Genome: Unlocking Life's Code

Genome: Unlocking Life's Code The exhibition “Genome: Unlocking Life’s Code” immerses museum visitors in an environment that captures the revolutionary nature of genomic science.
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The 4,400-square foot exhibition opened on June 14, 2013 at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History (NMNH). The exhibition was developed and produced by NMNH and the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI). After a year at NMNH, the exhibition will travel to other venues throughout North America. Exhibition currently on view: National Museum of Natural History 10th Street and Constitution Ave., NW Washington, D.C. 20560 Moderated comment policy: Unlocking Life’s Code is a moderated comment FaceBook page. This means that comments left by visitors on this FaceBook page are subject to review and, if in violation of page guidelines stated here, removal without notice. Our general guidelines and policy for comment moderation is as follows: The staff for the Unlocking Life’s Code FaceBook page will remove comments that are considered blatantly partisan political views, are explicit commercial endorsements, or contain discriminatory, racist, offensive, obscene, inflammatory, unlawful or otherwise objectionable statements, language or content. Comments are not allowed that contain a URL link out to another website. Comments are not allowed that are off-topic or unrelated to the subject matter. These guidelines may be modified without notice at a future time.

National Human Genome Research Institute
12/23/2020

National Human Genome Research Institute

In the depths of Antarctica's McMurdo Dry Valleys, researchers found long strands of DNA in creatures that could be up to 15,000 years old! This suggests that these microorganisms have been in a self-protected state for thousands of years. A total mood! #genomefacts

Genomics Education Programme
12/21/2020

Genomics Education Programme

#Genomics101 is our fantastic introductory series of courses designed to give all healthcare professionals an overview of key concepts in genomics. Find out more today: http://orlo.uk/XM3ei

National Human Genome Research Institute
12/18/2020

National Human Genome Research Institute

Community engagement is an essential way to establish respect between genomic researchers and various communities. A 2018 workshop led by Southcentral Foundation (SCF) and Alaska Native Health Board (ANHB) and co-sponsored by NHGRI paves a path towards collaborative, community-driven research. https://bit.ly/34oTCud

Many human diseases have a genetic component. The National Human Genome Research Institute has curated a list that descr...
12/18/2020
Genetic Disorders

Many human diseases have a genetic component. The National Human Genome Research Institute has curated a list that describes 50 different genetic disorders. Learn more: https://bit.ly/33xLh5i

A list of genetic, orphan and rare diseases under investigation by researchers at or associated with the National Human Genome Research Institute.

#DYK Learning Undefeated science educators are available to participate in your digital classroom as guest speakers or t...
12/16/2020

#DYK Learning Undefeated science educators are available to participate in your digital classroom as guest speakers or to answer student questions over video chat. Our team members have backgrounds in biology, chemistry, genomics and more! Request a speaker here: https://bit.ly/2WipWdM

As part of the Smithsonian Science for Global Goals project, the Smithsonian Magazine partnered with the InterAcademy Pa...
12/15/2020
Smithsonian Science for Global Goals

As part of the Smithsonian Science for Global Goals project, the Smithsonian Magazine partnered with the InterAcademy Partnership to develop new Smithsonian Science for Global Goals community research guides. These free guides use the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals as a framework to focus on student-defined and implemented sustainable actions. Click here for the resource: https://ssec.si.edu/global-goals

Smithsonian Science for Global Goals project has new freely available community research guides developed by the Smithsonian Science Education Center (SSEC) in partnership with the InterAcademy Partnership. These Smithsonian Science for Global Goals community research guides use the United Nations S...

National DNA Day
12/14/2020

National DNA Day

It’s not too early to think about your #DNADay21 celebrations. National DNA Day has activities that can be performed in the comforts of home or over a virtual platform with family members. Activities can be found here https://bit.ly/3l1Et7E

Genomics Education Programme
12/11/2020

Genomics Education Programme

To all those nurses, midwives and health professionals who completed our genomics awareness survey, we have listened to your feedback. During our #GenomicsConversation 2021 we hope to bring you a digestible introduction to what genomics is and demonstrate how relevant genomics is in your practice today: http://orlo.uk/5ET0L

Today is the Rare New England career fair! Genetic counseling is one of the fastest growing STEM careers in the U.S. Use...
12/10/2020
Timeline

Today is the Rare New England career fair! Genetic counseling is one of the fastest growing STEM careers in the U.S. Use our new informative interactive to learn about why genetic counselors are an important and vital part of the healthcare system. https://bit.ly/3lY9xGa

Explore the Human Genome Project within us. Learn about DNA and genomics role in medicine and society at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History

Our on-line journal, Genomics: Insights, was featured in the most recent issue of The Genomics Landscape, a newsletter a...
12/09/2020
A wealth of ELSI information at your fingertips: The ELSIhub

Our on-line journal, Genomics: Insights, was featured in the most recent issue of The Genomics Landscape, a newsletter authored by Dr. Eric Green of the National Human Genome Research Institute. Click here to read the latest issue: https://bit.ly/39Wa9t6

In the December 3, 2020 edition of The Genomics Landscape, Dr. Eric Green spotlights on ELSIhub.

National DNA Day
12/08/2020

National DNA Day

Organizations are encouraged to think creatively about how to celebrate #DNADay21. Host a virtual presentation or panel featuring STEM scientists, or maybe an engaging demonstration of an activity with the public. The options are endless for 2021.

Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History
12/07/2020

Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History

Over most of Earth’s 🌎 land lies a thin layer of soil—a complex and variable mixture of minerals, air, water, decaying remains of life, and countless living organisms.

Earth’s “skin” is not one soil, but many soils—each with its own story. Tens of thousands of different soils cover the continents.

Without soils, life would not exist as we know it.

Soils are alive: they are born, they age, they breathe, and are constantly created and lost. Soils sustain life on Earth and are crucial to our everyday lives, storing carbon, filtering water, growing plants, and so much more. #WorldSoilDay

https://s.si.edu/worldsoilday

Join The New York Academy of Sciences on Dec. 16 from 4-5 p.m. EST for "Chat with a Scientist - How Drug Development and...
12/02/2020
Webinar: Chat with a Scientist- How drug development and clinical trials really work | The New York Academy of Sciences

Join The New York Academy of Sciences on Dec. 16 from 4-5 p.m. EST for "Chat with a Scientist - How Drug Development and Clinical Trials Really Work." Learn how clinical trials are used to test out promising new drugs and life-saving vaccines. Register here: https://bit.ly/3lwyOqm

The New York Academy of Sciences invites NYC students to a virtual series called Chat with a Scientist, which spotlights the diversity of STEM professionals and their careers, and creates a casual space where youth can engage with and learn from real scientists. In this event you’ll hear from two ...

World AIDS Day has been an opportunity to remember those lost and support those affected, while uniting in the goal of e...
12/01/2020

World AIDS Day has been an opportunity to remember those lost and support those affected, while uniting in the goal of ending the HIV/AIDS epidemic. Join the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History for a three-part series that honors those who have made a difference. Register here: https://s.si.edu/2Jul2Hm

BioBus
11/30/2020

BioBus

Is racism linked to disease? How does structural racism affect the treatment of diseases? 🤔Join BioBus in our final Student Town Hall in our series Racism and Society on December 3rd to hear directly from the experts! BioBus will be joined by Cardiothoracic Surgeon, Dr. JaBaris Swain, and psychiatrist and neuroscientist, Dr. Gaby Ritfeld to answer your questions on racism and disease. Send us your questions today at www.biobus.org/townhall and then watch live on YouTube for the answers!
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#TownHall #STEMeducation #socialscience #racism #health #ScienceAndSociety #FreeNYC

National Human Genome Research Institute
11/25/2020

National Human Genome Research Institute

How did @aphillippy's team fill in the missing pieces of the human genome? First, they got the longest-possible data read for a single cell line. Then, the team entered the data into an algorithm to help finish the puzzle (or pie, if you will). #holidaygenomefacts

Genome Data from Africa Reveal Millions of New Variants
11/24/2020
Genome Data from Africa Reveal Millions of New Variants

Genome Data from Africa Reveal Millions of New Variants

The first Homo sapiens emerged in Africa hundreds of thousands of years ago. We are all descended from that common pool of ancestors. Put another way, we are all Africans. While it’s not possible t…

The The Jackson Laboratory "Value of Family History in the Prenatal Care Practice" is a resource for educators on family...
11/23/2020
The Value of Family History in the Prenatal Care Practice Curriculum

The The Jackson Laboratory "Value of Family History in the Prenatal Care Practice" is a resource for educators on family health history in prenatal care.
The 60-minute presentation can be implemented as a Grand Rounds lecture for healthcare providers. https://bit.ly/3pWofAf #FamilyHealthHistoryMonth

A slideset for educators on the value of family history in general prenatal care that focuses on family history collection and interpretation in prenatal case studies.

Join Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History for a conversation with Dr. Rita Colwell, who will discuss "Scienc...
11/21/2020
An Evening With Rita Colwell: Science, Sexism, and the Fight Against the Status Quo

Join Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History for a conversation with Dr. Rita Colwell, who will discuss "Science, Sexism, and the Fight against the Status Quo." She is a pioneering microbiologist and the first woman to lead the National Science Foundation (NSF). Register here: https://s.si.edu/3m1SGTa

“If you think sexism only thrives on Wall Street or in Hollywood, you haven’t visited a lab, a science department, a research foundation, or a biotech firm,” says scientist Rita Colwell. She is a pioneering microbiologist and the first woman to lead the National Science Foundation, but that st...

Our November newsletter was sent to over 9,600 subscribers. Each month we share freely available resources and events to...
11/19/2020
Unlocking Life's Code November 2020 Newsletter

Our November newsletter was sent to over 9,600 subscribers. Each month we share freely available resources and events to engage your students with hot topics in genetics and genomics. Help us reach 10,000 subscribers and sign up today! Sign up here: https://conta.cc/3ptZFq8

NEWSLETTER: November 2020 This Issue: *Family Health History Interactive *NHGRI Twitter Chat *NHGRI Facebook Story *DNA Day Twitter Chat *Virtual STEM Workshop  Join Genome: Unlocking Life’s Code in

National Human Genome Research Institute
11/17/2020

National Human Genome Research Institute

[email protected]_gov is celebrating #FamilyHealthHistory Day! Knowing more about your family's health can help inform you and your healthcare providers about risk factors and how to stay healthy. Start these important conversations with your family! https://bit.ly/32K4WjE

11/16/2020
National Human Genome Research Institute

National Human Genome Research Institute

The Human Genome Project finished in 2003 with an almost “complete” first draft of the human genome sequence. It was about 95% complete — with over 150,000 gaps of DNA left to be sequenced. Scientists are closing these gaps, with only about 100 left! https://bit.ly/32sAXg0

Celebrate Family Health History Month with National DNA Day on November 17, 2020.
11/13/2020

Celebrate Family Health History Month with National DNA Day on November 17, 2020.

The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine is convening a three-day public symposium to explore ambit...
11/12/2020
Imagining the Future of Undergraduate STEM Education

The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine is convening a three-day public symposium to explore ambitions for the future of undergraduate STEM education and identify steps for achieving them. Register here: https://bit.ly/3eT62id

How we can transform undergraduate STEM education to meet the needs of students, science, and society in the year 2040 and beyond?

#DYK It's genetic counselor awareness day! Learn more about this exciting career using our latest interactive. https://b...
11/12/2020

#DYK It's genetic counselor awareness day! Learn more about this exciting career using our latest interactive. https://bit.ly/3lY9xGa

The Smithsonian Science Education Center is looking for field testers for two new modules--Biodiversity! and Sustainable...
11/10/2020
Field Testing Smithsonian Science for Global Goals

The Smithsonian Science Education Center is looking for field testers for two new modules--Biodiversity! and Sustainable Cities!. These freely available community research guides engage youth aged 8-17 to take sustainable actions in their own communities. Click to learn more: https://s.si.edu/3ljed9K

Do you want to field test a new module from the Smithsonian Science for Global Goals project?

11/09/2020
National Human Genome Research Institute

National Human Genome Research Institute

Scientists use one reference genome as a guide to study all humans, but it does not represent everyone. Now, researchers are working to create a “pangenome,” which would represent all of humanity’s diversity. Look out for our video coming soon, from NHGRI and Massive Science!

Join us today at 1:00 p.m. EST!
11/06/2020

Join us today at 1:00 p.m. EST!

Want to know how to write about genomics in an engaging manner? Join genomic professionals Drs. Chris Gunter and Brittany Baur on Nov 6 at 1 p.m. EST for an instructional webinar on science communication. Click this link to join on Nov 6: https://bit.ly/3mNh0YW

Looking for a way to up-cycle that Halloween pumpkin? Repurpose it for an at-home science experiment using this curated ...
11/05/2020

Looking for a way to up-cycle that Halloween pumpkin? Repurpose it for an at-home science experiment using this curated list of pumpkin-themed STEM activities. Click here to find your next activity: https://bit.ly/2I4upNm

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11/04/2020
Bitly | Page Not Found | 404

Bitly | Page Not Found | 404

This is a 404 error, which means you've clicked on a bad link or entered an invalid URL. Maybe what you are looking for can be found at Bitly.com. P.S. Bitly links are case sensitive.

11/03/2020
National Human Genome Research Institute on Twitter

Talking to your relatives about your family health history can help you and your healthcare provider better understand your health! Join the National Human Genome Research Institute's clinical director
@benjaminsolomo2 on Twitter
to learn more about Family Health History on November 17. Send in your questions via Twitter using the hashtag #FamilyHealthChat

“Talking to your relatives about your family health history can help you and your healthcare provider better understand your health! Our clinical director @benjaminsolomo2 will tweet about Family Health History on November 17. Send us your questions! #FamilyHealthChat https://t.co/cfQf9vxKhT”

Want to know how to write about genomics in an engaging manner? Join genomic professionals Drs. Chris Gunter and Brittan...
11/02/2020

Want to know how to write about genomics in an engaging manner? Join genomic professionals Drs. Chris Gunter and Brittany Baur on Nov 6 at 1 p.m. EST for an instructional webinar on science communication. Click this link to join on Nov 6: https://bit.ly/3mNh0YW

National DNA Day
10/30/2020

National DNA Day

DNA is in all living things, including the pumpkins you carve during the holidays. Want to see pumpkin DNA? Follow the directions in the video for extracting DNA from a strawberry, substituting in mashed pumpkin flesh. Watch the video here https://bit.ly/2Gfr91e

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Comments

Tonight, don't miss "The Gene" at 8/7c on PBS!
Universities should not use their public-outreach websites as a Trojan Horse to further pollute the public understanding of the complex syndrome called ADHD— and the neurostimulant medications that are its first-line treatment. Yet, that's what we find with the University of Utah's learn.genetics site. People with ADHD suffer enough from an uninformed and misinformed public. The last thing they need is for a university's website, ostensibly with the goal of teaching about genetics, to use a very sensational angle in doing so. The page leads with the headline "Ritalin and Cocaine" as if those two naturally belong together. They do not. Even though they later clarify, in a meandering way, that Cocaine is metabolized in an entirely different way than Ritalin—they lead with the sensational. Scientific ignorance or Search Engine Optimization? Either is bad. Perhaps the LDS influence that makes the University of Utah create such a highly problematic error? Because caffeine is bad, stimulants must be worst? I know many LDS folks with ADHD who take stimulant medication, and it has only made them more capable of self-regulating their thoughts and behaviors. Many, however, still encounter protests and wrong-headed judgment from their friends and family, along the lines of "That's like cocaine! You'll become a drug addict!" I encourage the University of Utah to re-think its approach. If I hadn't searched around the page to find the source, I would have assumed it was from the anti-psychiatry "Ritalin Kills" crowd. This is the 21st Century. Universities (especially publicly funded) must either help to educate the public on how to understand 21st Century neuroscience or back away from the lab—and government grants. https://learn.genetics.utah.edu/content/addiction/ritalin/ excerpt: Like cocaine, Ritalin is a powerful stimulant that increases alertness and productivity. Ritalin and cocaine also look and act very much alike. They have a similar chemical structure, and both increase dopamine levels in the brain. They do this by blocking a dopamine transporter protein, which normally takes up dopamine from the synapse. ADHD children are typically taken off of Ritalin when they reach adulthood. Interestingly, these individuals seem to be more prone to cocaine addiction. Why is that? Because Ritalin and cocaine are similar drugs, it's possible that ADHD adults are unknowingly using cocaine as a replacement for Ritalin. In other words, it may be an attempt to self-medicate. Cocaine may help individuals with ADHD focus and feel calm and in control.
I enjoy your site and plan on using this information and the learning materials you provide next term when I teach Introduction to Genetics. Thanks!
One of the most sought after skills for the future will be life coding of DNA.