U.S. Department of the Interior Museum

U.S. Department of the Interior Museum Since 1938 the Interior Museum has been educating the public about the history, art and architecture, and current missions and programs of the U.S.

Department of the Interior.

Operating as usual

We're closing out our #NationalParkWeek park art challenge with this 1976 oil on Masonite piece by Chris Kenyon. Can you...
04/25/2021

We're closing out our #NationalParkWeek park art challenge with this 1976 oil on Masonite piece by Chris Kenyon. Can you guess where this is? 🐻 Hint: it’s home to ~2,200 brown bears, many of which can be viewed on a live Bear Cam (approximately July-October) raising their young and fishing for salmon!

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Alaska’s Katmai National Park & Preserve (OSAC 00164)

We're closing out our #NationalParkWeek park art challenge with this 1976 oil on Masonite piece by Chris Kenyon. Can you guess where this is? 🐻 Hint: it’s home to ~2,200 brown bears, many of which can be viewed on a live Bear Cam (approximately July-October) raising their young and fishing for salmon!

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Alaska’s Katmai National Park & Preserve (OSAC 00164)

Our #NationalParkWeek park art challenge heads to the Southwest! Can you guess where this is? Hint: this park contains m...
04/24/2021

Our #NationalParkWeek park art challenge heads to the Southwest! Can you guess where this is? Hint: this park contains more than 2,000 of these massive yet delicate sandstone features formed by erosion over millions of years.

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Utah’s Arches National Park, by David Hal Morris Jr. (OSAC 02690)

Our #NationalParkWeek park art challenge heads to the Southwest! Can you guess where this is? Hint: this park contains more than 2,000 of these massive yet delicate sandstone features formed by erosion over millions of years.

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Utah’s Arches National Park, by David Hal Morris Jr. (OSAC 02690)

Heading into the weekend with more of our #NationalParkWeek park art challenge . . . guess where! Hint: this 1908 nation...
04/23/2021

Heading into the weekend with more of our #NationalParkWeek park art challenge . . . guess where! Hint: this 1908 national monument protecting coastal redwood trees and honoring a wilderness preservationist was the first national monument created from land donated by private citizens (William & Elizabeth Kent).

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California’s Muir Woods National Monument, by Paul Calle (OSAC 00219)

Heading into the weekend with more of our #NationalParkWeek park art challenge . . . guess where! Hint: this 1908 national monument protecting coastal redwood trees and honoring a wilderness preservationist was the first national monument created from land donated by private citizens (William & Elizabeth Kent).

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California’s Muir Woods National Monument, by Paul Calle (OSAC 00219)

Another installment in our #NationalParkWeek park art challenge! Think you know where this is? Hint: In 1909, President ...
04/22/2021

Another installment in our #NationalParkWeek park art challenge! Think you know where this is?

Hint: In 1909, President Theodore Roosevelt designated a portion of this Washington forest reserve as a national monument--in part to protect the habitat of a species of elk now named for him. The site was renamed and made a national park in 1938.

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Olympic National Park by Moodie, n.d. (OSAC 00135)

Another installment in our #NationalParkWeek park art challenge! Think you know where this is?

Hint: In 1909, President Theodore Roosevelt designated a portion of this Washington forest reserve as a national monument--in part to protect the habitat of a species of elk now named for him. The site was renamed and made a national park in 1938.

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Olympic National Park by Moodie, n.d. (OSAC 00135)

Back with our next #NationalParkWeek park art challenge! Do you know what this painting depicts? Hint: This site holds o...
04/21/2021

Back with our next #NationalParkWeek park art challenge! Do you know what this painting depicts? Hint: This site holds one of the longest (10,000 years!) and most complete archaeological records of human use of anywhere in the southeastern United States!

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Painting of Alabama’s Russell Cave National Monument, by John Schoenherr (OSAC 02664)

Back with our next #NationalParkWeek park art challenge! Do you know what this painting depicts? Hint: This site holds one of the longest (10,000 years!) and most complete archaeological records of human use of anywhere in the southeastern United States!

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Painting of Alabama’s Russell Cave National Monument, by John Schoenherr (OSAC 02664)

Can you guess the location of today’s #NationalParkWeek park art challenge? Hint: this 1975 photograph was taken when th...
04/20/2021

Can you guess the location of today’s #NationalParkWeek park art challenge? Hint: this 1975 photograph was taken when this “land of sand and solitude” was a national lakeshore. In 2019, it was designated the 61st national park.

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“Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore” (now Indiana Dunes National Park) by Milo Woodbridge “Woody” Williams (OSAC 00093)

Can you guess the location of today’s #NationalParkWeek park art challenge? Hint: this 1975 photograph was taken when this “land of sand and solitude” was a national lakeshore. In 2019, it was designated the 61st national park.

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“Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore” (now Indiana Dunes National Park) by Milo Woodbridge “Woody” Williams (OSAC 00093)

We’re back with our #NationalParkWeek park art challenge! Do you know where this is? Hint: In 1937, National Park Servic...
04/19/2021

We’re back with our #NationalParkWeek park art challenge! Do you know where this is? Hint: In 1937, National Park Service chief photographer George Alexander Grant made this photograph of a freshwater swamp habitat that’s home to panthers, mangroves, alligators, and more. Thirty seven years later--in 1974--it was designated as the country’s first national preserve.

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“Cabbage Palmetto Near Ochopee, Florida” (now Big Cypress National Preserve) by George Alexander Grant, photographic print, 1937 (OSAC 02768)

We’re back with our #NationalParkWeek park art challenge! Do you know where this is? Hint: In 1937, National Park Service chief photographer George Alexander Grant made this photograph of a freshwater swamp habitat that’s home to panthers, mangroves, alligators, and more. Thirty seven years later--in 1974--it was designated as the country’s first national preserve.

👇 👇 👇 (scroll for the answer)

“Cabbage Palmetto Near Ochopee, Florida” (now Big Cypress National Preserve) by George Alexander Grant, photographic print, 1937 (OSAC 02768)

Our #NationalParkWeek park art challenge continues: Founded as Lafayette National Park in 1919 as the first national par...
04/18/2021

Our #NationalParkWeek park art challenge continues:

Founded as Lafayette National Park in 1919 as the first national park east of the Mississippi River, it was renamed in 1929. It's known for its rocky coastlines and spectacular fall foliage. Do you know where?

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Schooner Head at Acadia National Park, circa 1930s hand-tinted photograph, artist unknown (OSAC 02661)

Our #NationalParkWeek park art challenge continues:

Founded as Lafayette National Park in 1919 as the first national park east of the Mississippi River, it was renamed in 1929. It's known for its rocky coastlines and spectacular fall foliage. Do you know where?

👇 👇 👇 (scroll for the answer)

Schooner Head at Acadia National Park, circa 1930s hand-tinted photograph, artist unknown (OSAC 02661)

It's #NationalParkWeek, and we'll be virtually working our way across the country from east to west sharing park art fro...
04/17/2021

It's #NationalParkWeek, and we'll be virtually working our way across the country from east to west sharing park art from our museum collection. Test your knowledge of national parks and see if you can identify where!

First up: Established in 1964, this national seashore is the only federally designated wilderness in NY.
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Fire Island National Seashore (OSAC 07252), by Maurice Silber

It's #NationalParkWeek, and we'll be virtually working our way across the country from east to west sharing park art from our museum collection. Test your knowledge of national parks and see if you can identify where!

First up: Established in 1964, this national seashore is the only federally designated wilderness in NY.
👇 👇 👇 (scroll for the answer)



Fire Island National Seashore (OSAC 07252), by Maurice Silber

Today (April 16) marks the 85th anniversary of the cornerstone being laid for our current U.S. Department of the Interio...
04/16/2021

Today (April 16) marks the 85th anniversary of the cornerstone being laid for our current U.S. Department of the Interior headquarters building in Washington, DC. The public ceremony kicked off at 11 a.m. that day in 1936, drawing large crowds. The speaking program featured chair of the National Capital Park and Planning Commission Frederic A. Delano, Secretary of the Interior Harold Ickes, and President Franklin Delano Roosevelt. In his prepared remarks, Secretary Ickes noted, "This new building represents much more to us than merely better and more desirable office space … it is to us a symbol of a new day." President Roosevelt echoed this in his keynote address that followed: "As I view this serviceable new structure, I like to think of it as symbolical of the Nation's vast resources, and this stone that I am about to lay as the cornerstone of a conservation policy that will guarantee to future Americans the richness of their heritage."

👉 Fun fact: the trowel used to lay the cornerstone was the same one President George Washington used when placing the U.S. Capitol's cornerstone in 1793!

#OnThisDay #OTD

📷: April 16, 1936: Interior Secretary Harold Ickes speaks at the cornerstone ceremony for the new Department of the Interior Building. The United States Marine Band is seated on the terrace. Also visible in the crowd are project architect Waddy Wood, presidential aide Gus Gennerich, and (above and to the left of the podium) a delegation from the Hopi Tribe. (U.S. Department of the Interior Museum, INTR 07449)

Today (April 16) marks the 85th anniversary of the cornerstone being laid for our current U.S. Department of the Interior headquarters building in Washington, DC. The public ceremony kicked off at 11 a.m. that day in 1936, drawing large crowds. The speaking program featured chair of the National Capital Park and Planning Commission Frederic A. Delano, Secretary of the Interior Harold Ickes, and President Franklin Delano Roosevelt. In his prepared remarks, Secretary Ickes noted, "This new building represents much more to us than merely better and more desirable office space … it is to us a symbol of a new day." President Roosevelt echoed this in his keynote address that followed: "As I view this serviceable new structure, I like to think of it as symbolical of the Nation's vast resources, and this stone that I am about to lay as the cornerstone of a conservation policy that will guarantee to future Americans the richness of their heritage."

👉 Fun fact: the trowel used to lay the cornerstone was the same one President George Washington used when placing the U.S. Capitol's cornerstone in 1793!

#OnThisDay #OTD

📷: April 16, 1936: Interior Secretary Harold Ickes speaks at the cornerstone ceremony for the new Department of the Interior Building. The United States Marine Band is seated on the terrace. Also visible in the crowd are project architect Waddy Wood, presidential aide Gus Gennerich, and (above and to the left of the podium) a delegation from the Hopi Tribe. (U.S. Department of the Interior Museum, INTR 07449)

Hey, we recognize this masterpiece and can't wait to be able to welcome visitors back in person to see it in our newest ...
04/15/2021

Hey, we recognize this masterpiece and can't wait to be able to welcome visitors back in person to see it in our newest exhibition!

#WorldArtDay #BigPictureMorans

(https://www.doi.gov/interiormuseum/exhibitions/onview)

Happy #WorldArtDay! We manage one of the world's largest museum collections, including over 101,000 works of art. Thomas Moran painted “The Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone” in 1872 and directly contributed to the appreciation and protection of this place: http://ow.ly/Tcdi50Epra7

We're loving seeing works from our Department of the Interior colleagues' collections on this #WorldArtDay! 🎨If you didn...
04/15/2021

We're loving seeing works from our Department of the Interior colleagues' collections on this #WorldArtDay! 🎨

If you didn't know that the Bureau of Reclamation stewards more than 200 incredible paintings highlighting western water and power projects, see and learn even more here: https://usbr.gov/newsroom/#/news-release/3820?field_story=1

We celebrate #WorldArtDay to reinforce the links between artistic creations, society, and our mission. Join us today as we share some of the amazing works of art from the Interior collection. http://ow.ly/qlDl50EoDxa

"Birds at Tule Lake Refuge" by John W. McCoy (1910-1989) Bureau of Reclamation

Away we go! Hooray for #WorldArtDay! 🎨🖌🖼
04/15/2021

Away we go! Hooray for #WorldArtDay! 🎨🖌🖼

We can bear-ly contain our excitement for #WorldArtDay tomorrow! John Schoenherr served as a National Park Service artist in residence at Great Smoky Mountains National Park and was asked to reflect on the park’s 1,500 black bears. This piece resides U.S. Department of the Interior Museum http://ow.ly/laGH50EoIeO

#OnThisDay 1931, two special story poles arrived at the U.S. Department of the Interior, carved by Haida master craftsma...
04/14/2021

#OnThisDay 1931, two special story poles arrived at the U.S. Department of the Interior, carved by Haida master craftsman John Wallace. Read the rest of the story of "The Raven" and "The Chief's Daughter" at http://ow.ly/eWgy50EoJx1

#OnThisDay 1931, two special story poles arrived at the U.S. Department of the Interior, carved by Haida master craftsman John Wallace. Read the rest of the story of "The Raven" and "The Chief's Daughter" at http://ow.ly/eWgy50EoJx1

🌼Happy spring! If your attentions are turning to April showers bringing May flowers, you are not alone!🌼Our collections ...
04/09/2021

🌼Happy spring! If your attentions are turning to April showers bringing May flowers, you are not alone!🌼

Our collections highlight this month is a piece known as a "jardinière basket," an item popular in the first half of the 20th century for holding ferns or potted plants. This one was created by an unidentified Chippewa artist, most likely in the mid 1920s. You can see that its form is reminiscent of a seed pod or blossom, with its rim flared into seven distinct "petals." Black cherry bark has been plaited to form the basket's outer surface and is lined on the inside with a birch bark cutout. It is edged in sweetgrass and sewn together with commercial black thread. A splint appliquéd flower made from birch bark adorns the front of the piece. (INTR 00712)

🌼Happy spring! If your attentions are turning to April showers bringing May flowers, you are not alone!🌼

Our collections highlight this month is a piece known as a "jardinière basket," an item popular in the first half of the 20th century for holding ferns or potted plants. This one was created by an unidentified Chippewa artist, most likely in the mid 1920s. You can see that its form is reminiscent of a seed pod or blossom, with its rim flared into seven distinct "petals." Black cherry bark has been plaited to form the basket's outer surface and is lined on the inside with a birch bark cutout. It is edged in sweetgrass and sewn together with commercial black thread. A splint appliquéd flower made from birch bark adorns the front of the piece. (INTR 00712)

In our latest e-newsletter:  🏞 Learn what public lands will be featured in future works coming to our collection through...
04/03/2021

In our latest e-newsletter:
🏞 Learn what public lands will be featured in future works coming to our collection through artists-in-residence programs;
🏛 Gain insight into a special 85th anniversary in April; and
🌸 View an object-of-the-month perfect for spring!

Read on -->
https://content.govdelivery.com/accounts/USDOI/bulletins/2caf7ac

In our latest e-newsletter:
🏞 Learn what public lands will be featured in future works coming to our collection through artists-in-residence programs;
🏛 Gain insight into a special 85th anniversary in April; and
🌸 View an object-of-the-month perfect for spring!

Read on -->
https://content.govdelivery.com/accounts/USDOI/bulletins/2caf7ac

#WomensHistoryMonth Thanks so much for joining us on this month’s exploration of 25 women and their artistic works repre...
03/31/2021

#WomensHistoryMonth

Thanks so much for joining us on this month’s exploration of 25 women and their artistic works represented in our Interior Museum collection. We guaranteed that by month’s end you’d be able to name many more than #5WomenArtists, and to recap: Abbott, Achee, Dimmitt, Frank, Harris, Henry, Hutton, Hyde, Kempton, Keyser, Marshall, Martinez, Meline, Nampeyo, Paszek, Pavila, Roybal, Shondee, Spagnolo, Starr, Thompson, Wasaquan, Waugh, Wege, and Woolf!

#WomensHistoryMonth

Thanks so much for joining us on this month’s exploration of 25 women and their artistic works represented in our Interior Museum collection. We guaranteed that by month’s end you’d be able to name many more than #5WomenArtists, and to recap: Abbott, Achee, Dimmitt, Frank, Harris, Henry, Hutton, Hyde, Kempton, Keyser, Marshall, Martinez, Meline, Nampeyo, Paszek, Pavila, Roybal, Shondee, Spagnolo, Starr, Thompson, Wasaquan, Waugh, Wege, and Woolf!

#5WomenArtists #WomensHistoryMonth Among the Interior Museum’s newest works is this oil on canvas piece by Kansas-based ...
03/30/2021

#5WomenArtists #WomensHistoryMonth

Among the Interior Museum’s newest works is this oil on canvas piece by Kansas-based artist, illustrator and lifelong educator, Nancy Lehenbauer Marshall. “Homestead 1862-2020” draws upon her recent artist-in-residence experience at Homestead National Historical Park in Nebraska.

Her oil on canvas painting is inspired, in part, by an Aldo Leopold quote: “When we see land as a community to which we belong, we may begin to use it with love and respect.” Through a series of interwoven vignettes, Marshall simultaneously tells the Homestead story and illustrates a farming future that is eco-friendly. Taken as a whole, the painted narrative encompasses generations of changing interactions with the land: as ancestral homeland, natural habitat, migration route, and agricultural provider.

🎨 OSAC 07355

#5WomenArtists #WomensHistoryMonth

Among the Interior Museum’s newest works is this oil on canvas piece by Kansas-based artist, illustrator and lifelong educator, Nancy Lehenbauer Marshall. “Homestead 1862-2020” draws upon her recent artist-in-residence experience at Homestead National Historical Park in Nebraska.

Her oil on canvas painting is inspired, in part, by an Aldo Leopold quote: “When we see land as a community to which we belong, we may begin to use it with love and respect.” Through a series of interwoven vignettes, Marshall simultaneously tells the Homestead story and illustrates a farming future that is eco-friendly. Taken as a whole, the painted narrative encompasses generations of changing interactions with the land: as ancestral homeland, natural habitat, migration route, and agricultural provider.

🎨 OSAC 07355

Address

1849 C St NW
Washington D.C., DC
20240

Take the orange or blue line to the Farragut West metro station. Exit on 18th Street and walk 5 blocks south.

General information

Closed Federal holidays

Opening Hours

Monday 08:30 - 16:30
Tuesday 08:30 - 16:30
Wednesday 08:30 - 16:30
Thursday 08:30 - 16:30
Friday 08:30 - 16:30

Telephone

(202) 208-4743

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Comments

My time interning at the Department of the Interior was one of the best experiences of my career! I can’t believe this was 6 years ago!
FROM 1994 democratic elections in south Africa to 100th birthday of Mr Mandela
It would be cool to see folks from the Harpers Ferry Center come down to the museum to present on their design work!
What are your programs in CA?