She spoke about closing her gallery with a pristine, unviewed show waiting inside, the surge of activist murals emerging from Black Lives Matter protests as colonialist monuments fall, and a renewed need to support community arts centers.

The Pandemic Oral History Project gives voice to the arts community during one of the most turbulent periods in modern history and creates a permanent record of this extraordinary moment. This series of 85 newly conducted interviews of American artists and art world figures living and working through the events of 2020 is now available on the Archives’ website and YouTube channel. To watch the full interview with Moctezuma today, visit: s.si.edu/Moctezuma

#AmericanArtInPandemic #ArchivesPandemicOHProject #OralHistory

An oral history interview with Alessandra Moctezuma conducted 2020 July 22, by Fernanda Espinosa, at Moctezuma's home in San Diego, Calif. This interview is ...

Happy Birthday, Helen Frankenthaler! 🎉🎈✨ You can find photos of and references to painter Helen Frankenthaler throughout...
12/12/2020

Happy Birthday, Helen Frankenthaler! 🎉🎈✨ You can find photos of and references to painter Helen Frankenthaler throughout our collections, here: s.si.edu/Frankenthaler

And thank you to our friends at the Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, who have supported the Archives over the years!

Photograph of Helen Frankenthaler in her studio, 1961. Photograph by André Emmerich. André Emmerich Gallery records, circa 1929–2009.

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Since 1954, the Archives has collected over 20 million letters, photographs, diaries, oral history interviews, sketches, scrapbooks, business records, and other documents that support the study of the history of the visual arts in America. Smithsonian Privacy Statement: http://www.si.edu/privacy/ Smithsonian Terms of Use: http://www.si.edu/termsofuse/


Comments

Remembering Mail Art. enjoy.
One of our great resources!
Rachel Handler Procures Girls; Check Flight Logs to Little Saint James (Epstein Island) 3133 Q !!mG7VJxZNCI 20 Mar 2019 - 10:30:24 PM >>5800566 http://www.rachelchandler.us How many 'girls' were waiting for their return to the boat? Who owned the boat? What does a 'handler' procure? Is the 'handler' [one of many] connected to Epstein? Flight logs reveal many hidden artifacts. [RC] Q >>5800988 WHO IS RACHEL CHANDLER? Q
This is a show I'm not going to miss. Flowers in American Art, on from now till October in Washington, DC
ART150, a collective of over 20 artists living and working at 150 Bay Street, the historic landmark building in the heart of downtown Jersey City’s Powerhouse Arts District (PAD), will hold a public group art exhibition the weekend of May 5th & 6th, 12:00-6:00 PM This is a free event. Shipping Station, 58x36 inches, Graphite on canvas
Una revista muy especial! Thank you for your awesome writing! Shalom