The George Washington University Museum and The Textile Museum

The George Washington University Museum and The Textile Museum Located in the heart of Washington, D.C., the George Washington University Museum and The Textile Museum celebrates the creative achievements of local and global cultures from antiquity through today.
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The George Washington University Museum and The Textile Museum unites the Textile Museum's collection and the Albert H. Small Washingtoniana collection.

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Connect past and present with our latest #InTheLoop textile features:Read about the power and symbolism of flags in Sony...
06/22/2021
Sewing with African Wax Print Fabric

Connect past and present with our latest #InTheLoop textile features:

Read about the power and symbolism of flags in Sonya Clark's exhibition at National Museum of Women in the Arts: https://nmwa.org/blog/nmwa-exhibitions/forming-a-more-perfect-union/

Check out the virtual exhibition on a historical kimono house from Worcester Art Museum "Kimono Culture: The Art of Chiso": https://www.worcesterart.org/exhibitions/kimono-couture/

Consider the creative possibilities of wax print fabric with a recent publication from Adaku Parker, "Sewing with African Wax Print Fabric" ($): https://www.simonandschuster.com/books/Sewing-with-African-Wax-Print-Fabric/Adaku-Parker/9781782498773

All the techniques, step-by-step instructions, and patterns you need to make 25 African wax print garments and accessories.INCLUDES FULL SIZE PATTERNS...

Today’s #MondayMotivation comes from multimedia artist Do Ho Suh whose work explores domestic space. Suh taps into our p...
06/21/2021
Do Ho Suh - Artists - Lehmann Maupin

Today’s #MondayMotivation comes from multimedia artist Do Ho Suh whose work explores domestic space. Suh taps into our psychological reactions to spaces by creating sculptural installations of homes from around the globe.

What sort of emotions do these translucent structures stir in you?

https://www.lehmannmaupin.com/artists/do-ho-suh

Since its establishment more than two decades ago Lehmann Maupin has identified and cultivated the careers of an international roster of visionary and historically significant artists.

This is a Buddhist temple banner. It was woven in Japan in the mid-19th century.Banners with dragons, like this one, wou...
06/18/2021

This is a Buddhist temple banner. It was woven in Japan in the mid-19th century.

Banners with dragons, like this one, would have been hung in the main hall of a Buddhist temple for special occasions. Dragons were common in ritual paraphernalia and seen as protectors of Buddha and Buddhist law. Viewed as beneficent creatures, they are often associated with water, rainfall and, by extension, fertility and prosperity. This banner shows a dragon depicted in gilt paper rising from the sea #FabricFriday

Buddhist temple banner, Japan, mid-19th century. Silk, gilt paper; satin weave with supplementary weft patterning; 271 x 67 cm. The Textile Museum Collection 2011.9.1. Museum purchase

This is a Buddhist temple banner. It was woven in Japan in the mid-19th century.

Banners with dragons, like this one, would have been hung in the main hall of a Buddhist temple for special occasions. Dragons were common in ritual paraphernalia and seen as protectors of Buddha and Buddhist law. Viewed as beneficent creatures, they are often associated with water, rainfall and, by extension, fertility and prosperity. This banner shows a dragon depicted in gilt paper rising from the sea #FabricFriday

Buddhist temple banner, Japan, mid-19th century. Silk, gilt paper; satin weave with supplementary weft patterning; 271 x 67 cm. The Textile Museum Collection 2011.9.1. Museum purchase

Get to know Sarah Fee, senior curator of global fashion and textiles at the Royal Ontario Museum in Toronto, Canada. Dr....
06/17/2021

Get to know Sarah Fee, senior curator of global fashion and textiles at the Royal Ontario Museum in Toronto, Canada. Dr. Fee oversees its collection of textiles and related objects from Asia, Africa and the Islamic world. She is also a member of The Textile Museum Journal editorial board and guest editor for volume 48, coming out this November.

Dr. Fee says, “It has been exciting to work with this multidisciplinary group of scholars representing so many parts of Africa and the Diaspora. Each article gives new insights into the incredible textile creativity of the continent and its global connections, past, present and future.”

Get to know Sarah Fee, senior curator of global fashion and textiles at the Royal Ontario Museum in Toronto, Canada. Dr. Fee oversees its collection of textiles and related objects from Asia, Africa and the Islamic world. She is also a member of The Textile Museum Journal editorial board and guest editor for volume 48, coming out this November.

Dr. Fee says, “It has been exciting to work with this multidisciplinary group of scholars representing so many parts of Africa and the Diaspora. Each article gives new insights into the incredible textile creativity of the continent and its global connections, past, present and future.”

Used across a wide variety of textiles, appliqué techniques allow flexibility in design creation. Can you tell which typ...
06/16/2021

Used across a wide variety of textiles, appliqué techniques allow flexibility in design creation.

Can you tell which types of appliqué create the designs on this Kuna mola (top) and Indian "chaklo" (bottom)?
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Left: Mola blouse, Panama, San Blas Islands, 20th century. Cotton; machine woven, plain weave, appliqué; 54 x 50 cm. The Textile Museum Collection 1968.12.4. Museum purchase
Right: Wall hanging (chaklo), India, 20th century. Cotton, appliqué, 79 x 79 cm. The Textile Museum Collection 1973.14.11. Gift of Ronald Harvey Goodman

Go on some virtual adventures with this week's #InTheLoop features:Take a virtual walk around the contemporary galleries...
06/15/2021
Saeksilnubi — Tatter

Go on some virtual adventures with this week's #InTheLoop features:

Take a virtual walk around the contemporary galleries at the Cleveland Museum of Art, featuring contemporary textile artists: https://medium.com/cma-thinker/around-the-world-in-five-minutes-b5b01fc7ee70

Let your ears travel to Vienna with an audio tour of the exhibition "Women Artists of the Wiener Werkstatte": https://soundcloud.com/makwien/audio-tour-women-artists-of-the-wiener-werkstatte

Try your hand at "saeksil nubi," a Korean quilting technique, at an upcoming workshop from Tatter ($): https://www.tatter.org/tatter-events/2021/6/26/saeksilnubi

Saeksilnubi is a Korean traditional craft that uses two layers of fabrics, cords made with hanji (Korean mulberry paper), and colorful threads to make a quilted texture. Hanji cord or cotton cord were used as a batting or stuffing. This type of quilting was utilitarian in its purpose. Most

Embrace the power of communal storytelling with today’s #MondayMotivation from Marie Watt. Watt both draws from her own ...
06/14/2021
Marie Watt Studio

Embrace the power of communal storytelling with today’s #MondayMotivation from Marie Watt. Watt both draws from her own Indigenous heritage on independent projects and works on large-scale projects where community involvement is encouraged.

Do you prefer working alone or communally on textile projects?

https://www.mariewattstudio.com/

The online home and catalogue of American artist Marie Watt.

This is a sari woven in the south Indian city of Karuppur for the ruling family of Tanjore (Thanjavur). It was made in t...
06/11/2021

This is a sari woven in the south Indian city of Karuppur for the ruling family of Tanjore (Thanjavur). It was made in the 19th century.

Saris like this one – with a subtle hint of gold embedded in deep red – evolved under the patronage of the Maratha ruler Serfoji Raja Bhonsle Chhatrapati II (1787-1832). The craft died out when royal patronage was withdrawn in the mid-19th century. This sumptuous example stretches nearly 30 feet long and would have been very expensive to make #FabricFriday

Sari, woven in Karuppur for the Tanjore court, South India, 19th century. Cotton, gold-wrapped yarn; plain weave, supplementary-weft patterning, tapestry weave, resist dyed (drawn resist), mordant dyed; 907 x 107 cm. The Textile Museum Collection 6.78. Acquired by George Hewitt Myers in 1936

This is a sari woven in the south Indian city of Karuppur for the ruling family of Tanjore (Thanjavur). It was made in the 19th century.

Saris like this one – with a subtle hint of gold embedded in deep red – evolved under the patronage of the Maratha ruler Serfoji Raja Bhonsle Chhatrapati II (1787-1832). The craft died out when royal patronage was withdrawn in the mid-19th century. This sumptuous example stretches nearly 30 feet long and would have been very expensive to make #FabricFriday

Sari, woven in Karuppur for the Tanjore court, South India, 19th century. Cotton, gold-wrapped yarn; plain weave, supplementary-weft patterning, tapestry weave, resist dyed (drawn resist), mordant dyed; 907 x 107 cm. The Textile Museum Collection 6.78. Acquired by George Hewitt Myers in 1936

One of the ways to change from one color area to another in tapestry weave is by interlocking or looping the two colored...
06/09/2021

One of the ways to change from one color area to another in tapestry weave is by interlocking or looping the two colored wefts together where they meet each other.

How do the design elements of this Inca fragment (top) and the contemporary “Time’s Arrow” (bottom) benefit from interlocked tapestry weave?
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Left: Band fragment, Peru, 14th century. Camelid hair, interlocked tapestry weave, 12 x 39 cm. Cotsen Textile Traces Study Collection T-1607. Photo by Bruce M. White
Right: Rose Owens for Gloria F. Ross Tapestries, Kenneth Noland; "Time's Arrow," 1991. Wool, interlocked tapestry weave, 107 x 107 cm. The Textile Museum Collection 1998.2.2. Gift of Gloria F. Ross

Take some deep dives with this week's #InTheLoop features: Peer into the Greek embroideries of the Ashmolean Museum with...
06/08/2021
3D textiles could "replace concrete and cement" in construction says Hella Jongerius

Take some deep dives with this week's #InTheLoop features:

Peer into the Greek embroideries of the Ashmolean Museum with the online exhibition "Mediterranean Threads": https://www.ashmolean.org/event/mediterranean-threads

Explore the intersection of textiles and painting through an interview from The Phillips Collection with artist Eric N. Mack: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HBcp2wXwXhQ

Hear designer Hella Jongerius' case for using 3D textiles in building construction: https://www.dezeen.com/2021/04/30/3d-weaving-architecture-hella-jongerius/

New three-dimensional weaving technologies could revolutionise architecture and lead to lighter, more flexible buildings, according to Dutch designer Hella Jongerius.

Find some #MondayMotivation in the intricate work of Ghanian sculptor El Anatsui. By experimenting with materials, such ...
06/07/2021
El Anatsui

Find some #MondayMotivation in the intricate work of Ghanian sculptor El Anatsui. By experimenting with materials, such as recycled bottle caps, his works embrace flexibility while provoking conversations about consumption, colonialism and more.

What are your favorite materials to experiment with in your work?

https://elanatsui.art/

El Anatsui is a Ghanaian sculptor active for much of his career in Nigeria. He has drawn particular international attention for his iconic 'bottle-top' installations.

This is a cover or hanging from the village of Arraoilos in central Portugal. It was woven in the 17th century. The desi...
06/04/2021

This is a cover or hanging from the village of Arraoilos in central Portugal. It was woven in the 17th century.

The design resembles 16th- and 17th-century rugs imported from Safavid Iran, especially the sumptuous Kashan silk carpets. These carpets have medallions with floral and animal imagery. Portuguese embroiderers artfully reformulated Kashan designs when creating textiles like this one #FabricFriday

Cover or hanging, Portugal, Arraiolos, 17th century. Linen, wool; plain weave, embroidered in herringbone stitch; 385 x 178 cm. The Textile Museum Collection R44.6.1. Acquired by George Hewitt Myers in 1945

This is a cover or hanging from the village of Arraoilos in central Portugal. It was woven in the 17th century.

The design resembles 16th- and 17th-century rugs imported from Safavid Iran, especially the sumptuous Kashan silk carpets. These carpets have medallions with floral and animal imagery. Portuguese embroiderers artfully reformulated Kashan designs when creating textiles like this one #FabricFriday

Cover or hanging, Portugal, Arraiolos, 17th century. Linen, wool; plain weave, embroidered in herringbone stitch; 385 x 178 cm. The Textile Museum Collection R44.6.1. Acquired by George Hewitt Myers in 1945

Twill weave is recognized by appearance of the diagonal lines in the weave created by a specific interlacing order of th...
06/02/2021

Twill weave is recognized by appearance of the diagonal lines in the weave created by a specific interlacing order of the warps and wefts. However, this structure can be adapted to produce a variety of patterns.

Between this Kalinga blanket (left) and Kashmir sash (right), which do you think uses diamond twill to distinguish itself?
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Left: Blanket, Philippines, mid-20th century. Cotton, twill weave, 163 x 138 cm. The Textile Museum Colletion 2015.5.3. From the collection of Margaret and Daniel Sullivan
Right: Sash, India, Kashmir, 18th century. Cotton, silk; twill weave, supplementary-weft patterning; 244 x 48 cm. The Textile Museum Collection 6.130. Acquired by George Hewitt Myers in 1947

Stay #InTheLoop this week with some interactive textile experiences:Register for a virtual talk on Egyptian textiles fro...
06/01/2021
Weaving Connections: Local Perspectives on Collections from the Middle East, North and West Africa

Stay #InTheLoop this week with some interactive textile experiences:

Register for a virtual talk on Egyptian textiles from Harvard Art Museums: https://harvardartmuseums.org/calendar/art-talk-live-up-close-and-personal-looking-at-ancient-textiles-1

Learn about the future of natural fabrics with this New York Times interactive story: https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2021/04/22/style/fabrics-from-your-fridge.html

Explore the Jenny Balfour-Paul Collection at the Pitt Rivers Museum with the virtual exhibition "Weaving Connections": https://www.prm.ox.ac.uk/event/weaving-connections-0

Highlight objects and photographs from the Jenny Balfour-Paul collection with interpretations by Multaka-Oxford volunteers.

05/31/2021
Françoise Grossen

Get tangled up in the braiding and knotting techniques of artist Francoise Grossen for today’s #MondayMotivation. Over the course of her career, Grossen has experimented with presenting her sculptures suspended in air, resting on land and floating in water.

How do your textiles interact with the elements around them?

http://www.francoisegrossen.com/

The southern patio of a friend, a school studio and later large loft spaces allowed me to develop a body of work from the Miniatures to 3-story high walls of braided or knotted rope. A few ceiling hooks, pulleys, a choice of different height stools, a couple of high ladders (the r

This is a woman’s headcover (tarf er-ras) from the Kerkennah Islands in Tunisia. It was woven in the early 20th century....
05/28/2021

This is a woman’s headcover (tarf er-ras) from the Kerkennah Islands in Tunisia. It was woven in the early 20th century.

A woman would wear a headcloth like this one for festive occasions along with a wrapped garment called a “tarf el-ktef.” These garments are worn in a regional style that is distinct from those worn on the mainland.

The headcovers are embellished with embroidery that is planned with a careful eye to the final, three-dimensional appearance on the body #FabricFriday

Headcover (tarf er-ras), Tunisia, Islands of Kerkennah, c. 1900-1950. Wool, cotton; plain weave with supplementary-weft patterning; 152 x 87 cm. The Textile Museum Collection 2003.26.2. The Irmtraud H. Reswick Collection.

This is a woman’s headcover (tarf er-ras) from the Kerkennah Islands in Tunisia. It was woven in the early 20th century.

A woman would wear a headcloth like this one for festive occasions along with a wrapped garment called a “tarf el-ktef.” These garments are worn in a regional style that is distinct from those worn on the mainland.

The headcovers are embellished with embroidery that is planned with a careful eye to the final, three-dimensional appearance on the body #FabricFriday

Headcover (tarf er-ras), Tunisia, Islands of Kerkennah, c. 1900-1950. Wool, cotton; plain weave with supplementary-weft patterning; 152 x 87 cm. The Textile Museum Collection 2003.26.2. The Irmtraud H. Reswick Collection.

Check out this month’s fashion-forward book recommendation from librarian Tracy Meserve:“'Maison Lesage: Haute Couture E...
05/27/2021

Check out this month’s fashion-forward book recommendation from librarian Tracy Meserve:

“'Maison Lesage: Haute Couture Embroidery' tells the story of the renowned Parisian embroidery house Maison Lesage. Started in 1924 by Albert Lesage, the house has stayed in the family ever since its founding. Over its nearly 100-year history, it has worked with some of the biggest names in fashion: Schiaparelli, Dior, Balenciaga, Saint Laurent and Chanel to name a few.

Elsa Schiaparelli was one of the first designers to work with Lesage, working closely with the house from 1934 until the closing of her own house in 1954. Pictured here is a wool cape in Schiaparelli's signature shocking pink with a sequined sun, which was made by Lesage for Schiaparelli's successful Astrology collection in 1938.” -Tracy Meserve #LibraryInsights

Check out this month’s fashion-forward book recommendation from librarian Tracy Meserve:

“'Maison Lesage: Haute Couture Embroidery' tells the story of the renowned Parisian embroidery house Maison Lesage. Started in 1924 by Albert Lesage, the house has stayed in the family ever since its founding. Over its nearly 100-year history, it has worked with some of the biggest names in fashion: Schiaparelli, Dior, Balenciaga, Saint Laurent and Chanel to name a few.

Elsa Schiaparelli was one of the first designers to work with Lesage, working closely with the house from 1934 until the closing of her own house in 1954. Pictured here is a wool cape in Schiaparelli's signature shocking pink with a sequined sun, which was made by Lesage for Schiaparelli's successful Astrology collection in 1938.” -Tracy Meserve #LibraryInsights

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Thursday 11:00 - 19:00
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Saturday 10:00 - 17:00
Sunday 13:00 - 17:00

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(202) 994-5200

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Located in the heart of Washington, D.C., the George Washington University Museum and The Textile Museum celebrates the creative achievements of local and global cultures from antiquity through today. The museum unites The Textile Museum, established in 1925, and the Albert H. Small Center for National Capital Area Studies to engage the university and the wider community through collections, scholarship, exhibitions, and educational programs.