Mid-Atlantic Region of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

Mid-Atlantic Region of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum Contact information, map and directions, contact form, opening hours, services, ratings, photos, videos and announcements from Mid-Atlantic Region of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, Museum, 100 Raoul Wallenberg Place, SW, Washington D.C., DC.

04/28/2022

To remember victims of the Holocaust, we keep their stories alive. Watch live as the Museum leads the nation in observing Days of Remembrance, established by the US Congress as the country’s annual Holocaust commemoration. Together we remember the six million Jews who were murdered and honor the survivors.

01/27/2022

Every January 27, on the anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz-Birkenau, people worldwide pause on International .

Watch the Museum’s virtual ceremony as we commemorate the lives of Europe’s Jews and other victims of N**i persecution.

10/25/2021

Dazzling art, dubious dealers, and greedy N**i leaders eager to convey an air of grandeur and power. That’s only part of the story behind one of the greatest thefts in history. The N**i plot to strip Jews of their art, furnishings, and even objects of little value was a sign of their greater ambition—to destroy a people and erase their history. Learn about some of the victims and perpetrators—and a mole who secretly documented the theft and hiding places of priceless art.

07/14/2021

Superheroes have always fought dangerous villains. Their battle against the comic book version of Adolf Hi**er in the 1940s taught about World War II and the N**is.

Learn why it took years before the Holocaust and Jewish victims were clearly identified in popular comics and graphic novels and how artists like Joe Kubert and Art Spiegelman helped shed light on one of the darkest chapters in history.

As Allied troops advanced across Europe, both American GIs and those who suffered under the N**i regime raised the Ameri...
07/04/2021

As Allied troops advanced across Europe, both American GIs and those who suffered under the N**i regime raised the American flag as a symbol of hope and freedom.

This photo, which was taken on April 30, 1945, shows prisoners at the newly liberated Allach concentration camp, a subcamp of Dachau, waving a homemade American flag.

The caption in the US National Archives included this note, "As it [the flag] waved in the breeze, it seemed to reflect the joy of inmates who realize freedom for the first time in many years."

06/30/2021

It was a dangerous mission. To try to protect the true identities of Jews and resistance fighters hiding behind false ID cards, members of a Dutch resistance group knew they had to destroy the originals. Dressed as policemen, they entered the Amsterdam Registry and set off explosions that burned 800,000 identity cards. This Pride Month, watch live on Facebook to learn about Frieda Belinfante, one of Europe’s first female conductors and a le***an, and painter Willem Arondeus, the gay leader of this group of artists turned resisters.

06/18/2021

While posted in Berlin, American diplomat Raymond Geist worked the loopholes within a restrictive system to help rescue as many victims of N**i persecution as he could, including Albert Einstein. Another diplomat, Colonel José Arturo Castellanos of El Salvador, and his first secretary, Jewish businessman George Mandel-Mantello, defied government instructions to provide citizenship certificates to thousands of European Jews who had no connection to El Salvador. As we commemorate World Refugee Day, learn about some daring diplomats.

06/04/2021

Have you noticed how often people call someone they disagree with a N**i? Or compare controversial rules or laws to the persecution of Jews? For Holocaust survivors, these comparisons evoke the most traumatic moments of their lives. Hear survivors describe their personal experiences in video testimony, and explore how careless comparisons can be both painful and dangerous.

05/19/2021

Polish-born Leo Melamed was only eight years old when he landed in Kobe, Japan. After traversing Siberia by train, it was a paradise. In August 1940, Japanese diplomat Chiune Sugihara had issued Leo’s family a visa that helped them escape Soviet occupation and the N**i threat.

Just a year later, following Japan’s attack on Pearl Harbor, Japanese Americans were sent to “relocation camps” in the United States. Even as their family members were imprisoned, some joined the American military and helped liberate N**i camps. Learn about these unexpected rescuers and the impact one man’s lifesaving act has had on Leo 80 years since he survived the Holocaust.

05/05/2021

N**i propagandists built the myth of the perfect mother to convince "valuable" women to have babies. They peddled nationalism and conspiracy theories about "dangerous Jews," which were designed specifically to appeal to women. Learn how some women today have become messengers and targets for old conspiracies that divide us.

Survival. Resilience. Hope. At this difficult time for our nation, we hope you will come together for a virtual tribute....
04/22/2021

Survival. Resilience. Hope. At this difficult time for our nation, we hope you will come together for a virtual tribute. It will be chaired for the first time by Holocaust survivors who represent all survivors whose active involvement led to the creation of the Museum and its growth as a global institution.

Join us today, Thursday, April 22, at 6 p.m. ET for the 2021 National Tribute Virtual Event.

Survival. Resilience. Hope. At this difficult time for our nation, join us for a virtual tribute event to renew our pledge to ensure that the lessons of the Holocaust shape the way forward.

Join us at the National Tribute Virtual Event to recognize the Elie Wiesel Award honorees and renew our pledge to ensure...
04/17/2021

Join us at the National Tribute Virtual Event to recognize the Elie Wiesel Award honorees and renew our pledge to ensure that the lessons of the Holocaust—about the fragility of societies, the nature of hate, and the consequences of indifference—shape the way forward.

Survival. Resilience. Hope. At this difficult time for our nation, join us for a virtual tribute event to renew our pledge to ensure that the lessons of the Holocaust shape the way forward.

Learn more about the Museum's role in these challenging times of rising antisemitism, racism, and neo-N**ism. Join us on...
04/09/2021

Learn more about the Museum's role in these challenging times of rising antisemitism, racism, and neo-N**ism. Join us on Thursday, April 22, for the 2021 National Tribute Virtual Event.

Survival. Resilience. Hope. At this difficult time for our nation, join us for a virtual tribute event to renew our pledge to ensure that the lessons of the Holocaust shape the way forward.

04/08/2021

Join our nation and a global community to honor Holocaust survivors, remember the six million Jews murdered, and pay tribute to American soldiers who liberated victims.

Tune in for this moving commemoration featuring remarks from US Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken.

04/07/2021

Raphael Lemkin, a Polish Jewish lawyer, escaped the N**is but lost 49 members of his family in the Holocaust. He coined the word "genocide" and devoted the last 15 years of his life to lobbying governments to recognize it as an international crime.

Come together with members of the Museum community for a virtual event where we will confer our highest honor, the Elie ...
04/01/2021

Come together with members of the Museum community for a virtual event where we will confer our highest honor, the Elie Wiesel Award, to two recipients who have worked tirelessly to secure a measure of justice for Holocaust survivors.

Join us on Thursday, April 22 at 6 p.m. EST.

Survival. Resilience. Hope. At this difficult time for our nation, join us for a virtual tribute event to renew our pledge to ensure that the lessons of the Holocaust shape the way forward.

03/24/2021

While growing up in a time of racial segregation and the Great Depression, some young Americans looked beyond the struggles of their own nation to respond to the N**i threat in Europe.

03/10/2021

Josephine Baker, an American vaudeville performer turned glittering star of Paris, was at the peak of her fame in 1939 when the N**i regime began its stranglehold on Europe. But then came an offer that changed her life.

Like Baker, Virginia Hall, an American who lost a leg in a hunting accident, and Noor Inayat Khan, a Muslim pacifist, weren’t prototypical spies. Learn how they turned prejudice and society’s low expectations of women into weapons that hid their critical work to defeat the N**is.

Hannah Szenes, a young poet, immigrated from Hungary to the British Mandate for Palestine in 1939 at age 18. She was par...
03/08/2021

Hannah Szenes, a young poet, immigrated from Hungary to the British Mandate for Palestine in 1939 at age 18. She was part of a group of young Jews who joined the British Army and parachuted into German-occupied Europe. Their mission was to organize resistance to the N**is and aid in the rescue of Allied personnel.

Hannah parachuted into Yugoslavia in March 1944 and crossed into Hungary, where she was captured with a radio transmitter. She was held for nearly five months and tortured but refused to give up the code for the radio transmitter. Hannah was executed at age 23.

Hannah wrote her last poem days before her arrest and gave it to another parachutist. Her poems are now widely published.

Photo: Beit Hannah Senesh https://encyclopedia.ushmm.org/content/en/gallery/hannah-szenes?utm_medium=socialmedia&utm_source=facebook&utm_campaign=womenshistorymonth&utm_content=internationalwomensday:hannahszenes20210308

02/24/2021

Learn about the often overlooked history of Black Americans serving in World War II — fighting for freedoms they did not share.

The N**is considered Afro-Germans racially inferior, but they did not have an organized program to eliminate them. Nonet...
02/05/2021

The N**is considered Afro-Germans racially inferior, but they did not have an organized program to eliminate them. Nonetheless, the N**i regime isolated, sterilized, incarcerated, and murdered an unknown number of Afro-Germans.

Hilarius Gilges was an Afro-German dancer and Communist activist from Düsseldorf, Germany. N**is murdered him on June 20, 1933. Today Hilarius Gilges Platz in Düsseldorf memorializes Gilges as a victim of N**i terror.

Photo: Mahn-und Gedenkstaette Duesseldorf

01/27/2021

On International Holocaust Remembrance Day, join Susan Eisenhower live on Facebook as we remember the efforts of her grandfather, Dwight D. Eisenhower, to preserve the truth of the Holocaust, even as World War II waged on. He wrote of the N**i brutality he saw: "I have never at any other time experienced an equal sense of shock."

"And they said, 'From now on you do not answer by your name. Your name is your number.' And the delusion, the disappoint...
01/26/2021

"And they said, 'From now on you do not answer by your name. Your name is your number.' And the delusion, the disappointment, the discouragement that I felt, I felt like I was not a human person anymore." —Lilly Appelbaum, Auschwitz survivor

The Germans established the Auschwitz camp complex in the spring of 1940 in German-occupied Poland. It eventually consisted of three main camps: Auschwitz I, Auschwitz II Birkenau, and Auschwitz III Monowitz. By the time Soviet troops liberated the remaining prisoners in Auschwitz on January 27, 1945, approximately 1.1 million people had been murdered there.

Tomorrow, we mark the 76th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz.

Photo: Yad Vashem

The Auschwitz camp system, located in German-occupied Poland, was a complex of 3 camps, including a killing center. Learn about the history of Auschwitz.

When we think of N**i camps, our thoughts often begin and end with Auschwitz. However, the camp system set up by N**i Ge...
01/21/2021

When we think of N**i camps, our thoughts often begin and end with Auschwitz. However, the camp system set up by N**i Germany and its collaborators was a far-reaching network of concentration camps, killing centers, forced labor sites, and other places of detention that spanned much of Europe.

The N**i state and its allies established more than 44,000 incarceration sites between 1933 and 1945, according to ongoing Museum research. Eighty years since the Holocaust began, scholars are still working to untangle the N**i camp system.

N**i Germany and its allies established over 44,000 concentration camps and incarceration sites during the Holocaust. Read about the N**i camp system.

01/13/2021

Last week's attack on the US Capitol and our democracy remind us of the ever-present dangers of hatred and propaganda. Join us for a discussion about how, 75 years after the Holocaust, white supremacist and other hate groups continue to exploit racism, conspiracy theories, and antisemitic lies.

The timeless image of two children next to a Christmas tree served a purpose far greater than most such photos. It helpe...
12/25/2020

The timeless image of two children next to a Christmas tree served a purpose far greater than most such photos. It helped save the lives of a Jewish family during the Holocaust.

Read the story about the Mandil family and how one holiday photo made the difference between life and death.

It’s a timeless holiday photo: two children dressed for a special occasion standing next to a Christmas tree. Thousands of similarly…

12/16/2020

Learn how a family cook heroically rescued her former employer’s treasured recipes, preserving their connection to childhood memories and Holocaust history.

Thanksgiving is a special holiday for Holocaust survivor Rae Goldfarb. “My mother and I arrived to the United States on ...
11/26/2020

Thanksgiving is a special holiday for Holocaust survivor Rae Goldfarb. “My mother and I arrived to the United States on November 17, 1947.” The women had survived the Holocaust in hiding in N**i-controlled Poland. The week after arriving in America, surrounded by her aunt, uncle, and cousins, Rae celebrated her first . “It is very memorable to me because it was a dual celebration for us. We were grateful to finally join my aunt and find a permanent home.”

To mark the anniversary of the Nuremberg trials, which began 75 years ago, the Museum has released recordings and film f...
11/23/2020

To mark the anniversary of the Nuremberg trials, which began 75 years ago, the Museum has released recordings and film from the trials, including 1,942 gramophone discs holding 775 hours of hearings and 37 reels of film. This is the first time these digital records are available in their entirety.

For the first time, public receives digital access to full sound recordings and film of war crimes proceedings, marking the 75th anniversary of the Nuremberg Trials.

On this day 75 years ago, the trial of major N**i war criminals began at the International Military Tribunal at Nurember...
11/20/2020

On this day 75 years ago, the trial of major N**i war criminals began at the International Military Tribunal at Nuremberg.

The trials of leading German officials before the International Military Tribunal (IMT) are the best known of the postwar war c...

11/18/2020

At age 27, in his first turn as a prosecutor, Benjamin Ferencz led what was then called "the biggest murder trial in history." The Nuremberg Trials, which began 75 years ago this month, aimed to achieve a measure of justice for Germany’s monstrous crimes, including the Holocaust. Ben, now 100, has devoted his life to pursuing peace, demanding justice for victims, and preventing genocide. Learn Ben's inspiring story and why his motto is: “Never give up.”

10/28/2020

People with disabilities were the N**is' first victims of mass murder. But most remain anonymous. Learn the stories of some of the victims whose names have been recently uncovered.

10/18/2020

Holocaust survivors know about the dangers of hatred and indifference. Now is the time to listen to their voices.

After the war, the German people said, "We didn't know there were concentration camps, didn’t know they were killing the...
09/30/2020

After the war, the German people said, "We didn't know there were concentration camps, didn’t know they were killing the Jews.' They were silent. They were lying like hell.”

Holocaust survivor David Bayer remembers seeing the wife of the Auschwitz commandant looking down from her house as he and other prisoners, in their striped uniforms, were forced to dig a garden where she planted vegetables and flowers.

"She could see from her home... she could see the whole camp..."

Although the commandant’s wife had a firsthand view of the N**is’ systematic murder machine, the Holocaust required the complicity of millions of ordinary Germans and average citizens living in lands occupied by Germany and its collaborators.

09/16/2020

It's Day, and we're taking your questions. Our Museum holds the world's most diverse collection of objects, artworks, documents, and other artifacts of the Holocaust. These rescued items reveal powerful stories of loss, survival, and hope.

Being able to explain what   is and where it comes from can be difficult.Start with the basics: Who are "Jews"? How did ...
09/10/2020

Being able to explain what is and where it comes from can be difficult.

Start with the basics: Who are "Jews"? How did antisemitism start? Why is it still with us, even after the Holocaust.

Antisemitism is prejudice against or hatred of Jews. The Holocaust, the state-sponsored persecution and murder of European Jews by N**i Germany and its collaborators, is history’s most extreme example of antisemitism.

09/09/2020

The Holocaust is the best-documented case of genocide. The US military and their allies collected firsthand evidence. Survivors and other eyewitnesses testified about their personal experiences. And the N**is themselves kept meticulous records.

Yet people always have attempted to distort or deny the history. Governments minimize the part played by local N**i collaborators in order to rehabilitate their images. As time passes, new generations are susceptible to manipulation.

We're live on Facebook discussing how deniers use social media to spread lies.

"Antisemitism has a template with three elements: money and finance; intellect used maliciously and nefariously; and hav...
08/30/2020

"Antisemitism has a template with three elements: money and finance; intellect used maliciously and nefariously; and having [disproportionate] power in society. That all ties together into a conspiratorial notion of the Jew wanting to do evil—to use their financial ability, their cunning, and their power against non-Jewish people." —Holocaust historian Deborah Lipstadt

The N**i regime used similar centuries-old myths to stoke fear in the German public about Jews, which are still being used today.

The term antisemitism was coined only in the nineteenth century, but anti-Jewish hatred and Judeophobia (fear of Jews) date back to ancient times and have a variety of causes.

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The purpose of this page is to share information about Museum programs and resources; memorialize the Nazis’ victims; launch discussion about the Holocaust and its relevance today; and raise awareness that antisemitism, hatred, and genocide are ongoing threats and that we each have a role in combating them.

Towards these goals, we welcome your feedback about our efforts and your contributions to our Wall about issues that are consistent with the Museum's mission to advance and disseminate knowledge about the Holocaust; to preserve the memory of those who suffered; and to encourage people to reflect upon the moral and spiritual questions raised by the events of the Holocaust as well as their own responsibilities as global citizens.

The Museum strives to keep our Wall a forum that is open and welcoming to many issues and opinions. Towards that goal, we reserve the right to remove posts and comments that violate the following guidelines. Repeat offenders may be banned:

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Source : The Washington Jewish Week,November 14, 3019; Don’t charge to hear survivors

I am a Holocaust survivor who speaks about my experience to groups, including at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum. I believe the museum’s charging of $85 to hear Holocaust survivors is unbecoming and a serious mistake (“Honoring Holocaust Survivors,” Calendar, Nov. 7). Commercialization of Holocaust survivors is, in my view, a detriment to the Holocaust survivors who are used for raising
money. Holocaust deniers and anti-Semitic groups can argue that the museum exploits Holocaust survivors.

You ought to let people hear the survivors without charge.

FRED KAHN

Bethesda , Maryland