Recovering Voices

Recovering Voices We document and sustain endangered languages and knowledge. Home to the Mother Tongue Film Festival.

Recovering Voices works in close partnership with two other Smithsonian units, the National Museum of the American Indian and the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage. We hope you’ll contribute to this interactive forum and to our ongoing conversation about the work we do to further the Smithsonian's mission to increase and diffuse knowledge.

The newest exhibit at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History is curated by Recovering Voices Curator of Glob...
06/27/2023

The newest exhibit at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History is curated by Recovering Voices Curator of Globalization and Anthropologist Joshua A. Bell and is now open! "Cellphone: Unseen Connections" features global stories and natural histories of cellphones, and explores the material, social, and linguistic dimensions of human lives at the local and global scale. Don't miss it! 📱

Join us Wednesday Jan 11, 2023, 1:00pm for a seminar with Justyna Olko of the Center for Research and Practice in Cultur...
01/06/2023

Join us Wednesday Jan 11, 2023, 1:00pm for a seminar with Justyna Olko of the Center for Research and Practice in Cultural Continuity
Faculty of "Artes Liberales”, University of Warsaw, who will speak about "Language as a stigma, language as a cure. Historical trauma, well-being and health of ethnic minorities". Join in-person at Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History or via Zoom https://tinyurl.com/sbc43per

As we enter the new year, we look to the past to reflect on what the coming months will bring. In 2022, the Mother Tongu...
01/05/2023

As we enter the new year, we look to the past to reflect on what the coming months will bring. In 2022, the Mother Tongue Film Festival presented 35 films in 43 languages from 17 regions. As a virtual event, this diversity of voices and cultural expressions reached online viewers in 98 countries.

Many of these virtual offerings are still available to watch for free online on our website: https://mothertongue.si.edu/

We are excited to return in person for the 2023 Mother Tongue Film Festival, as we invite you to gather in Washington, D.C., from February 23 to 26. See you there!

Our call for proposals closes next week! Apply at the link below.
01/03/2023

Our call for proposals closes next week! Apply at the link below.

Indigenous communities whose linguistic or cultural traditions are represented in the Smithsonian’s collections and archives are invited to submit a research proposal through the Smithsonian’s Recovering Voices Program. Awards of up to $10,000 can be used to cover the cost of travel, accommodation, and research. Proposals are due by Sunday, January 15, 2023.
Learn more: https://naturalhistory.si.edu/research/anthropology/programs/recovering-voices/recovering-voices-community-research

This winter, the Mother Tongue Film Festival returns in person to the National Mall! Between February 23–26, join us in ...
11/28/2022

This winter, the Mother Tongue Film Festival returns in person to the National Mall! Between February 23–26, join us in Washington, DC, as we celebrate the power of language to connect us to home.

Not in DC? Stay tuned for our virtual offerings!
Learn more about the 2023 festival and our past programs: mothertongue.si.edu

We are thrilled to announce the opening of the Call for Proposals for our 2023 Community Research Program. The call open...
11/15/2022

We are thrilled to announce the opening of the Call for Proposals for our 2023 Community Research Program. The call opens today and closes on January 15, 2023.

Application materials are available at www.recoveringvoices.si.edu

Contact us at [email protected] with any questions about the call or submission requirements.

A new Recovering Voices open-access publication is out now! "Being present and bearing witness: talking about cultural r...
09/16/2022

A new Recovering Voices open-access publication is out now! "Being present and bearing witness: talking about cultural revitalization programming in museums" by Gwyneira Isaac, Ingrid Ahlgren, Alan Ojiig Corbiere, and Judith Andrews is available online. Please share!

At a time when museums are expected to address access issues that are the explicit and implicit products of their colonial histories, the Recovering Voices initiative at the Smithsonian Institution...

Miss Mother Tongue on the National Mall? Between July 1–4, join us at the   Festival pocket cinema at 5:15 pm for a sele...
07/01/2022

Miss Mother Tongue on the National Mall? Between July 1–4, join us at the Festival pocket cinema at 5:15 pm for a selection of our favorite Mother Tongue shorts.

Check out our programming highlights: s.si.edu/3nuHu3Q

Though   is officially a wrap, you can still read insights from our filmmakers in Folklife Magazine! With a theme of “le...
03/15/2022

Though is officially a wrap, you can still read insights from our filmmakers in Folklife Magazine! With a theme of “legacy” running through this year’s selections, we asked participating filmmakers about their interpretations of its meaning.

“I see legacy as a visual,” says Mariona Lloreta, director of the short film A Lua Nunca Morre. “I always imagine our ancestors running as far as they could in their pursuit of joy, truth, and freedom, and then passing the baton to the next generation. This is what makes it all worth it to me. I constantly ask myself: how far will you go before you hand your baton to the next person?”

Read more from insights from directors below, and watch a selection of our films still available online at mothertongue.si.edu.

The term “legacy” rings differently in the consciousness of each individual—and has different meanings in a range of cultural traditions and mother tongues.

Our friends at the Environmental Film Festival in the Nation's Capital are celebrating their 30th Anniversary this year ...
03/09/2022

Our friends at the Environmental Film Festival in the Nation's Capital are celebrating their 30th Anniversary this year with an all-virtual Festival!

Check out their incredible lineup featuring 100+ films (many FREE), including a co-presentation with our own Mother Tongue Film Festival! Learn more at the link below. ⬇️

On  , we celebrate and uplift the voices of women tradition-bearers globally. Hear women directors discuss their role in...
03/08/2022

On , we celebrate and uplift the voices of women tradition-bearers globally. Hear women directors discuss their role in cultural and language transmission in our Women Director's Panel.

Every year, Mother Tongue presents a roundtable with women directors to honor the role of women in language transmission. This year, we bring together women ...

Thursday, March 10 at 6:30 pm, join us and Columbia University School of the Arts for a conversation with director Eribe...
03/07/2022

Thursday, March 10 at 6:30 pm, join us and Columbia University School of the Arts for a conversation with director Eriberto Gualinga and curator Amalia Cordova, introduced by Ron Gregg.

Register for the conversation, and receive a link to watch Eribeto's film "Helena of Sarayaku."

Director ​​Eriberto Gualinga in conversation with Amalia Córdova, Mother Tongue Film Festival, Smithsonian. Introduced by Ron Gregg, MA in Film and Media Studies.

Can you believe it's the closing night of   already?! Thank you everyone for attending, participating, and helping make ...
03/04/2022

Can you believe it's the closing night of already?! Thank you everyone for attending, participating, and helping make our second year as a virtual film festival a success.

Watch our closing night film, "Healer Stones of Kapaemahu" at the link below.

The long-suppressed history of four legendary stones on Waikiki Beach, and the mysterious gender fluid spirits within them.

 ! Looking for some music to enliven your morning? Listen in to our "Music of the Mother Tongue" program, and explore a ...
03/04/2022

! Looking for some music to enliven your morning? Listen in to our "Music of the Mother Tongue" program, and explore a range of musical styles and genres in languages hailing from around the globe.

Check it out at the link below! 🎶

Jay Shootah has been a standout in the Samoan rap scene, and “Le Ila” is no exception.

  attendees might remember "Kapaemahu" from last year’s festival, an animation exploring the journey of four spiritual b...
03/03/2022

attendees might remember "Kapaemahu" from last year’s festival, an animation exploring the journey of four spiritual beings quest to bring healing arts to bless the people of Hawai‘i and imbue the powers into four boulders.

Dive deeper into that story with a sneak preview of "The Healer Stones of Kapaemahu," Hinaleimoana Wong-Kalu's latest feature film. Available on our closing night only.

The long-suppressed history of four legendary stones on Waikiki Beach, and the mysterious gender fluid spirits within them.

03/03/2022

Every year, Mother Tongue presents a roundtable with women directors to honor the role of women in language transmission. This year, we bring together women directors from communities in Canada, the United States, and Mexico to discuss the power of language in their films, expanding on the courage that is required in portraying difficult realities for a more balanced future.

Accessibility: ASL interpretation and live real-time captioning will be provided for the discussion.

Cada año, el Festival de Cine Lengua Materna presenta un conversatorio con directoras mujeres para honrar el rol de las mujeres en la transmisión del lenguaje. Este año, reuniremos directoras de comunidades de Canadá, los Estados Unidos y México para compartir acerca del poder del lenguaje en cada película, y sobre el coraje que require retratar realidades difíciles, para un futuro más equilibrado.

Accesibilidad: se proporcionará interpretación y subtítulos de ASL en vivo en tiempo real para la discusión.

This year's "Survivance" program is derived from the words “survival” and “resistance.” These films embody the fundament...
03/03/2022

This year's "Survivance" program is derived from the words “survival” and “resistance.” These films embody the fundamental right of Indigenous peoples to not only survive and thrive but to resist assimilation, removal, and appropriation.

Register at the link below!

This short reminds us of how ancestral knowledge can guide us through the struggles of mental health.

Ahead of our Women Directors Roundtable tomorrow, watch its film program counterpart. From revealing documentaries, colo...
03/02/2022

Ahead of our Women Directors Roundtable tomorrow, watch its film program counterpart. From revealing documentaries, colorful animations, and moving narrative stories, this collection of shorts from North America showcases incredible stories of hope, resilience, and strength.

Register at the link below!

A single father navigates the complexities of caring for his son and mother.

A wonderful Smithsonian Folklife Festival connection to "Junior," screening at the 2022 Mother Tongue Film Festival.Regi...
03/02/2022

A wonderful Smithsonian Folklife Festival connection to "Junior," screening at the 2022 Mother Tongue Film Festival.

Register to watch: bit.ly/MT2022Remaking

In 2004, Haitian musician Lénord Fortuné, better known as Azor, and his band filled the Smithsonian Folklife Festival with sounds of traditional vodou drumming and lively Haitian jazz. One of the people in the audience that summer was filmmaker A.J. Wilhelm.

That was the first time Wilhelm saw the band perform, but over time he developed a close friendship with one of the drummers, Jérôme “Junior” Simeon. His new short documentary film “Junior,” detailing Simeon’s work as a drum maker and offering a glimpse of the next generation of musical culture bearers in Haiti, is now screening as part of the Smithsonian’s Mother Tongue Film Festival.

“It’s kind of full circle!” Wilhelm says in his welcome video.

Watch “Junior” and more films celebrating cultural and linguistic diversity, all available free and on-demand through March 4: mothertongue.si.edu

Photo by Willis Bretz, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives

Happy  ! Join us Thursday at 1 pm for our annual women directors roundtable. This year, we bring together filmmakers fro...
03/01/2022

Happy ! Join us Thursday at 1 pm for our annual women directors roundtable.

This year, we bring together filmmakers from communities across North America to discuss the power of language in their films, expanding on the courage that is required in portraying difficult realities for a more balanced future.

🗣️: bit.ly/MT2022WomenDirectors

02/28/2022

Join us for a roundtable discussion about the film I Had a Dream (Bir Rüya Gördüm). Introduced by Tom Vick (Curator of Film, National Museum of Asian Art) this roundtable involves a discussion between filmmaker Burcu Esenc and producer Umut Egitimci and Mary Linn (Curator of Cultural and Linguistic Revitalization at the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage). They will focus on the making of the film, and the life of Tevifik Esenc and wider history of the Ubykh language.

Accessibility: ASL interpretation and live real-time captioning will be provided for the discussion.

I Had a Dream (Bir Rüya Gördüm), follows Burcu Esenc exploration of the legacy of her grandfather Tevifik Esenc, the last speaker of Ubykh Language, who died in 1992. Burcu Esenc’s journey is one of self-discovery and sheds light on her grandfather’s life, his collaboration with linguists to document the Ubykh language, as well as the history of the Ubykh speakers.

On Monday, February 28 at noon, join us and the Smithsonian's National Museum of Asian Art for a Q+A with "I Had A Dream...
02/27/2022

On Monday, February 28 at noon, join us and the Smithsonian's National Museum of Asian Art for a Q+A with "I Had A Dream" filmmaker Burcu Esenç and producer Umut Egitimci.

Learn about a granddaughter's quest to revive the Ubykh language: https://bit.ly/MT2022DirectorQandA

Looking for something to add to your weekend  ? "I Had a Dream," tells the story of a granddaughter's journey to revive ...
02/25/2022

Looking for something to add to your weekend ? "I Had a Dream," tells the story of a granddaughter's journey to revive the Ubykh language after the death of her grandfather, the last speaker, in 1992. 📽️: https://bit.ly/MT2022IHadADream

And join us for our director Q+A, Monday at noon:
https://bit.ly/MT2022DirectorQandA

02/25/2022

Language reclamation goes beyond language learning and daily use to reclaim relationships with ancestors, the land, and community. The films presented here represent different ways of learning, through legacy documentation, situating language in the home, youth-centered approaches, and creating new modes of expression. Caryl Tex, director of the Advocates for Indigenous California Languages Survival (AICLES), will lead the live discussion on approaches to language learning and reclamation in North America with Ron Corn, Jr., featured in Living Language: Menominee Language Revitalization; Olivia Uvilik, creator of Inuktitut Dialects in the 21st Century; and Quirina Geary, a traditional Ohlone artist and gatherer who is learning her language through the Breath of Life approach featured in the film Chasing Voices.

Accessibility: ASL interpretation and live real-time captioning will be provided for the discussion.

Reclamar las lenguas va más allá del aprendizaje de lengua y su uso diario para retomar las relaciones con los antepasados, la tierra y la comunidad. Las películas presentadas aquí representan maneras diferentes de aprendizaje, a través documentación, aplicando el lenguaje en casa, acercando a los jóvenes, y creando formas nuevas de expresión. La discusión en vivo sobre las aproximaciones a aprendizaje del lenguaje y reclamación en Norteamérica será liderado por Caryl Tex, directora de la organización Advocates for Indigenous California Languages Survival, que aparece en la película Chasing Voices, en conversación con Ron Corn Jr., quien participó el la película Living Language: Menominee Language Revitalizaiton; contará con Olivia Uvilik, creadora del film Inuktitut dialects in the 21st century; y Quirina Geary

Accesibilidad: se proporcionará interpretación y subtítulos de ASL en vivo en tiempo real para la discusión.

Believing that most problems can be solved with puppets and art, Marion Delonde has produced a children’s television sho...
02/24/2022

Believing that most problems can be solved with puppets and art, Marion Delonde has produced a children’s television show entirely in the Mohawk language for over a decade.

Follow Delonde’s language reclamation journey: bit.ly/MT2022Reclamation

Have you ever wondered about technology’s influence on language? If so, check out director Ulivia Uviluk’s film Inuktitu...
02/23/2022

Have you ever wondered about technology’s influence on language? If so, check out director Ulivia Uviluk’s film Inuktitut Dialects in the 21st Century with and explore technology as a tool for language preservation.

📽️: bit.ly/MT2022Reclamation

02/23/2022

This two-part roundtable considers the complicated legacies of the Yanomamö Film Series (1969–1976), a groundbreaking ethnographic media project that expanded the boundaries of documentary. Distributed by Documentary Education Resources (DER) and archived in the Smithsonian’s National Anthropological Archive, the series emerged from a collaboration between anthropologist Napoleon Chagnon (1938–2019), filmmaker Tim Asch (1932–1994), and Yanomamö communities in southern Venezuela and northern Brazil.

The collaboration resulted in 110,000 feet of film and 21 films, including some of the most celebrated ethnographic films of the period: The Feast (1970), The Ax Fight (1975), and A Man Called “Bee” (1974). But this work was not without controversy as Chagnon’s mischaracterizations of the Yanomamö as the “Fierce People” has had ongoing impacts on communities, and scholars have called into question his ethics.

The first roundtable is focused on the technical and aesthetic issues underlying the processes of preservation and digital restoration. The second panel explores the value of these films for the Yanomamö and anthropologists interested in more equitable collaborations. Acknowledging the painful legacies of anthropology, these roundtables will provoke discussions about the value of historical works and the potential for redress and corrected narratives.

This program is co-presented by Documentary Educational Resources and the National Anthropological Archives.

Restoration of the Yanomamö Film Series was graciously funded by a National Film Preservation Foundation grant and individual donors.

Accessibility: ASL interpretation and live real-time captioning will be provided for the discussion.

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Esta mesa redonda tiene dos partes y considera los complicados legados de la serie de cine de Yanomamö (1969–1976), un proyecto mediático pionero que amplió los límites del documental. Distribuído por Documentary Educational Resources y resguardado en el archivo nacional antropológico (National Anthropological Archive) de Smithsonian, la serie de cine sobre los Yanomamö surgió de una collaboration entre el antropólogo Napoleon Chagnon (1938–2019), el cineasta Tim Asch (1932–1994) y las comunidades Yanomamö en el sur de Venezuela y el norte de Brasil.

Esta colaboración resultó en 110,000 pies de película y 21 películas ,incluyendo algunas de las películas etnográficas más celebradas del período: The Feast (1970), The Ax Fight (1975), and A Man Called “Bee” (1974). Sin embargo, estas obras no fueron exentas de controversia, debido a que las descaracterizaciones de Chagnon de los Yanomamö como “gente feroz” impactaron y siguen afectando a las comunidades, y la comunidad académica han cuestionado la ética del proyecto.

La primera mesa redonda, Preservacion y Restauracion Digital, trata sobre los asuntos técnicos y estéticos que sustentaron los procesos de restauración digital y preservación. La segunda mesa redonda, La Participación de las Comunidades, explora el valor de estas películas para los Yanomamö y para los antropólogos que tienen interés en colaboraciones más equitativas. Reconociendo los dolorosos legados de la antropología, estas mesas redondas provocaron discusiones sobre el valor de las obras históricas y el potencial para narrativas nuevas.

Esta programa es co-presentado por Documentary Educational Resources y National Anthropological Archives.

La restauración de la serie de cine de Yanomamö fue financiada por una subvención de la National Film Preservation Foundation y de donantes individuales.

Accesibilidad: se proporcionará interpretación y subtítulos de ASL en vivo en tiempo real para la discusión.

Language reclamation goes beyond language learning and daily use to reclaim relationships with ancestors, the land, and ...
02/22/2022

Language reclamation goes beyond language learning and daily use to reclaim relationships with ancestors, the land, and community. On Friday 2/25, join us for our education roundtable!

Attend: bit.ly/MT2022Education
Watch the films: bit.ly/MT2022Reclamation

02/21/2022

On International Mother Language Day, Kālewa Correa, curator of Hawai’i and the Pacific at the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center, speaks with filmmakers Conrad Lihilihi (The Mainland, 2020) and Hinaleimoana Wong-Kalu (The Healer Stones of Kapaemahu, 2022) about the real-world implications of racial misrepresentation in film, what it means to have their cultures properly represented and the challenges they have faced in the entertainment industry.

To view the films beforehand, please register at: https://bit.ly/MT2022RepresentationFilm

En el Día internacional de la lengua materna, Kālewa Correa, curador de Hawái y el pacifico en el Centro Americano Pacifico Asiático del Smithsonian, habla con los cineastas Conrad Lihilihi (The Mainland, 2020) y Hinaleimoana Wong-Kalu (The Healer Stones of Kapaemahu, 2022) sobre las implicaciones reales de la tergiversación racial en el cine, lo que significa representar debidamente a sus culturas, y los obstáculos que han enfrentado en la industria del entretenimiento.

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The Mother Tongue Film Festival is a public program of Recovering Voices, a collaboration between Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History, the National Museum of the American Indian, the Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage, and the Asian Pacific American Center.

Additional Smithsonian partners include the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Asian Art. This program received support from the Smithsonian Asian Pacific Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center, and from the Latino Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Latino Center.

Additional support is provided by Columbia University School of the Arts, Documentary Educational Resources, the Embassy of Canada to the United States, the Québec Government Office in Washington D.C., Georgetown University Department of Anthropology, The Elizabeth and Whitney MacMillan Endowment, Wick and Bonnie Moorman, The Environmental Film Festival in the Nation’s Capital, and Ferring Pharmaceuticals.

Happy  ! Celebrate with the Mother Tongue Film Festival this afternoon, as curator Kālewa Correa discusses representatio...
02/21/2022

Happy ! Celebrate with the Mother Tongue Film Festival this afternoon, as curator Kālewa Correa discusses representation in film with directors Hinaleimoana Wong-Kalu (The Healer Stones of Kapaemahu, 2022) and Conrad Lihilihi (The Mainland, 2020).

Watch live here on Facebook at 3:30, or register to watch via Eventive: bit.ly/RepresentationPanel

Aspiring actor Ikaika is struggling with the trendy facade of diversity spreading through Hollywood when his small-town ...
02/19/2022

Aspiring actor Ikaika is struggling with the trendy facade of diversity spreading through Hollywood when his small-town cousin, Kekoa, unexpectedly visits from Hawai‘i, bringing him a much-needed dose of ohana and aloha.

Register to watch "Mainland" (2019, dir. Conrad Lihilihi).

📽️: bit.ly/MT2022RepresentationFilm

Looking for some new content for your weekend  ? Check out our   Remaking the World program! These films inspire action ...
02/18/2022

Looking for some new content for your weekend ? Check out our Remaking the World program! These films inspire action and creation, reminding us of humanity’s ability to build our own realities by molding the world and its materials.

Register now: https://bit.ly/MT2022Remaking

02/17/2022

Hear opening remarks from Smithsonian staff Meroë Park, Kālewa Correa, and Gwyneira Isaac as we kick off the virtual Mother Tongue Film Festival!

Join us for our opening night, featuring the U.S. premiere of Québec filmmaker Caroline Monnet’s debut feature film "Bootlegger" alongside the world premiere of "Ixim Ulew," the latest music video from Maya hip-hop artist Tz’utu Kan.

🎟️ bit.ly/MT2022Opening

This  , we invite you to consider the complicated legacies of the Yanomamö Film Series, an ethnographic media project th...
02/17/2022

This , we invite you to consider the complicated legacies of the Yanomamö Film Series, an ethnographic media project that expanded the boundaries of documentary.

On 2/23, join us, Documentary Educational Resources, and the National Anthropological Archives for a discussion on preservation, digital restoration, and return: http://bit.ly/MT2022Archives

Distributed by Documentary Educational Resources (DER) and archived in the Smithsonian’s National Anthropological Archive, the series emerged from a collaboration between anthropologist Napoleon Chagnon (1938–2019), filmmaker Tim Asch (1932–1994), and Yanomamö communities in southern Venezuela and northern Brazil.

The collaboration resulted in 110,000 feet of film and 21 films—but this work was not without controversy as Chagnon’s mischaracterizations of the Yanomamö as the “Fierce People” has had ongoing impacts on communities, and scholars have called into question his ethics.

The first roundtable is focused on the technical and aesthetic issues underlying the processes of preservation and digital restoration. The second panel explores the value of these films for the Yanomamö and anthropologists interested in more equitable collaborations. Acknowledging the painful legacies of anthropology, these roundtables will provoke discussions about the value of historical works and the potential for redress and corrected narratives.

"Bootlegger" tells the story of two radically opposed women who divide a   Indigenous community to determine the best pa...
02/15/2022

"Bootlegger" tells the story of two radically opposed women who divide a Indigenous community to determine the best path to independence.

Presented with Québec Government Office in Washington, join us this Thursday for the opening night of ! Register: bit.ly/MT2022Opening

Official trailer for Bootlegger, directed by Caroline Monnet.In theaters on October 15Synopsis : Mani, a master's student, returns to the reserve in northern...

02/10/2022

35 films. 16 regions. 45 languages.

Registration for is now live! From February 17 to March 4, join us as we reflect on the legacies of our ancestors as foundations for the futures we create.

Our seventh annual festival is online, with on-demand film screenings and virtual events free and open to the public.

Attend: bit.ly/MT2022Register

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Don't forget to register for free access to the Vision Maker Film Festival that starts today, August 31!!
Was listening to this article from last year and thought I would share!
On May 10, 2020, Amelia Huanaquiri Tuisima (89) died in Iquitos, Peru, of complications from COVID19- this is a personal tribute to her, as an Omagua language speaker and consultant.
I was really happy to discover, coincidentally, Zacharias Kunuk’s interview when I watched NHK world, Japanese public broadcaster, to see what’s going on in my home country. I watched his latest film “One Day in the Life of Noah Piugattuk” at Mother Tongue Film Festival (https://mothertongue.si.edu) and wanted to know more about the filmmaker.
I feel like the festival happened very long time ago.... This pandemic really changed our life. In the meantime, I was really happy to discover Zacharias Kunuk’s interview when I watched NHK world, Japanese public television, to see what’s going on over there. Want to share with you.
Disney/Frozen 2 to be dubbed into a Sami language!
A really special podcast episode from "All My Relations" Episode 9: Can Our Ancestors Hear Us? Dr. Adrienne Keene and Matika Wilbur look at language from personal and community perspectives.

If you loved her music in Edge of the Knife, come check out Mohawk artist KInnie Starr's documentary "Play Your Gender" at Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian on Monday, August 19 at 1 pm. In this film she explores the glaring lack of female music producers industry wide. Part of the Smithsonian's
https://www.facebook.com/events/458604541355200/?active_tab=about
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HF6CfGndHH8 Jeremy Dutcher's Tiny Desk at NPR.
AE
Quite a diverse array this month