Genome: Unlocking Life's Code

Genome: Unlocking Life's Code The exhibition “Genome: Unlocking Life’s Code” immerses museum visitors in an environment that captures the revolutionary nature of genomic science.
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The 4,400-square foot exhibition opened on June 14, 2013 at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History (NMNH). The exhibition was developed and produced by NMNH and the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI). After a year at NMNH, the exhibition will travel to other venues throughout North America. Exhibition currently on view: National Museum of Natural History 10th Street and Constitution Ave., NW Washington, D.C. 20560 Moderated comment policy: Unlocking Life’s Code is a moderated comment FaceBook page. This means that comments left by visitors on this FaceBook page are subject to review and, if in violation of page guidelines stated here, removal without notice. Our general guidelines and policy for comment moderation is as follows: The staff for the Unlocking Life’s Code FaceBook page will remove comments that are considered blatantly partisan political views, are explicit commercial endorsements, or contain discriminatory, racist, offensive, obscene, inflammatory, unlawful or otherwise objectionable statements, language or content. Comments are not allowed that contain a URL link out to another website. Comments are not allowed that are off-topic or unrelated to the subject matter. These guidelines may be modified without notice at a future time.

National Human Genome Research Institute
11/25/2020

National Human Genome Research Institute

How did @aphillippy's team fill in the missing pieces of the human genome? First, they got the longest-possible data read for a single cell line. Then, the team entered the data into an algorithm to help finish the puzzle (or pie, if you will). #holidaygenomefacts

Genome Data from Africa Reveal Millions of New Variants
11/24/2020
Genome Data from Africa Reveal Millions of New Variants

Genome Data from Africa Reveal Millions of New Variants

The first Homo sapiens emerged in Africa hundreds of thousands of years ago. We are all descended from that common pool of ancestors. Put another way, we are all Africans. While it’s not possible t…

The The Jackson Laboratory "Value of Family History in the Prenatal Care Practice" is a resource for educators on family...
11/23/2020
The Value of Family History in the Prenatal Care Practice Curriculum

The The Jackson Laboratory "Value of Family History in the Prenatal Care Practice" is a resource for educators on family health history in prenatal care.
The 60-minute presentation can be implemented as a Grand Rounds lecture for healthcare providers. https://bit.ly/3pWofAf #FamilyHealthHistoryMonth

A slideset for educators on the value of family history in general prenatal care that focuses on family history collection and interpretation in prenatal case studies.

Join Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History for a conversation with Dr. Rita Colwell, who will discuss "Scienc...
11/21/2020
An Evening With Rita Colwell: Science, Sexism, and the Fight Against the Status Quo

Join Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History for a conversation with Dr. Rita Colwell, who will discuss "Science, Sexism, and the Fight against the Status Quo." She is a pioneering microbiologist and the first woman to lead the National Science Foundation (NSF). Register here: https://s.si.edu/3m1SGTa

“If you think sexism only thrives on Wall Street or in Hollywood, you haven’t visited a lab, a science department, a research foundation, or a biotech firm,” says scientist Rita Colwell. She is a pioneering microbiologist and the first woman to lead the National Science Foundation, but that st...

Our November newsletter was sent to over 9,600 subscribers. Each month we share freely available resources and events to...
11/19/2020
Unlocking Life's Code November 2020 Newsletter

Our November newsletter was sent to over 9,600 subscribers. Each month we share freely available resources and events to engage your students with hot topics in genetics and genomics. Help us reach 10,000 subscribers and sign up today! Sign up here: https://conta.cc/3ptZFq8

NEWSLETTER: November 2020 This Issue: *Family Health History Interactive *NHGRI Twitter Chat *NHGRI Facebook Story *DNA Day Twitter Chat *Virtual STEM Workshop  Join Genome: Unlocking Life’s Code in

National Human Genome Research Institute
11/17/2020

National Human Genome Research Institute

[email protected]_gov is celebrating #FamilyHealthHistory Day! Knowing more about your family's health can help inform you and your healthcare providers about risk factors and how to stay healthy. Start these important conversations with your family! https://bit.ly/32K4WjE

11/16/2020
National Human Genome Research Institute

National Human Genome Research Institute

The Human Genome Project finished in 2003 with an almost “complete” first draft of the human genome sequence. It was about 95% complete — with over 150,000 gaps of DNA left to be sequenced. Scientists are closing these gaps, with only about 100 left! https://bit.ly/32sAXg0

Celebrate Family Health History Month with National DNA Day on November 17, 2020.
11/13/2020

Celebrate Family Health History Month with National DNA Day on November 17, 2020.

The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine is convening a three-day public symposium to explore ambit...
11/12/2020
Imagining the Future of Undergraduate STEM Education

The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine is convening a three-day public symposium to explore ambitions for the future of undergraduate STEM education and identify steps for achieving them. Register here: https://bit.ly/3eT62id

How we can transform undergraduate STEM education to meet the needs of students, science, and society in the year 2040 and beyond?

#DYK It's genetic counselor awareness day! Learn more about this exciting career using our latest interactive. https://b...
11/12/2020

#DYK It's genetic counselor awareness day! Learn more about this exciting career using our latest interactive. https://bit.ly/3lY9xGa

The Smithsonian Science Education Center is looking for field testers for two new modules--Biodiversity! and Sustainable...
11/10/2020
Field Testing Smithsonian Science for Global Goals

The Smithsonian Science Education Center is looking for field testers for two new modules--Biodiversity! and Sustainable Cities!. These freely available community research guides engage youth aged 8-17 to take sustainable actions in their own communities. Click to learn more: https://s.si.edu/3ljed9K

Do you want to field test a new module from the Smithsonian Science for Global Goals project?

11/09/2020
National Human Genome Research Institute

National Human Genome Research Institute

Scientists use one reference genome as a guide to study all humans, but it does not represent everyone. Now, researchers are working to create a “pangenome,” which would represent all of humanity’s diversity. Look out for our video coming soon, from NHGRI and Massive Science!

Join us today at 1:00 p.m. EST!
11/06/2020

Join us today at 1:00 p.m. EST!

Want to know how to write about genomics in an engaging manner? Join genomic professionals Drs. Chris Gunter and Brittany Baur on Nov 6 at 1 p.m. EST for an instructional webinar on science communication. Click this link to join on Nov 6: https://bit.ly/3mNh0YW

Looking for a way to up-cycle that Halloween pumpkin? Repurpose it for an at-home science experiment using this curated ...
11/05/2020

Looking for a way to up-cycle that Halloween pumpkin? Repurpose it for an at-home science experiment using this curated list of pumpkin-themed STEM activities. Click here to find your next activity: https://bit.ly/2I4upNm

Bitly | Page Not Found | 404
11/04/2020
Bitly | Page Not Found | 404

Bitly | Page Not Found | 404

This is a 404 error, which means you've clicked on a bad link or entered an invalid URL. Maybe what you are looking for can be found at Bitly.com. P.S. Bitly links are case sensitive.

11/03/2020
National Human Genome Research Institute on Twitter

Talking to your relatives about your family health history can help you and your healthcare provider better understand your health! Join the National Human Genome Research Institute's clinical director
@benjaminsolomo2 on Twitter
to learn more about Family Health History on November 17. Send in your questions via Twitter using the hashtag #FamilyHealthChat

“Talking to your relatives about your family health history can help you and your healthcare provider better understand your health! Our clinical director @benjaminsolomo2 will tweet about Family Health History on November 17. Send us your questions! #FamilyHealthChat https://t.co/cfQf9vxKhT”

Want to know how to write about genomics in an engaging manner? Join genomic professionals Drs. Chris Gunter and Brittan...
11/02/2020

Want to know how to write about genomics in an engaging manner? Join genomic professionals Drs. Chris Gunter and Brittany Baur on Nov 6 at 1 p.m. EST for an instructional webinar on science communication. Click this link to join on Nov 6: https://bit.ly/3mNh0YW

National DNA Day
10/30/2020

National DNA Day

DNA is in all living things, including the pumpkins you carve during the holidays. Want to see pumpkin DNA? Follow the directions in the video for extracting DNA from a strawberry, substituting in mashed pumpkin flesh. Watch the video here https://bit.ly/2Gfr91e

10/28/2020
National Human Genome Research Institute

National Human Genome Research Institute

Nearly 125 million people in the U.S. live with some form of chronic inflammatory disease. But many of these diseases have overlapping symptoms, which often make it difficult for researchers to diagnose the specific inflammatory disease in a given patient. In an unusual approach, researchers at NHGRI used a “search the genome” approach to reveal how mutations in a specific gene called UBA1 are linked to a new autoinflammatory disease called VEXAS. Read about the study here: https://bit.ly/2FZNwrc

10/27/2020
WETA National Digital Studios

#ICYMI #TheGenePBS The Gene Explained Animated Series won a Gold Davey award! Congratulations!

This animated series won’t get you a PhD, but it does clear up a few mysteries about how genes work, how they make us, if we can change them and what they might look like in the future. (Microscope not required.) #StayHome and watch #TheGenePBS on Tuesday, April 7 & 14 8/7c

Attending the American Public Health Association Annual Meeting?  Check out the National DNA Day pre-recorded poster pre...
10/26/2020

Attending the American Public Health Association Annual Meeting? Check out the National DNA Day pre-recorded poster presentation “National DNA Day: A Science Education Movement to Improve Genomic Literacy” in the Genomics Forum Poster Session. #APHA2020 #DNADay21

Genomics is transforming healthcare and a successful change requires an informed and engaged public that is equipped and empowered by the knowledge they need to make informed healthcare-related decisions. This is the age of genomic literacy and words matter! #NHEW

All Ohio high school juniors or seniors during the 2020-2021 school year, who meet the qualifications noted on the schol...
10/24/2020
About Believe in Ohio – Believe in Ohio

All Ohio high school juniors or seniors during the 2020-2021 school year, who meet the qualifications noted on the scholarship application, are invited to apply for a $1,000 Believe in Ohio STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering & Math) Scholarship. https://bit.ly/3oc7ksP

AboutHigh School CompetitionsRegional CompetitionsState CompetitionsStatewide STEM Scholarship ProgramSTEM Entrepreneurship & Innovation ForumsImpact of Believe in OhioNewsTestimonials The purpose of the Believe in Ohio program is to create a “Culture of Innovation” in Ohio high schools, promote...

The Inspire Educators Workshops is a special event for educators designed to inspire and equip teachers with the most cu...
10/23/2020
Inspire Educators | USASEF

The Inspire Educators Workshops is a special event for educators designed to inspire and equip teachers with the most current and innovative STEM learning tools for the classroom. Attendees will have the option to livestream or view on-demand. https://bit.ly/3khx8kD

The VIRTUAL Inspire Educators Workshops is a special event series for educators designed to inspire and equip teachers with the most current and innovative STEM learning tools for the classroom. Industry leaders will share their STEM perspectives and resources while implementing realistic teaching m...

Tune in October 24 at 12 p.m. EST, for a one hour video screening of the Henrietta Lacks Memorial Lecture: 100 Years of ...
10/23/2020
Webinar on Building Educational Equity Indicator Systems

Tune in October 24 at 12 p.m. EST, for a one hour video screening of the Henrietta Lacks Memorial Lecture: 100 Years of Henrietta Lacks. Researchers and community members discuss the impact of Henrietta Lacks and her cells in our past, present and future. https://bit.ly/3kjdDIz

How can education leaders monitor and measure progress toward educational equity?

Educational policy makers recognize the importance of making sure that students of all backgrounds and abilities have an...
10/22/2020
Webinar on Building Educational Equity Indicator Systems

Educational policy makers recognize the importance of making sure that students of all backgrounds and abilities have an equal chance to succeed. Join the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine on Tuesday, October 27 for the first part of this webinar series to learn more. https://bit.ly/3kjdDIz

How can education leaders monitor and measure progress toward educational equity?

What is a genetic counselor? What do they do and how much do they earn? The Genome: Unlocking Life's Code Counseling Car...
10/21/2020

What is a genetic counselor? What do they do and how much do they earn? The Genome: Unlocking Life's Code Counseling Career Profile interactive answers these questions and more: https://bit.ly/3lY9xGa #GenomicCareers #GenomicWorkforce

Several psychiatric disorders have a genetic component contributing towards their etiology, which can be uncovered clini...
10/20/2020
www.nncionline.org » Autism Spectrum Disorder

Several psychiatric disorders have a genetic component contributing towards their etiology, which can be uncovered clinically and lead to actionable interventions. This advanced module will help healthcare providers learn about Autism Spectrum Disorder: https://bit.ly/2H5DQMq

Overview: Several psychiatric disorders such as autism and schizophrenia have a large genetic component contributing towards their etiology, which can be uncovered clinically and lead to actionable interventions that would alter management and treatment. Many of these genetic variants are individual...

10/19/2020
Event Registration

This webinar will feature three short presentations providing perspectives on the use of next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies for pathogen detection. Register here: https://bit.ly/3o1Upts

How do we inherit our genome from our parents? How does this DNA combine to produce your own unique set of information? ...
10/17/2020
How We Inherit Genomic Information - Genomics Education Programme

How do we inherit our genome from our parents? How does this DNA combine to produce your own unique set of information? Learn more about how we inherit genomes by watching this short animation from the Genomics Education Programme: https://bit.ly/3jVsokH

We inherit our genome from our parents, but how does this DNA combine to produce your own unique set of information? Learn more about how we inherit genomic information by watching this short animation.

The National Institute of General Medical Sciences has launched a new issue of the Pathways magazine in partnership with...
10/16/2020
Pathways

The National Institute of General Medical Sciences has launched a new issue of the Pathways magazine in partnership with Scholastic. The issue features drug resistance in viruses and bacteria. Pathways includes a student magazine, teaching guide and interactive quiz. Access the free resources here: https://bit.ly/3dlqfwe

Science and language arts program for grades 6-12 about basic science research featuring 4 interactive videos!

The October issue of our Genome: Unlocking Life's Code newsletter is now available. This issue features new interactives...
10/15/2020
Unlocking Life's Code: October 2020 Newsletter

The October issue of our Genome: Unlocking Life's Code newsletter is now available. This issue features new interactives, virtual events and workshops! Join our mailing list today. Read more here: https://conta.cc/2Iecdkw

The global COVID-19 pandemic has changed many aspects of our daily lives. This three-part animation series explores the biology of the virus SARS-CoV-2, which causes the disease COVID-19. The first animation, Infection, describes the structure of coronaviruses like SARS-CoV-2 and how they infect hu...

Don't miss tomorrow's virtual career fair profiling genetic counseling programs across the United States and Canada. The...
10/14/2020
- WSRGN

Don't miss tomorrow's virtual career fair profiling genetic counseling programs across the United States and Canada. The Western States Regional Genetic Network is hosting the event on Thursday, October 15, 2020. Register here: https://bit.ly/3lzSiLg

The Genetic Counseling Virtual Fair will run from 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Eastern time 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. Central time 8 a.m. - 3 p.m. Mountain time 7 a.m. - 2 p.m. Pacific time Allexhibit rooms will be staffed live from: 12 pm - 3 pm Eastern time 11 am to 2 pm Central time

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Comments

Tonight, don't miss "The Gene" at 8/7c on PBS!
Universities should not use their public-outreach websites as a Trojan Horse to further pollute the public understanding of the complex syndrome called ADHD— and the neurostimulant medications that are its first-line treatment. Yet, that's what we find with the University of Utah's learn.genetics site. People with ADHD suffer enough from an uninformed and misinformed public. The last thing they need is for a university's website, ostensibly with the goal of teaching about genetics, to use a very sensational angle in doing so. The page leads with the headline "Ritalin and Cocaine" as if those two naturally belong together. They do not. Even though they later clarify, in a meandering way, that Cocaine is metabolized in an entirely different way than Ritalin—they lead with the sensational. Scientific ignorance or Search Engine Optimization? Either is bad. Perhaps the LDS influence that makes the University of Utah create such a highly problematic error? Because caffeine is bad, stimulants must be worst? I know many LDS folks with ADHD who take stimulant medication, and it has only made them more capable of self-regulating their thoughts and behaviors. Many, however, still encounter protests and wrong-headed judgment from their friends and family, along the lines of "That's like cocaine! You'll become a drug addict!" I encourage the University of Utah to re-think its approach. If I hadn't searched around the page to find the source, I would have assumed it was from the anti-psychiatry "Ritalin Kills" crowd. This is the 21st Century. Universities (especially publicly funded) must either help to educate the public on how to understand 21st Century neuroscience or back away from the lab—and government grants. https://learn.genetics.utah.edu/content/addiction/ritalin/ excerpt: Like cocaine, Ritalin is a powerful stimulant that increases alertness and productivity. Ritalin and cocaine also look and act very much alike. They have a similar chemical structure, and both increase dopamine levels in the brain. They do this by blocking a dopamine transporter protein, which normally takes up dopamine from the synapse. ADHD children are typically taken off of Ritalin when they reach adulthood. Interestingly, these individuals seem to be more prone to cocaine addiction. Why is that? Because Ritalin and cocaine are similar drugs, it's possible that ADHD adults are unknowingly using cocaine as a replacement for Ritalin. In other words, it may be an attempt to self-medicate. Cocaine may help individuals with ADHD focus and feel calm and in control.
I enjoy your site and plan on using this information and the learning materials you provide next term when I teach Introduction to Genetics. Thanks!
One of the most sought after skills for the future will be life coding of DNA.