Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center

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Operating as usual

Why is it important to find ways to learn together even in challenging times? What resources exist for educators looking...
08/23/2021

Why is it important to find ways to learn together even in challenging times? What resources exist for educators looking to safely acknowledge the difficult experiences of last year? As schools reopen and educators look to rebuild their classrooms after a year apart, we recognize these questions and aim to support teachers, caregivers who teach, and learners.

Check out our Learning Together update for new resources available for you to connect with and learn from Asian American educators who have created materials you can use in the classroom, and workshop opportunities for educators to practice teaching Asian American stories. Click the link below about a few of the existing and newly added resources included on the #LearningTogether page!

https://smithsonianapa.org/learn

Why is it important to find ways to learn together even in challenging times? What resources exist for educators looking to safely acknowledge the difficult experiences of last year? As schools reopen and educators look to rebuild their classrooms after a year apart, we recognize these questions and aim to support teachers, caregivers who teach, and learners.

Check out our Learning Together update for new resources available for you to connect with and learn from Asian American educators who have created materials you can use in the classroom, and workshop opportunities for educators to practice teaching Asian American stories. Click the link below about a few of the existing and newly added resources included on the #LearningTogether page!

https://smithsonianapa.org/learn

06/01/2021
If you are someone who shares our belief in the importance of accessibility and elevating #AAPI history, art, and cultur...
05/28/2021

If you are someone who shares our belief in the importance of accessibility and elevating #AAPI history, art, and culture with the world, then make a gift today to support the work of the Center! Thanks to the contributions of our community, we're only $1,200 away from reaching our goal. The pledge drive ends on Monday!

By supporting the Center you are powering:
• collaboration with community artists & educators
• the creation of free lesson plans, activities, & webinars that can be used in-person or online learning
• youth media camps that present and elevate Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander histories, art, & culture
• real-life learning experiences for students through our museum internship opportunities

To learn more about the pledge drive and to make a gift today, click the link below!

https://smithsonianapa.org/pledge2021/

If you are someone who shares our belief in the importance of accessibility and elevating #AAPI history, art, and culture with the world, then make a gift today to support the work of the Center! Thanks to the contributions of our community, we're only $1,200 away from reaching our goal. The pledge drive ends on Monday!

By supporting the Center you are powering:
• collaboration with community artists & educators
• the creation of free lesson plans, activities, & webinars that can be used in-person or online learning
• youth media camps that present and elevate Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander histories, art, & culture
• real-life learning experiences for students through our museum internship opportunities

To learn more about the pledge drive and to make a gift today, click the link below!

https://smithsonianapa.org/pledge2021/

Philippine-born, Auckland-based Marc Conaco is a graphic designer, illustrator and aspiring farmer who is on a steady jo...
05/26/2021

Philippine-born, Auckland-based Marc Conaco is a graphic designer, illustrator and aspiring farmer who is on a steady journey of indigenization centered on learning about his pre-colonial history and culture. His zines and illustrations centre on the heritage of his ancestors and the importance of keeping their stories alive.

Marc Conaco’s practice looks at pre-colonial cultural traditions from the Visayas, a cluster of islands in the middle of the Philippines, an important place within his family history. He explores indigenous mythology, tattoo cultures and a pre-colonial Visayan writing system known as Suwat Bisaya or Badlit within his illustrations and design, highlighting and reviving the knowledge structures that have been lost through the Spanish colonization of the Philippines.

This May, the Center is asking for your support towards our pledge drive to deepen the breadth and reach of our educational resources. When you give to the pledge drive, you are eligible to receive a limited-edition art print bundle from artist Marc Conaco. This limited-edition bundle includes 15 prints and an accompanying zine from the series Ang Babaylan Nga Nahimong Bayot, adapted from Te Whāinga, the #CultureLab collaboration with Auckland Museum in Tāmaki Makaurau. *Please note, this thank you gift is only available while supplies last.

Click the link in our bio to donate today!

#Bisaya #Indigenization #Decolonization #Donate #Q***r #Philippines #Diaspora #APAHM #AAPIHeritageMonth #AAPIHM

https://smithsonianapa.org/pledge2021/

Philippine-born, Auckland-based Marc Conaco is a graphic designer, illustrator and aspiring farmer who is on a steady journey of indigenization centered on learning about his pre-colonial history and culture. His zines and illustrations centre on the heritage of his ancestors and the importance of keeping their stories alive.

Marc Conaco’s practice looks at pre-colonial cultural traditions from the Visayas, a cluster of islands in the middle of the Philippines, an important place within his family history. He explores indigenous mythology, tattoo cultures and a pre-colonial Visayan writing system known as Suwat Bisaya or Badlit within his illustrations and design, highlighting and reviving the knowledge structures that have been lost through the Spanish colonization of the Philippines.

This May, the Center is asking for your support towards our pledge drive to deepen the breadth and reach of our educational resources. When you give to the pledge drive, you are eligible to receive a limited-edition art print bundle from artist Marc Conaco. This limited-edition bundle includes 15 prints and an accompanying zine from the series Ang Babaylan Nga Nahimong Bayot, adapted from Te Whāinga, the #CultureLab collaboration with Auckland Museum in Tāmaki Makaurau. *Please note, this thank you gift is only available while supplies last.

Click the link in our bio to donate today!

#Bisaya #Indigenization #Decolonization #Donate #Q***r #Philippines #Diaspora #APAHM #AAPIHeritageMonth #AAPIHM

https://smithsonianapa.org/pledge2021/

Music carries a special power—to physically and emotionally move us. It connects us to other people and places. Our team...
05/20/2021
The Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center Calls Upon Its Community to Share the Power of Music

Music carries a special power—to physically and emotionally move us. It connects us to other people and places. Our team at Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center beckoned to friends from near and afar to compile this playlist as we emerged from a year in which we were forced to stay physically apart, as we mourn the losses we have individually and collectively suffered, as we continue to grapple with persistent injustice and hate.

Accept this playlist as an extension of our #ArtCarePackage. Through these tracks, we call up the ancestors, stay present and look to the future. We invite you to explore the diverse ways through which Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders use music for affirmation and consolation, as a call to action and to find their joy.

We are grateful to all the contributors for coming through and so openly sharing, and for helping us find a way forward through art. Click the link in bio to read about each song selection at Smithsonian Magazine and hear the whole playlist on Spotify or YouTube.

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smithsonian-institution/smithsonian-asian-pacific-american-center-calls-upon-its-community-share-power-music-180977716/

#Playlist #Smithsonian #APAHM #AAPIHM #AAPIHeritageMonth #Traktivist TRAKTIVIST.com #Beckoning #Joy #Sorrow #Rage #Resistance #StopAsianHate

As an antidote for these times, 43 songs honoring joy, sorrow, rage and resistance

As we mark another commemoration of #APAHM, we have to acknowledge how this time feels different. A global pandemic has ...
05/10/2021
Standing Together for AAPI Heritage Month - Standing Together

As we mark another commemoration of #APAHM, we have to acknowledge how this time feels different. A global pandemic has shaken our communities to the core, revealing long-standing and often unacknowledged inequalities. Our families in Atlanta, Indianapolis, and throughout the nation continue to shoulder the pain of losing loved ones to violence and harassment. Please remember to take time to support each other as we try to make sense of these times. Usually, these month-long events in May have been wonderful ways to gather up our voices to celebrate achievements. We would share songs, food, ritual, and stories. And while this year we grieve, let us also strive to find the humanity in each other. We wish to see the fullness of who we have been, who we are, and who we can still be. We are more than what has been done to us. We bear witness to and participate in calls for racial equality, justice, and much-needed kindness and healing. Our Asian American and Pacific Islander traditions demonstrate unity and care for each other. On behalf of everyone at the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center, I invite you to live out these ideals with us not only in May, but throughout the year. [A message from @SmithsonianAPA’s Interim Director, Theo Gonzalves]

Head to the smithsonianapa.org/stand to access a calendar of events across the #Smithsonian in commemoration of APAHM and for a growing collection of free resources created to support community education and self-care throughout the year. #AAPIHeritageMonth #AAPIHM
• • • • •

This May, the Center is asking for your support towards our pledge drive to deepen the breadth and reach of our educational resources. By supporting the Center you are powering:

• collaboration with community artists & educators

• the creation of free lesson plans, activities, & webinars that can be used in in-person or online learning

• youth media camps that present and elevate Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander histories, art, & culture

• real-life learning experiences for students through our internship opportunities

To learn more about the pledge drive and to donate today, head to our website!

The Smithsonian Institution mourns the loss of eight people—seven of them women, six of whom were of Asian descent—who were killed last week when a gunman opened fire inside three spas located in Georgia.

04/30/2021

The Diasporic Vietnamese Artists Network (DVAN) is collaborating with the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American (APA) Center to host ACCENTEDiRL: Dialogues in Diaspora.

This Spring 2021, ACCENTEDiRL will feature authors, artists, poets, and cultural producers across the Southeast Asian diaspora in a series of four free virtual events hosted on Facebook Live and YouTube, hosted by Pulitzer-prize winning author Viet Thanh Nguyen.

This project blends DVAN’s ACCENTED: Dialogues in Diaspora show with the Smithsonian APA Center’s Heritage iRL to engage with audiences from across the world in intimate, lively conversations about culture, heritage, and narrative.

This third installation of ACCENTEDiRL will center diasporic writers’ memories and reflections of April 30th, 1975, the liminality of refugees, and postmemories. Grab a drink and join groundbreaking authors Lan Cao, Duong Van Mai Elliott, Le Ly Hayslip, and Marcelino Truong as we transcend and travel through time to that fateful day.

Why is it important to identify the existence and evolution of caste apartheid in America? How has caste been perpetuate...
04/27/2021

Why is it important to identify the existence and evolution of caste apartheid in America? How has caste been perpetuated amongst South Asian Americans throughout history? How have Dalit activists applied lessons learned from Black American liberation movements to advocate for their communities?

In the latest video of our educational series, "We are not a stereotype," Dalit rights activist, transmedia storyteller, technologist, and artist Thenmozhi Soundararajan breaks down the impact of caste discrimination in the United States throughout history and modern-day times. Watch as Thenmozhi takes us through a timeline of caste in America, calling forth the need to recognize and dismantle this system for a more equitable future. Follow the link to access the complete presentation and to learn about Thenmozhi’s work at Equality Labs: https://smithsonianapa.org/learn/not-a-stereotype/

Thenmozhi's presentation was recorded in the fall of 2020 and includes stories about the harsh treatment of Dalits in the United States and around the world, and covers the sexual assault and abuse of Dalit women. *We acknowledge that this content may be disturbing, and we encourage you to care for your well-being before and during this talk.*

Stay tuned for more videos and join the conversation: #BreakingAPABias

#CasteApartheid #SouthAsians #Dalit #Smithsonian #Education #KnowYourHistory #WeAreNotAStereotype #NotAMonolith #Stereotypes #AAPI #APA

Why is it important to identify the existence and evolution of caste apartheid in America? How has caste been perpetuated amongst South Asian Americans throughout history? How have Dalit activists applied lessons learned from Black American liberation movements to advocate for their communities?

In the latest video of our educational series, "We are not a stereotype," Dalit rights activist, transmedia storyteller, technologist, and artist Thenmozhi Soundararajan breaks down the impact of caste discrimination in the United States throughout history and modern-day times. Watch as Thenmozhi takes us through a timeline of caste in America, calling forth the need to recognize and dismantle this system for a more equitable future. Follow the link to access the complete presentation and to learn about Thenmozhi’s work at Equality Labs: https://smithsonianapa.org/learn/not-a-stereotype/

Thenmozhi's presentation was recorded in the fall of 2020 and includes stories about the harsh treatment of Dalits in the United States and around the world, and covers the sexual assault and abuse of Dalit women. *We acknowledge that this content may be disturbing, and we encourage you to care for your well-being before and during this talk.*

Stay tuned for more videos and join the conversation: #BreakingAPABias

#CasteApartheid #SouthAsians #Dalit #Smithsonian #Education #KnowYourHistory #WeAreNotAStereotype #NotAMonolith #Stereotypes #AAPI #APA

This blue cotton turban belonged to Balbir Singh Sodi, a Sikh gas station owner, who was shot to death in Mesa, Arizona,...
04/23/2021

This blue cotton turban belonged to Balbir Singh Sodi, a Sikh gas station owner, who was shot to death in Mesa, Arizona, days after the Twin Tower attacks on September 11, 2001. His death is recognized as one of the first acts of retaliation targeting Arab Americans, Muslim Americans and South Asian Americans after 9/11. The turban was donated to the National Museum of American History by his family.

Offered by Rana Singh Sodhi
Photo Credit: Richard Strauss, National Museum of American History

#SikhAmericans
• • • • •

Once again we are in mourning after yet another act of violence against Asian Americans. As we at SmithsonianAPA process and mourn last week’s attack in Indianapolis, we underscore the fact that our communities include South Asians, Southeast Asians, and Central Asian Americans.

We honor the eight victims in Indianapolis, at least four of whom were part of the local Sikh community. We extend our condolences to the families of Matthew R. Alexander, Samaria Blackwell, Amarjeet Kaur Johal, Jasvinder Kaur, Jaswinder Singh, Amarjit Kaur Sekhon, Karli Smith, and John Weisert.

As we recall the killing of Balbir Singh Sodhi and many others following 9/11, the Wisconsin Sikh temple shooting in 2012, and the ongoing racial profiling of Sikh Americans, we recognize that hate and violence against Sikhs is a painful and deeply embedded part of American history.

We look to community organizations that are advocating for Sikh and South Asian American communities, such as the Sikh American Legal Defense and Education Fund (SALDAF), South Asian Americans Leading Together (SAALT), the Kaur Foundation, the South Asian American American Digital Archive (SAADA), and the Sikh Coalition.

We continue to condemn xenophobia in all of its forms. We denounce targeted violence against all Asian Americans, and we unite against systemic and unjust violence against Black Americans.
-----
• • • • •

In 2018, cartoonist, educator, and speaker Vishjavit Singh wrote the article (In)Visible Identity for Learning For Justice. Click the link to access SmithsonianAPA’s #LearningTogether page which features an article by Vishjavit Singh, wrote the article (In)Visible Identity for @LearningForJustice. Vishjavit’s article links classroom-ready materials including a documentary, lessons, reports about bullying, teacher resource guides, and more, all created by Sikh American organizations.

https://smithsonianapa.org/learn/

This blue cotton turban belonged to Balbir Singh Sodi, a Sikh gas station owner, who was shot to death in Mesa, Arizona, days after the Twin Tower attacks on September 11, 2001. His death is recognized as one of the first acts of retaliation targeting Arab Americans, Muslim Americans and South Asian Americans after 9/11. The turban was donated to the National Museum of American History by his family.

Offered by Rana Singh Sodhi
Photo Credit: Richard Strauss, National Museum of American History

#SikhAmericans
• • • • •

Once again we are in mourning after yet another act of violence against Asian Americans. As we at SmithsonianAPA process and mourn last week’s attack in Indianapolis, we underscore the fact that our communities include South Asians, Southeast Asians, and Central Asian Americans.

We honor the eight victims in Indianapolis, at least four of whom were part of the local Sikh community. We extend our condolences to the families of Matthew R. Alexander, Samaria Blackwell, Amarjeet Kaur Johal, Jasvinder Kaur, Jaswinder Singh, Amarjit Kaur Sekhon, Karli Smith, and John Weisert.

As we recall the killing of Balbir Singh Sodhi and many others following 9/11, the Wisconsin Sikh temple shooting in 2012, and the ongoing racial profiling of Sikh Americans, we recognize that hate and violence against Sikhs is a painful and deeply embedded part of American history.

We look to community organizations that are advocating for Sikh and South Asian American communities, such as the Sikh American Legal Defense and Education Fund (SALDAF), South Asian Americans Leading Together (SAALT), the Kaur Foundation, the South Asian American American Digital Archive (SAADA), and the Sikh Coalition.

We continue to condemn xenophobia in all of its forms. We denounce targeted violence against all Asian Americans, and we unite against systemic and unjust violence against Black Americans.
-----
• • • • •

In 2018, cartoonist, educator, and speaker Vishjavit Singh wrote the article (In)Visible Identity for Learning For Justice. Click the link to access SmithsonianAPA’s #LearningTogether page which features an article by Vishjavit Singh, wrote the article (In)Visible Identity for @LearningForJustice. Vishjavit’s article links classroom-ready materials including a documentary, lessons, reports about bullying, teacher resource guides, and more, all created by Sikh American organizations.

https://smithsonianapa.org/learn/

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THE IRON ROAD (First Transcontinental Railroad) – Bein Yiu Chung, The Chinese Railroad Worker Raymond Douglas Chong will present a tale, about Bein Yiu Chung, his great great grandfather, from Hoyping (Kaiping) of Kwangtung (Guangdong) in Cathay (China). He was a Chinese railroad worker on the Iron Road, the first Transcontinental Railroad, for Central Pacific Railroad Company, from 1865 to 1869. We will follow with screening of MY ODYSSEY – Between Two Worlds film. Our documentary chronicles Raymond’s ancestral roots from Kaiping, China to Gold Mountain, America, dating back seven generations to 1849. His ancestral journey includes monumental events such as the California Gold Rush, the building of the First Transcontinental Railroad, Tong Wars in Boston Chinatown, the Kubla Khan Theater Restaurant in San Francisco Chinatown, the Far East Café at Little Tokyo, and more. Venue: California State Railroad Museum, Sacramento Day: Saturday, September 11, 2021 Time: 1:00 PM to 3:00 PM • Start • Welcome • Moment of Silence 9/11 • Introduction • Southern Pacific Railroad History Center o Rendering of SPRHC by J. Craig Thorpe o Donation of vent door related to Central Pacific 12 by Lauren Oberlander • THE IRON ROAD – Bein Yiu Chung, The Chinese Railroad Worker • MY ODYSSEY – Between Two Worlds documentary • Questions and Answers • End
THE PAN AM HISTORICAL FOUNDATION - Colonel Ronald Won’s Lifetime of Aviation At website of the Pan Am Historical Foundation, a tribute to Ronald Chin Won (1925 to 2021), United States Air Force Colonel & Pan American World Airways Captain. He followed his dreams during the Golden Age of Aviation at our trailblazer. He was always an officer and a gentleman.
SOUTHERN PACFIIC RAILROAD – Chinese Railroad Workers On behalf of Southern Pacific Railroad History Center, for Bill Fowler, Director, we are seeking names, stories, photos of Chinese railroad workers, who worked for Southern Pacific Railroad, including Central Pacific Railroad of First Transcontinental Railroad, from 1865 to 1996, when it merged with Union Pacific. We acknowledge “Voices from the Railroad,” by Chinese Historical Society of America, an excellent reference. If you have such information, please share with Bill Fowler at [email protected] (email). Thank you.
THE IRON ROAD (First Transcontinental Railroad) – Bein Yiu Chung, The Chinese Railroad Worker By Raymond Douglas Chong Venue: California State Railroad Museum, Sacramento Day: Saturday, September 11, 2021 Time: 1:00 PM to 3:00 PM Agenda 1:00 PM – Start 1:05 PM – Welcome 1:06 PM – Introduction 1:10 PM – Southern Pacific Railroad History Center 1:15 PM – THE IRON ROAD – Bein Yiu Chung, The Chinese Railroad Worker 1:30 PM – MY ODYSSEY – Between Two Worlds documentary 2:25 PM – Questions and Answers 2:55 PM – “THE IRON ROAD OF GOLD MOUNTAIN” poem 3:00 PM – End
THE AMERICAN DREAM - The Zhang Clan Odyssey on Gold Mountain | TEDxColeParkStudio On TEDx, I tell “THE AMERICAN DREAM – The Zhang Clan Odyssey on Gold Mountain.” This story is the saga of my Zhang Clan in America, my forefathers, from Hoyping, Kongmoon, in the Pearl River Delta, during Imperial Cathay and Republic of China. • From the California Gold Rush, (1849 to 1855); • thru First Transcontinental Railroad (1865 to 1869), from Sacramento to Promontory Summit; • at gambling hall and o***m den of Boston Chinatown (1891 to 1926); • at Imperial Restaurant in Cambridge Central Square (1923 to 1936); • and with US Naval Reserve during World War II (1943-1945), while serving famous China Clipper seaplane, at Kubla Khan Theater Restaurant in San Francisco Chinatown, during the Golden Age of Chinese Nightclubs (1946 to 1950), and landmark Far East Café, with its iconic Chop Suey sign, at Little Tokyo in Los Angeles (1950-1974). Our saga spans from 1849 to now, 172 years, 7 generations, as sojourners and pioneers at Gold Mountain – America. Our American Dream is your American Dream. I am very appreciative to Liza Wisner, with TEDxColeParkStudio, for this awesome opportunity to be part of TED – Ideas worth spreading. And kudo to Kenji Kaio Chong, KKC Visuals, my #1 son, who filmed and edited this video.
ASAMNEWS – Anti-Asian Hate & abuse of African Americans My poignant article about the shared struggles among Asian Asians & Pacific Islanders and African Americans to end systemic racism against people of color in our America.
ASAMNEWS – Tribute to Dr. John Raymond Jung My heartfelt article about the late Dr. John Raymond Jung, the Chinese American storyteller.
ASAMNEWS - Legacy of Chinese Exclusion Act: Su***de of a Chinese War Bride My AsAmNews article about the tragic su***de of Bick Ha Leung at San Francisco Immigration Station in 1948.
ASIAN AMERICAN UNITY COALITION Podcast Building Our Collective American Dream July 25, 2021, Sunday, 8 pm EST/ 7 pm CST/ 5 pm PST The Asian American Unity Coalition is proud to introduce a new Podcast series titled “Racial Disparity and Harmony”, our seventh episode airing on Sunday, July 25 at 8:00 pm EST. Welcome to AAUC Podcast “Building our Collective American Dream” episode 7: “Racial Disparity and Harmony”. Our featured speakers include: • Professor Karen Umemoto, UCLA, Asian American Studies • Professor Russell Jeung, San Francisco State University, Asian American Studies, founder, Stop AAPI Hate • Doctor Raymond Chong, creator and writer, 6th generation Chinese American • Doctor Jonathan Leong, founder, Asian American Donor Program The AAUC podcast series is supported by our member organizations and our lifetime Individual members. For more information about AAUC please visit our website: https://asamunitycoalition.org/ All podcasts will air at 8 pm ET on the last Sunday of each month. Please join us on July 25th or at your convenience for the seventh episode of “Building our Collective American Dream.” Go to our website at: https://asamunitycoalition.org/ and click on Podcast! AAUC Podcast Episode #7 Racial Disparity and Harmony, A Building Block for Our Collective American Dream Copyright © *2021* *AAUC*, All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: [email protected]
RONALD CHIN WON – The Aviator We sadly mourn the passing of Colonel Ronald Chin Won, 96 years old. He died on July 6, 2021 in San Francisco. He led a vibrant life as pioneering aviator with United States Air Force jet fighter and cargo transport pilot, as well as Pan American World Airways commercial pilot. Ronald was a true Officer and a pure gentleman, while pursuing American Dream, with his beloved Marian. “For God, For Country, For Family” —Colonel Ronald Chin Won
OUR AMERICAN DREAM ON GOLD MOUNTAIN My Op Ed in AsAmNews of my Zhang family saga in America, since 1849.
FIRST TRANSCONTINENTAL RAILROAD – The Iron Road of Gold Mountain At the California Railroad Museum at Sacramento in California, within their new permanent exhibit on the Chinese railroad workers during the First Transcontinental Railroad (1865 to 1869), it humbly features Bein Yiu Chung, my great great grandfather, from Hoyping at Kwangtung of Imperial Cathay. The “Chinese Railroad Workers’ Experience” exhibit offers a view of the Chinese workers who built the western portion of the nation’s first Transcontinental Railroad. Marginalized by history, the Chinese workers were more than a nameless group of laborers. I told the story of Bein Yiu Chung: “Bein Yiu Chung, my great-great- grandfather, was a Chinese railroad worker of the first Transcontinental Railroad – Iron Road, from 1865 to 1869. He was one of thousands of contract laborers, sons of poor farmers, from Sze Yup region in Kwangtung, to pursue their golden dreams. His tale and other ones of the Iron Road should never be forgotten. The Chinese railroad workers, as sojourners, faced constant hardship and discrimination to build the Transcontinental Railroad, the greatest engineering feat of the 19th century – a work of giants. As a nation of immigrants, Americans should rightly recognize the struggles and sacrifices of the Chinese railroad workers to link the East Coast with the West Coast of America. - Dr. Raymond Douglas Chong, Texas” My poetic tribute to our Chinese Railroad Workers: THE IRON ROAD OF GOLD MOUNTAIN An ancient eon ago The intrepid Chinese From Sze Yup – Four Counties Of Imperial Cathay Left the country villages Of their lovesome families For majestic Gold Mountain. In fearsome gloom They anxiously arrive Aboard swift clippers Across turquoise Pacific Ocean To First City of Golden Gate – San Francisco. For The Big Four Leland Stanford, Collis Potter Huntington, Mark Hopkins, and Charles Crocker Of the Central Pacific Railroad The Army of Canton arduously toil and agonizingly brave Amidst a virgin wilderness Of the American West To build First Transcontinental Railroad – the Iron Road If it is ever built, it will be the work of giants. From the Second City – Sacramento Over woody foothills Over alpine Sierra Nevada Mountain Over barren Great Basin Desert To a mystical rendezvous By two railroad lines Of Central Pacific Railroad from the west And of Union Pacific Railroad from the east. Midst a Hell on Wheels Under the cruel torment By red hair devils. Against freezing winters And against blazing summers With teary bitterness Away from their beloved ones. The Army of Canton mightily march With their gritty mettle Among an impassioned camaraderie As they raise steel rails and talking wires Along the Iron Road. For four hardened years They chisel cement rocks Of Bloomer Divide They build wooden trestle bridges Above abyssal ravines They carve a curvy ledge Of Cape Horn They blast 15 Summit tunnels At granite Donner Pass They lay ten miles of track In a single day. Midst a golden spring dawn On the Day of the Golden Spike – May 10, 1869 At Promontory Summit Near Great Salt Lake The Chinese lay the last rails When the two Iron Horses meet After Leland Stanford hammers The Last Spike May God continue the unity of our Country as this Railroad unites the two great Oceans of the world A telegraph message flashes: D-O-N-E Across Gold Mountain From sea to shining sea. The glorious tale Of a magnificent achievement By the Chinese Railroad Workers After their bitter struggles Deeply inspire our hearts and souls For their spectacular feat The Iron Road of Gold Mountain. © 2021 Raymond Douglas Chong (Zhang Weiming)