DACOR and DACOR Bacon House Foundation

DACOR and DACOR Bacon House Foundation A community of foreign affairs professionals. Website: http://www.dacorbacon.org/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/dacortweets DACOR is a private organization for foreign affairs professionals that fosters frank dialog about current foreign policy matters; its philanthropic arm is the DACOR Bacon House Foundation which awards fellowships and maintains the historic site.
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DACOR welcomes into membership professionals in the field of foreign affairs. Virtual tour: http://vimeo.com/97895380

DACOR welcomes into membership professionals in the field of foreign affairs. Virtual tour: http://vimeo.com/97895380

Operating as usual

The answer to last week's #DBHTrivia is George Washington. Here is the full facsimile of a letter dated December 1, 1789...
04/29/2021

The answer to last week's #DBHTrivia is George Washington. Here is the full facsimile of a letter dated December 1, 1789 from George Washington to Emperor Mohammed III of Morocco. Written in his own handwriting, Washington tells the Emperor that he is now President and includes a copy of the Constitution. Washington also mentions the "Treaty of Peace and Friendship" which was signed in 1787. This Treaty is still in force, making it the longest unbroken treaty relationship in U.S. history. The relationship between the U.S. and Morocco is particularly important to our country's history since Morocco was the first country whose head of state recognized the U.S. as an independent nation. #DCHouseMuseums #TBT

The answer to last week's #DBHTrivia is George Washington. Here is the full facsimile of a letter dated December 1, 1789 from George Washington to Emperor Mohammed III of Morocco. Written in his own handwriting, Washington tells the Emperor that he is now President and includes a copy of the Constitution. Washington also mentions the "Treaty of Peace and Friendship" which was signed in 1787. This Treaty is still in force, making it the longest unbroken treaty relationship in U.S. history. The relationship between the U.S. and Morocco is particularly important to our country's history since Morocco was the first country whose head of state recognized the U.S. as an independent nation. #DCHouseMuseums #TBT

This week we return to #DBHTrivia. Can you identify the author of this letter? Below is a closeup of the start of the le...
04/22/2021

This week we return to #DBHTrivia. Can you identify the author of this letter? Below is a closeup of the start of the letter. Hint: It is addressed to the sixth ruler of the Moroccan Alaouite Dynasty and signifies a key moment in American history. #DCHouseMuseums #DBHistory

This week we return to #DBHTrivia. Can you identify the author of this letter? Below is a closeup of the start of the letter. Hint: It is addressed to the sixth ruler of the Moroccan Alaouite Dynasty and signifies a key moment in American history. #DCHouseMuseums #DBHistory

Happy Spring! Here in Washington, DC we have welcomed the beautiful time of year when everything comes to life. We hope ...
04/08/2021

Happy Spring! Here in Washington, DC we have welcomed the beautiful time of year when everything comes to life. We hope that we'll be able to welcome you back to the House sooner rather than later. In the meantime, here's a picture showcasing one of our blooming magnolia trees - the first sign that spring has sprung at DACOR Bacon House.

Happy Spring! Here in Washington, DC we have welcomed the beautiful time of year when everything comes to life. We hope that we'll be able to welcome you back to the House sooner rather than later. In the meantime, here's a picture showcasing one of our blooming magnolia trees - the first sign that spring has sprung at DACOR Bacon House.

DACOR’s program "Covering the UN and Diplomacy Worldwide” featured Dulcie Leimbach, founder of PassBlue, in an interview...
04/05/2021

DACOR’s program "Covering the UN and Diplomacy Worldwide” featured Dulcie Leimbach, founder of PassBlue, in an interview with Dr. Elizabeth “Liz” O. Colton. PassBlue is an independent, women-led journalism site that closely covers the U.S.-UN relationship, women’s issues, human rights, peacekeeping, and other urgent global matters playing out in the world body. They report from their base in the UN press corps and are read in the U.S. and overseas: London, Geneva, Paris, Berlin, Delhi, Nairobi, Johannesburg, Manila and Australia/New Zealand. Ms. Leimbach has reported from New York and overseas from West Africa (Burkina Faso, Mali and Senegal) as well as from Europe (Scotland, Sicily, Vienna, Budapest, Kyiv, Armenia and The Hague) for PassBlue and other publications. She has provided commentary on the UN for BBC World Radio, NHK's English channel and Background Briefing with Ian Masters/KPFK Radio in Los Angeles. Dr. Liz Colton’s career bridges diplomacy, journalism, and education around the world. Currently, she works as a UNITAR Professor of Diplomacy in UNITAR's&Collaborative International Universities' global online courses and also as Diplomat & Journalist in Residence at Warren Wilson College.

DACOR’s program "Covering the UN and Diplomacy Worldwide” featured Dulcie Leimbach, founder of PassBlue, in an interview with Dr. Elizabeth “Liz” O. Colton. PassBlue is an independent, women-led journalism site that closely covers the U.S.-UN relationship, women’s issues, human rights, peacekeeping, and other urgent global matters playing out in the world body. They report from their base in the UN press corps and are read in the U.S. and overseas: London, Geneva, Paris, Berlin, Delhi, Nairobi, Johannesburg, Manila and Australia/New Zealand. Ms. Leimbach has reported from New York and overseas from West Africa (Burkina Faso, Mali and Senegal) as well as from Europe (Scotland, Sicily, Vienna, Budapest, Kyiv, Armenia and The Hague) for PassBlue and other publications. She has provided commentary on the UN for BBC World Radio, NHK's English channel and Background Briefing with Ian Masters/KPFK Radio in Los Angeles. Dr. Liz Colton’s career bridges diplomacy, journalism, and education around the world. Currently, she works as a UNITAR Professor of Diplomacy in UNITAR's&Collaborative International Universities' global online courses and also as Diplomat & Journalist in Residence at Warren Wilson College.

04/01/2021

The many changes that were brought about by these women to the House aided the DACOR Bacon House to exude a sense of our nation’s early history. National Women’s History Month is a celebration of women’s contributions to history, culture and society. Sarah Thomas (neé Ringgold), Sally Sprigg Carroll, Mary Ellen Fuller, Alice Copley Thaw and Virginia Murray Bacon all contributed to this House’s rich history and style. Their individual contributions have not only produced a sense of elegance, authenticity and architectural integrity that can be felt throughout the look and the feel of the house even today but also created a center for dialogue and understanding by holding salons and other gatherings throughout the House’s existence. #DBHistory #DCHouseMuseums #WomensHistoryMonth

Before Allice Copley Thaw’s remodeling of the house, Mary Ellen Fuller, known to her friends as Mollie, became owner of ...
04/01/2021

Before Allice Copley Thaw’s remodeling of the house, Mary Ellen Fuller, known to her friends as Mollie, became owner of the house in April 13, 1896. She was the wife of Melville Weston Fuller, the sitting Chief Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court. They resided together in the home for the next fourteen years, from 1896 to 1910. They also did some of their own remodeling. When the Fullers acquired the house at 1801 F Street, they engaged the noted architects Hornblower and Marshall to enlarge and modernize it and add a four-story wing, which is still an integral part of the present-day house. The Fullers had purchased their house from the Carrolls, following Sally Sprigg Carroll’s death.

This brings us to another women who played a vital role in making the house what it is today. In 1835, Governor Samuel Sprigg bought the house for his daughter, Sally Sprigg Carroll, who resided in the home with her husband William Thomas Carroll for the next sixty years. The Carrolls were close friends to President and Mrs. Lincoln and played a prominent role in Washington power circles for nearly 50 years. Of the family’s sixty years in the house, Sally Sprigg Carroll spent the last thirty-two there as a widow. In the mid-1860s, shortly after William Carroll’s death, a major renovation was begun that shaped the house’s present appearance. The city had an initiative to level many streets in preparation for installing water and sewer systems. Therefore, on both the south and east sides the streets were lowered about seven feet. With the house foundation threatened and exterior plantings exposed, Sally Carroll felt the necessity to build the red brick, redstone-capped retaining wall that still to this day encloses the property on the sides facing 18th and F Streets. She also improved the family’s general living conditions by having the city’s newly laid water, gas, and sewer lines connected to the house.

Below we can see the four-story wing added by the Fullers and the wall added by Mrs. Carroll. #DBHistory #DCHouseMuseums #WomensHistoryMonth

As mentioned in last week's post on Thursday, the DACOR Bacon House's exterior has been changed over time from the origi...
03/25/2021

As mentioned in last week's post on Thursday, the DACOR Bacon House's exterior has been changed over time from the original designs. The House was owned by Alice Copley Thaw from 1911-1923. While Copley Thaw did not spend a lot of time living at the House, she did entertain here a lot and she rented the building to others as a residence. In addition, she renovated parts of the interior and exterior. Some of the indoor renovations included the addition of a faux-marble Georgian cornice in the dining room, the black marble surrounds and mantels on the three fireplaces in the drawing and dining rooms, and installation of the House’s first electric lighting system. On the exterior, Copley Thaw added the elaborate Georgian-style metal cornice on the roof and the matching cornice on the front portico as well as enlarging and modernizing the adjoining carriage house. Here we see a couple of the House’s distinctive design elements, courtesy of Alice Copley Thaw – the black marble fireplace and her magnificent George III Chippendale period giltwood mirror by Thomas Johnson, ca. 1760, in the dining room and the façade with its cornice along the roof and portico. Without Copley Thaw's contributions to the House, it would not have it's distinctive and impressive design elements we all love. #DBHistory #DCHouseMuseums #WomenHistoryMonth

Last week, DACOR was pleased to host an event titled, The U.S. and Europe: The View from the Danube and the Potomac with...
03/23/2021

Last week, DACOR was pleased to host an event titled, The U.S. and Europe: The View from the Danube and the Potomac with Ambassadors Raymond Ewing & Géza Jeszenszky. DACOR is an organization of American foreign affairs professionals located in Washington, DC, and Grandhouse International Club is a club where members from anywhere in the world, who are wise, honest and courageous enough to express their views in order to exert positive influence to make the world a better place located in Budapest, Hungary. Ambassadors Ewing and Jeszenszky had a dialogue on the current and future relationship of the U.S. and Europe before taking questions from the audience. Ambassador Raymond C. Ewing had a 36-year career in the Foreign Service of the U.S. Department of State which included service as Ambassador to Cyprus and to Ghana, and postings in Tokyo, Vienna (IAEA), Lahore, Rome, Bern and Dar es Salaam. In Washington, he was a Deputy Assistant Secretary in the European Bureau, Director of the Office of Southern European Affairs (Greece, Turkey, and Cyprus), Dean of the Language School at the Foreign Service Institute, Director of Foreign Service Career Development and Assignments, and had various assignments in the Bureau of Economic and Business Affairs. Ambassador Géza Jeszenszky is a professor of history and a Hungarian diplomat. He served as Hungary’s Minister for Foreign Affairs from 1990-1994, President of the Hungarian Atlantic Council from 1995-1998, Hungary’s Ambassador to the United States from 1998-2002, and Hungary’s Ambassador to Norway and Iceland from 2011-14. DACOR hopes to hold joint events with Grandhouse in the future.

Last week, DACOR was pleased to host an event titled, The U.S. and Europe: The View from the Danube and the Potomac with Ambassadors Raymond Ewing & Géza Jeszenszky. DACOR is an organization of American foreign affairs professionals located in Washington, DC, and Grandhouse International Club is a club where members from anywhere in the world, who are wise, honest and courageous enough to express their views in order to exert positive influence to make the world a better place located in Budapest, Hungary. Ambassadors Ewing and Jeszenszky had a dialogue on the current and future relationship of the U.S. and Europe before taking questions from the audience. Ambassador Raymond C. Ewing had a 36-year career in the Foreign Service of the U.S. Department of State which included service as Ambassador to Cyprus and to Ghana, and postings in Tokyo, Vienna (IAEA), Lahore, Rome, Bern and Dar es Salaam. In Washington, he was a Deputy Assistant Secretary in the European Bureau, Director of the Office of Southern European Affairs (Greece, Turkey, and Cyprus), Dean of the Language School at the Foreign Service Institute, Director of Foreign Service Career Development and Assignments, and had various assignments in the Bureau of Economic and Business Affairs. Ambassador Géza Jeszenszky is a professor of history and a Hungarian diplomat. He served as Hungary’s Minister for Foreign Affairs from 1990-1994, President of the Hungarian Atlantic Council from 1995-1998, Hungary’s Ambassador to the United States from 1998-2002, and Hungary’s Ambassador to Norway and Iceland from 2011-14. DACOR hopes to hold joint events with Grandhouse in the future.

Members and their guests joined DACOR and the USAID Alumni Association for a discussion with Dr. Gerald Hyman, titled, "...
03/23/2021

Members and their guests joined DACOR and the USAID Alumni Association for a discussion with Dr. Gerald Hyman, titled, "Democracy Promotion, Development Assistance and Foreign Policy". Dr. Gerald F. “Jerry” Hyman was (resident) Senior Advisor at the Center for Strategic and International Studies and the President of its Hills Program on Governance between 2007 and 2015. Since then he has been a non-resident senior advisor at CSIS. From 2002 to 2007, he was the director of the US Agency for International Development’s global Office of Democracy and Governance, a senior management position. He is the author of numerous articles and publications. And, he is a member of the Research Council of the National Endowment for Democracy’s International Forum for Democratic Studies.

Members and their guests joined DACOR and the USAID Alumni Association for a discussion with Dr. Gerald Hyman, titled, "Democracy Promotion, Development Assistance and Foreign Policy". Dr. Gerald F. “Jerry” Hyman was (resident) Senior Advisor at the Center for Strategic and International Studies and the President of its Hills Program on Governance between 2007 and 2015. Since then he has been a non-resident senior advisor at CSIS. From 2002 to 2007, he was the director of the US Agency for International Development’s global Office of Democracy and Governance, a senior management position. He is the author of numerous articles and publications. And, he is a member of the Research Council of the National Endowment for Democracy’s International Forum for Democratic Studies.

The DACOR Bacon House was built in 1825 primarily by enslaved people including untrained laborer's and skilled craftsmen...
03/18/2021

The DACOR Bacon House was built in 1825 primarily by enslaved people including untrained laborer's and skilled craftsmen. Here we see a conceptual drawing by Zane Carter and Katherine J. McGwier of the design before later additions which give the House it's distinctive appearance today. The 1801 F Street, NW property was sold to then U.S. marshal of the District of Columbia Tench Ringgold for around $800. However, Ringgold was not able to build a house on the property by himself due to financial issues. He had to borrow $6,000 from his daughter, Sarah. Thus, it was actually Sarah Thomas, neé Ringgold, who enabled our House to begin its long history of hosting our nation's leaders and being a center for international dialogue. #DBHistory #DCHouseMuseums #WomensHistoryMonth

The DACOR Bacon House was built in 1825 primarily by enslaved people including untrained laborer's and skilled craftsmen. Here we see a conceptual drawing by Zane Carter and Katherine J. McGwier of the design before later additions which give the House it's distinctive appearance today. The 1801 F Street, NW property was sold to then U.S. marshal of the District of Columbia Tench Ringgold for around $800. However, Ringgold was not able to build a house on the property by himself due to financial issues. He had to borrow $6,000 from his daughter, Sarah. Thus, it was actually Sarah Thomas, neé Ringgold, who enabled our House to begin its long history of hosting our nation's leaders and being a center for international dialogue. #DBHistory #DCHouseMuseums #WomensHistoryMonth

DACOR had an informative program with Dr. Ashley Tellis on "The Sino-Indian Crisis: Is India Finally Ready to Become a U...
03/15/2021

DACOR had an informative program with Dr. Ashley Tellis on "The Sino-Indian Crisis: Is India Finally Ready to Become a U.S. Ally?" Dr. Tellis described the origins and evolution of the still ongoing Sino-Indian border conflict in eastern Ladakh in his discussion. He explored whether the challenge of facing up to a threatening superpower on its doorstep will finally push India into a strategic alliance with the United States. Ashley J. Tellis holds the Tata Chair for Strategic Affairs and is a Senior Fellow at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, specializing in international security and U.S. foreign and defense policy with a special focus on Asia and the Indian subcontinent. While on assignment to the U.S. Department of State as Senior Adviser to the Undersecretary of State for Political Affairs, he was intimately involved in negotiating the civil nuclear agreement with India. Previously he was commissioned into the Foreign Service and served as Senior Adviser to the Ambassador at the U.S. Embassy in New Delhi. He also served on the National Security Council staff as Special Assistant to President George W. Bush and Senior Director for Strategic Planning and Southwest Asia.

DACOR had an informative program with Dr. Ashley Tellis on "The Sino-Indian Crisis: Is India Finally Ready to Become a U.S. Ally?" Dr. Tellis described the origins and evolution of the still ongoing Sino-Indian border conflict in eastern Ladakh in his discussion. He explored whether the challenge of facing up to a threatening superpower on its doorstep will finally push India into a strategic alliance with the United States. Ashley J. Tellis holds the Tata Chair for Strategic Affairs and is a Senior Fellow at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, specializing in international security and U.S. foreign and defense policy with a special focus on Asia and the Indian subcontinent. While on assignment to the U.S. Department of State as Senior Adviser to the Undersecretary of State for Political Affairs, he was intimately involved in negotiating the civil nuclear agreement with India. Previously he was commissioned into the Foreign Service and served as Senior Adviser to the Ambassador at the U.S. Embassy in New Delhi. He also served on the National Security Council staff as Special Assistant to President George W. Bush and Senior Director for Strategic Planning and Southwest Asia.

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1801 F St NW Fl 4
Washington D.C., DC
20006

General information

Public tours are available from 2:30-4:30 Mondays, Wednesdays, Thursdays; no reservation necessary. Members and their accompanied guests are invited to join us for weekly Member Lunches: Tuesdays: Buffet, 12:00 – 1:30, $15 Thursdays: Served two-course meal with wine, 12:30 – 1:15, $25 Bar: Opens at noon

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