Smithsonian

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Stay on topic. The Smithsonian and its audiences expect comments to deal with the topic at hand. Keep the conversation civil. Express yourself in ways that are befitting of an educational environment. Post nothing threatening, s*xually explicit, or hateful here. Hateful includes derogatory statements targeting individuals o

Smithsonian Terms of Use: https://www.si.edu/termsofuse

Rules of Conduct

Stay on topic. The Smithsonian and its audiences expect comments to deal with the topic at hand. Keep the conversation civil. Express yourself in ways that are befitting of an educational environment. Post nothing threatening, s*xually explicit, or hateful here. Hateful includes derogatory statements targeting individuals o

Operating as usual

Labor Day started as a 19th-century celebration of the dignity of work. Learn some holiday history from our National Mus...
09/03/2021
The making of Labor Day

Labor Day started as a 19th-century celebration of the dignity of work. Learn some holiday history from our National Museum of American History.

Editor's Note: To commemorate Labor Day, the American Enterprise exhibition team will be highlighting some of the museum’s rich collections in labor history over the next two weeks. Today’s post includes a brief history of the holiday by historian Paul Buhle. Labor Day, in its origins a 19th cen...

We thought it might be a good time for kittens. This group comes from an oversize letter from Georges Mathieu, a French ...
09/01/2021

We thought it might be a good time for kittens. This group comes from an oversize letter from Georges Mathieu, a French painter, to painter Hedda Sterne.

Sterne lived in New York City and was known for working in many artistic styles, including surrealism and abstract expressionism. Her papers are in the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art. #BecauseOfHerStory

We thought it might be a good time for kittens. This group comes from an oversize letter from Georges Mathieu, a French painter, to painter Hedda Sterne.

Sterne lived in New York City and was known for working in many artistic styles, including surrealism and abstract expressionism. Her papers are in the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art. #BecauseOfHerStory

Back-to-school season is better with a buddy. This photo of a pair of young learners outside our Castle, from around 197...
08/31/2021

Back-to-school season is better with a buddy. This photo of a pair of young learners outside our Castle, from around 1970, comes from Smithsonian Institution Archives.

Educators can register for the free, virtual Smithsonian's Educator's Day on Friday, Sept. 17. This back-to-school program from Smithsonian Education will feature sessions led by teachers from across the country and educators from our museums, research centers and the National Zoo. Registration: s.si.edu/EducatorsDay2021 #SmithsonianEdu

Back-to-school season is better with a buddy. This photo of a pair of young learners outside our Castle, from around 1970, comes from Smithsonian Institution Archives.

Educators can register for the free, virtual Smithsonian's Educator's Day on Friday, Sept. 17. This back-to-school program from Smithsonian Education will feature sessions led by teachers from across the country and educators from our museums, research centers and the National Zoo. Registration: s.si.edu/EducatorsDay2021 #SmithsonianEdu

Which one of these swimsuits from our National Museum of American History are you wearing to the pool?
08/27/2021

Which one of these swimsuits from our National Museum of American History are you wearing to the pool?

08/26/2021
Race and Our Shared Future Forum

Our virtual #RaceAndOurSharedFuture forum features Smithsonian scholars in conversation with authors, experts and activists about racism, wealth and wellness. Join us on Thursday, Aug. 26 at 7 p.m. ET. oursharedfuture.si.edu/events

Join us Thursday, Aug. 26 at 7 pm ET to explore our nation’s systems of wealth and wellness and their impact on communit...
08/25/2021
The Relationship Between Race and Wellness Has Never Been More Pressing

Join us Thursday, Aug. 26 at 7 pm ET to explore our nation’s systems of wealth and wellness and their impact on communities of color. Together, we will confront our history and unite to bring healing and hope for our future. #RaceAndOurSharedFuture

A new Smithsonian initiative kicks off this week with a virtual summit examining these urgent issues

In 1971, a small group of volunteers noticed that local Chinatown residents in New York City needed doctors who understo...
08/19/2021

In 1971, a small group of volunteers noticed that local Chinatown residents in New York City needed doctors who understood their languages and cultural backgrounds. Sparked by a growing concern over inadequate health care services, they organized a street health fair to arrange for screenings, translate health care information, and raise money to build a free clinic.

Thanks to an outpouring of community support, the Chinatown Health Clinic opened its doors later that year and was run entirely by volunteer medical staff and students. Photo from our National Museum of American History.

This week we are sharing objects from museums across the Smithsonian that shed light on discriminatory systems of wellness and wealth for communities of color. Tune in on Thursday, Aug. 26 for a virtual forum examining how these systems have perpetuated racism and how we can re-imagine our shared future. Follow along and visit oursharedfuture.si.edu to learn more. #RaceAndOurSharedFuture

In 1971, a small group of volunteers noticed that local Chinatown residents in New York City needed doctors who understood their languages and cultural backgrounds. Sparked by a growing concern over inadequate health care services, they organized a street health fair to arrange for screenings, translate health care information, and raise money to build a free clinic.

Thanks to an outpouring of community support, the Chinatown Health Clinic opened its doors later that year and was run entirely by volunteer medical staff and students. Photo from our National Museum of American History.

This week we are sharing objects from museums across the Smithsonian that shed light on discriminatory systems of wellness and wealth for communities of color. Tune in on Thursday, Aug. 26 for a virtual forum examining how these systems have perpetuated racism and how we can re-imagine our shared future. Follow along and visit oursharedfuture.si.edu to learn more. #RaceAndOurSharedFuture

In the 1960s, city planning commissioners and private developers in East Harlem, New York, targeted specific communities...
08/18/2021

In the 1960s, city planning commissioners and private developers in East Harlem, New York, targeted specific communities for what was then called, “urban renewal.” These communities were often labeled as slums, a characterization that residents and activists rejected. Photographer Hiram Maristany, born and raised in East Harlem, asserted a different perspective of the neighborhood known as El Barrio, portraying a community filled with life and culture. Maristany’s photographs, many in the Smithsonian American Art Museum and the Renwick Gallery collection, challenged the notion of the inner city as a place of decay and crime.

This week we are sharing objects from museums across the Smithsonian that shed light on discriminatory systems of wellness and wealth for communities of color. Tune in on Thursday, Aug. 26 for a virtual forum examining how these systems have perpetuated racism and how we can re-imagine our shared future. Follow along and visit oursharedfuture.si.edu to learn more. #RaceAndOurSharedFuture

📷: "Kite Flying on Rooftop" by Hiram Maristany, 1964. Gelatin silver print. Smithsonian American Art Museum; Museum purchase through the Smithsonian Latino Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Latino Center © 1964 Hiram Maristany

In the 1960s, city planning commissioners and private developers in East Harlem, New York, targeted specific communities for what was then called, “urban renewal.” These communities were often labeled as slums, a characterization that residents and activists rejected. Photographer Hiram Maristany, born and raised in East Harlem, asserted a different perspective of the neighborhood known as El Barrio, portraying a community filled with life and culture. Maristany’s photographs, many in the Smithsonian American Art Museum and the Renwick Gallery collection, challenged the notion of the inner city as a place of decay and crime.

This week we are sharing objects from museums across the Smithsonian that shed light on discriminatory systems of wellness and wealth for communities of color. Tune in on Thursday, Aug. 26 for a virtual forum examining how these systems have perpetuated racism and how we can re-imagine our shared future. Follow along and visit oursharedfuture.si.edu to learn more. #RaceAndOurSharedFuture

📷: "Kite Flying on Rooftop" by Hiram Maristany, 1964. Gelatin silver print. Smithsonian American Art Museum; Museum purchase through the Smithsonian Latino Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Latino Center © 1964 Hiram Maristany

A baby gets a check-up at a 1970s Chicago health clinic run by the Black Panther Party, a national political organizatio...
08/17/2021

A baby gets a check-up at a 1970s Chicago health clinic run by the Black Panther Party, a national political organization that advocated against police brutality and created “survival programs” for Black communities. The party defined wellness broadly and provided legal aid, distributed food and clothing, and set up free health clinics to address a lack of accessible and affordable health care.

Their advocacy and work in public health informed programs that exist today to address racial disparities in social and economic conditions as well as in healthcare. Photo from our Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture

This week we are sharing objects from museums across the Smithsonian that shed light on discriminatory systems of wellness and wealth for communities of color. Tune in on Thursday, Aug. 26 for a virtual forum examining how these systems have perpetuated racism and how we can re-imagine our shared future. Follow along and visit oursharedfuture.si.edu to learn more. #RaceAndOurSharedFuture

📷: "Doctor Examines Baby at Health Clinic Run by the Black
Panther Party, Chicago, Illinois, 1970" by Stephen Shames, 1970. Silver and photographic gelatin on photographic paper. Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of
African American History and Culture © Stephen Shames

A baby gets a check-up at a 1970s Chicago health clinic run by the Black Panther Party, a national political organization that advocated against police brutality and created “survival programs” for Black communities. The party defined wellness broadly and provided legal aid, distributed food and clothing, and set up free health clinics to address a lack of accessible and affordable health care.

Their advocacy and work in public health informed programs that exist today to address racial disparities in social and economic conditions as well as in healthcare. Photo from our Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture

This week we are sharing objects from museums across the Smithsonian that shed light on discriminatory systems of wellness and wealth for communities of color. Tune in on Thursday, Aug. 26 for a virtual forum examining how these systems have perpetuated racism and how we can re-imagine our shared future. Follow along and visit oursharedfuture.si.edu to learn more. #RaceAndOurSharedFuture

📷: "Doctor Examines Baby at Health Clinic Run by the Black
Panther Party, Chicago, Illinois, 1970" by Stephen Shames, 1970. Silver and photographic gelatin on photographic paper. Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of
African American History and Culture © Stephen Shames

The 1968 Poor People's Campaign brought together a community of advocates demanding economic justice, the right to a dec...
08/16/2021

The 1968 Poor People's Campaign brought together a community of advocates demanding economic justice, the right to a decent life, and dignity. By taking up residence on the National Mall for six weeks in a temporary camp called Resurrection City, the movement drew national and international attention to poverty that affected a large part of the population. The multiracial, multiethnic coalition has inspired new generations of social justice activism. This poster is one of many objects in our National Museum of American History's collection from the campaign.

This week we are sharing objects from museums across the Smithsonian that shed light on discriminatory systems of wellness and wealth for communities of color. Tune in on Thursday, Aug. 26 for our virtual forum examining how these systems have perpetuated racism and how we can re-imagine our shared future. Follow along and visit oursharedfuture.si.edu to learn more. #RaceAndOurSharedFuture

The 1968 Poor People's Campaign brought together a community of advocates demanding economic justice, the right to a decent life, and dignity. By taking up residence on the National Mall for six weeks in a temporary camp called Resurrection City, the movement drew national and international attention to poverty that affected a large part of the population. The multiracial, multiethnic coalition has inspired new generations of social justice activism. This poster is one of many objects in our National Museum of American History's collection from the campaign.

This week we are sharing objects from museums across the Smithsonian that shed light on discriminatory systems of wellness and wealth for communities of color. Tune in on Thursday, Aug. 26 for our virtual forum examining how these systems have perpetuated racism and how we can re-imagine our shared future. Follow along and visit oursharedfuture.si.edu to learn more. #RaceAndOurSharedFuture

08/13/2021
Our Shared Future: Reckoning with Our Racial Past

Today we launch Our Shared Future: Reckoning with Our Racial Past, an initiative that will provide tools and resources to support the work of confronting race and racism in America and spark positive social change. Explore virtual forums, in-person and digital exhibitions, film screenings, educational materials and more. https://oursharedfuture.si.edu/race

#RaceAndOurSharedFuture

Today marks the Smithsonian’s 175th birthday!Driven by the belief that knowledge and curiosity have the capacity to chan...
08/10/2021
Celebrate Your Smithsonian!

Today marks the Smithsonian’s 175th birthday!

Driven by the belief that knowledge and curiosity have the capacity to change the world for the better, the Smithsonian was established on August 10, 1846.

Join the celebrations by making a birthday gift to ensure your Smithsonian can continue inspiring curiosity in generations to come! https://s.si.edu/3x90HuB

You can support the Smithsonian, the world's largest museum and research complex, with 19 museums, 9 research centers, and affiliates around the world.

Today is our birthday! The Smithsonian was officially created 175 years ago today, on Aug. 10, 1846. This Smithsonian ba...
08/10/2021

Today is our birthday! The Smithsonian was officially created 175 years ago today, on Aug. 10, 1846.

This Smithsonian baby photo is the earliest-known photo of our Smithsonian Institution Building, known as the Castle. It was taken in 1850 by William and Frank Langenheim, and is the only image we have of the building under construction—see if you can spot a crane rising over the North Tower. #Smithsonian175

Today is our birthday! The Smithsonian was officially created 175 years ago today, on Aug. 10, 1846.

This Smithsonian baby photo is the earliest-known photo of our Smithsonian Institution Building, known as the Castle. It was taken in 1850 by William and Frank Langenheim, and is the only image we have of the building under construction—see if you can spot a crane rising over the North Tower. #Smithsonian175

Tomorrow is a special day for your Smithsonian!When the Smithsonian was established 175 years ago, it set into motion a ...
08/09/2021
Sign the Card!

Tomorrow is a special day for your Smithsonian!

When the Smithsonian was established 175 years ago, it set into motion a bold vision of discovering and sharing knowledge with everyone, everywhere.

Join Smithsonian supporters from around the world in signing the digital birthday card to help celebrate 175 years of sharing knowledge far and wide! https://s.si.edu/3lanIuI

You can support the Smithsonian, the world's largest museum and research complex, with 19 museums, 9 research centers, and affiliates around the world.

This tea bowl was once broken, but made whole again with gold.✨The 17th century piece in our Smithsonian's National Muse...
08/06/2021

This tea bowl was once broken, but made whole again with gold.✨

The 17th century piece in our Smithsonian's National Museum of Asian Art was repaired with a Japanese technique known as kintsugi (golden joinery) or kintsuguroi (golden repairs). The repairs were done using lacquer, a natural resin made from tree sap, sprinkled with powdered gold. Unlike many restoration techniques that work to hide previous damage, this technique not only accepts but highlights the life of the object.

Leading up to our 175th birthday on Aug. 10, we’re sharing some of your favorite social media posts from over the years. #Smithsonian175

This tea bowl was once broken, but made whole again with gold.✨

The 17th century piece in our Smithsonian's National Museum of Asian Art was repaired with a Japanese technique known as kintsugi (golden joinery) or kintsuguroi (golden repairs). The repairs were done using lacquer, a natural resin made from tree sap, sprinkled with powdered gold. Unlike many restoration techniques that work to hide previous damage, this technique not only accepts but highlights the life of the object.

Leading up to our 175th birthday on Aug. 10, we’re sharing some of your favorite social media posts from over the years. #Smithsonian175

We're feeling the love in this drawing by Christina Malman from our Cooper Hewitt's collection. Malman was best known as...
08/05/2021

We're feeling the love in this drawing by Christina Malman from our Cooper Hewitt's collection. Malman was best known as a cartoonist for The New Yorker, and this piece—“Woman and a Dog"—was published in a 1935 issue, just as she was starting her career.

Leading up to our 175th birthday on Aug. 10, we’re sharing some of your favorite social media posts from over the years. #Smithsonian175

We're feeling the love in this drawing by Christina Malman from our Cooper Hewitt's collection. Malman was best known as a cartoonist for The New Yorker, and this piece—“Woman and a Dog"—was published in a 1935 issue, just as she was starting her career.

Leading up to our 175th birthday on Aug. 10, we’re sharing some of your favorite social media posts from over the years. #Smithsonian175

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