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Operating as usual

Close to 500 African Americans, including 116 postmasters, are known to have been employed in the postal service followi...
02/09/2021

Close to 500 African Americans, including 116 postmasters, are known to have been employed in the postal service following the Civil War, although the actual number is likely higher. Many major cities including Charleston, SC; Little Rock, AR; and New Orleans, LA as well as some small southern towns had African American postmasters during Reconstruction. The majority of these postmasters had been free before the Civil War. Some, however, had formerly been enslaved and sought education either while serving in the Union army or in schools established by the Freedman’s Bureau. The earliest known African American postmaster, James W. Mason, was appointed by the U.S. Postmaster General in Sunny Side, Arkansas on February 22, 1867. He served in this role just over four years and was a delegate to the 1868 constitutional convention during his term. Mason went on to serve as a state senator, county judge, and county sheriff. Image courtesy of John E. Bush IV.

The United States Postal Service (formerly the Post Office Department) has been both a place where African Americans have faced virulent discrimination, and a place where many African Americans pursued opportunities for advancement. African Americans have been involved in the delivery of mail since the beginning of slavery in America, when enslaved men and women carried mail and packages between homesteads, or to and from town. Today, Black Americans make up 21% of the Postal Service (USPS is one of the country’s most diverse federal work forces, comprised of 39% non-white employees and 40% women employees). Over centuries, Black postal employees have encountered various forms of segregation, inequality and mistreatment on all levels. They have also broken ground and glass ceilings alike, serving and excelling in positions of leadership and with great responsibilities, under the most challenging of circumstances. The Black experience in the postal system is one of tenacity, courage, and success which we are enthusiastic about exploring, without diminishing the racism and oppression that accompanied these triumphs. Truly, the narrative of African Americans in the postal service illustrates important changes throughout history, as well as systemic failures of this great, but flawed nation.

Image courtesy of John E. Bush IV.

Rosa Parks was born on February 4, 1913; USPS released this commemorative stamp in 2013, on what would have been her 100...
02/04/2021

Rosa Parks was born on February 4, 1913; USPS released this commemorative stamp in 2013, on what would have been her 100th birthday. Working with art director Derry Noyes, artist Thomas Blackshear II created the stamp art. In his original painting, Blackshear expressed his intent of depicting Parks' “quiet determination and pleasant persona.” Fittingly, “COURAGE” is printed along the stamp sheet selvage

In 1955, Parks refused to give up her seat to a white man on a Montgomery, AL, city bus, thereby catalyzing a new era of the civil rights movement in America. Parks’ pluck and subsequent arrest inspired a city-wide bus boycott by people of color that lasted 381 days, and culminated in a Supreme Court decision upholding the U.S. District Court for the Middle District of Alabama, Northern (Montgomery) Division’s 1956 ruling that racial segregation laws (also known as "Jim Crow laws") were unconstitutional.

For her courage and advocacy, Parks received numerous awards during her lifetime including the NAACP's Spingarn Medal in 1979, the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1996, and the Congressional Gold Medal in 1999. Parks passed away on October 24, 2005; she was the first woman in the nation’s history to lie in state at the U.S. Capitol.

In her autobiography, Parks wrote, “People always say that I didn’t give up my seat because I was tired, but that isn’t true. I was not tired physically… No, the only tired I was, was tired of giving in.”

©USPS; all rights reserved.

Today is National Thank A Mail Carrier Day! Show your gratitude for the mail and package carriers working hard to keep u...
02/04/2021
Thank Your Mail Carrier Coloring Pages | National Postal Museum

Today is National Thank A Mail Carrier Day! Show your gratitude for the mail and package carriers working hard to keep us connected with our downloadable coloring pages! Display your finished sign on your window, mailbox or door as a message of support and thanks. Nine different templates are available at the link.

Today is the first day of the 45th year of Black History Month, the theme of which is “The Black Family: Representation,...
02/02/2021
The Genesis of Dr. Carter Woodson's Negro History Week - Smithsonian's National Postal Museum - Google Arts & Culture

Today is the first day of the 45th year of Black History Month, the theme of which is “The Black Family: Representation, Identity, and Diversity." We're looking forward to exploring stories of resilience and excellence with you all month through our collection!

Dr. Carter Goodwin Woodson legitimized and popularized the history of African American people through his establishment of the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History (ASNLH, referred to today as the Association for the Study of African American Life and History) in 1915 and the organization's subsequent launch of Negro History Week in February 1926. When mainstream history either largely ignored or debased the Black presence in the American narrative, Dr. Woodson labored to inject a fair portrayal of African Americans into the national record.

When there were no academic journals to counter racist scholarship, he created one. When there were no professional presses that would accept materials about African Americans, he created one. The Journal of Negro History, Associated Publishers, and what became known as "Black History Month" are among the crown jewels of his legacy. Learn more about Woodson's extraordinary life and legacy from this virtual exhibition.

*Dr. Carter Goodwin Woodson legitimized and popularized the history of African American people through his establishment of the Association for the Study...

On January 28,1908, author Julia Ward Howe became the first woman elected to the American Academy of Arts and Letters. A...
01/28/2021

On January 28,1908, author Julia Ward Howe became the first woman elected to the American Academy of Arts and Letters. After Ward’s death in 1910, another woman was not inducted into the Academy until 1926.

Howe (1819-1910) is best known for her 1861 poem “The Battle Hymn of the Republic.” The song riffed off “John Brown’s Body,” a marching song about abolitionist John Brown, with the melody lifted from “Canaan’s Happy Shore.” The Battle Hymn of the Republic" was largely sung by Union troops during the Civil War, but its popularity surged; to this day, the tune remains a stand out in the repertoire of American patriotic songs.

In addition, Howe was involved in the suffragist movement within the United States. She co-founded and/or served as president of the following: the New England Women's Club, the New England Woman Suffrage Association, the American Woman Suffrage Association, Boston’s Women's Educational and Industrial Union, and the Association of American Women. Howe was an abolitionist who opposed slavery but it is important to note that she was not an advocate for racial equality.

The Julia Ward Howe stamp was issued in 1987 as part of the “Great Americans” series. ©USPS; all rights reserved.

Simon Wiesenthal, who survived the Nazi death camps, spent the rest of his life documenting the atrocities committed and...
01/27/2021

Simon Wiesenthal, who survived the Nazi death camps, spent the rest of his life documenting the atrocities committed and tracking down some 1,100 Nazi war criminals. Wiesenthal’s evidence and detailed dossiers were utilized during war crimes trials to convict hundreds of SS officers. He likewise cooperated with numerous foreign governments, including the US Army’s Office of Strategic Services and the Counter-Intelligence Corps, to locate Nazis, many of whom were in hiding across the globe.

What many do not know is that Simon Wiesenthal spent his evenings on a very different quest: searching for vintage postage stamps. He once wrote that he became interested in stamp collecting in 1948, when he visited a doctor for severe insomnia. "He suggested that I do something at night to take my mind off my troubles, and that's how I began collecting postage stamps. My hobby has since given me many pleasant hours and helped me to meet people in many countries."

Most of his stamp collection was a classic holding of stamps from various countries. But it also included a more personal section—a collection of postmarks and postcards from different towns named Wiesenthal. The National Postal Museum is privileged to have in our collection Wiesenthal’s specialized cancel collection and several of his personal philatelic tools like the tongs and perforation gauge pictured here.

On June 14, 2010, Israel and Austria jointly issued a stamp issue honoring Simon Wiesenthal. Wiesenthal is portrayed in a frame in the form of the Star of David with text in both German and Hebrew.

Parents and caregivers, the "Winter at Home" activity guide is a free new Smithsonian Education resource you can print a...
01/26/2021
Let Creativity Be Your Guide This Winter

Parents and caregivers, the "Winter at Home" activity guide is a free new Smithsonian Education resource you can print at home. Some 40 activities range from inviting a bird to brunch with a homemade Smithsonian’s National Zoo and Conservation Biology Institute feeder, fun with fables from National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution, and more!

Born January 26, 1892, Bessie Coleman became the world's first licensed female African American pilot. While working in ...
01/26/2021

Born January 26, 1892, Bessie Coleman became the world's first licensed female African American pilot. While working in Chicago, she dreamed of flying after hearing stories from soldiers returning from World War I. Because of her race and gender, she could not find a school to accept her, so she studied French and with the financial support of the leading Black Chicago publisher, Robert Abbot, she got her aviator's license in Paris, France at the esteemed Fédération Aéronautique Internationale.

She returned to the United States in 1921 and flew in countless air shows as a barnstormer, performing daring figure eights and loop de loops in the sky. During this era of discrimination, segregation, and Jim Crow laws, Coleman selected only the shows that permitted spectators of all races. She also lectured across the country, inspiring countless others with her story of perseverance and courage. In 1926, while practicing for an exhibition, Coleman was killed when her plane – a shoddy WWI surplus model – nosedived and threw her from the aircraft. Bessie Coleman was honored with the issuance of a 32-cent commemorative stamp on April 27, 1995, in Chicago, Illinois. The photograph of Coleman is from the collection of the National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.

“I am once again asking you to use the correct ZIP code.”We recreated Bernie Sanders’ iconic inaugural look using object...
01/22/2021

“I am once again asking you to use the correct ZIP code.”

We recreated Bernie Sanders’ iconic inaugural look using objects from our collection...

Please note that this image is just for fun and in no way should be interpreted as a political statement.

This 1939 stamp commemorates the 150th anniversary of Washington’s first inauguration on the steps of Federal Hall in Ne...
01/20/2021

This 1939 stamp commemorates the 150th anniversary of Washington’s first inauguration on the steps of Federal Hall in New York City on April 30, 1789. NYC was the nation’s capital for just one year, from 1789-1790, whereupon it was moved to Philadelphia, and finally to Washington D.C. in 1800. The Electoral College unanimously elected Washington for both of his presidential terms. With the Revolutionary War a not-too-distant memory, Washington was clearly aware of the significance of his charge. His first inaugural address is peppered with expressions of profound and poetic humility, such as this line from the first paragraph:

“…the magnitude and difficulty of the trust to which the voice of my Country called me, being sufficient to awaken in the wisest and most experienced of her citizens, a distrustful scrutiny into his qualifications, could not but overwhelm with dispondence [sic], one, who, inheriting inferior endowments from nature and unpractised [sic] in the duties of civil administration, ought to be peculiarly conscious of his own deficiencies.”

Unsurprisingly, George Washington—the first president of the United States—is featured on more U.S. stamps than any other president, or person! His likeness has appeared on over 300 stamps, including one of the very first U.S. stamps issued in 1847 (a dual issue; a 5 cent Benjamin Franklin and a 10 cent George Washington). The Bureau of Engraving and Printing produced 72,764,550 of the inaugural commemorative stamps.

The 3rd Monday in January was designated a Federal holiday in 1986 in honor of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s life and leg...
01/18/2021

The 3rd Monday in January was designated a Federal holiday in 1986 in honor of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s life and legacy. During the 1950s and 60s, King spearheaded mass action through marches, sit-ins, boycotts, and nonviolent demonstrations that profoundly impacted American attitudes toward racial prejudice and discrimination. In 1963, King became the first African-American honored as TIME magazine’s Man of the Year, and in 1964, he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

His life was cut tragically short, but his words and actions endure. He has been featured on two U.S. postage stamps, including this one, issued January 13, 1979. It is the second stamp of the "Black Heritage" stamp series.

©USPS; all rights reserved.

The Collection of Royal Imperforate Printings of Egyptian Stamps was formed by George L. Lee (1901-1966) and donated to ...
01/16/2021

The Collection of Royal Imperforate Printings of Egyptian Stamps was formed by George L. Lee (1901-1966) and donated to the Smithsonian on December 23, 1960. The collection dates to 1926, when the government of Egypt began printing its own stamps. As part of the production process, the first sheet of stamps produced from each new design was printed on thick paper and presented to King Faud without perforations or gum. This practice continued under King Faud’s son, King Farouk, until the revolution of 1952. The existence of these imperforate copies was unknown until Egypt’s revolutionary government ordered the Royal Collections of Egypt sold at auction in 1954. George L. Lee acquired some of the stamps, and his collection formed the basis of a catalogue, which he published in 1959. Lee mounted the original stamps onto removeable album pages currently housed in a luxurious red leather binding.

The album pages are frequently requested for exhibition at national and international stamp shows. Exhibitions in Stockholm and Monaco required a thorough condition assessment of the album which resulted in a series of conservation treatments to stabilize and reattach the stamps to the album pages.

America's ten-dollar-founding-father, Alexander Hamilton, was born today on the island of Nevis in the West Indies, like...
01/11/2021

America's ten-dollar-founding-father, Alexander Hamilton, was born today on the island of Nevis in the West Indies, likely in 1755. The date has been disputed for centuries, as the orphaned Hamilton himself claimed to have been born in 1757, but evidently records from Nevis cite 1755.

During his tenure as George Washington’s secretary of the treasury, Hamilton was permitted to send official correspondence for free by signing his name. This ensured that customs inspectors and collectors all over the country were kept busy responding to ceaseless requests for information about imports and exports, tonnage and construction of ships, trade routes, and ports of call. His ability to interpret and remember this data made Hamilton the best informed member of Washington’s first Cabinet.

These covers, signed by Hamilton and thereby “free franked,” are from our collection.

At the turn of the 20th century, the Post Office Department contracted dog sled teams to transport mail to the Territory...
01/04/2021

At the turn of the 20th century, the Post Office Department contracted dog sled teams to transport mail to the Territory of Alaska and regions of Canada largely occupied by Americans. The Yukon Gold Rush had flooded these remote areas with prospectors who relied on the dog sled teams for provisions and contact with the outside world, especially during the harsh winter months when travel was difficult and dangerous.

The most commonly used sled dogs were Malamutes, Huskies, St. Bernards, and Newfoundlands—breeds known for their heartiness and thick coats. Mail carriers and their dogs were well-respected on the trail and offered preferential lodging at road houses along their routes, with lead dogs sleeping inside.

Contract mail carrier Ed Biederman used this dogsled from 1922-1935 for his 160-mile route between Circle and Eagle, Alaska. The sled remained in his family and was donated to the National Postal Museum in 1995. The picture postcard is dated 1910.

Did you know that behind most stamps there is a work of art? These artworks are often two-dimensional, but not always! F...
01/02/2021

Did you know that behind most stamps there is a work of art? These artworks are often two-dimensional, but not always! For the 2007 “Holiday Knits” issue, illustrator Nancy Stahl combined her love of knitting with her design skills. Inspired by traditional Norwegian sweaters and handmade Christmas stockings, Stahl knit the patterns that would become these cozy stamps depicting a dignified stag, a snow-dappled evergreen tree, and a perky snowman sporting a top hat. 🦌🌲⛄

Stahl’s knitwork— along with thousands of other unique pieces—make up the Postmasters General’s Collection, which is currently kept at the National Postal Museum.

© USPS; all rights reserved. Artwork courtesy of the Postmaster General Collection.

Midnight on New Year’s Eve 1913 found two top postal officials at post offices, mailing trophies. Too much champagne? No...
12/31/2020
Parcel Post Cups | National Postal Museum

Midnight on New Year’s Eve 1913 found two top postal officials at post offices, mailing trophies. Too much champagne? Nope, they were "racing" to see which would be first to use Parcel Post, which was introduced at midnight. Prior to Jan. 1, 1913, packages could weigh no more than four pounds to be mailed by the Post Office Department.

So, who won? Learn more about this postal competition, and the origins of the parcel post...

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2 Massachusetts Ave NE
Washington D.C., DC
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METRO: Take Metro's Red Line to Union Station. As you get off the escalator, the National Postal Museum will be across the street. PARKING: The National Postal Museum does not have a parking lot. Street parking is available near the museum and all-day paid parking is available at Union Station, located accross the street. BUS: The DC Circulator just announced the new Navy Yard-Union Station route: www.dccirculator.com Union Station is also served by many other bus routes including: 96 to 14th & U NW D3 to Ivy City D4 to Ivy City D6 to Stadium Armory Station D8 to Washington Hospital 96 to Capitol Heights Station 97 to Capitol Heights Station D1 to Glover Park D3 to Dupont Circle D6 to Sibley Hospital X8 to Carver Terrace RAIL: Union Station is well-connected by rail, serviced by both MARC and VRE trains.

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Thank you so much for the Valentine card project! We are having lots of fun decorating our cards.
Thank you so much for the wonderful Valentine’s Day card kits! Lucas and Dominic loved putting theirs together 😍
Can I post you a postcard from Australia? Will you keep/ archive it? What are your rules?
Solano Chronicles, Dec. 20, 2020 By Brendan Riley The loot taken in Solano County’s only mail train robbery wasn’t much – $14 in cash and a small silver spoon found in stolen registered mail pouches – but the daring April 16, 1910, hold-up by two masked gunmen made headlines around the country, including the front page of the New York Times. Three months later, on July 15, a Sacramento constable arrested two men suspected of stealing a bale of hay. Three revolvers found in their wagon linked them to the late-night train robbery near Benicia, and Joseph C. Brown and Charles Dunbar Bishop eventually confessed. By late August they were starting 45-year prison terms. Here’s a detailed account, drawn from various 1910 newspaper stories and a few columns written in later years, of the carefully planned robbery: Brown and Bishop had holed up in an abandoned shack near Benicia and, with high-powered field glasses, had been watching the mail trains come and go for days. They knew that eastbound trains took a few minutes to pick up speed after leaving a ferry that hauled them across the Carquinez Strait. The night of the robbery, they stowed away on one of those slow-moving trains. At a remote spot between Benicia and Suisun, they emerged from hiding, pointed their guns at Jack Marsh, the engineer, and Jim Blakely, his fireman, and ordered them to stop the locomotive. Marsh and Blakely then were marched back to the mail car, where two clerks were forced to throw out registered mail sacks. One clerk started to toss out sacks filled with newspapers but the robbers detected the ruse and threatened to kill him unless he handed over the registered mail sacks. The crewmen were then ordered to put the pouches in the engine cab and unhook the locomotive. The robbers took off in the engine, stopped a couple of miles down the tracks at a bridge over Goodyear Slough and unloaded the pouches into a small boat. Then the engine was turned loose, with the throttle wide open. As the locomotive passed the station at Suisun, the station operator saw it was running wild and alerted dispatchers, who ordered that the engine be shunted onto a siding at Tolenas, several miles down the line. The engine, almost out of steam, ran onto the siding and rammed into two boxcars. Had it not been switched from the main line, it would have run into a westbound passenger train that had stopped at Tolenas. While railway employees rushed to prevent a train collision, the robbers rowed from the slough to a point just east of Martinez, across the Carquinez Strait from Benicia, and made their getaway in a stolen horse and buggy. They hid out near Mount Diablo for a couple of days, and then went to Los Angeles. Investigators found a shotgun and other weapons abandoned by the robbers as they made their escape, and learned that the shotgun had been stolen from a Riverside, Calif., store. There were other clues, along with a $5,000 reward offered by Southern Pacific for information, but the trail had gone cold – until the July 15 arrest of Brown and Bishop in Sacramento by Constable Michael Judge. Authorities determined that the three handguns found in their wagon also had been stolen from the same Riverside store. The two men immediately became the prime suspects in the train robbery case. Brown was the first to crack under questioning, admitting four days after his arrest to the gun thefts, the train robbery and other crimes. He also implicated Bishop, who held out but a few days later also confessed. A Sacramento Bee account stated that Bishop was “highly incensed at Brown for making the confession and has on several occasions since being in jail here intimated to some of his jail mates that if an opportunity presented itself that he would do Brown bodily harm.” On Aug. 22, the two men appeared before Solano County Superior Court Judge A.J. Buckles in Fairfield and entered guilty pleas to the train robbery. Several witnesses were called, including the mail clerks on the train, Tom Clancy and Herbert Block; and Constable Judge from Sacramento. The constable eventually collected a total reward of $10,000, or $5,000 per man, for the arrests and convictions of Brown and Bishop. Judge Buckles was prepared to impose 50-year sentences on Brown and Bishop but reduced the time after the county prosecutor, District Attorney Joseph Raines, said the pair had confessed and thereby saved the county time and money had the case gone to trial. The judge “stated that he was convinced that they were criminals of the first water and that they deserved no leniency,” the Oakland Tribune reported. “The limit, he stated, was not too good for them, but he believed that 45 years would serve the ends of justice.” Bishop was sent to San Quentin Prison, was paroled in late 1919 and eventually returned to his hometown, New Haven, Conn.. Brown was sent to Folsom Prison but escaped from a prison convict work gang near San Andreas in May 1917 and was never apprehended. ---- Vallejo and other Solano County communities are treasure troves of early-day California history. The “Solano Chronicles” column, running every other Sunday, highlights various aspects of that history. My source references are available upon request. If you have local stories or photos to share, email me at [email protected]. You can also send any material care of the Times-Herald, 420 Virginia St.; or the Vallejo Naval and Historical Museum, 734 Marin St., Vallejo 94590.
Today in History: American diplomat Hiram Bingham IV was born on July 17, 1903, in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Bingham was featured as part of the Distinguished American Diplomats Series at the Washington 2006 World Philatelic Exhibition. (Thanks! Autograph by Art Director: Howard E. Paine from Delaplane, VA)
I love the US Postal Museum!
A bit of a postal history lesson for these times from the RI Philatelic Society. Back in the early 1920's, just after the Influenza epidemic, authorities were required to report communicable diseases via postal cards!
My Mom (Marguerite Schroeder) worked at the Washington DC Post Office in the Registered Mail Department in 1947-1948. Last week I toured the National Postal Museum in her honor. Thought you'd enjoy this photo from her archives
#Zeppelin collectors, please check out this group. https://www.facebook.com/groups/ZeppelinCollectors/
Do you need a loan if yes email us on [email protected]
You're welcome to use these on your web site. They are from my collection
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