Heurich House Museum

Heurich House Museum It is our mission to honestly explore what is take to achieve the American Dream through the legacy of German immigrant and brewmaster, Christian Heurich and his household & brewery staff.

Out of an abundance of caution, the museum's buildings remain closed to the general public, but our Castle Garden is open...

PUBLIC ACCESS
Tuesday thru Thursday 11am-5pm

1921 HAPPY HOUR - Starting February 11th. Thursdays 5-8pm

BEER & CIDER PICK-UP
Tuesday thru Thursday 12-5pm

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The Heurich House Museum preserves the legacy of Christian Heurich and enriches the cultural life of Washington, DC. The mansion was built from 1892-94 by German immigrant, local brewer, and philanthropist Christian Heurich (1842-1945). He and his family lived in their Dupont Circle home from its completion in 1894 until his wife’s death in 1956. Recognized as Washington, DC’s most successful brewer, he ran the Chr. Heurich Brewing Co., the city’s longest-operating brewery (1873-1956), until his death at 102. The mansion is notable for its fireproof construction, original interiors, and family collections.

Operating as usual

Want to be transported back to the 19th century? With our Castle Garden, you can do so without even leaving D.C. Tuesday...
05/25/2021

Want to be transported back to the 19th century? With our Castle Garden, you can do so without even leaving D.C. Tuesdays-Thursdays 12-5pm.

Want to be transported back to the 19th century? With our Castle Garden, you can do so without even leaving D.C. Tuesdays-Thursdays 12-5pm.

Jesse Thomas was a chauffeur for the Heurich family from 1925 to 1926. While there is much missing from our archives abo...
05/22/2021

Jesse Thomas was a chauffeur for the Heurich family from 1925 to 1926. While there is much missing from our archives about his life, the notes from Amelia Heurich’s diary help us build his story. On Easter Sunday, April 12, 1925, Amelia hid some eggs around her garden for Jesse’s children to hunt. This story shows that Jesse and his family were embraced by the Heurichs and not just seen as staff. On a trip in July later that year, Amelia also made sure to include Jesse on her list of people to send postcards to, which adds to the familial sentiment. Piecing these few mentions together, it becomes more clear how the Heurich family treated their staff and how Jesse in particular was brought into their family.

As our research continues, there are still some parts of Jesse’s life that are uncertain. One main roadblock is that there were multiple D.C. residents in the 1920s who had the same name. A recently uncovered clue from the Evening Star newspaper tells us that his middle initial was “A,” which has helped push the puzzle’s progress along. That same article, published March 21, 1925, also revealed that Jesse was in a car accident where a child ran in front of his moving vehicle and was minorly injured. Here, Jesse Thomas’s address was listed as “1307 New Hampshire Ave NW,” where the Heurich family home is located. Does that mean he was living in the carriage house at the time? Since not all staff lived onsite, what would living at the Heurichs’ home tell us about their relationship?

“History doesn't repeat itself but it often rhymes.” The only difference between a historic and modern Senate Beer are y...
05/19/2021

“History doesn't repeat itself but it often rhymes.” The only difference between a historic and modern Senate Beer are yeast strains and water. Grab yours: the-heurich-house-museum-gift-shop.myshopify.com

“History doesn't repeat itself but it often rhymes.” The only difference between a historic and modern Senate Beer are yeast strains and water. Grab yours: the-heurich-house-museum-gift-shop.myshopify.com

Just another day in the leaf. 🌳See you in the garden (wifi included) from 10am-5pm on Tuesday-Thursday.
05/17/2021

Just another day in the leaf. 🌳

See you in the garden (wifi included) from 10am-5pm on Tuesday-Thursday.

Just another day in the leaf. 🌳

See you in the garden (wifi included) from 10am-5pm on Tuesday-Thursday.

156 years ago today was the end of the Civil War. Hubert Dilger believed slavery was so abhorrent that he actually obtai...
05/10/2021

156 years ago today was the end of the Civil War. Hubert Dilger believed slavery was so abhorrent that he actually obtained permission from the Duke of Baden to immigrate to the US from Germany to fight in the War. Dilger enlisted as a volunteer in the Ohio regiment, and was made a captain in the artillery. He was later made adjutant general of the state of Illinois. Hubert Dilger’s son, Louis Dilger, went on to work at the Heurich’s Dairy Farm.

Source: @librarycongress

156 years ago today was the end of the Civil War. Hubert Dilger believed slavery was so abhorrent that he actually obtained permission from the Duke of Baden to immigrate to the US from Germany to fight in the War. Dilger enlisted as a volunteer in the Ohio regiment, and was made a captain in the artillery. He was later made adjutant general of the state of Illinois. Hubert Dilger’s son, Louis Dilger, went on to work at the Heurich’s Dairy Farm.

Source: @librarycongress

Over the last year, we interviewed five descendants of the brewery workers from the Christian Heurich Brewing Company, w...
03/24/2021

Over the last year, we interviewed five descendants of the brewery workers from the Christian Heurich Brewing Company, which operated from 1872-1956 and was the largest non-governmental employer in the District. This work was made possible thanks to a grant from @humanities_dc in partnership with the @dcpubliclibrary and @dchistory.

Over the next few weeks we’ll share these stories with you! We hope these interviews will help us better understand  what life was like at the brewery and in DC during this time and make connections to the present.

Over the last year, we interviewed five descendants of the brewery workers from the Christian Heurich Brewing Company, which operated from 1872-1956 and was the largest non-governmental employer in the District. This work was made possible thanks to a grant from @humanities_dc in partnership with the @dcpubliclibrary and @dchistory.

Over the next few weeks we’ll share these stories with you! We hope these interviews will help us better understand  what life was like at the brewery and in DC during this time and make connections to the present.

So this happened last week. The victims: 125 year old plate glass and original wooden blinds. Will you help us fix them?...
03/23/2021

So this happened last week. The victims: 125 year old plate glass and original wooden blinds. Will you help us fix them? Donate through the link in our bio.

DC should be a state. Pass it on. #dcstatehood #51ststate #51stars
03/22/2021

DC should be a state. Pass it on. #dcstatehood #51ststate #51stars

#StopAAPIHate #StopAsianHate | “We believe that every person deserves inherent dignity, and that the equal and inalienab...
03/19/2021

#StopAAPIHate #StopAsianHate | “We believe that every person deserves inherent dignity, and that the equal and inalienable rights of all members of the human family is the foundation of freedom, justice, and peace in the world.⁣” - Universal Declaration of Human Rights, UN

Second graphic by Studio Aorta, a proudly Asian Woman owned business in Washington, DC. Studio Aorta, founded by Rina Alfonso Osawa, designs with integrity, thoughtfulness, and empathy - their work ranges from graphics, branding, branded environments, exhibits, and illustration. We had the pleasure of working with the Studio to design our exhibit “HOME/BREWED: How the Chr. Heurich Brewing Co. Witnessed DC History” in 2018.

It’s been a year since we saw our local and national community close down. Along with loss and tribulation, we have seen...
03/13/2021

It’s been a year since we saw our local and national community close down. Along with loss and tribulation, we have seen an amazing amount of togetherness. We are proud to be a part of, and a witness to, the amazing things our city and global community have accomplished together. Share a memory from the last year with us below, we want to celebrate you!

Over the last year,  we advocated for our local small business community and began unmuting historical narratives that were often left out of the Heurich story, but most importantly we were able to do this with your support. We look forward to continuing this work and having you on the journey with us.

After digging through the archives, we've identified 9 women who may have worked as governesses for the Heurich family. ...
03/08/2021

After digging through the archives, we've identified 9 women who may have worked as governesses for the Heurich family. Inge Sommerfeldt began working for the Heurich family in 1913 after emigrating from Germany. #InternationalWomensDay #IWD2021 #womeninhistory #womenshistorymonth

Photos:
1. Illustration of Inge Sommerfeldt
2. Photo of a governess and coachman with Chris Jr. and Anita Heurich

Meet Florence Scott, a black woman named who worked as a cook in the Heurich home from 1950 to 1951.Through archival res...
02/27/2021

Meet Florence Scott, a black woman named who worked as a cook in the Heurich home from 1950 to 1951.Through archival research, we believe Florence was born in Virginia around 1888.

Florence and Amelia seemed constantly at odds - In Amelia’s diaries, she claimed that Florence accused her of lying and complained about how much the staff was fed.

We’re looking at how power dynamics between staff and family shape our memory -- Florence’s voice is silenced in history.

In 1951, Florence was fired: “Now today, I was compelled to dismiss Florence Scott… Well I stood the awful loud speaking, rough person as long as I could. Florence was a person who knew everything better and did as she wanted to go where she wanted + come when she wanted.”

What would Florence’s side of the story look like? How can we unsilence her perspective without her own account?

Photos:
1951 Diary Entry in the larder where Amelia Heurich would lock up the dry goods in the house away from the staff.
1940 Census in the Kitchen where Florence would have worked.

#blackhistorymonth #bhm #blackhistory

ISO Bar Manager! We’re hiring a part-time (up to 40 hours a month) Bar Manager to join our team for our 1921 happy hours...
02/25/2021

ISO Bar Manager! We’re hiring a part-time (up to 40 hours a month) Bar Manager to join our team for our 1921 happy hours and the events as we open up over the course of the year. If the following applies to you, head to the bio to learn more and apply:

🍻Professional bartending experience
🍻Exceptional hospitality experience
🍻Passion for the local alcohol industry
🍻Either already has completed or has the ability to complete ABRA and TIPS
trainings
🍻Creative problem solver
🍻Team player and self-starter
🍻Event execution skills

ISO Bar Manager! We’re hiring a part-time (up to 40 hours a month) Bar Manager to join our team for our 1921 happy hours and the events as we open up over the course of the year. If the following applies to you, head to the bio to learn more and apply:

🍻Professional bartending experience
🍻Exceptional hospitality experience
🍻Passion for the local alcohol industry
🍻Either already has completed or has the ability to complete ABRA and TIPS
trainings
🍻Creative problem solver
🍻Team player and self-starter
🍻Event execution skills

In 1920, in the middle of Prohibition, Heurich was given special permission to sell a 6% ABV apple drink … and today you...
02/23/2021

In 1920, in the middle of Prohibition, Heurich was given special permission to sell a 6% ABV apple drink … and today you can drink the 100 year homage: Liberty Apple Cider. 🍏

Order your 4-pack or case today...and check out this interesting DC story. ⬇️

In anticipation of Prohibition coming to D.C., Christian Heurich pivoted his brewery to make a non-alcoholic apple drink, purchasing $100,000 worth of apples and pasteurizing them to prevent the juice from fermenting to alcohol. While he diluted the beverage and added a hop extract, what Heurich did not anticipate is that, contrary to beer which requires the addition of yeast, cider ferments in its own juices. After 18 months, the apple drink was about 6% ABV.

Although Prohibition was in effect, in 1920 Heurich was given special permission to sell the fermented apple drink - which he called Liberty Apple Champagne - for just three weeks. In 1933 when Prohibition was repealed, Heurich still had 60,000 gallons of Liberty Apple Champagne stored at the brewery, which were dumped and lost to time to make room for future brews.

Order now: https://the-heurich-house-museum-gift-shop.myshopify.com/

Have you ever seen details like this, we know we haven’t! Thanks to an ongoing process of preparing a Conservation Manag...
02/19/2021

Have you ever seen details like this, we know we haven’t! Thanks to an ongoing process of preparing a Conservation Management Plan, imaging was done at the house last week and we got to sneak in a few pictures of the top of the main stairwell for you all while the team was using powerful lighting!

The skylight was not only a decorative feature, but also played a key role in airflow the house! While we don’t know the original glassworker, we know it was restored in the 1980s and is not a Tiffany window - although it may look like one!⁣

Did you know the only difference between the modern Senate Beer and the historic Senate Beer is water chemistry and exti...
02/17/2021

Did you know the only difference between the modern Senate Beer and the historic Senate Beer is water chemistry and extinct yeast strains? When you drink Senate Beer in 2021 you will be drinking as close to Christian Heurich’s Senate Beer as you ever could in this lifetime. Let us know what you think after to take home a 6-pack (or case).

Order for pick-up or delivery: https://the-heurich-house-museum-gift-shop.myshopify.com/

02/17/2021

We’re exploring ways to memorialize Paul, a Black man whose story has been obscured due to archival silences. We only know Paul from Amelia Heurich’s diaries and he is never mentioned with his last name, so it’s been challenging to piece together the story of his life.  

In her 1912 diary, Amelia referred to Paul as “our old colored man,” stating that he did “the rough work” like cleaning the sidewalks and maintaining the furnace.

In 1916, Amelia wrote: “Our old colored man died this morning from appendicitis. He was taken suddenly ill last evening while we were at dinner.” Even here, she did not include his full name. #BlackHistoryMonth

Photo: Photograph of Amelia’s diary in the boiler room, where Paul would have likely worked

Meet Marie Miles, a Black woman born in Washington, DC in 1889. She worked for the Heurich family from 1927 through the ...
02/14/2021

Meet Marie Miles, a Black woman born in Washington, DC in 1889. She worked for the Heurich family from 1927 through the 1950s as a maid, and in the later years was a companion to Amelia Heurich.

According to family oral histories, Marie Miles enjoyed watching wrestling with Amelia in the reception room after the family got a television.

Marie was included in Amelia’s will: “To my faithful employee, Marie Miles, Seventy-five Dollars ($75) per month.” With inflation, $75 would be about $700 in 2021.

While we have some archival documents, photos, and the family’s details, we wish we knew about Marie’s experience from her own perspective. #BlackHistoryMonth

Photos:
1. A Black woman in the garden (likely Marie) petting a large dog
2. Marie with Amelia Heurich, Amelia Eckles, Charles King Jr., and Geoffrey Eckles in the dining room
3. An excerpt from Amelia Heurich’s will
4. Current day reception room

Meet Edward Chives, a Black man who worked for the Heurich family in 1910 as a butler. After some digging in the archive...
02/09/2021

Meet Edward Chives, a Black man who worked for the Heurich family in 1910 as a butler.

After some digging in the archives, we found that Chives was born in Spotsylvania, VA on December 25th, 1887 to a formerly enslaved man. His father, Edmund Chives, later became a “laborer” in Washington, DC.

Around the time Edward Chives worked for the Heurich family, he lived at 1611 Corcoran St NW. After working as a butler for the family, he worked as an “unskilled laborer” - it is recorded that he made 25 cents per hour in 1917.

We don’t have any photos of Edward Chives and there’s still so much information that we don’t know, including how long he worked at the house — but we hope to uncover more of his story through our ongoing research about the Heurichs’ household staff. #BlackHistoryMonth

Photos: Edward Chives’ 1917 draft registration card in the first floor butler’s pantry where he likely would have spent time while working in the home.

#bhm #blackhistory #blackhistorymonth2021 #blm

Did anyone else think drawing rooms were named that because people drew in them? 🙈We actually call them drawing rooms be...
02/08/2021

Did anyone else think drawing rooms were named that because people drew in them? 🙈
We actually call them drawing rooms because it’s where people would “withdraw” to after a long day… I wish I could “withdraw” away to a place like the Heurich House for a few days!

Meet Andrew Bell, a Black man born in Washington, DC in October 1896, who worked as a butler for the Heurich family for ...
02/06/2021

Meet Andrew Bell, a Black man born in Washington, DC in October 1896, who worked as a butler for the Heurich family for about 19 years.

In 1962, Bell walked around the Heurich House with the Washington Historical Society, which  at that time had been headquartered here since Amelia Heurich’s death in 1956. He provided an extensive account, but the recorded interview lacks information about his experience and rather focused on how the family used the home with mentions of spaces that were used by the staff.

We wish we could’ve learned about Mr. Bell’s experiences in his own words: What was an average day like? What were his relationships like with friends, family, and coworkers? How did he feel walking around the space?
Through our ongoing research, we’re questioning why these silences exist and exploring how we can further tell Andrew Bell’s story. #BlackHistoryMonth

Photos:
1: A butler in the home (believed to be Andrew Bell), Amelia Heurich, Amelia Eckles, Charles King Jr., Geoffrey Eckles.

2: Bell’s WWII 1943 Draft Registration card, which lists the Heurich House as his residence and Christian Heurich as his employer (courtesy of Ancestry.com).

3-8: Bell’s account of the Heurich home from 1962.

During a normal year, Collections Manager Allison would typically do a month-long deep-clean of the museum during Januar...
02/02/2021

During a normal year, Collections Manager Allison would typically do a month-long deep-clean of the museum during January. his year looked a little different since we haven’t had guests for a while,  and she was able to spread out her maintenance over the course of the year. Instead, this January, Allison  worked on digitizing our collections to make them more publicly accessible. Stay tuned for more - she’s halfway through the process of digitizing the entire collection! 😲

In 2020, we worked to shift our mindset about who we serve and whose stories we tell.⁣ In 2021, we will use archival res...
02/01/2021

In 2020, we worked to shift our mindset about who we serve and whose stories we tell.⁣ In 2021, we will use archival research to unmute the voices of the household staff and brewery workers. This February - #BlackHistoryMonth - we will focus on the Black workers whose lives intersected with the Heurichs’.  This research is new and evolving, but we hope you will join us as we build on and develop these initial discoveries.

Photos:
1) Marie, the maid, Amelia Heurich, Amelia Eckles, Charles King Jr., Geoffrey Eckles in the dining room
2) Black woman in garden (probably Marie, the maid) petting a large dog
3) Butler (probably Andrew Bell), Amelia Heurich, Amelia Eckles, Charles King Jr., Geoffrey Eckles in the dining room
4) Edward Chives 1917 Draft Registration Card
5) Amelia Heurich’s Will Leaving Maire, her “Faithful Employee”, $75 a month

Address

1307 New Hampshire Ave NW
Washington D.C., DC
20036

Dupont South Metro, Circulator

Opening Hours

Tuesday 11:00 - 17:00
Wednesday 11:00 - 17:00
Thursday 11:00 - 17:00

Telephone

(202) 429-1894

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Comments

Planning to visit soon. 🍺🍻
In late December 1988, several of us in Civil War uniforms or civilian attire toured the Christian Heurich house museum. Suffice it to say we were amazed and delighted not only with the beauty of the house but also by the very kind, gracious and informative staff members who guided us through the house!
aus "Freies Wort" 2017-10-23