U.S. Botanic Garden

U.S. Botanic Garden The U.S. Botanic Garden, created in 1820, is dedicated to demonstrating aesthetic, cultural, economic, therapeutic and ecological importance of plants to human well-being.
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The easiest way to reach us is by taking Metro to Federal Center SW station. The United States Botanic Garden (USBG) is the oldest continuously operating public garden in the United States, founded in 1820. The Garden informs visitors about the importance, value and diversity of plants, as well as their aesthetic, cultural, economic, therapeutic and ecological significance. With more than a million visitors annually, the USBG strives to demonstrate and promote sustainable practices. The Garden is a living plant museum accredited by the American Alliance of Museums and Botanic Gardens Conservation International.

Operating as usual

Another Amorphophallus has been blooming -- Amorphophallus bulbifer, native to Burma (Myanmar). The peachy-pink inflores...
05/12/2021

Another Amorphophallus has been blooming -- Amorphophallus bulbifer, native to Burma (Myanmar). The peachy-pink inflorescence stands about 2-3 feet tall. Click through to see the bloom progression, a crosscut showing all the flowers inside, and the creation of bulbils!

Join us Friday as we explore recipes from here in D.C. to around the world and the plants that bring these recipes to li...
05/12/2021

Join us Friday as we explore recipes from here in D.C. to around the world and the plants that bring these recipes to life. In this month's local chef series, Chef Andrew demonstrates surprising sandwich-inspired recipes highlighting the use of scallions, pistachios, tomatoes, tea, and more! Join us to discover dishes and cuisines that celebrate how plants shape our food and culture.

Presenter: Chef Andrew Markert, Owner/Operator of Beuchert's Saloon and Fight Club

DATE: Friday, May 14
TIME: 12:00 p.m. to 12:45 p.m. ET
LOCATION: online
FREE: Pre-registration required
REGISTER at https://app.livestorm.co/u-s-botanic-garden/a-twist-on-sandwiches-with-fight-club-local-chef-series-online-cooking-demo?type=detailed

Join us Friday as we explore recipes from here in D.C. to around the world and the plants that bring these recipes to life. In this month's local chef series, Chef Andrew demonstrates surprising sandwich-inspired recipes highlighting the use of scallions, pistachios, tomatoes, tea, and more! Join us to discover dishes and cuisines that celebrate how plants shape our food and culture.

Presenter: Chef Andrew Markert, Owner/Operator of Beuchert's Saloon and Fight Club

DATE: Friday, May 14
TIME: 12:00 p.m. to 12:45 p.m. ET
LOCATION: online
FREE: Pre-registration required
REGISTER at https://app.livestorm.co/u-s-botanic-garden/a-twist-on-sandwiches-with-fight-club-local-chef-series-online-cooking-demo?type=detailed

Each day, more peonies begin to bloom throughout the Garden. This is Paeonia 'Coral Supreme,' an early season bloomer. T...
05/11/2021

Each day, more peonies begin to bloom throughout the Garden. This is Paeonia 'Coral Supreme,' an early season bloomer. This salmon-coral, semi-double hybrid was first introduced in 1964. It stands about 2-3 feet tall and is hardy USDA zones 3-7.

Check out the answer to this week's Plant Riddle, created for the Garden by author and naturalist Melanie Choukas-Bradle...
05/11/2021

Check out the answer to this week's Plant Riddle, created for the Garden by author and naturalist Melanie Choukas-Bradley. Did you guess correctly? #PlantRiddle

I mistook a cicada for this name
Although they’re not one and the same
The sweetest substance from a bee
Completes the moniker of this tree

Answer: honey locust (Gleditsia triacanthos); pea or legume family (Fabaceae). The honey locust tree blooms in May with small greenish-yellow flowers that hang in clusters called racemes. The leaves are alternately arranged, pinnately or bipinnately compound with small, delicate leaflets that give the overall leaf a feathery appearance and turn bright golden yellow in the fall. The tree bears large, sometimes branched, thorns, although nurseries have cultivated thornless varieties.

Honey locusts produce long, twisted pods (as much as 16 inches in length!) that contain large oval seeds surrounded by a sweet pulp that gives the honey locust its name. The pulp attracts many animals, including deer and domestic livestock like cattle and horses, who eat the pulp and can disperse the seeds over long distances. This has contributed to the spread of honey locust well beyond its original central U.S. range. In some parts of the world, it is considered invasive. Honey locust is naturalized in Maryland and Virginia, but you are more likely to see it planted rather than growing wild in the immediate D.C. area. Honey locust is one of several common trees in the legume family that grow well in city parks and gardens including the outdoor Regional Garden of the U.S. Botanic Garden.

Happy #NationalCactusDay ! You might be tempted to give your cactus a hug, but their prickly protection of their water i...
05/11/2021

Happy #NationalCactusDay ! You might be tempted to give your cactus a hug, but their prickly protection of their water inside might convince you to love them with your eyes! Shown: the mesmerizing geometry of Mammillaria spinossisima

Happy #NationalCactusDay ! You might be tempted to give your cactus a hug, but their prickly protection of their water inside might convince you to love them with your eyes! Shown: the mesmerizing geometry of Mammillaria spinossisima

Columbine (Aquilegia canadensis) is blooming in the Garden and throughout the D.C. area. This wildflower is native throu...
05/10/2021

Columbine (Aquilegia canadensis) is blooming in the Garden and throughout the D.C. area. This wildflower is native throughout eastern North America, and many hybrid variations also introduce many different color combinations for the garden. They tolerate full sun to part shade, and the flowers attract hummingbirds. Are you seeing columbines blooming in your area? What colors?

Join us Tuesday at noon for this second online program celebrating the Garden's bicentennial -- an exploration of the U....
05/10/2021

Join us Tuesday at noon for this second online program celebrating the Garden's bicentennial -- an exploration of the U.S. Botanic Garden today and into the future. Since its founding in 1820, the Garden has evolved through time, while staying true to its mission of connecting people and plants. This panel will discuss the Garden's current and future plant collections, science and conservation work, education, outreach, and more.

Tuesday, May 11, 12-1 p.m. Eastern
online, free
REGISTER at https://app.livestorm.co/u-s-botanic-garden/usbg-at-200-part-2-branching-outward?type=detailed

Panel:
* Dr. Saharah Moon Chapotin, USBG Executive Director,
* Jim Adams, USBG Horticulture Manager;
* Dr. Susan Pell, USBG Deputy Executive Director;
* Amy Bolton, USBG Public Programs Manager;
* Moderator: Devin Dotson, USBG Public Affairs Specialist

Join us Tuesday at noon for this second online program celebrating the Garden's bicentennial -- an exploration of the U.S. Botanic Garden today and into the future. Since its founding in 1820, the Garden has evolved through time, while staying true to its mission of connecting people and plants. This panel will discuss the Garden's current and future plant collections, science and conservation work, education, outreach, and more.

Tuesday, May 11, 12-1 p.m. Eastern
online, free
REGISTER at https://app.livestorm.co/u-s-botanic-garden/usbg-at-200-part-2-branching-outward?type=detailed

Panel:
* Dr. Saharah Moon Chapotin, USBG Executive Director,
* Jim Adams, USBG Horticulture Manager;
* Dr. Susan Pell, USBG Deputy Executive Director;
* Amy Bolton, USBG Public Programs Manager;
* Moderator: Devin Dotson, USBG Public Affairs Specialist

05/10/2021

Here's a new Plant Riddle, created for the Garden by author and naturalist Melanie Choukas-Bradley. Share your guesses below or using #PlantRiddle. We'll post the answer tomorrow.

I mistook a cicada for this name
Although they’re not one and the same
The sweetest substance from a bee
Completes the moniker of this tree

Paphiopedilum glaucophyllum orchid blooming in the Tropics house. Native to Central Sumatra and Java, where it grows in ...
05/09/2021

Paphiopedilum glaucophyllum orchid blooming in the Tropics house. Native to Central Sumatra and Java, where it grows in forests and rocky areas such as inland cliffs and mountain peaks. It is an endangered species, threatened by human development and agriculture.

Paphiopedilum glaucophyllum orchid blooming in the Tropics house. Native to Central Sumatra and Java, where it grows in forests and rocky areas such as inland cliffs and mountain peaks. It is an endangered species, threatened by human development and agriculture.

Happy Mother’s Day! Flowering dogwoods have been brightening up the springtime at eye level with their showy white and p...
05/09/2021

Happy Mother’s Day! Flowering dogwoods have been brightening up the springtime at eye level with their showy white and pink bracts. This is Cornus florida ‘Cherokee Princess.’ This variety is known for early blooming with large quantities of very white bracts.

Clouds of blue from this eastern bluestar (Amsonia tabernaemontana ‘Storm Cloud’). The species is native throughout much...
05/08/2021

Clouds of blue from this eastern bluestar (Amsonia tabernaemontana ‘Storm Cloud’). The species is native throughout much of the eastern United States, and has distinctive blue star-shaped clusters of flowers in the spring. The ‘Storm Cloud’ variety has near-black stems. It is hardy USDA zones 4-9.

Soft yellow blooms on this Parodia warasii cactus, native to Brazil
05/07/2021

Soft yellow blooms on this Parodia warasii cactus, native to Brazil

Soft yellow blooms on this Parodia warasii cactus, native to Brazil

Saturday at noon, USBG gardener Craig will leading a live Q&A all about Seasonal Vegetable Gardening. Looking for strawb...
05/07/2021

Saturday at noon, USBG gardener Craig will leading a live Q&A all about Seasonal Vegetable Gardening. Looking for strawberry growing tips? Wondering about tomato and pepper varieties? Need help with support structures and trellising? Bring your questions and join Craig online for some late-spring vegetable gardening Q&A.

Saturday, May 8, 12 p.m. to 12:45 p.m. ET
online, free
REGISTER at https://app.livestorm.co/u-s-botanic-garden/online-q-and-a-seasonal-vegetable-gardening?type=detailed

Saturday at noon, USBG gardener Craig will leading a live Q&A all about Seasonal Vegetable Gardening. Looking for strawberry growing tips? Wondering about tomato and pepper varieties? Need help with support structures and trellising? Bring your questions and join Craig online for some late-spring vegetable gardening Q&A.

Saturday, May 8, 12 p.m. to 12:45 p.m. ET
online, free
REGISTER at https://app.livestorm.co/u-s-botanic-garden/online-q-and-a-seasonal-vegetable-gardening?type=detailed

This climbing Banksian rose (Rosa banksiae ‘Lutea’) is bursting with yellow flowers. It climbs and covers arbors and tre...
05/07/2021

This climbing Banksian rose (Rosa banksiae ‘Lutea’) is bursting with yellow flowers. It climbs and covers arbors and trellises with spreads up to 15-20 feet. The Lutea variety has double yellow flowers and produces the most flowers of the various Banksian roses.

Soft, snowy blooms in this green Hawthorne (Crataegus viridis ‘Winter King’). This rose family native of the southeaster...
05/06/2021

Soft, snowy blooms in this green Hawthorne (Crataegus viridis ‘Winter King’). This rose family native of the southeastern United States, grows to 20-35 feet tall and equally wide. ‘Winter King’ is mostly spineless, has purple and scarlet fall color, and gives many blooms.

05/06/2021
Cooking Demo: Lavender Thyme Tea Cake for Mother's Day

Mother's Day is perfect for a delicious cake, preferably served in a serene and beautiful setting. Join Danielle for this online cooking demonstration as she shows you how to make a floral tea cake. Then join Adrienne as she walks you through planting warm-weather annuals like tomatoes, peppers, and zucchini for best results.

Presenters: Danielle Cook, MS, Nutritionist, and Cooking Instructor, and Adrienne Cook, Gardening and Cooking Writer

Find the recipe and other cooking demos on our Cooking page at www.USBG.gov/Cooking

Thank you, Hill Rag for including us in sharing about how to identify and deal with rose rosette disease. If you’re seei...
05/06/2021
Outbreak of Rose Rosette Disease Detected on Hill | HillRag

Thank you, Hill Rag for including us in sharing about how to identify and deal with rose rosette disease. If you’re seeing small, twisted leaves on your roses, read on to see if you might be seeing rose rosette disease, plus resources for more information.

Mia Grosjean started noticing it late last year. All over the Hill, the once-ubiquitous, beautiful rose bushes were starting to look different. Shriveled. Less joyful. “Like witches’ broom,” she

Join us Friday at noon for a free Seed Starting program!Garden writer Teresa Speight will help you learn how to start yo...
05/06/2021

Join us Friday at noon for a free Seed Starting program!

Garden writer Teresa Speight will help you learn how to start your garden from seed to seedling. She'll discuss what soil or soil-less mix to use, seed selection, how to read a seed packet, and most importantly how to plant your seeds. What kind of lights should you use? Can seeds be direct sown in the garden and when? What does 'hardening' off seedlings mean? This information-filled hour will help you start a beautiful summer garden from seed to soil.

Friday, May 7, 12 p.m. to 1 p.m.
online, free
REGISTER at https://app.livestorm.co/u-s-botanic-garden/starting-seeds-for-a-successful-season?type=detailed

Join us Friday at noon for a free Seed Starting program!

Garden writer Teresa Speight will help you learn how to start your garden from seed to seedling. She'll discuss what soil or soil-less mix to use, seed selection, how to read a seed packet, and most importantly how to plant your seeds. What kind of lights should you use? Can seeds be direct sown in the garden and when? What does 'hardening' off seedlings mean? This information-filled hour will help you start a beautiful summer garden from seed to soil.

Friday, May 7, 12 p.m. to 1 p.m.
online, free
REGISTER at https://app.livestorm.co/u-s-botanic-garden/starting-seeds-for-a-successful-season?type=detailed

Spotlighting another native North American azalea: the Florida Azalea (Rhododendron austrinum). This easy-to-grow shrub ...
05/05/2021

Spotlighting another native North American azalea: the Florida Azalea (Rhododendron austrinum). This easy-to-grow shrub is native to the lower southeastern United States, and its fragrant flowers attract hummingbirds and bees. It grows in part shade, prefers dry, acidic soil, and is hardy USDA zones 6-9. This specific variety is ‘Lisa’s Gold,’ introduced in 1999.

Our native azaleas are blooming throughout the mid-Atlantic. This is Azalea canescens, native to eastern and central Uni...
05/04/2021

Our native azaleas are blooming throughout the mid-Atlantic. This is Azalea canescens, native to eastern and central United States. This shrub grows to about 8 feet tall, and is lightly fragrant. It is the most common native azalea in the southeastern United States, growing in part shade.

The first peonies are beginning to bloom around the Garden. This is Paeonia 'Blaze,' a large hybrid peony first introduc...
05/04/2021

The first peonies are beginning to bloom around the Garden. This is Paeonia 'Blaze,' a large hybrid peony first introduced in 1973.

05/03/2021

Garden moment of zen — calm breeze, chirping birds, and vibrant flowers of Loropetalum chinense ‘Zhuzhou’

A celebration of the outstanding colors over the last few weeks for this Chinese fringe–flower (Loropetalum chinense ‘Zh...
05/03/2021

A celebration of the outstanding colors over the last few weeks for this Chinese fringe–flower (Loropetalum chinense ‘Zhuzhou’)!

What a stunning spring color combination the Horticulture built around the Bartholdi Park sign!
05/03/2021

What a stunning spring color combination the Horticulture built around the Bartholdi Park sign!

Very deep pink-red color on this flowering dogwood variety (Cornus florida ‘Cherokee Chief’). It has a plant patent from...
05/03/2021

Very deep pink-red color on this flowering dogwood variety (Cornus florida ‘Cherokee Chief’). It has a plant patent from 1958, by Isaac J. Hawkersmith of Tennessee. He found a dogwood at his nursery with the unusual color and grafted buds from it onto seedlings. The discovery sparked the creation of a large dogwood-producing industry in Franklin County, Tennessee.

Kaenpferia rotunda -- This ginger’s bright blooms emerge from its partial dormancy before the leaves.
05/02/2021

Kaenpferia rotunda -- This ginger’s bright blooms emerge from its partial dormancy before the leaves.

Kaenpferia rotunda -- This ginger’s bright blooms emerge from its partial dormancy before the leaves.

A stunner! Eastern camas / wild hyacinth (Camassia scilloides). A perennial wildflower in zones 4-8 that grows in full s...
05/01/2021

A stunner! Eastern camas / wild hyacinth (Camassia scilloides). A perennial wildflower in zones 4-8 that grows in full sun to partial shade. Attracts bees and butterflies.

A stunner! Eastern camas / wild hyacinth (Camassia scilloides). A perennial wildflower in zones 4-8 that grows in full sun to partial shade. Attracts bees and butterflies.

New spring blooms on this tree peony (Paeonia rockii ‘Zi Hai Yin Bo’)
05/01/2021

New spring blooms on this tree peony (Paeonia rockii ‘Zi Hai Yin Bo’)

A nice bloom on this woodland Chinese peony (Paeonia obovate var. willmottiae)
05/01/2021

A nice bloom on this woodland Chinese peony (Paeonia obovate var. willmottiae)

04/30/2021
Q&A: Seasonal Vegetable Gardening

April is the perfect month to dig into your vegetable garden! Are you getting ready to transition from cool to warm season crops? Need help identifying and staying ahead of weeds? Want to pick up a few mid-spring growing tips? Then join Amanda for answers to your questions and strategies for an enjoyable and abundant season in your vegetable garden.

Presenter: Amanda Helin, Gardener, U.S. Botanic Garden
This program was recorded on Monday, April 5, 2021.

Find upcoming programs and recordings of previous programs at www.USBG.gov/OnlinePrograms

Happy Arbor Day! As we wrap up the final day of National Native Plant Month, today we feature a beautiful small tree: Sw...
04/30/2021

Happy Arbor Day! As we wrap up the final day of National Native Plant Month, today we feature a beautiful small tree: Sweetbay magnolia (Magnolia virginiana)
Cup-shaped, creamy-white flowers nicely contrast against matte-green leaves in the early summer. Come autumn, cone-like fruits with exposed red seeds put on a beautiful show. Light: full sun to part shade. #NationalNativePlantMonth

Happy Arbor Day! As we wrap up the final day of National Native Plant Month, today we feature a beautiful small tree: Sweetbay magnolia (Magnolia virginiana)
Cup-shaped, creamy-white flowers nicely contrast against matte-green leaves in the early summer. Come autumn, cone-like fruits with exposed red seeds put on a beautiful show. Light: full sun to part shade. #NationalNativePlantMonth

U.S. Botanic Garden and NatureServe are launching a new partnership in the name of conserving U.S. native plants! Our co...
04/29/2021

U.S. Botanic Garden and NatureServe are launching a new partnership in the name of conserving U.S. native plants! Our combined expertise will help us tackle two critical areas of plant conservation – assessing threats to at-risk plants and safeguarding the wild relatives of crops – while also educating the public about the growing risk of plant extinction.

Using grape species native to the United States and critical to the wine industry (Vitis spp.) as a model, the partners will develop conservation plans, complete conservation status assessments, and conduct educational programs. Crop wild relatives like these, the closely related plants of agricultural staples like grains, fruits, and vegetables, are critical to the future of food security as they can often withstand diseases and pests and thrive under a variety of environmental conditions.

Learn more: https://www.usbg.gov/working-together-save-plants-us-botanic-garden-and-natureserve

Address

100 Maryland Ave SW
Washington D.C., DC
20001

The easiest way to reach us by Metrorail is by taking either the Orange, Blue, or Silver line to the Federal Center SW station. Exit the station, walk north (left) along Third Street SW for two blocks, cross Independence Avenue and continue one more block to Maryland Avenue. Look toward the Capitol and you will see the glass dome of the Conservatory. The Conservatory entrance is on Maryland Avenue. Metrobuses #32, 34 and 36 stop behind the Conservatory at Independence Avenue and First Street SW. We encourage taking public transportation, you can plan your trip on Metro. The National Mall route of the DC Circulator bus stops on 3rd St SW by the Capitol Reflecting Pool, in front of the Conservatory.

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The United States Botanic Garden (USBG) is the oldest continuously operating botanic garden in the United States and informs visitors about the importance, value and diversity of plants, as well as their aesthetic, cultural, economic, therapeutic and ecological significance. With more than a million visitors annually, the USBG strives to demonstrate and promote sustainable practices. The Garden is a living plant museum accredited by the American Alliance of Museums and Botanic Gardens Conservation International.


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Online Cooking Demo: Mother's Day Tea Party #OnlineCookingDemo
United States Botanic Garden along Maryland Avenue between 1st and 3rd Street, SW, Washington DC on Tuesday afternoon, 27 April 2021 by Elvert Barnes Photography Maintenance Mechanics changing bulbs in street light pole
Happy 'belated' #ArborDay! 🍂🌳🍂🌲🍂🌴🍂
Gorgeous! 🌿🌼🌿
Spring bloomers in Germany
dandelion with 13 flowers on a stem, notarized
rare young sycamore trees with colorful leaves discovered in nature. a tree would greatly enhance your public garden 🍁
New book coming for your children's education program! Produced by Missouri Botanical Gardens.
Will there be a 2021 open house at the production facilities?
Indicated I was going - nothing said about preregistration at that time. 12:15 EDT Oct 30 passed and no email. Very disappointed when, after frantically searching the website and following "See more..." I discovered I was supposed to preregister.
FLOWERING INDUCTION IN NOBILE DENDROBIUM. Dendrobium nobile is a species that crosses with other similar species of the genus Dendrobium, giving rise to a group of hybrids, called "Dendrobium tipo nobile". They are plants with a monsoon climate of centuries-old trees. Of economic importance as flowering plants and not as cut flowers. "Floral induction", also called "floral stimulation", is part of the reproductive state of plants, in which differentiated cells specialize in floral tissues. You can choose meristematic mosaics if they become reproductive structures. It is not a visible morphological alteration, but a histological process that occurs mainly at night. This triggers external factors, such as: the photoperiod and the cold. The technology with which we can manage this process will determine: Whether the plant blooms? How many buttons? Flowering season? Flower location in the pseudobulb (reed) ................ The induction factor: COLD, is generally "a plant developer", especially in tropical plants. In this case, we refer to night temperatures of 10 to 15 ° C. Induction period: 30 to 40 NIGHTS. Keep in mind that I always mean night, darkness. Commercial producers enter their factories in cold chambers at night to artificially induce induction, bagging during the day. Stimulus receiving organ: THE AXILLARY GEMS OF PSEUDOLBS. The stems originated from the last spring bud in the "modern" Dendrobium or the penultimate spring, in the "old" dendrobium. This is a DETERMINED induction, and you yourself must have the prerequisites for induction: 1-MATURATION: the plants in a juvenile state in bloom must be ripe. We know that they are mature, when there is also the so-called "flag". It marks the cessation of vegetative and reproductive status. It is desirable that this moment is before December-January in the southern hemisphere, otherwise the induction will occur only in the upper third of the poles. To achieve proper maturation, the following are important: a positive daily temperature range of 10 to 15 ° C, abundant irrigation, adequate fertilization and correct lighting. An excess of nitrogen will keep the plant in a vegetative state, not appearing at the typical time of time and forming at the tip of the canes. 2-TRAINING: are the changes (development) that the cane must undergo once MATURE, to be sensitive to the COLD. Son: thickening (due to the accumulation of water and nutrients), yellowing and extreme roundness. The induction that concerns us is a REVERSIBLE process, the axillary yeasts are induced and undifferentiated, they can go to the vegetative state, giving rise to Keikis (plants from the botanical point of view). This will occur when daytime temperatures are above 25 ° C for more than 20 days. If we decide to have a vegetative induction, it should happen in late spring and when we fertilize with a lot of nitrogen. About this technology and others, little is written, published or told the truth. Much hides and lies. They are technological and profitable secrets. If you liked and / or received this note, share it. If you want more, follow the social networks: Pedro Boggiatto, Or the friend and / or follower of the Orchidists of Tucumán. Agronomist Engineer Pedro Boggiatto. Spiker List from the American Orchid Society. Tucumán- Argentina.