American University Museum at the Katzen Arts Center

American University Museum at the Katzen Arts Center Dedicated to local, international, and political art. Tuesday-Sunday 11:00AM-4:00PM. Closed for certain holidays and during installation. Check our homepage for our operating status: american.edu/museum
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Housed in the dynamic and multidisciplinary Katzen Arts Center, the American University Museum builds its programming on the strengths of a great college and great university. We focus on international art because American University has a global commitment. We show political art because the university is committed to human rights, social justice, and political engagement. We support the artists i

Housed in the dynamic and multidisciplinary Katzen Arts Center, the American University Museum builds its programming on the strengths of a great college and great university. We focus on international art because American University has a global commitment. We show political art because the university is committed to human rights, social justice, and political engagement. We support the artists i

Operating as usual

Today is World Blood Donor Day, and we are featuring this evocative piece by Jordan Eagles from our permanent collection...
06/14/2021

Today is World Blood Donor Day, and we are featuring this evocative piece by Jordan Eagles from our permanent collection.
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“Our Blood Can Save Them” (2018) is a screen printed image of a 1943 World War II propaganda poster, encouraging Americans to donate blood during the war. It was created using a pint of donated blood from an active duty transgender, pansexual, US Service Member. Both the subject and the material used in the creation of this piece reflect on the history of issues around equity and equality that still persist in the donation of blood by LGBTQ+ individuals in the United States.
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Jordan Eagles, “Our Blood Can Save Them,” 2018. Screen-printed blood of a transgender, pansexual, active US Service Member on paper, 26 x 20 in. Gift of the artist, 2019.

Today is World Blood Donor Day, and we are featuring this evocative piece by Jordan Eagles from our permanent collection.
.
“Our Blood Can Save Them” (2018) is a screen printed image of a 1943 World War II propaganda poster, encouraging Americans to donate blood during the war. It was created using a pint of donated blood from an active duty transgender, pansexual, US Service Member. Both the subject and the material used in the creation of this piece reflect on the history of issues around equity and equality that still persist in the donation of blood by LGBTQ+ individuals in the United States.
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Jordan Eagles, “Our Blood Can Save Them,” 2018. Screen-printed blood of a transgender, pansexual, active US Service Member on paper, 26 x 20 in. Gift of the artist, 2019.

While our reserved tickets for June are currently sold out, there is no need to emulate this minimalist abstraction enti...
06/12/2021

While our reserved tickets for June are currently sold out, there is no need to emulate this minimalist abstraction entitled “Grrrrr” (1979) by William S. Dutterer. This piece and many others from our exhibition, “The Long Sixties: Washington Paintings in the Watkins and Corcoran Legacy Collections, 1957-1982,” can be explored virtually in our [email protected]. The exhibition runs through August 8, 2021.
https://www.american.edu/cas/museum/2021/the-long-sixties.cfm
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Be sure to sign up for our mailing list to find out when you can reserve your July tickets.
https://american.co1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_8rbNDIvoHnR4Bcp
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William S. Dutterer (1943–2007), “Grrrrr,” 1979. Acrylic on canvas, canvas size: 76 1/4 × 60 1/2 × 1 3/4 in. Gift of the William S. Dutterer Trust, 2020.

While our reserved tickets for June are currently sold out, there is no need to emulate this minimalist abstraction entitled “Grrrrr” (1979) by William S. Dutterer. This piece and many others from our exhibition, “The Long Sixties: Washington Paintings in the Watkins and Corcoran Legacy Collections, 1957-1982,” can be explored virtually in our [email protected]. The exhibition runs through August 8, 2021.
https://www.american.edu/cas/museum/2021/the-long-sixties.cfm
.
Be sure to sign up for our mailing list to find out when you can reserve your July tickets.
https://american.co1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_8rbNDIvoHnR4Bcp
.
William S. Dutterer (1943–2007), “Grrrrr,” 1979. Acrylic on canvas, canvas size: 76 1/4 × 60 1/2 × 1 3/4 in. Gift of the William S. Dutterer Trust, 2020.

Our next #TBT in honor of our 15th Anniversary goes to “Circle of Friends” from #2016. .The inaugural exhibition of the ...
06/10/2021

Our next #TBT in honor of our 15th Anniversary goes to “Circle of Friends” from #2016.
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The inaugural exhibition of the Alper Initiative for Washington Art featured 16 woman artists from the Baltimore/Washington region who formed Renée Stout's artistic cohort. These artists influenced Stout, were influenced by her, or provided support to Stout since she arrived in DC in 1985. The exhibition demonstrated how artists relied on each other's support for their work to flourish. It also provided an interesting perspective on the workings of the Washington art world over the last 30 years.
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Installation image courtesy of Greg Staley. Foreground: Valerie Maynard, "The Dancers," 1995. Slate. Courtesy of the artist.

Our next #TBT in honor of our 15th Anniversary goes to “Circle of Friends” from #2016.
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The inaugural exhibition of the Alper Initiative for Washington Art featured 16 woman artists from the Baltimore/Washington region who formed Renée Stout's artistic cohort. These artists influenced Stout, were influenced by her, or provided support to Stout since she arrived in DC in 1985. The exhibition demonstrated how artists relied on each other's support for their work to flourish. It also provided an interesting perspective on the workings of the Washington art world over the last 30 years.
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Installation image courtesy of Greg Staley. Foreground: Valerie Maynard, "The Dancers," 1995. Slate. Courtesy of the artist.

While tickets to visit the museum in person this month may be sold out, there are still plenty of opportunities to explo...
06/08/2021

While tickets to visit the museum in person this month may be sold out, there are still plenty of opportunities to explore our current exhibitions virtually. “Peace Corps at 60: Inside the Volunteer Experience” is co-presented by the Museum of the Peace Corps Experience and American University Museum, and tells the stories of 30 volunteers through objects and photographs from their service.
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This decorative bowl, also known as a calabash, is one such object brought back by Marla Bush, who served with the Peace Corps in Chad.The exhibition text notes that they are “Multipurpose vessels, they are used for storage, food preparation, and serving; as ladles, drinking vessels, containers for milk and other products—even as parts of musical instruments. They are decorated by women in a myriad of tribal styles and techniques and are a source of pride and wealth”. Bush recounts her growing appreciation and collection of these objects, clearly a source of pride for her as well.
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Explore more stories from Peace Corps at 60 at https://www.peacecorpsat60.com/.
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Elizabeth Bako, Sara Madjingaye, c. 1969. Sarh (formerly Ft. Archambault), Moyen-Chari, Chad. Gourd, beading, pyro-engraving, 3 1/4 x 6 1/2 x 6 1/2 in.
Collection, Museum of the Peace Corps Experience. Gift of Marla Bush, Chad, Ft. Lamy 1968–70.

While tickets to visit the museum in person this month may be sold out, there are still plenty of opportunities to explore our current exhibitions virtually. “Peace Corps at 60: Inside the Volunteer Experience” is co-presented by the Museum of the Peace Corps Experience and American University Museum, and tells the stories of 30 volunteers through objects and photographs from their service.
.
This decorative bowl, also known as a calabash, is one such object brought back by Marla Bush, who served with the Peace Corps in Chad.The exhibition text notes that they are “Multipurpose vessels, they are used for storage, food preparation, and serving; as ladles, drinking vessels, containers for milk and other products—even as parts of musical instruments. They are decorated by women in a myriad of tribal styles and techniques and are a source of pride and wealth”. Bush recounts her growing appreciation and collection of these objects, clearly a source of pride for her as well.
.
Explore more stories from Peace Corps at 60 at https://www.peacecorpsat60.com/.
.
Elizabeth Bako, Sara Madjingaye, c. 1969. Sarh (formerly Ft. Archambault), Moyen-Chari, Chad. Gourd, beading, pyro-engraving, 3 1/4 x 6 1/2 x 6 1/2 in.
Collection, Museum of the Peace Corps Experience. Gift of Marla Bush, Chad, Ft. Lamy 1968–70.

We’ve all memorized the view from our windows this past year. While we are eager to have you rejoin us at the museum, ou...
06/05/2021

We’ve all memorized the view from our windows this past year. While we are eager to have you rejoin us at the museum, our reserved tickets for June are currently sold out. Sign up for our mailing list to find out when you can reserve your July tickets, and explore our current exhibitions virtually. https://american.co1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_8rbNDIvoHnR4Bcp

We invite you to view Raya Bodnarkchuk’s “This is a True Picture of How It Was” and explore the way Raya views the world. https://www.american.edu/cas/museum/2021/raya-bodnarchuk.cfm

A DC local, Raya’s work is described as art that “celebrates the light, the positive side of our lives, even during our darkest hours,” by Director & Curator Jack Rasmussen in the exhibition catalog foreword.

Raya Bodnarkchuk, “Some BIg Clouds,” October 14, 2018. Watercolor on Rives BFK, 4x7in. Courtesy of the artist.

We’ve all memorized the view from our windows this past year. While we are eager to have you rejoin us at the museum, our reserved tickets for June are currently sold out. Sign up for our mailing list to find out when you can reserve your July tickets, and explore our current exhibitions virtually. https://american.co1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_8rbNDIvoHnR4Bcp

We invite you to view Raya Bodnarkchuk’s “This is a True Picture of How It Was” and explore the way Raya views the world. https://www.american.edu/cas/museum/2021/raya-bodnarchuk.cfm

A DC local, Raya’s work is described as art that “celebrates the light, the positive side of our lives, even during our darkest hours,” by Director & Curator Jack Rasmussen in the exhibition catalog foreword.

Raya Bodnarkchuk, “Some BIg Clouds,” October 14, 2018. Watercolor on Rives BFK, 4x7in. Courtesy of the artist.

Our next #TBT in honor of our 15th Anniversary goes to “Titus Kaphar: The Vesper Project” from 2015. This installation w...
06/03/2021

Our next #TBT in honor of our 15th Anniversary goes to “Titus Kaphar: The Vesper Project” from 2015.

This installation was a massive sculptural statement that weaved the artist's own work into the walls of a 19th century American house. “The Vesper Project” was a culmination of an intense five-year engagement with the lost storylines of the Vesper family. In the artist's musings, the members of the Vesper family and their histories are intertwined with Kaphar's autobiographical details and layered with widely­ accepted cultural triggers of identity. Period architecture, gilt frames, a vintage typewriter, a neglected wardrobe and old photographs act as seemingly recognizable elements, but by employing every tool of his trade, Kaphar insinuates doubt and transports the viewer into a disrupted mental state. As the house fractures, so does the viewer's experience.

Mark Jenkins at The Washington Post writes: "Actual dates aside, there are lots of opinions on when the 1960s truly bega...
06/03/2021
The 1960s didn’t end until the ’80s. So says this art show about painting in D.C.

Mark Jenkins at The Washington Post writes:

"Actual dates aside, there are lots of opinions on when the 1960s truly began. Some commentators argue the decade didn’t really commence until late 1963 or early ’64 — John F. Kennedy’s assassination or the U.S. arrival of the Beatles, respectively — while others contend that the ’60s significantly overflowed their literal boundaries on both sides. Taking the latter view, American University Museum director Jack Rasmussen has devised a 32-artist survey of Washington painting that runs, as he defines the 1960s, all the way from 1957 to 1982 (though a couple of paintings actually fall outside even that span). He calls that quarter century “The Long Sixties.”

The American University Museum encapsulates the spirit of a decade in a span of 32 years.

It's Pride Month! We're kicking it off with photographer Jeffrey Clopper's "Untitled" (1985)..Contact sheets preview all...
06/01/2021

It's Pride Month! We're kicking it off with photographer Jeffrey Clopper's "Untitled" (1985).
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Contact sheets preview all images on a roll of film. Clopper used contact sheets as the work itself to explore identity and perspective. The work compiles different angles of one individual, visualizing how the medium distorts us under a photographic lens.
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Jeffrey Clopper (1958-1987), “Untitled (woman with earrings and black necklace)," 1985. Contact prints mounted on black construction paper, 18 x 14 in. Gift from the Trustees of the Corcoran Gallery of Art (Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Jack Clopper in memory of Jeffrey Clopper).

It's Pride Month! We're kicking it off with photographer Jeffrey Clopper's "Untitled" (1985).
.
Contact sheets preview all images on a roll of film. Clopper used contact sheets as the work itself to explore identity and perspective. The work compiles different angles of one individual, visualizing how the medium distorts us under a photographic lens.
.
Jeffrey Clopper (1958-1987), “Untitled (woman with earrings and black necklace)," 1985. Contact prints mounted on black construction paper, 18 x 14 in. Gift from the Trustees of the Corcoran Gallery of Art (Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Jack Clopper in memory of Jeffrey Clopper).

Our next TBT in honor of our 15th Anniversary goes to “An Opening of the Field: Jess, Robert Duncan, and Their Circle” f...
05/27/2021

Our next TBT in honor of our 15th Anniversary goes to “An Opening of the Field: Jess, Robert Duncan, and Their Circle” from 2014.
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After meeting in San Francisco in 1950, Duncan and Jess created a domestic life based on mutual intellectual and aesthetic interests. In reexamining myths through a synthesis of art and literature, their deeply interrelated works stand as crucial assemblages of the meaning of our time. “An Opening of the Field” presented a rich cross-section of Jess's paintings and collages and Duncan's colorful abstract drawings, as well as a gallery of works by the artists and poets who were intimates in their circle.
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Installation view. Foreground: George Herms, “Donuts for Duncan,” 1989. Mixed media. Iris & B. Gerald Cantor Center for Visual Art at Stanford University, Gift of the Robert & Ruth Halperin Foundation, 2000.28.

Our next TBT in honor of our 15th Anniversary goes to “An Opening of the Field: Jess, Robert Duncan, and Their Circle” from 2014.
.
After meeting in San Francisco in 1950, Duncan and Jess created a domestic life based on mutual intellectual and aesthetic interests. In reexamining myths through a synthesis of art and literature, their deeply interrelated works stand as crucial assemblages of the meaning of our time. “An Opening of the Field” presented a rich cross-section of Jess's paintings and collages and Duncan's colorful abstract drawings, as well as a gallery of works by the artists and poets who were intimates in their circle.
.
Installation view. Foreground: George Herms, “Donuts for Duncan,” 1989. Mixed media. Iris & B. Gerald Cantor Center for Visual Art at Stanford University, Gift of the Robert & Ruth Halperin Foundation, 2000.28.

Check out this call for artists from our friends at Tenleytown Main Street!
05/26/2021

Check out this call for artists from our friends at Tenleytown Main Street!

Art All Night returns live and in-person this September!
TMS seeks visual and performing artists who would like to showcase their work as part of Art All Night on Sat, Sept 25, 2021. Not an artist, but still an art lover? We welcome volunteers to help produce this year’s event!

+ ARTISTS & PERFORMERS: Apply online by June 15th http://bit.ly/AAN-2021-Application
+ VOLUNTEERS: Email [email protected]

Read more about this year's Art All Night event, including sponsorship opportunities: tenleytownmainstreet.org/event/art-all-night/

Have you seen your first cicada from this year's brood?.Raya Bodnarchuk's "This is a True Picture of How it Was" is feat...
05/20/2021

Have you seen your first cicada from this year's brood?
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Raya Bodnarchuk's "This is a True Picture of How it Was" is featured in our [email protected]. Learn more and read the e-book exhibition catalog: https://www.american.edu/cas/museum/2021/raya-bodnarchuk.cfm
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"A Cicada," September 5, 2019. Watercolor on Rives BFK, 4 x 7 in. Courtesy of the artist.

Have you seen your first cicada from this year's brood?
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Raya Bodnarchuk's "This is a True Picture of How it Was" is featured in our [email protected]. Learn more and read the e-book exhibition catalog: https://www.american.edu/cas/museum/2021/raya-bodnarchuk.cfm
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"A Cicada," September 5, 2019. Watercolor on Rives BFK, 4 x 7 in. Courtesy of the artist.

Christina Bothwell is a self-taught, experimental glass artist who explores her interest in birth, death, and renewal wh...
05/19/2021

Christina Bothwell is a self-taught, experimental glass artist who explores her interest in birth, death, and renewal while imbuing her work with a sense of wonder and hope. “I try to express more than our bodies. My ongoing interest in the spiritual infuses my work and runs parallel to the narrative I’m creating.”

Learn more about her work on May 22-23 at the next James Renwick Alliance for Craft Distinguished Artist Series weekend: https://www.jra.org/jracraftevents/christina-bothwell

05/13/2021
“Free Punch & Pie” MFA Artist Feature: Jonathan Ege

Jonathan Ege’s oil paintings appropriate the subjects of canonical paintings to critique the modern world. He repurposes ornate frames and covers them in branches, expanding the physical boundaries of painting.
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"Free Punch & Pie" is featured in the American University Museum's [email protected] in May 2021. Produced by Fernando Rocha as part of our Artist Studio Series. Learn more: https://www.american.edu/cas/museum/2021/free-punch-and-pie.cfm

Address

4400 Massachusetts Ave NW
Washington D.C., DC
20016

Metrorail (Red Line) & AU Shuttle Bus: * From the Tenleytown/AU Metrorail red line east exit (escalator or elevator), simply walk straight ahead 100 feet to the bus stops at the corner of Albemarle and 40th Streets. All shuttle bus routes lead directly to the Katzen, and run every 10–15 minutes. The distance is a mile, about 5 minutes. Buses are clearly marked with AU logos. Metrobus: * N3, N4, N6, N8 pass the Katzen on Massachusetts Ave. * M4 and N2 pass the Katzen on Nebraska Ave. at Ward Circle

Opening Hours

Tuesday 11:00 - 16:00
Wednesday 11:00 - 16:00
Thursday 11:00 - 16:00
Friday 11:00 - 16:00
Saturday 11:00 - 16:00
Sunday 11:00 - 16:00

Telephone

(202) 885-1300

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What's Happening at American University, Katzen Center?
What's happening at American University, Katzen Center
Seriously, this just in... Visiting an art museum could be as healthy as exercising! And, a private tour of American University Museum at the Katzen Arts Center with curator/director Jack Rasmussen and your friends is even better! Bid on this private tour, improve your health, and the health of DC students by supporting DC Arts and Humanities Education Collaborative and #ArtsandHumanitiesforEveryStudent Bid on your auction item here: https://www.32auctions.com/organizations/47759/auctions/58776/auction_items/1586998 (Check out the news article here: https://bit.ly/2RJsJZr)
Nancy Jo Snider