U.S. Botanic Garden

U.S. Botanic Garden The U.S. Botanic Garden, created in 1820, is dedicated to demonstrating aesthetic, cultural, economic, therapeutic and ecological importance of plants to human well-being.

The easiest way to reach us is by taking Metro to Federal Center SW station. The United States Botanic Garden (USBG) is the oldest continuously operating public garden in the United States, founded in 1820. The Garden informs visitors about the importance, value and diversity of plants, as well as their aesthetic, cultural, economic, therapeutic and ecological significance. With more than a millio

The easiest way to reach us is by taking Metro to Federal Center SW station. The United States Botanic Garden (USBG) is the oldest continuously operating public garden in the United States, founded in 1820. The Garden informs visitors about the importance, value and diversity of plants, as well as their aesthetic, cultural, economic, therapeutic and ecological significance. With more than a millio

Operating as usual

Colorful new leaves on this 'Rising Sun' variety of eastern redbud (Cercis canadensis 'The Rising Sun'). This cultivar h...
09/15/2021

Colorful new leaves on this 'Rising Sun' variety of eastern redbud (Cercis canadensis 'The Rising Sun'). This cultivar has new leaves that emerge peachy-apricot and turn golden-yellow and then green. It was discovered in 2006 as a seedling in Tennessee. The tree grows to around 8-15 feet tall, prefers full sun to part shade, and is winter hardy USDA zones 4-8. You can see this tree in our Regional Garden that celebrates native plants.

Come join the U.S. Botanic Garden family! We're hiring a Maintenance Mechanic on our Operations team. This position help...
09/14/2021

Come join the U.S. Botanic Garden family! We're hiring a Maintenance Mechanic on our Operations team. This position helps with heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC), electrical, carpentry, plumbing/pipefitting boiler plant maintenance, and other support work throughout the USBG. Applications are due by September 24, 2021. Find the link at www.USBG.gov/Jobs

Come join the U.S. Botanic Garden family! We're hiring a Maintenance Mechanic on our Operations team. This position helps with heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC), electrical, carpentry, plumbing/pipefitting boiler plant maintenance, and other support work throughout the USBG. Applications are due by September 24, 2021. Find the link at www.USBG.gov/Jobs

Check out the answer to this week's Plant Riddle, created for the Garden by author and naturalist Melanie Choukas-Bradle...
09/14/2021

Check out the answer to this week's Plant Riddle, created for the Garden by author and naturalist Melanie Choukas-Bradley. Did you guess correctly? #PlantRiddle

Golden plumes in the meadow bright
Say summer’s taking her last flight
Blooming well into the fall
Some of them bear a harmless gall

Answer: Goldenrods (Solidago spp.), aster family (Asteraceae). As summer ends and fall begins, one bright yellow wildflower genus steals the show in field, meadow and woodland. Many species of goldenrod – and one intriguing ‘silverrod’ (Solidago bicolor) – bloom in the D.C. area beginning with the early goldenrod (Solidago juncea) in mid-summer and continuing into the fall. Most goldenrods bear a showy terminal plume of tiny yellow flowers but some, such as the blue-stemmed goldenrod (Solidago caesia) and the zigzag goldenrod (Solidago flexicaulis), also bear smaller clusters of flowers all along the plant stem.

Like all members of the aster family, each “flower” is actually a cluster of tiny flowers (an inflorescence). If you look closely, you’ll see each individual goldenrod flower is arranged like a daisy or black-eyed Susan, with tiny disk flowers at the center surrounded by little ray flowers. In most species, the disk and ray flowers are both yellow, but the silverrod bears white rays around a yellow disk. Goldenrod plants grow 1 to 4 or more feet tall and bear alternate, often lanceolate (lance-shaped) to elliptic leaves that are usually toothed. You might find swollen round galls on some species of goldenrod, which form due to the presence of insect eggs and larvae. (For a fascinating description of the goldenrod gall fly: https://hort.extension.wisc.edu/.../goldenrod-gall-fly.../).

The Flora of Virginia contains descriptions of more than 30 species of goldenrods. Common species in our area include Canada goldenrod (Solidago canadensis), late goldenrod (Solidago gigantea), rough-stemmed goldenrod (Solidago rugosa), and elm-leaved goldenrod (Solidago ulmifolia). You will find goldenrods growing in our Regional Garden of native plants as well as in many area parks and various habitats from fields, meadows, woodlands, and riverbanks to roadsides and disturbed sites. If you also find yourself sneezing in these places, don’t be so quick to blame the goldenrods! Goldenrod flowers are pollinated by insects, not wind, and the pollen is not allergenic. Most allergies this time of year are actually caused by common ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia), a wind-pollinated member of the aster family.

It’s National Small Business Week! The U.S. Botanic Garden is proud to prioritize purchasing from small American busines...
09/13/2021

It’s National Small Business Week! The U.S. Botanic Garden is proud to prioritize purchasing from small American businesses.

(Photo shows colorful summer blooms of canna, croton, coleus, and marigold.)

It’s National Small Business Week! The U.S. Botanic Garden is proud to prioritize purchasing from small American businesses.

(Photo shows colorful summer blooms of canna, croton, coleus, and marigold.)

A more colorful red variety of okra usually seen in green color, this is Abelmoschus esculentus ‘Carmine Splendor’
09/10/2021

A more colorful red variety of okra usually seen in green color, this is Abelmoschus esculentus ‘Carmine Splendor’

09/09/2021
Figs Stuffed with Honey-Mascarpone + Fig Tree Care

The popularity of figs has exploded in the U.S. as cooks and diners alike discover the joys of this traditional Mediterranean delicacy. Incredibly versatile, figs take center stage in Danielle's recipe, then Adrienne will bring you tips on the pruning and maintenance of a rangy, prolific fig tree.

Presenters: Danielle Cook, MS, Nutritionist, and Cooking Instructor, and Adrienne Cook, Gardening and Cooking Writer

Find the recipe and other cooking demos on our Cooking page at www.USBG.gov/Cooking

These colorful orange hips of swamp rose (Rosa palustris) are already ready for autumn vibes! R. palustris is native to ...
09/08/2021

These colorful orange hips of swamp rose (Rosa palustris) are already ready for autumn vibes! R. palustris is native to eastern North America.

These colorful orange hips of swamp rose (Rosa palustris) are already ready for autumn vibes! R. palustris is native to eastern North America.

What a beautiful blue damselfly (possibly Enallagma civile) on this lead plant / false indigo (Amorpha canescens). A. ca...
09/06/2021

What a beautiful blue damselfly (possibly Enallagma civile) on this lead plant / false indigo (Amorpha canescens). A. canescens is a member of the pea family native to North America. It prefers full sun, attracts birds, butterflies and other pollinators, and is USDA hardy zones 2-9. It blooms in the summer with small blue-purple flowers and is a good plant for a native wildflower garden or meadow.

What a beautiful blue damselfly (possibly Enallagma civile) on this lead plant / false indigo (Amorpha canescens). A. canescens is a member of the pea family native to North America. It prefers full sun, attracts birds, butterflies and other pollinators, and is USDA hardy zones 2-9. It blooms in the summer with small blue-purple flowers and is a good plant for a native wildflower garden or meadow.

A fiery skipper (Hylephila phyleus) enjoys a redwhisker clammyweed (Polanisia dodecandra), a native wildflower found thr...
09/05/2021

A fiery skipper (Hylephila phyleus) enjoys a redwhisker clammyweed (Polanisia dodecandra), a native wildflower found through most of the United States.

A fiery skipper (Hylephila phyleus) enjoys a redwhisker clammyweed (Polanisia dodecandra), a native wildflower found through most of the United States.

Over the past two weeks, USBG gardeners, interns, and volunteers have harvested 177 pounds of produce from our Kitchen G...
09/03/2021

Over the past two weeks, USBG gardeners, interns, and volunteers have harvested 177 pounds of produce from our Kitchen Garden for donation through Food Rescue US in DC, an organization that connects sources that have fresh food they can donate with local groups serving community members experiencing food insecurity. Recent harvests have included a wide variety of summer fruits and vegetables, including eggplants, cucumbers, squash, peppers, corn, celeriac, tomatoes, tomatillos, melons, and figs.

09/02/2021
Fennel-Roasted Chicken with Plums & Onion + Fall Vegetable Gardening Tips

Traditionally a fall fruit, fresh, juicy plums have been sneaking into summer dishes for years. Join Danielle as she highlights these jewel-toned beauties in a dish that spans the seasons. And while it’s cooking, join Adrienne in her garden as she winds down the summer garden and revs up fall-producing varieties.

Presenters: Danielle Cook, MS, Nutritionist, and Cooking Instructor, and Adrienne Cook, Gardening and Cooking Writer

Find the recipe and other cooking demos on our Cooking page at www.USBG.gov/Cooking

One in 3 tree species worldwide are threatened with extinction, twice the number of threatened mammals, birds, amphibian...
09/01/2021

One in 3 tree species worldwide are threatened with extinction, twice the number of threatened mammals, birds, amphibians, and reptiles combined, according to the first-ever #StateOfTrees report published by Botanic Gardens Conservation International. A major contribution for the U.S. was a collaboration between the United States Botanic Garden, BGCI-US, The Morton Arboretum, and NatureServe. This partnership delivered the first-ever conservation assessments of all 841 native, continental U.S. tree species, showing at least 11% of continental U.S. native trees are threatened in the wild.

The report, which is the result of 5 years of research among more than 60 institutions, also finds hope for the future, noting that 64% of tree species are in at least one protected area, and about 30% are in botanical gardens and seed banks. #WeNeedTrees Learn more at https://www.usbg.gov/state-of-the-worlds-trees-report-release

One in 3 tree species worldwide are threatened with extinction, twice the number of threatened mammals, birds, amphibians, and reptiles combined, according to the first-ever #StateOfTrees report published by Botanic Gardens Conservation International. A major contribution for the U.S. was a collaboration between the United States Botanic Garden, BGCI-US, The Morton Arboretum, and NatureServe. This partnership delivered the first-ever conservation assessments of all 841 native, continental U.S. tree species, showing at least 11% of continental U.S. native trees are threatened in the wild.

The report, which is the result of 5 years of research among more than 60 institutions, also finds hope for the future, noting that 64% of tree species are in at least one protected area, and about 30% are in botanical gardens and seed banks. #WeNeedTrees Learn more at https://www.usbg.gov/state-of-the-worlds-trees-report-release

The Fountain of Light and Water is gloriously living up to its name in this nighttime photo by visitor Kayden Deen. It’s...
09/01/2021

The Fountain of Light and Water is gloriously living up to its name in this nighttime photo by visitor Kayden Deen. It’s been a part of the United States Botanic Garden since 1877.

The Fountain of Light and Water is gloriously living up to its name in this nighttime photo by visitor Kayden Deen. It’s been a part of the United States Botanic Garden since 1877.

08/31/2021
Bees on Texas milkweed

Lots of bees and pollinators all over this Texas milkweed (Asclepias texana), native Texas to northern Mexico. It prefers full sun, sandy/gravelly soil, and low water. It has been reported as being winter hardy in USDA zones 10-6b.

This is Agave ‘Blue Glow.’ This variety grows up to 2 feet tall and 3 feet wide, with blue-green leaves that up to about...
08/30/2021

This is Agave ‘Blue Glow.’ This variety grows up to 2 feet tall and 3 feet wide, with blue-green leaves that up to about 18 inches long and feature yellow and red edges. They prefer full sun to part sun and need little water/handle drought.

Full view and close up of the beautiful blooms of desert willow (Chilopsis linearis). This small tree is native to the s...
08/28/2021

Full view and close up of the beautiful blooms of desert willow (Chilopsis linearis). This small tree is native to the southwestern United States and Mexico.

08/26/2021
Summer Harvest Vegetarian Chile + End of Summer Gardening Tips

There’s so much going in the garden right now – not to mention farmer’s markets and wayside stands! For this week's online cooking demonstration, Danielle will dive in and share a seasonal recipe for Vegetarian Chili based on what inspiration strikes from the bounty of the summer harvest. Then join Adrienne is in her garden as she provides tips and tricks for keeping that terrific summer harvest going into fall.

Presenters: Danielle Cook, MS, Nutritionist, and Cooking Instructor, and Adrienne Cook, Gardening and Cooking Writer

Find the recipe and other cooking demos at www.USBG.gov/Cooking

Vibrant scarlet blooms of Hibiscus ‘Midnight Marvel’ — this variety is a hardy hibiscus, hardy to USDA zones 5 to 9. Mos...
08/26/2021

Vibrant scarlet blooms of Hibiscus ‘Midnight Marvel’ — this variety is a hardy hibiscus, hardy to USDA zones 5 to 9. Most of these hardy hybrids were developed by crossing multiple U.S. native hibiscus: H. coccineus, H. laevis, and H. moscheutos. This Woody perennial can grow 3-4 feet tall, with flowers 9-10 inches across. It prefers full sun and medium-to-wet soil, maki KB it a good candidate for use in rain gardens.

Vibrant scarlet blooms of Hibiscus ‘Midnight Marvel’ — this variety is a hardy hibiscus, hardy to USDA zones 5 to 9. Most of these hardy hybrids were developed by crossing multiple U.S. native hibiscus: H. coccineus, H. laevis, and H. moscheutos. This Woody perennial can grow 3-4 feet tall, with flowers 9-10 inches across. It prefers full sun and medium-to-wet soil, maki KB it a good candidate for use in rain gardens.

08/25/2021
Summer Tomatoes (Online Live Cooking Demo)

Resplendent in reds, pinks, oranges, yellows, and even greens, the summer tomato is the star of the show – and of the home garden. Not always easy to grow, they are worth every effort. During this live online cooking demonstration, Danielle and Adrienne will bring examples of tomatoes from their own gardens and farmer’s markets, using them in two new recipes that highlight the many shapes, colors, and flavors of these delectable summer fruits.

Presenters: Danielle Cook, MS, Nutritionist, and Cooking Instructor, and Adrienne Cook, Gardening and Cooking Writer

This program was recorded on July 30, 2021.

Join the U.S. Botanic Garden team! We are hiring a Gardener for our Exhibits and Displays Horticulture Team. Application...
08/25/2021
Opportunities at the U.S. Botanic Garden (Jobs and Internships) | United States Botanic Garden

Join the U.S. Botanic Garden team! We are hiring a Gardener for our Exhibits and Displays Horticulture Team. Applications are due by August 31, 2021. Find the listing and link for where to apply online at www.USBG.gov/Jobs

All outdoor gardens are currently open. The Conservatory and public restrooms remain closed, due to the closure of the U.S. Capitol campus buildings. Please monitor www.USBG.gov for updates on operating status. USBG resources can be accessed online, including educational materials, virtual tours, an...

Check out this Amorphophallus titanum seedling 5 months after sowing.  It is unfurling a second leaf from the apex.  You...
08/24/2021

Check out this Amorphophallus titanum seedling 5 months after sowing. It is unfurling a second leaf from the apex. You can still see what remains of the seed attached to the corm. The seed was from our successful pollination last summer, using pollen from The Huntington Library, Art Museum, and Botanical Gardens to pollinate one of our A. titanum blooms.

This beautiful plant is pearl millet (Cenchrus americanus). Pearl millet is an annual grass that can grow from 1.5-12 fe...
08/24/2021

This beautiful plant is pearl millet (Cenchrus americanus). Pearl millet is an annual grass that can grow from 1.5-12 feet tall. It was first domesticated around 2,000-3,000 years ago, and is now cultivated in subtropical areas throughout much of the world for its edible seed. It is a staple in the diet for more than 100 million people, especially in parts of tropical Africa and India.

08/23/2021
St. John's Wort and bumblebees

St. John’s Wort (Hypericum prolificum) has a long history of medicinal use and is also a great native plant for pollinators. Here you see a busy bumblebee (Bombus sp.) hard at work collecting pollen to bring back to the larvae in her colony.

This stunning red variegated plant is a cotton plant (Gossypium herbaceum ‘Albe Red Variegated’)! It makes a great plant...
08/22/2021

This stunning red variegated plant is a cotton plant (Gossypium herbaceum ‘Albe Red Variegated’)! It makes a great plant for your garden. As an economic crop, cotton is a $75 billion industry in the United States. However, the potential for use in decorative landscaping was discovered in the USDA‘s National Cotton Germplasm Collection fields. The U.S. National Arboretum distributed seeds from plants with varied leaf color for use in ornamental gardening. Full sun, 2-3’ in height, winter hardy USDA zone 10. A few states require an exemption from the Cotton Boll Weevil Eradication Program to grow non-commercial cotton in your garden. You can check with your state extension service.

A black-and-gold bumblebee (Bombus auricomus) rests on a purple cone flower (Echinacea purpurea). Purple cone flower and...
08/21/2021

A black-and-gold bumblebee (Bombus auricomus) rests on a purple cone flower (Echinacea purpurea). Purple cone flower and others in the Echinacea genus are excellent sources of pollen and nectar for visiting pollinators. The genus name comes from the Greek word echinos, meaning hedgehog – describing the bloom’s spiky central disc. This bloom is a composite flower, a bloom made up of many smaller flowers, and the central disc contains hundreds of individual flowers each with nectar and pollen.

A black-and-gold bumblebee (Bombus auricomus) rests on a purple cone flower (Echinacea purpurea). Purple cone flower and others in the Echinacea genus are excellent sources of pollen and nectar for visiting pollinators. The genus name comes from the Greek word echinos, meaning hedgehog – describing the bloom’s spiky central disc. This bloom is a composite flower, a bloom made up of many smaller flowers, and the central disc contains hundreds of individual flowers each with nectar and pollen.

08/20/2021
Bumblebee on artichoke

Artichokes (Cynara scolymus) aren’t just food for us humans—bees love them too! Here you see a Black-and-gold bumblebee (Bombus auricomus) foraging for nectar on one of the huge artichoke inflorescences in our Kitchen Garden.

08/19/2021
Green Beans with Herbs and Olives + Bean Growing Tips (Online Cooking Demo)

Peak season for beans brings to mind their many varieties and the ease with which they grow. Join Danielle during this week's online cooking demo as she showcases beans in a new recipe with herbs and olives. Then join Adrienne as she talks about how to make room for beans and grow some in your own garden.

Presenters: Danielle Cook, MS, Nutritionist, and Cooking Instructor, and Adrienne Cook, Gardening and Cooking Writer

Find the recipe and other cooking demos on our Cooking page at www.USBG.gov/Cooking

Address

100 Maryland Ave SW
Washington D.C., DC
20001

The easiest way to reach us by Metrorail is by taking either the Orange, Blue, or Silver line to the Federal Center SW station. Exit the station, walk north (left) along Third Street SW for two blocks, cross Independence Avenue and continue one more block to Maryland Avenue. Look toward the Capitol and you will see the glass dome of the Conservatory. The Conservatory entrance is on Maryland Avenue. Metrobuses #32, 34 and 36 stop behind the Conservatory at Independence Avenue and First Street SW. We encourage taking public transportation, you can plan your trip on Metro. The National Mall route of the DC Circulator bus stops on 3rd St SW by the Capitol Reflecting Pool, in front of the Conservatory.

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The United States Botanic Garden (USBG) is the oldest continuously operating botanic garden in the United States and informs visitors about the importance, value and diversity of plants, as well as their aesthetic, cultural, economic, therapeutic and ecological significance. With more than a million visitors annually, the USBG strives to demonstrate and promote sustainable practices. The Garden is a living plant museum accredited by the American Alliance of Museums and Botanic Gardens Conservation International.

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Muito lindo amei conhecer aí obrigada
Gorgeous! 💌💐💌
Online Cooking Demo: Mother's Day Tea Party #OnlineCookingDemo
United States Botanic Garden along Maryland Avenue between 1st and 3rd Street, SW, Washington DC on Tuesday afternoon, 27 April 2021 by Elvert Barnes Photography Maintenance Mechanics changing bulbs in street light pole
Happy 'belated' #ArborDay! 🍂🌳🍂🌲🍂🌴🍂
Gorgeous! 🌿🌼🌿
Spring bloomers in Germany
dandelion with 13 flowers on a stem, notarized
rare young sycamore trees with colorful leaves discovered in nature. a tree would greatly enhance your public garden 🍁
New book coming for your children's education program! Produced by Missouri Botanical Gardens.
Will there be a 2021 open house at the production facilities?