Mid-Atlantic Region of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

Mid-Atlantic Region of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum Contact information, map and directions, contact form, opening hours, services, ratings, photos, videos and announcements from Mid-Atlantic Region of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, Museum, 100 Raoul Wallenberg Place, SW, Washington D.C., DC.

Thanksgiving is a special holiday for Holocaust survivor Rae Goldfarb. “My mother and I arrived to the United States on ...
11/26/2020

Thanksgiving is a special holiday for Holocaust survivor Rae Goldfarb. “My mother and I arrived to the United States on November 17, 1947.” The women had survived the Holocaust in hiding in Nazi-controlled Poland. The week after arriving in America, surrounded by her aunt, uncle, and cousins, Rae celebrated her first #Thanksgiving. “It is very memorable to me because it was a dual celebration for us. We were grateful to finally join my aunt and find a permanent home.”

To mark the anniversary of the Nuremberg trials, which began 75 years ago, the Museum has released recordings and film f...
11/23/2020
Museum Makes Available Nuremberg War Crimes Trial Recordings

To mark the anniversary of the Nuremberg trials, which began 75 years ago, the Museum has released recordings and film from the trials, including 1,942 gramophone discs holding 775 hours of hearings and 37 reels of film. This is the first time these digital records are available in their entirety.

For the first time, public receives digital access to full sound recordings and film of war crimes proceedings, marking the 75th anniversary of the Nuremberg Trials.

On this day 75 years ago, the trial of major Nazi war criminals began at the International Military Tribunal at Nurember...
11/20/2020
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

On this day 75 years ago, the trial of major Nazi war criminals began at the International Military Tribunal at Nuremberg.

"The wrongs which we seek to condemn and punish have been so calculated, so malignant and so devastating, that civilization cannot tolerate their being ignored, because it cannot survive their being repeated." —US Chief Prosecutor Robert H. Jackson, in his opening statement

In the aftermath of the Holocaust, the world was faced with a challenge—how to seek justice for an almost unimaginable scale of criminal behavior. On this day 75 years ago, the trial of major Nazi war criminals began at the International Military Tribunal at Nuremberg. The Nuremberg war crimes trial set important legal precedents and helped established a strong historical record of Nazi crimes.

11/18/2020
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

At age 27, in his first turn as a prosecutor, Benjamin Ferencz led what was then called "the biggest murder trial in history." The Nuremberg Trials, which began 75 years ago this month, aimed to achieve a measure of justice for Germany’s monstrous crimes, including the Holocaust. Ben, now 100, has devoted his life to pursuing peace, demanding justice for victims, and preventing genocide. Learn Ben's inspiring story and why his motto is: “Never give up.”

Benjamin Ferencz, now 100, is a role model for many. Learn his inspiring story, his role at an important moment in history, and why his motto is: “Never give up.”

10/28/2020
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

People with disabilities were the Nazis' first victims of mass murder. But most remain anonymous. Learn the stories of some of the victims whose names have been recently uncovered.

People with disabilities were the Nazis' first victims of mass murder. But most remain anonymous. Learn the stories of some of the victims whose names have been recently uncovered.

After the war, the German people said, "We didn't know there were concentration camps, didn’t know they were killing the...
09/30/2020

After the war, the German people said, "We didn't know there were concentration camps, didn’t know they were killing the Jews.' They were silent. They were lying like hell.”

Holocaust survivor David Bayer remembers seeing the wife of the Auschwitz commandant looking down from her house as he and other prisoners, in their striped uniforms, were forced to dig a garden where she planted vegetables and flowers.

"She could see from her home... she could see the whole camp..."

Although the commandant’s wife had a firsthand view of the Nazis’ systematic murder machine, the Holocaust required the complicity of millions of ordinary Germans and average citizens living in lands occupied by Germany and its collaborators.

09/16/2020
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

It's #AskACurator Day, and we're taking your questions. Our Museum holds the world's most diverse collection of objects, artworks, documents, and other artifacts of the Holocaust. These rescued items reveal powerful stories of loss, survival, and hope.

On Ask A Curator Day, learn how seemingly ordinary objects, many once belonging to victims and survivors of the Holocaust, reveal powerful stories of tragedy, survival, and hope.

Being able to explain what #antisemitism is and where it comes from can be difficult.Start with the basics: Who are "Jew...
09/10/2020
Antisemitism and Holocaust Denial

Being able to explain what #antisemitism is and where it comes from can be difficult.

Start with the basics: Who are "Jews"? How did antisemitism start? Why is it still with us, even after the Holocaust.

Antisemitism is prejudice against or hatred of Jews. The Holocaust, the state-sponsored persecution and murder of European Jews by Nazi Germany and its collaborators, is history’s most extreme example of antisemitism.

09/09/2020
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

The Holocaust is the best-documented case of genocide. The US military and their allies collected firsthand evidence. Survivors and other eyewitnesses testified about their personal experiences. And the Nazis themselves kept meticulous records.

Yet people always have attempted to distort or deny the history. Governments minimize the part played by local Nazi collaborators in order to rehabilitate their images. As time passes, new generations are susceptible to manipulation.

We're live on Facebook discussing how deniers use social media to spread lies.

The Holocaust is the best documented case of genocide. Yet people always have attempted to distort the history or flat-out deny it. Countries minimize or ignore the part played by local collaborators in order to rehabilitate their images. People quickly spread misinformation through the power of social media. And as the history recedes in time, new generations are susceptible to the dangers of manipulation.

"Antisemitism has a template with three elements: money and finance; intellect used maliciously and nefariously; and hav...
08/30/2020
Antisemitism

"Antisemitism has a template with three elements: money and finance; intellect used maliciously and nefariously; and having [disproportionate] power in society. That all ties together into a conspiratorial notion of the Jew wanting to do evil—to use their financial ability, their cunning, and their power against non-Jewish people." —Holocaust historian Deborah Lipstadt

The Nazi regime used similar centuries-old myths to stoke fear in the German public about Jews, which are still being used today.

The term antisemitism was coined only in the nineteenth century, but anti-Jewish hatred and Judeophobia (fear of Jews) date back to ancient times and have a variety of causes.

"The minute we landed in New York, it was a place that I felt at home, and it completely eliminated the last nine years....
08/22/2020

"The minute we landed in New York, it was a place that I felt at home, and it completely eliminated the last nine years."

Frank Liebermann was still a child when his family fled the Nazi threat in Germany.

As a young Jewish boy in public school in Germany, he remembered recess as “the most scary part of the day" because some of his Christian classmates threatened him physically. After he arrived in the United States, and he grew to know his new country, Frank recognized flaws in America and wanted to see them improved. But he felt he belonged here.

"This is my country. I studied its history, its Constitution, as well as its weaknesses because I want my home to be as good as it can be."

Would you know #antisemitism if you saw it or heard it?There are many different forms of antisemitism: racial, religious...
08/14/2020
Antisemitism

Would you know #antisemitism if you saw it or heard it?

There are many different forms of antisemitism: racial, religious, economic, political, and denial that the Holocaust occured.

Explore and share the link below.

The term antisemitism was coined only in the nineteenth century, but anti-Jewish hatred and Judeophobia (fear of Jews) date back to ancient times and have a variety of causes.

08/12/2020
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

There's nothing funny about the Holocaust, but mocking perpetrators, as comedian Mel Brooks did, can strip them of their power. Watch now to learn how humor can be used to heal the pain of the Holocaust.

Jewish comedian Robert Clary, who was imprisoned in the Buchenwald concentration camp and later acted in the 1960s sitcom “Hogan’s Heroes,” says that making people laugh during the Holocaust saved his life. Humor helped some people cope with atrocious conditions in ghettos and concentration camps as they suffered under Nazi brutality.

Join Ferne Pearlstein, director of “The Last Laugh,” to explore how humor kept the human spirit alive during the Holocaust and helped some survivors heal.

07/30/2020
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

On the United Nations International Day of Friendship, join Museum experts to learn about individuals who helped their Jewish friends find refuge.

When Pennsylvanian teen Jane Bomberger and American exchange student Robert Harlan learned about Nazi persecution of Jews, they wanted to take action. They were able to help their friends flee Nazi Germany and Austria. Assistance from abroad was vital because few people could obtain the necessary paperwork and permissions needed to emigrate from Nazi-occupied Europe in the 1930s.

On the United Nations International Day of Friendship, join Museum experts to learn about individuals who helped their Jewish friends find refuge.

07/29/2020
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum : Some Were Neighbors

What motives and pressures led so many individuals to abandon their fellow human beings? Why did others make the choice to help?

While the role of Hitler and the Nazis is indisputable, the Holocaust could not have happened without tens of thousands of ordinary people actively collaborating with—or indifferent to— the actions of perpetrators. Many more supported or tolerated the crimes.

The central role of Hitler and other Nazi Party leaders is indisputable. Less well understood is these perpetrators’ dependence on countless others. In countries across Europe, tens of thousands of ordinary people actively collaborated with German perpetrators of the Holocaust. Many more supported...

Nesse Godin grew up in Siauliai, Lithuania—a town that boasted a large and culturally vibrant Jewish population. Life fo...
07/25/2020

Nesse Godin grew up in Siauliai, Lithuania—a town that boasted a large and culturally vibrant Jewish population. Life for Siauliai’s 10,000 Jewish residents changed dramatically when Nazi Germany occupied the town in 1941. ⁣

“I was a prisoner from the age of 13 to 17," she said. "I lived through a ghetto, concentration camp, four labor camps, and a death march. I was not strong, I was not smart, I was a little girl.” Nesse survived four years of Nazi imprisonment, all before her 18th birthday. She credits her survival as a young girl to the care and protection she received from Jewish women in the camps.

07/15/2020
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

Art has long been used as a form of protest and to influence social and political action. We're live on Facebook discussing art's power then and now.

Polish-born artist Arthur Szyk was alarmed by the Nazi threat and used his pen and paper to call public attention to the persecution of Europe’s Jews. Art has long been used as a form of protest to influence social and political action. Learn about the power of art—then and now—to change minds and highlight our shared humanity.

07/04/2020
Donald Hall- American Flag

“Seeing the American flag rekindled something in each of us. Every star on the American flag stood for something precious we had lost: One for hope, one for freedom, one for justice." —Holocaust survivor Simon Wiesenthal

In 1945, Sergeant Donald Hall was presented with a handmade American flag by newly liberated prisoners of the Langenstein-Zwieberge concentration camp. It had been made as a gesture of gratitude.

Hall, a member of the 83rd Infantry Division of the US Army, took part in the liberation of the camp on April 11, 1945. #FourthofJuly

04/22/2020
National Tribute Gathering

During the annual Days of Remembrance, members of the Museum community from across the country committed to our mission of teaching the history and lessons of the Holocaust. The 30-minute gathering featured Museum Director Sara Bloomfield and Maziar Bahari, the 2020 Elie Wiesel Award recipient, and closed with Holocaust survivors’ messages for the future.

Harry Markowicz’s first memory is of hiding in a ditch on the side of the road at age three. Following the Nazi invasion...
11/13/2019

Harry Markowicz’s first memory is of hiding in a ditch on the side of the road at age three. Following the Nazi invasion of Belgium, his family tried to flee into France. German planes machine gunned the road on which hordes of refugees were attempting to escape. Harry’s family huddled in the ditch to wait out the attack. When they reached the French border, they were turned away and forced to remain in Belgium.

Harry is among the survivors you may have the opportunity to meet at our upcoming Evening to Honor Survivors on Nov. 16.

https://www.ushmm.org/remember/holocaust-survivors/volunteers/harry-markowicz?utm_medium=socialmedia&utm_source=facebook&utm_campaign=eveningtohonorsurvivors&utm_content=eveningtohonorsurvivors:harrymarkowicz20191113

Susan Warsinger's parents thought they were sending Susan away from danger when they paid to have her and her brother, J...
11/05/2019

Susan Warsinger's parents thought they were sending Susan away from danger when they paid to have her and her brother, Joseph, smuggled into France. But in Versailles, after the German invasion, Susan came face-to-face with a Nazi officer. The officer and the mayor of Versailles wanted to communicate but had no language in common. Then someone remembered that a little girl spoke German. Susan nervously translated for the officer and the mayor. Her Jewish identity was not discovered.

Susan is among the survivors you may have the opportunity to meet at our upcoming Evening to Honor Survivors on Nov. 16.

https://www.ushmm.org/remember/holocaust-survivors/volunteers/susan-warsinger?utm_medium=socialmedia&utm_source=facebook&utm_campaign=&utm_content=eveningtohonorsurvivors:susanwarsinger20191104

Marcel Drimer is among the survivors you may have the opportunity to meet at our upcoming Evening to Honor Survivors on ...
10/25/2019

Marcel Drimer is among the survivors you may have the opportunity to meet at our upcoming Evening to Honor Survivors on Nov. 16.

Marcel, of Drohobycz, Poland, hid in a field under his mother's wheat-colored raincoat as the Jews of his town were murdered. For hours, he heard the sounds of pleading and gunfire. "We called it a symphony of death," Marcel said.

His former nanny, a policeman bribed with family jewelry, a Christian doctor, and and even a German soldier contributed to his survival during the Holocaust.

Learn more about Marcel: https://www.ushmm.org/remember/holocaust-survivors/volunteers/marcel-drimer

We hope that you will be able to join us for An Evening to Honor Survivors on Nov. 16 at our Museum. Stay tuned to meet ...
10/16/2019

We hope that you will be able to join us for An Evening to Honor Survivors on Nov. 16 at our Museum. Stay tuned to meet some of the survivors who may attend the program. We'll introduce them on this page between now and the event.
📸 Leigh Vogel for the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum
www.ushmm.org/events/2019-next-gen-dc

We join our chairs, Sara and Joseph Finkelstein, in extending our heartfelt thanks to everyone who supported the 25th An...
10/02/2018

We join our chairs, Sara and Joseph Finkelstein, in extending our heartfelt thanks to everyone who supported the 25th Anniversary Philadelphia Dinner, held last Thursday, September 27 at the Crystal Tea Room, to recognize local Holocaust survivors with the Museum's highest honor, The Elie Wiesel Award. We were fortunate to have over 45 survivors in attendance.

We would also like to extend our special thanks to the featured speaker, Deborah E. Lipstadt, for her riveting and relevant keynote address. Deborah's work, alongside the work of the Museum, stands as a constant reminder of the individual and shared responsibility to combat Antisemitism and Holocaust denial wherever it exists.

If you have not had the opportunity to join the Philadelphia community in its support of the Museum, please take a moment and donate now: https://donate.ushmm.org/PZp7ruCYzEihG81Dx9lCIA2

United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
08/22/2018
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

Our Museum is proud to have played a role in @TheJusticeDept efforts to gain a measure of justice for victims. As expert witness, a #USHMM historian explained the role of labor camp guards in preventing escape in the massacre of 6,000 Jewish men, women and children.

United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
08/17/2018
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

“Every day on the set, I said to myself, I said to Elie — because I had his photograph in my pocket — ‘Elie, I’m doing this for you,' ” - actor Ben Kingsley on how Museum Founder and Holocaust survivor Elie Wiesel inspired him to make Operation Finale

The Museum is committed to honoring the memory of Holocaust victims and survivors by sharing their experiences. New tech...
08/16/2018
go.ushmm.org

The Museum is committed to honoring the memory of Holocaust victims and survivors by sharing their experiences. New technology can allow us to enhance traditional displays and help build connections with a wider audience. One project that highlights this commitment is an augmented reality project—now in its test phase—that allows visitors to use their smartphones to interact with the Museum's exhibitions.

In a three-story tower in the Permanent Exhibition, Museum visitors come face to face with hundreds of photographs taken of a single Jewish village that was destroyed during the Holocaust. While people naturally connect to the everyday images of families and friends, the individuals’ names and stories remain untold. With the augmented reality project, visitors can point their smartphones at a selection of haunting photographs and caption information appears, revealing more about the individuals and how the Holocaust impacted their lives.

Over the coming year, the Museum will be testing a number of pilot projects in the Permanent Exhibition. Based on the findings, we will decide how—and if—we will roll out these experiences for all visitors.

For a look at the augmented reality project in person, visit:
http://go.ushmm.org/g20i35e0600gYO0HK000xEE

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100 Raoul Wallenberg Place, SW
Washington D.C., DC
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Welcome to our official page

The purpose of this page is to share information about Museum programs and resources; memorialize the Nazis’ victims; launch discussion about the Holocaust and its relevance today; and raise awareness that antisemitism, hatred, and genocide are ongoing threats and that we each have a role in combating them.

Towards these goals, we welcome your feedback about our efforts and your contributions to our Wall about issues that are consistent with the Museum's mission to advance and disseminate knowledge about the Holocaust; to preserve the memory of those who suffered; and to encourage people to reflect upon the moral and spiritual questions raised by the events of the Holocaust as well as their own responsibilities as global citizens.

The Museum strives to keep our Wall a forum that is open and welcoming to many issues and opinions. Towards that goal, we reserve the right to remove posts and comments that violate the following guidelines. Repeat offenders may be banned:

1. Stay on topic—all contributions to this page should be relevant to its stated purpose (see above).


Comments

Source : The Washington Jewish Week,November 14, 3019; Don’t charge to hear survivors I am a Holocaust survivor who speaks about my experience to groups, including at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum. I believe the museum’s charging of $85 to hear Holocaust survivors is unbecoming and a serious mistake (“Honoring Holocaust Survivors,” Calendar, Nov. 7). Commercialization of Holocaust survivors is, in my view, a detriment to the Holocaust survivors who are used for raising money. Holocaust deniers and anti-Semitic groups can argue that the museum exploits Holocaust survivors. You ought to let people hear the survivors without charge. FRED KAHN Bethesda , Maryland