Art Museum of the Americas

Art Museum of the Americas AMA | Art Museum of the Americas Located just steps from the Washington Monument and the White House, AMA | Art Museum of the Americas of the OAS is a hub for contemporary art produced in and about the Western Hemisphere.
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We promote social change by providing a lively space for educational exchange, new ideas, and creative expression. Within and beyond our gallery walls, we enrich our local and international communities by interconnecting artists, museums, and audiences across the Americas. Twitter: @AMAmuseum
Blog: AMAmuseum.org/blog.html

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Ányel Maidelin Calzadilla FernandezLady Varsovia (detail)Mixed mediaOn this day in 2007, Landings 5 opened at the AMA. L...
07/05/2021

Ányel Maidelin Calzadilla Fernandez
Lady Varsovia (detail)
Mixed media

On this day in 2007, Landings 5 opened at the AMA. Landings was conceived by the visual artist community of Belize in mid 2003 and one year later took off with landings/1st in the restored XVII century Franciscan convent of Conkal, on the outskirts of Mérida, Yucatán, México. By early 2010 it had exhibited in 10 international events, comprising 8 exhibitions that took place in México (2), Dominican Republic, Costa Rica, USA, Cuba (2) and Taiwan. landings 9/the forum was held in Belize in August 2008 and the project ends with landings TEN, a conceptual book/event, the finale of a set of nine books (landings 6+7 exhibitions held in Havana are 1 book) reflecting the entire seven-year collective effort involving over 70 visual artists from 15 nations of the Caribbean, Central America and Yucatán, along with the later inclusion of 1 Taiwanese artist who worked with us at landings 8, Taipei Fine Arts Museum. Additionally, many writers, designers, journalists, photographers and translators of various nationalities played important roles in the team’s efforts. Landings was directed and coordinated by Joan Duran. Participating artists included Adrian Barron, Laura Baumeister, Valentina Bosio, Santiago Cal, Ányel Maidelin Calzadilla Fernandez, Alex Castilla, Caryana Castillo, Dalia Chévez, Michael Gordon, Yasser Musa, Pierre Obando, Ryan Oduber, Celeste Ponce, Fernando Poyón, Adislen Reyes, Vanessa Rivero, and Gabriel Serra, among many others. Landings 5 ran through September 16, 2007.

Ányel Maidelin Calzadilla Fernandez
Lady Varsovia (detail)
Mixed media

On this day in 2007, Landings 5 opened at the AMA. Landings was conceived by the visual artist community of Belize in mid 2003 and one year later took off with landings/1st in the restored XVII century Franciscan convent of Conkal, on the outskirts of Mérida, Yucatán, México. By early 2010 it had exhibited in 10 international events, comprising 8 exhibitions that took place in México (2), Dominican Republic, Costa Rica, USA, Cuba (2) and Taiwan. landings 9/the forum was held in Belize in August 2008 and the project ends with landings TEN, a conceptual book/event, the finale of a set of nine books (landings 6+7 exhibitions held in Havana are 1 book) reflecting the entire seven-year collective effort involving over 70 visual artists from 15 nations of the Caribbean, Central America and Yucatán, along with the later inclusion of 1 Taiwanese artist who worked with us at landings 8, Taipei Fine Arts Museum. Additionally, many writers, designers, journalists, photographers and translators of various nationalities played important roles in the team’s efforts. Landings was directed and coordinated by Joan Duran. Participating artists included Adrian Barron, Laura Baumeister, Valentina Bosio, Santiago Cal, Ányel Maidelin Calzadilla Fernandez, Alex Castilla, Caryana Castillo, Dalia Chévez, Michael Gordon, Yasser Musa, Pierre Obando, Ryan Oduber, Celeste Ponce, Fernando Poyón, Adislen Reyes, Vanessa Rivero, and Gabriel Serra, among many others. Landings 5 ran through September 16, 2007.

Fernando de Szyszlo (Peruvian, b.1925, d.2017) Untitled, 1995 Color lithograph OAS AMA | Art Museum of the Americas Coll...
07/04/2021

Fernando de Szyszlo (Peruvian, b.1925, d.2017)
Untitled, 1995
Color lithograph
OAS AMA | Art Museum of the Americas Collection

On this day in 1953, the eponymous exhibition Fernando de Szyszlo concluded its month-long run at the OAS Main Building Gallery, precursor to the present-day AMA. Szyszlo and the AMA continued to come into one another’s spheres over the following decades, and Untitled came into the AMA collection in the late 1990s. A key figure in the advancement of abstract art, Szyszlo studied painting at the Pontifical Catholic University of Peru. Following his graduation, he lived in Florence and Paris before returning to Lima. He developed his work in a way that was simultaneously abstract and distinctly of Peruvian culture and history.

Fernando de Szyszlo (Peruvian, b.1925, d.2017)
Untitled, 1995
Color lithograph
OAS AMA | Art Museum of the Americas Collection

On this day in 1953, the eponymous exhibition Fernando de Szyszlo concluded its month-long run at the OAS Main Building Gallery, precursor to the present-day AMA. Szyszlo and the AMA continued to come into one another’s spheres over the following decades, and Untitled came into the AMA collection in the late 1990s. A key figure in the advancement of abstract art, Szyszlo studied painting at the Pontifical Catholic University of Peru. Following his graduation, he lived in Florence and Paris before returning to Lima. He developed his work in a way that was simultaneously abstract and distinctly of Peruvian culture and history.

Anne-Lise Large (France, b. 1982)From the series Mythology, 2009-2012On this day in 2013, The Burning of Visibility: Fro...
07/03/2021

Anne-Lise Large (France, b. 1982)
From the series Mythology, 2009-2012

On this day in 2013, The Burning of Visibility: From Reality to Dream—Photos by French Photographer Anne-Lise Large opened at the AMA F Street Gallery. The exhibition ran through August 9 of that year. The show included three photographic series by theFrench photographer: Lost Angels, Mythology, and Margins, shot between the years 2009 and 2012. Born in 1982 in France, Anne-Lise Large is an internationally recognized photographer and professor of philosophy. She received a Doctorate in Philosophy and a Diploma from The Cinema and Photographic Department from the University of Strasbourg and Paris, France. In 2005, Anne-Lise Large created her first exhibition of photography, titled Ph(il/ot)o-graphie. Connecting photography with philosophy, the exhibit included photography paired with selected original writings of modern-day philosophers, creating a visual forum between photography, writing and philosophy, allowing for creative interpretation from all areas of thought.

Anne-Lise Large (France, b. 1982)
From the series Mythology, 2009-2012

On this day in 2013, The Burning of Visibility: From Reality to Dream—Photos by French Photographer Anne-Lise Large opened at the AMA F Street Gallery. The exhibition ran through August 9 of that year. The show included three photographic series by theFrench photographer: Lost Angels, Mythology, and Margins, shot between the years 2009 and 2012. Born in 1982 in France, Anne-Lise Large is an internationally recognized photographer and professor of philosophy. She received a Doctorate in Philosophy and a Diploma from The Cinema and Photographic Department from the University of Strasbourg and Paris, France. In 2005, Anne-Lise Large created her first exhibition of photography, titled Ph(il/ot)o-graphie. Connecting photography with philosophy, the exhibit included photography paired with selected original writings of modern-day philosophers, creating a visual forum between photography, writing and philosophy, allowing for creative interpretation from all areas of thought.

Carlos Colombino (Paraguay, b.1937, d. 2013)Ícaro, 1966Xilo-painting, 63 x 63"55 years ago this month, the exhibition Ca...
07/02/2021

Carlos Colombino (Paraguay, b.1937, d. 2013)
Ícaro, 1966
Xilo-painting, 63 x 63"

55 years ago this month, the exhibition Carlos Colombino of Paraguay was set to open at the OAS Main Building Gallery, precursor to the present-day AMA. The exhibition ran from July 20-August 22 of that year. Carlos Colombino included Ícaro, o La imagen de mi pueblo in his first exhibition at the Visual Arts Section of the OAS in 1966. The mythological figure of Icarus, who out of hubris flew too close to the sun on wings of feather and wax, plummets towards the ocean. A trail of smoke seems to issue from charred and misshapen form, a large biomorphic mass suggestive of the deformation of both body and soul. Colombino tinted the shallowly carved panel red, green, and black to imply both the injury and the fiery fate of the figure and drew inspiration formally from the surrealism of Jean Arp, Max Ernst, and Roberto Matta, among others. Colombino’s suggestive title represents his existential despair over Paraguay’s future in an age overshadowed by the authoritarian regime of Alfredo Stroessner Mattiauda, who applied martial law, committed severe human rights abuses, and limited the freedom of the press. The artist envisioned a tragic future for Paraguay twisted by the hubris and corruption of Stroessner’s government, and Colombino, like his modernist contemporaries, used mythology to comment on the modern human condition. He became a leading figure of South American nueva figuración, and Ícaro expresses concern for the plight of Paraguayans and humanity in general in an uncertain postwar world. Born in Concepción, Paraguay, Carlos Colombino began his career as a lawyer in 1955, the same year he met artist Olga Blinder. Under the influence of Blinder, Colombino turned to art. He abandoned his legal practice in 1957 for the study of architecture at the Universidad de Asunción, eventually earning his degree in 1969. His architectural studies encouraged an interest in constructivism, which was visible in his entries in the influential 1959 exhibition South American Art Today at the Dallas Museum of Fine Arts in 1959 and the Sixth Bienal de São Paulo in 1961. Colombino’s work changed dramatically in 1962 after seeing Blinder’s woodcuts or xylographs, which led him to create an ongoing series of linocut paintings he dubbed xilopintura or xilo-paintings. Xilopintura amplified the surrealist tendencies that were beginning to appear in his work and coincided with a greater interest in social commentary. He featured his new medium in the 1963 exhibition Arte de América y España in Madrid and at the Esso Salon of Young Artists in 1965, where he won first prize for the Paraguay representation. During this time, Colombino began a career as a writer under the nom de plume Esteban Cabañas and published his first poems, Los monstruos vanos, in 1964. He developed the themes from the poems further in 1967 with an important series of xilo-paintings depicting monstrous caricatures based loosely on the tumultuous political situation in Paraguay. Apart from Colombino’s career as an artist and writer, he also helped to found the Centro de Artes Visuales/Museo del Barro in 1979 in Asunción. Colombino’s role in founding the museum and his prestige as an internationally recognized artist earned him the Premio Gabriela Mistral from the Organization of American States in 1990. He died in 2013.

Carlos Colombino incluyó Ícaro, o La imagen de mi pueblo en su primera muestra en la Sección de Artes Visuales en la OEA en 1966. Tal como el título lo indica, el retratado en la pieza es la figura mitológica de Ícaro, cuya arrogancia lo lleva a acercarse demasiado al sol, derretir así sus alas de cera, y caer en picada hacia el océano. Un rastro de humo parece salir de un cuerpo carbonizado y desfigurado. La apariencia biomórfica de esa gran figura sugiere la deformación del cuerpo y el alma. Colombino tiñó el panel —superficialmente tallado— con rojo, verde y negro para evocar tanto la herida como el destino ardiente del cuerpo, y se inspiró formalmente en el surrealismo de Jean Arp, Max Ernst y Roberto Matta, entre otros. El sugerente título representa su desesperación existencial ante el futuro de Paraguay, en una época eclipsada por el régimen autoritario de Alfredo Stroessner Matiauda, quien aplicó la ley marcial, cometió graves abusos a los derechos humanos y limitó la libertad de prensa. El futuro trágico que imaginaba para Paraguay, un país torcido por la arrogancia desmedida y la corrupción del gobierno de Stroessner, lo llevó, al igual que a sus contemporáneos modernistas, a utilizar la mitología para referirse a la condición humana moderna. Ícaro no solo expresa preocupación por la compleja situación de los paraguayos, sino también por la humanidad en general en un incierto mundo de posguerra. Tal vez es por este tipo de gestos que Colombino se convirtió en uno de los líderes de la nueva figuración sudamericana. Nacido en Concepción, Paraguay, Carlos Colombino comenzó su vida profesional como abogado en 1955, año en que conoció a la artista Olga Blinder. Bajo su influencia, el joven se volcó al arte. En 1957, abandonó su oficina de abogados para estudiar arquitectura en la Universidad de Asunción, carrera que finalizó en 1969. Estos estudios motivaron su interés por el constructivismo, lo cual quedó manifiesto en sus anotaciones expuestas en la prestigiosa muestra de 1959, South American Art Today en el Dallas Museum of Fine Arts y en la V Bienal de São Paulo en 1961. En 1962, tras ver los grabados y xilografías de Blinder, la obra de Colombino dio un giro drástico, lo que lo llevó a crear una serie continua de linograbados que llamó “xilopintura” o “xiloPinturas”. La xilopintura potenció las tendencias surrealistas que habían comenzado a aparecer en su obra y encajó con su gran interés por el comentario social. En 1963 mostró su nueva técnica en la exposición Arte de América y España en Madrid. Dos años después, en 1965, obtuvo el Primer Premio por Paraguay en el Salón Esso de Artistas Jóvenes. Durante este periodo, Colombino comenzó a escribir bajo el seudónimo Esteban Cabañas. Publicó sus primeros poemas, Los monstruos vanos, en 1964. Siguiendo con la exploración de las temáticas presentes en su poesía, en 1967 creó una importante serie de xilopintura que retrataba caricaturas monstruosas un tanto basadas en la tumultuosa situación política de Paraguay. Además de su carrera artística y de escritor, también ayudó a fundar el Centro de Artes Visuales/Museo del Barro en Asunción en 1979. Su rol como fundador del museo y prestigiosa reputación a nivel internacional lo llevaron a ganar el Premio Gabriela Mistral de la Organización de Estados Americanos. Colombino falleció en 2013.

-Mark White

Carlos Colombino (Paraguay, b.1937, d. 2013)
Ícaro, 1966
Xilo-painting, 63 x 63"

55 years ago this month, the exhibition Carlos Colombino of Paraguay was set to open at the OAS Main Building Gallery, precursor to the present-day AMA. The exhibition ran from July 20-August 22 of that year. Carlos Colombino included Ícaro, o La imagen de mi pueblo in his first exhibition at the Visual Arts Section of the OAS in 1966. The mythological figure of Icarus, who out of hubris flew too close to the sun on wings of feather and wax, plummets towards the ocean. A trail of smoke seems to issue from charred and misshapen form, a large biomorphic mass suggestive of the deformation of both body and soul. Colombino tinted the shallowly carved panel red, green, and black to imply both the injury and the fiery fate of the figure and drew inspiration formally from the surrealism of Jean Arp, Max Ernst, and Roberto Matta, among others. Colombino’s suggestive title represents his existential despair over Paraguay’s future in an age overshadowed by the authoritarian regime of Alfredo Stroessner Mattiauda, who applied martial law, committed severe human rights abuses, and limited the freedom of the press. The artist envisioned a tragic future for Paraguay twisted by the hubris and corruption of Stroessner’s government, and Colombino, like his modernist contemporaries, used mythology to comment on the modern human condition. He became a leading figure of South American nueva figuración, and Ícaro expresses concern for the plight of Paraguayans and humanity in general in an uncertain postwar world. Born in Concepción, Paraguay, Carlos Colombino began his career as a lawyer in 1955, the same year he met artist Olga Blinder. Under the influence of Blinder, Colombino turned to art. He abandoned his legal practice in 1957 for the study of architecture at the Universidad de Asunción, eventually earning his degree in 1969. His architectural studies encouraged an interest in constructivism, which was visible in his entries in the influential 1959 exhibition South American Art Today at the Dallas Museum of Fine Arts in 1959 and the Sixth Bienal de São Paulo in 1961. Colombino’s work changed dramatically in 1962 after seeing Blinder’s woodcuts or xylographs, which led him to create an ongoing series of linocut paintings he dubbed xilopintura or xilo-paintings. Xilopintura amplified the surrealist tendencies that were beginning to appear in his work and coincided with a greater interest in social commentary. He featured his new medium in the 1963 exhibition Arte de América y España in Madrid and at the Esso Salon of Young Artists in 1965, where he won first prize for the Paraguay representation. During this time, Colombino began a career as a writer under the nom de plume Esteban Cabañas and published his first poems, Los monstruos vanos, in 1964. He developed the themes from the poems further in 1967 with an important series of xilo-paintings depicting monstrous caricatures based loosely on the tumultuous political situation in Paraguay. Apart from Colombino’s career as an artist and writer, he also helped to found the Centro de Artes Visuales/Museo del Barro in 1979 in Asunción. Colombino’s role in founding the museum and his prestige as an internationally recognized artist earned him the Premio Gabriela Mistral from the Organization of American States in 1990. He died in 2013.

Carlos Colombino incluyó Ícaro, o La imagen de mi pueblo en su primera muestra en la Sección de Artes Visuales en la OEA en 1966. Tal como el título lo indica, el retratado en la pieza es la figura mitológica de Ícaro, cuya arrogancia lo lleva a acercarse demasiado al sol, derretir así sus alas de cera, y caer en picada hacia el océano. Un rastro de humo parece salir de un cuerpo carbonizado y desfigurado. La apariencia biomórfica de esa gran figura sugiere la deformación del cuerpo y el alma. Colombino tiñó el panel —superficialmente tallado— con rojo, verde y negro para evocar tanto la herida como el destino ardiente del cuerpo, y se inspiró formalmente en el surrealismo de Jean Arp, Max Ernst y Roberto Matta, entre otros. El sugerente título representa su desesperación existencial ante el futuro de Paraguay, en una época eclipsada por el régimen autoritario de Alfredo Stroessner Matiauda, quien aplicó la ley marcial, cometió graves abusos a los derechos humanos y limitó la libertad de prensa. El futuro trágico que imaginaba para Paraguay, un país torcido por la arrogancia desmedida y la corrupción del gobierno de Stroessner, lo llevó, al igual que a sus contemporáneos modernistas, a utilizar la mitología para referirse a la condición humana moderna. Ícaro no solo expresa preocupación por la compleja situación de los paraguayos, sino también por la humanidad en general en un incierto mundo de posguerra. Tal vez es por este tipo de gestos que Colombino se convirtió en uno de los líderes de la nueva figuración sudamericana. Nacido en Concepción, Paraguay, Carlos Colombino comenzó su vida profesional como abogado en 1955, año en que conoció a la artista Olga Blinder. Bajo su influencia, el joven se volcó al arte. En 1957, abandonó su oficina de abogados para estudiar arquitectura en la Universidad de Asunción, carrera que finalizó en 1969. Estos estudios motivaron su interés por el constructivismo, lo cual quedó manifiesto en sus anotaciones expuestas en la prestigiosa muestra de 1959, South American Art Today en el Dallas Museum of Fine Arts y en la V Bienal de São Paulo en 1961. En 1962, tras ver los grabados y xilografías de Blinder, la obra de Colombino dio un giro drástico, lo que lo llevó a crear una serie continua de linograbados que llamó “xilopintura” o “xiloPinturas”. La xilopintura potenció las tendencias surrealistas que habían comenzado a aparecer en su obra y encajó con su gran interés por el comentario social. En 1963 mostró su nueva técnica en la exposición Arte de América y España en Madrid. Dos años después, en 1965, obtuvo el Primer Premio por Paraguay en el Salón Esso de Artistas Jóvenes. Durante este periodo, Colombino comenzó a escribir bajo el seudónimo Esteban Cabañas. Publicó sus primeros poemas, Los monstruos vanos, en 1964. Siguiendo con la exploración de las temáticas presentes en su poesía, en 1967 creó una importante serie de xilopintura que retrataba caricaturas monstruosas un tanto basadas en la tumultuosa situación política de Paraguay. Además de su carrera artística y de escritor, también ayudó a fundar el Centro de Artes Visuales/Museo del Barro en Asunción en 1979. Su rol como fundador del museo y prestigiosa reputación a nivel internacional lo llevaron a ganar el Premio Gabriela Mistral de la Organización de Estados Americanos. Colombino falleció en 2013.

-Mark White

Address

201 18th St NW
Washington D.C., DC
20006

By Metro Take the 18th street exit on Farragut West Metro Station, walk towards Constitution Avenue for about 6 blocks. We are on the corner of 18th and Virginia Avenue, just past C Street. By Bus These buses stop at 18th & C St., NW (in front of the museum) S1 (16th street, Potomac Park line) 80 (North Capitol Street line) The following bus stops at 18th & E St, NW (two blocks from the museum) 1 (Connecticut Avenue line)

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Wednesday 10:00 - 17:00
Thursday 10:00 - 17:00
Friday 10:00 - 17:00
Saturday 10:00 - 17:00
Sunday 10:00 - 17:00

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(202) 370-0147

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