United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

United States Holocaust Memorial Museum A living memorial to the Holocaust, the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum (www.ushmm.org) inspires citizens and leaders worldwide to confront hatred, prevent genocide, and promote human dignity.
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The purpose of this page is to share information about Museum programs and resources; memorialize the Nazis’ victims; launch discussion about the Holocaust and its relevance today; and raise awareness that antisemitism, hatred, and genocide are ongoing threats and that we each have a role in combating them. Towards these goals, we welcome your feedback about our efforts and your contributions to our Wall about issues that are consistent with the Museum's mission to advance and disseminate knowledge about the Holocaust; to preserve the memory of those who suffered; and to encourage people to reflect upon the moral and spiritual questions raised by the events of the Holocaust as well as their own responsibilities as global citizens. The Museum strives to keep our Wall a forum that is open and welcoming to many issues and opinions. Towards that goal, we reserve the right to remove posts and comments that violate the following guidelines. Repeat offenders may be banned: 1. Stay on topic—all contributions to this page should be relevant to its stated purpose (see above). 2. Provide appropriate explanatory context for posted links, photos, and videos. 3. Be courteous. Do not use vulgarity or threaten or abuse others. 4. Challenge ideas and opinions, but refrain from attacks against groups or individuals. 5. Do not solicit or market products. 6. Repeated posts to our Wall may be treated as SPAM and deleted; repeat offenders may be banned. 7. We appreciate, and will address, honest questions about the complexity of Holocaust history. But, posts that disseminate misleading or historically inaccurate information may be deleted. Please direct concerns and suggestions regarding the Museum's exhibitions and programs to http://www.ushmm.org/museum/contact/.

04/21/2020
2020 Days of Remembrance Commemoration

Join us as our nation comes together to remember the victims of the Holocaust, honor the survivors, and pay tribute to the liberators during Days of Remembrance on April 21. Please show your commitment to keeping the memory of the Holocaust alive by watching this virtual commemoration, featuring Holocaust survivors' tributes to family members they lost, a stirring message from Benjamin Ferencz (the last living Nuremberg prosecutor), and timeless words from the late Elie Wiesel.

04/21/2020
#WeRemember

It is impossible to picture six million people at once; to read six million names; to know six million stories. But by reading one story, saying one name, sharing one person’s legacy, you keep a memory alive.

Join us today in remembrance of the stories of persecution, of survival, and of resilience as #WeRemember the Holocaust.

04/20/2020
Ringelblum Archive Preservation

Diaries. Photographs. Poetry. Last will and testaments. Learn about the Warsaw ghetto inhabitants who risked their lives to write their own history. Seventy-seven years ago this week, they buried the last of their writings, detailing the inhumane conditions in the ghetto and its true, murderous purpose. Only three members of the secret society who chronicled daily life in the ghetto would survive. Learn about efforts to preserve this important archive of the Holocaust.

04/20/2020
Ruth Cohen Remembers

Holocaust survivor Ruth Cohen remembers her younger brother, Aharon, who was killed at Auschwitz. Join us on Facebook on 4/21 at 11 a.m. ET, as #WeRemember the victims of the Holocaust and honor the survivors during our annual Days of Remembrance commemoration. ushmm.org/events/2020-dor?utm_medium=socialmedia&utm_source=facebook&utm_campaign=dor&utm_content=dorpromoandsurvivorstoryteaser:ruthcohen20200420

As we remember the victims of the Holocaust, it is important to bring to light why remembrance of these atrocities is ne...
04/20/2020
Origins of Neo-Nazi and White Supremacist Terms and Symbols: A Glossary

As we remember the victims of the Holocaust, it is important to bring to light why remembrance of these atrocities is necessary.

Today, neo-Nazis and White Supremacists continue to celebrate Hitler and his motives. Though the leaders of today’s organizations are not Adolf Hitler, and the United States is not Germany in the 1930s, the same words and symbols that were part of the ideology that led to the murder of six million Jews during the Holocaust are still used.

Along with remembering the victims and their experiences, we must learn about the hate that led to the Holocaust, how we can confront it, and how we uphold 'never again.'

The leaders of today’s Neo-Nazi and White Supremacist organizations are not Adolf Hitler, and America is not Germany, but, in order to understand their agenda, it is vital to understand the history of these code words, symbols, and ideologies.

Holocaust survivor Estelle Laughlin recalls the moment she and her family bolted into their underground bunker in the Wa...
04/19/2020
Estelle Laughlin: The Warsaw Ghetto Uprising -- United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

Holocaust survivor Estelle Laughlin recalls the moment she and her family bolted into their underground bunker in the Warsaw ghetto. "And you can imagine when we pulled the trap door closed and we stepped into this damp darkness, the ceiling closed in on us. . . . The ticking of the clock was our only connection with the universe outside, that’s how we knew when morning was rising, when the sun was setting. How abandoned I felt. How I craved for the open horizons, for the crispness, blue crispness of day."

On April 19, 1943, the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising began after German troops and police entered the ghetto to deport its surviving inhabitants. Ill-equipped Jewish fighters held off German SS and police units for nearly a month, but by May 16, the Germans had crushed the uprising and left the ghetto area in ruins. Surviving ghetto residents were deported to concentration camps or killing centers.

Listen to Estelle Laughlin describe the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising:

Estelle Laughlin discusses the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising, when German forces, intending to liquidate the ghetto on April 19, 1943, were stunned by an armed uprising from Jewish fighters. Estelle and her family hid in an underground bunker during the uprisi...

04/19/2020
Halina Peabody Remembers

Holocaust survivor Halina Peabody remembers her mother who narrowly escaped capture with her two young daughters. "I don't know anybody who was as brave as my mother when it came to her children," said Halina. #WeRemember

On this day in 1943, Jewish fighters in the Warsaw ghetto took up arms against Nazi SS and police units. German forces b...
04/19/2020
Warsaw Ghetto Uprising

On this day in 1943, Jewish fighters in the Warsaw ghetto took up arms against Nazi SS and police units. German forces began destroying the ghetto building by building. Hundreds of thousands had already been killed from the largest ghetto in German-occupied Poland.

On April 19, 1943, the Warsaw ghetto uprising began after German troops and police entered the ghetto to deport its surviving inhabitants. By May 16, 1943, the Germans had crushed the uprising a...

04/18/2020
Peter Gorog Remembers

“Millions of kisses to you,” Holocaust survivor Peter Gorog’s father wrote in postcards he sent to his wife and son from a forced labor camp. #WeRemember

Were there warning signs of what was to come when the Nazis came to power in 1933? The Holocaust, the systematic, state-...
04/18/2020
Introduction to the Holocaust

Were there warning signs of what was to come when the Nazis came to power in 1933?

The Holocaust, the systematic, state-sponsored murder of six million Jews and millions of others, did not happen overnight. Over the span of 12 years, the Nazi regime and its collaborators put into place laws, restrictions, propaganda, and fear.

Read about how it started:

The Holocaust was the systematic, bureaucratic, state-sponsored persecution and murder of six million Jews by the Nazi regime and its collaborators.

WATCH LIVE:https://www.facebook.com/holocaustmuseum/videos/2668580800088408/Every year, our nation comes together to rem...
04/18/2020

WATCH LIVE:
https://www.facebook.com/holocaustmuseum/videos/2668580800088408/

Every year, our nation comes together to remember the victims of the Holocaust, honor the survivors, and pay tribute to the liberators during our annual Days of Remembrance commemoration. Join us on Facebook on Tuesday, April 21, at 11 a.m. ET.

Honor the victims. Learn their stories. Say their names. ushmm.org/WeRemember
04/18/2020

Honor the victims. Learn their stories. Say their names.
ushmm.org/WeRemember

04/17/2020
Dora Klayman Remembers

Holocaust survivor Dora Klayman remembers her Aunt Giza, who sheltered Dora and her brother after their parents were deported to concentration camps in Croatia. Join us on Facebook on 4/21 at 11 a.m. ET, as #WeRemember the victims of the Holocaust and honor the survivors during our annual Days of Remembrance commemoration. ushmm.org/events/2020-dor?utm_medium=socialmedia&utm_source=facebook&utm_campaign=dor&utm_content=survivorstoryteaser:doraklayman20200417

#WeRemember Rosalia Wourgaft Schatz. Deported to Auschwitz. Gassed upon arrival.
04/17/2020
Rosalia Wourgaft Schatz

#WeRemember Rosalia Wourgaft Schatz. Deported to Auschwitz. Gassed upon arrival.

Rosalia Wourgaft Schatz Born: May 25, 1875 Tulchin, Ukraine Paris Drancy Auschwitz This content is available in the following languages عربي Español فارسی Français Türkçe Rosalia was raised by Jewish parents in the small, predominantly Jewish industrial...

04/16/2020
Susan Warsinger Remembers

“She made us feel loved and important. She made us feel safe when antisemitism was rampant in Germany,” said Holocaust survivor Susan Warsinger, remembering her great-aunt Anna. #WeRemember

#WeRemember Janka Glueck Gruenberger. Deported to Auschwitz with her daughters.
04/16/2020
Janka Glueck Gruenberger

#WeRemember Janka Glueck Gruenberger. Deported to Auschwitz with her daughters.

Janka Glueck Gruenberger Born: June 29, 1898 Kosice, Czechoslovakia Czechoslovakia Auschwitz This content is available in the following languages عربي Español فارسی Français Türkçe Janka was one of seven children raised in a Yiddish-and Hungarian-speaking household by religious Jewish p...

"We tell these stories because perhaps we know that not to listen, not to want to know, would lead you to indifference, ...
04/16/2020
Holocaust Encyclopedia | Identification Card

"We tell these stories because perhaps we know that not to listen, not to want to know, would lead you to indifference, and indifference is never an answer."— Elie Wiesel

Follow us this month as we honor the memory of the survivors and victims of the Holocaust through Days of Remembrance, our nation's annual commemoration of the Holocaust.

We would like to thank The Crown and Goodman Family and the Abe and Ida Cooper Foundation for supporting the ongoing work to create content and resources for the Holocaust Encyclopedia. View the list of all donors.

04/15/2020
We Remember Munzer Family

Holocaust survivor Alfred Münzer was just a baby when his parents made the agonizing decision to place him in hiding. Family photographs and objects now link him to his father and sisters. #WeRemember

04/15/2020
Days of Remembrance: Share Their Stories

It is impossible to picture six million people at once; to read six million names; to know six million stories. But by reading one story, saying one name, sharing one person’s legacy, you keep a memory alive.

This year, we ask you to share the stories of persecution, of survival, and of resilience as #WeRemember the Holocaust.

On this day 75 years ago, the British army entered the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp in northern Germany. The soldier...
04/15/2020
The 11th Armoured Division (Great Britain)

On this day 75 years ago, the British army entered the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp in northern Germany. The soldiers were totally unprepared for what they found. More than 60,000 prisoners were living in the camp, many of them seriously ill. Thousands of corpses lay unburied on the ground. "Never in my life have I seen such damnable ghastliness,” said Reverend T.J. Stretch, who was part of the British force occupying the camp.

The camp population had increased dramatically in the previous four months, when the Nazis evacuated prisoners to Bergen-Belsen from camps closer to the front. The food supply dwindled, and prisoners sometimes went days without anything to eat. Sanitation was also incredibly inadequate, leading to an outbreak of diseases including typhus, tuberculosis, and dysentery.

After liberation, more than 13,000 former prisoners died at Bergen-Belsen. After evacuating the remaining survivors, British forces burned down the entire camp to prevent the spread of typhus.

The discovery of the Bergen-Belsen camp and the horrendous conditions there made on powerful impact on public opinion in Great Britain and elsewh...

04/14/2020
Resilience After Liberation

After liberation, Holocaust survivors faced new struggles but rebuilt their lives. They married, fueled a baby boom, and reclaimed their humanity—opening schools, celebrating holidays, and rekindling religious life.

We are sorry that we couldn't join you live today on Facebook to share stories of resilience after liberation. We are ha...
04/14/2020

We are sorry that we couldn't join you live today on Facebook to share stories of resilience after liberation. We are having some technical difficulties. This episode will be available on demand later today.

“It's amazing how much suffering a human being can endure—and remain human. We survived with love for humanity, with com...
04/14/2020

“It's amazing how much suffering a human being can endure—and remain human. We survived with love for humanity, with compassion, and with joy of life.” But liberation was not a simple, happy ending for Estelle Laughlin. Like so many others who survived the Holocaust, she faced new struggles as she rebuilt her life. Join us live today on Facebook at 9:30 a.m. ET for a conversation with Museum experts about the resilience of survivors 75 years after liberation.

The liberation of Nazi concentration camps not only saved the lives of hundreds of thousands of people, it also led to d...
04/13/2020
Dora-Mittelbau: Overview

The liberation of Nazi concentration camps not only saved the lives of hundreds of thousands of people, it also led to discoveries of technology that the Nazi regime had kept secret throughout the war.

When American soldiers liberated the Dora-Mittelbau concentration camp in April 1945, they discovered and seized V-1 and V-2 rockets, which the Nazis used prisoner labor to build. The rockets were powerful German-made weapons designed to combat Allied forces.

During the Cold War, the American military developed “Operation Paperclip” and recruited German scientists, technicians, and physicians to share their expertise of V-2 technology, attempting to keep these advancements from the Soviet Union.

Despite the fact that former Nazis were technically ineligible for recruitment into the program, the US government ignored these restrictions to capitalize on Nazi scientists’ revolutionary weaponry development.

The same technology created to cause harm during World War II later benefited the American space and military programs, but at an ethical price.

Find topics of interest and explore encyclopedia content related to those topics

04/13/2020
Next Chapter: At the Heart of Antiquing

"Going antiquing, it just gives me an incredible feeling. My husband, Sidney, and I go to an antique fair. It's like a hobby—somebody else goes to a ballgame. It's a part of who we are."

When Louise Lawrence Israels and her family were in hiding during the Holocaust, her father leveraged his hobby of collecting as a means of survival. Today, antiquing still plays a meaningful role in Louise's life, and through her passion, she carries on her father's legacy. #NextChapterUSHMM

After liberation, Holocaust survivors faced new struggles. The desperate search to learn the fate of their families bega...
04/13/2020

After liberation, Holocaust survivors faced new struggles. The desperate search to learn the fate of their families began. Some had no homes to return to and prejudice against Jews made others afraid of going back. But survivors rebuilt. They married, had babies at record levels, and reclaimed their humanity by opening schools, celebrating holidays again, and rekindling religious practices. Watch live on Facebook on 4/14 at 9:30 a.m. ET to learn about the resilience of survivors.

"It was their kindness that helped us survive the ghetto." Holocaust survivor Nesse Godin writes about the selfless acts...
04/12/2020
The Kindnesses -- United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

"It was their kindness that helped us survive the ghetto."

Holocaust survivor Nesse Godin writes about the selfless acts of others that helped save her life.

November 01, 2011 By Nesse Godin In June 1941, the Germans occupied Lithuania within three days. Shauliai, the town where we lived, was taken over on the third day. We had heard what had happened to the Jews in Kaunas and in other cities. My brother Jec...

Liberated #OnThisDay in 1945, the Westerbork transit camp in the Netherlands was a temporary holding facility for nearly...
04/12/2020

Liberated #OnThisDay in 1945, the Westerbork transit camp in the Netherlands was a temporary holding facility for nearly 100,000 Jews during the Holocaust. The vast majority of them were deported to Auschwitz and Sobibor. That was the fate of Ephraim and Johanna Rosenbaum, seen here with their baby daughter Betty.

Ephraim, who went by Eli, worked at a pharmacy in Amsterdam near the Portuguese synagogue. Non-Jewish friends of the family had urged them to go into hiding, but the Jewish Council wanted Eli to continue working at the pharmacy. Jews still living in Amsterdam needed a place to get medicine. After the birth of their second child, a son, in 1943, Johanna and the children went to live with her family in the countryside. An official in the nearby town, Jan Hageman, issued a false ID card for Betty, and he and his wife agreed to hide Betty in their home.

Johanna and her infant son, Izaak, were hidden in another town, along with the fiancé of Johanna’s sister. But a Dutch collaborator betrayed them in exchange for money. The three were sent to Westerbork and then to Sobibor, where they were killed upon arrival, in April 1943. Eli was rounded up in Amsterdam and deported, also via Westerbork to Sobibor—where he was killed three weeks after his wife and child.

Betty survived the war in hiding with the Hagemans.

Photo: US Holocaust Memorial Museum, courtesy of Betty Kazin-Rosenbaum

At age 16, Elie Wiesel was liberated from Buchenwald #OnThisDay in 1945. Ten years later, he began writing his memoir "N...
04/11/2020

At age 16, Elie Wiesel was liberated from Buchenwald #OnThisDay in 1945. Ten years later, he began writing his memoir "Night." "I knew I would have to bear witness. Everyone who was there is a witness, and everyone who was there is a true witness," he told NPR in 1988.

"And, that is how we came to realize we were brothers—brothers linked through human cruelty, but brothers linked also th...
04/10/2020
Brothers -- United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

"And, that is how we came to realize we were brothers—brothers linked through human cruelty, but brothers linked also through human kindness and heroism."

#NationalSiblingsDay is a day to celebrate the relationships between siblings, but for many, this relationship is bonded by lived experiences, rather than biology.

Read the story of Al Munzer and his brother, Arn.

November 01, 2017 by Alfred Münzer Three years ago, I had a life-changing experience: I met a brother I never knew I had. His name is Arn Chorn Pond. It began with an invitation to speak at an International Holocaust Commemoration event in Scotland. I h...

After the Germans killed their parents and two brothers in 1941, three surviving brothers of the Bielski family—Tuvia, A...
04/10/2020
The Bielski Partisans

After the Germans killed their parents and two brothers in 1941, three surviving brothers of the Bielski family—Tuvia, Asael, and Zus—established a partisan group. Initially, the brothers attempted only to save their own lives and those of their family members, but soon they realized they could help save thousands. Read the story of these brothers. #NationalSiblingsDay

Despite great obstacles, Jews throughout occupied Europe attempted armed resistance against the Germans and their Axis partners. They faced overwhelming odds and desperate scenarios, including l...

Not all members of the Protestant church were eager to support the Nazis. German pastor Dietrich Bonhoeffer was one of t...
04/09/2020
Dietrich Bonhoeffer

Not all members of the Protestant church were eager to support the Nazis. German pastor Dietrich Bonhoeffer was one of the earliest critics of the regime. His outspoken political opinions and debate of the moral challenges facing the church under Nazism isolated him within his church.

“If I sit next to a madman as he drives a car into a group of innocent bystanders, I can't, as a Christian, simply wait for the catastrophe, then comfort the wounded and bury the dead. I must try to wrestle the steering wheel out of the hands of the driver.”

Bonhoeffer was arrested for conspiracy to rescue Jews during the Holocaust and hanged on this day in 1945 for his ties to a conspiracy to overthrow the Nazi regime. Read his story:

(Photo courtesy of Bundesarchiv)

Dietrich Bonhoeffer was a German pastor and theologian known for his opposition to National Socialism. His ties to the July 20, 1944, conspiracy to overthrow the Nazi regime led to his execution...

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100 Raoul Wallenberg Pl SW
Washington D.C., DC
20024-2126

The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum is located within blocks of the Independence Avenue exit of the Smithsonian Metro station on the orange/blue lines. For more information: http://www.ushmm.org/visit/gethere/.

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Comments

I have always been thankful that my parents left Russia after WWI and before WWII ad that I am alive and well today . Otherwise I might not be here today
What a shame so many great museums are in one place Washington DC..
My Grandpa baby in Christiania time Oslo/norway , he must drive dutch soldjat under this time in norway , my wriley grandmother from norway / Northland , meeted Germany soldjat in norway before 1946, They was together in norway in 1945. And she was preghtment with him, he was maried in NORTH Germany , must go toback to Germany after soldjat was finish in norway , she was Alone with my mother in 1946, she cuden’t stay Alone with baby , she givd my mother to Frelsesarmen bureau in norway in 1946, and They under Here adopted my mother in 1946. They was glad/Happy over adopted she❤️😢so They i take for my wriley grandparents in all year when i growd up, from 1965 to 1984 i have my grandma in my life , my grandpa to 1977 he die. So this dutch history about my mother is sad, my mother never meet shis wriley mother or German father in life ❤️❤️😢🙏💐🌹🕯
Es una mentira el holocuento digan la verdad mentirosos hijos de puta
They should teach about the holocaust they committed to the indigenous people who still on reservations that are poor. Why don't you fix home first?
My girlfriend's mom had l number tattooed on her arm by the Nazi's!
hi
El dicho holocausto nunca pasó. ...👀♻
Check out A Million Paper Clips on You Tube Amazing.
I have tickets for May 9. If the museum is closed, will they be refunded or honored on another date?
I met someone that went through hell in a concentration camp. It is not human what went on in there.