National Gallery of Art

National Gallery of Art The National Gallery of Art serves the nation by welcoming all people to explore and experience art, creativity, and our shared humanity. Admission is always free.
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FREE ADMISSION

About the Gallery:
Masterworks by the most renowned European and American artists, including the only painting by Leonardo da Vinci in the Americas and the largest mobile ever created by Alexander Calder, await visitors to the National Gallery of Art, one of the world's preeminent art museums. The Gallery’s collection of paintings, drawings, prints, photographs, sculpture, medals,

FREE ADMISSION

About the Gallery:
Masterworks by the most renowned European and American artists, including the only painting by Leonardo da Vinci in the Americas and the largest mobile ever created by Alexander Calder, await visitors to the National Gallery of Art, one of the world's preeminent art museums. The Gallery’s collection of paintings, drawings, prints, photographs, sculpture, medals,

Operating as usual

Your dog greeting you at the door = someone winning the lottery   Same energy. 🐾 In honor of National Dog Day, we’re shi...
08/26/2021

Your dog greeting you at the door = someone winning the lottery

Same energy.

🐾 In honor of National Dog Day, we’re shining light on one of our favorite canines brimming with energy: Édouard Manet’s spirited dog “Tama.”

🔎 Take a close look at this 19th-century painting… Notice how Manet perfectly captures the energy in Tama’s happy face with feathery brushwork. 🖌

Manet’s loose strokes, especially on Tama’s fur, give the animal a vital liveliness, making it appear as though it might jump right out of Manet's painting. ✨

🖼 Édouard Manet, “Tama, the Japanese Dog,” 1875, oil on canvas, 24 x 19 in., Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Mellon

Your dog greeting you at the door = someone winning the lottery

Same energy.

🐾 In honor of National Dog Day, we’re shining light on one of our favorite canines brimming with energy: Édouard Manet’s spirited dog “Tama.”

🔎 Take a close look at this 19th-century painting… Notice how Manet perfectly captures the energy in Tama’s happy face with feathery brushwork. 🖌

Manet’s loose strokes, especially on Tama’s fur, give the animal a vital liveliness, making it appear as though it might jump right out of Manet's painting. ✨

🖼 Édouard Manet, “Tama, the Japanese Dog,” 1875, oil on canvas, 24 x 19 in., Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Mellon

08/25/2021
What Lies Beneath the Surface of this Vermeer?

Unlocking the secrets of Vermeer 🔎✨

See what lies beneath the surface of a Johannes Vermeer painting from 1664 with advanced imaging technology courtesy of our curators, conservators, and imaging scientists 🔬

And take an even deeper dive in a fascinating new piece on our blog by our associate senior editor, John Strand ➡️ go.usa.gov/xFeen

🖼 Johannes Vermeer, “Woman Holding a Balance,” 1664, oil on canvas, 15 5/8 x 14 in., Widener Collection

Renaissance (1400-1600), Baroque (1600-1750), or Realism (1848-1900)? Which art historical period do you prefer?····Sand...
08/24/2021

Renaissance (1400-1600), Baroque (1600-1750), or Realism (1848-1900)?

Which art historical period do you prefer?
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Sandro Botticelli, “The Adoration of the Magi,” 1478/1482, tempera and oil on poplar panel, 26 x 40 in., Andrew W. Mellon Collection

Sir Peter Paul Rubens, “The Fall of Phaeton,” 1604/1605, probably reworked 1606/1608, oil on canvas, 38 x 51 in., Patrons' Permanent Fund

Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot, “The Island and Bridge of San Bartolomeo, Rome,” 1825/1828, oil on paper on canvas, 10 x 17 in., Patrons' Permanent Fund

“Woman with a Parasol” by Claude Monet. That’s it. That’s the post.🖼 Claude Monet, “Woman with a Parasol - Madame Monet ...
08/23/2021

“Woman with a Parasol” by Claude Monet.

That’s it. That’s the post.

🖼 Claude Monet, “Woman with a Parasol - Madame Monet and Her Son,” 1875, oil on canvas, 39 x 31 in., Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Mellon

“Woman with a Parasol” by Claude Monet.

That’s it. That’s the post.

🖼 Claude Monet, “Woman with a Parasol - Madame Monet and Her Son,” 1875, oil on canvas, 39 x 31 in., Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Mellon

At the National Gallery, the Center community works every day to investigate and deconstruct the history and practice of...
08/23/2021
Announcing Fellowship Deadlines

At the National Gallery, the Center community works every day to investigate and deconstruct the history and practice of art — from the examination of film to the study of architecture. 🏛

And now, you too can be a part of this growing research institute. Apply to join the team ➡️ bit.ly/3mnKdNd

Our Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts is now accepting applications for several fellowships for 2022–2023, which include residency at the National Gallery. ✨ The first deadline to apply is September 21!

The Center announces its program for senior fellowships, visiting senior fellowships, and postdoctoral fellowships. Fellowships are awarded without regard to age or nationality of applicants. Through its fellowship programs, the Center seeks a diverse pool of applicants in the visual arts and especi...

1, 2, 3, or 4? American artist edition 🖌 Tell us about your taste in art without telling us.____ Thomas Cole, “Italian C...
08/22/2021

1, 2, 3, or 4?

American artist edition 🖌

Tell us about your taste in art without telling us.
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Thomas Cole, “Italian Coast Scene with Ruined Tower,” 1838, oil on canvas, 34 x 46 in., Gift of The Circle of the National Gallery of Art

John La Farge, “Flowers on a Window Ledge,” 1861, oil on canvas, 24 3/16 × 20 1/16 in., Corcoran Collection

Archibald John Motley Jr., “Portrait of My Grandmother,” 1922, oil on canvas, 38 1/4 × 23 3/4 in., Patrons' Permanent Fund, Avalon Fund, and Motley Fund

Lee Krasner, “Imperative,” 1976, oil, charcoal and paper on canvas, 50 x 50 in., Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Victor Thaw

“I feel that there is nothing more truly artistic than to love people.” — Vincent van Gogh➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖The sensational ...
08/21/2021

“I feel that there is nothing more truly artistic than to love people.” — Vincent van Gogh
➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖

The sensational aspects of Van Gogh's life and su***de often cloud the intention and deliberation behind his highly charged and expressive style.

In a letter to his brother Theo he described how this painting consumed his attention: "It took me a whole week...but I had to reserve my mental energy to do ‘La Mousmé’ well." This name, he explained, came from a character in a popular novel set in Japan.

🔎 The subject’s costume is a contrast of patterns and complementary shades of blue and orange. The paint in these bold stripes and irregular dots stands out against the pale green lattice of vertical and horizontal brushstrokes in the background…🖌 The vigorous patterns express Van Gogh's sympathetic response to his sitter, whose face is carefully modeled and finished to a greater degree than other parts of his picture. ✨

🖼 Vincent van Gogh, “La Mousmé,” 1888, oil on canvas, 28 x 23 in., Chester Dale Collection

“I feel that there is nothing more truly artistic than to love people.” — Vincent van Gogh
➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖

The sensational aspects of Van Gogh's life and su***de often cloud the intention and deliberation behind his highly charged and expressive style.

In a letter to his brother Theo he described how this painting consumed his attention: "It took me a whole week...but I had to reserve my mental energy to do ‘La Mousmé’ well." This name, he explained, came from a character in a popular novel set in Japan.

🔎 The subject’s costume is a contrast of patterns and complementary shades of blue and orange. The paint in these bold stripes and irregular dots stands out against the pale green lattice of vertical and horizontal brushstrokes in the background…🖌 The vigorous patterns express Van Gogh's sympathetic response to his sitter, whose face is carefully modeled and finished to a greater degree than other parts of his picture. ✨

🖼 Vincent van Gogh, “La Mousmé,” 1888, oil on canvas, 28 x 23 in., Chester Dale Collection

Which renowned Italian artist painted this famous expressionist portrait? ✨ Bonus points for answering this: what is the...
08/20/2021

Which renowned Italian artist painted this famous expressionist portrait? ✨

Bonus points for answering this: what is the title of this iconic work of art? #ArtJeopardy

Uncover the answer ➡️go.usa.gov/xFA4M

Which renowned Italian artist painted this famous expressionist portrait? ✨

Bonus points for answering this: what is the title of this iconic work of art? #ArtJeopardy

Uncover the answer ➡️go.usa.gov/xFA4M

What do you think is happening in this painting? 🤔 Drop a comment with your guess. Then scroll down for the answer ⬇️···...
08/19/2021

What do you think is happening in this painting? 🤔

Drop a comment with your guess. Then scroll down for the answer ⬇️
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When “Watson and the Shark” was first exhibited in London in 1778, it was a sensation. Audiences were astounded by such a grisly subject: the image was an absolute novelty.

In 1749, 14-year-old Brook Watson had been attacked by a shark while swimming in Havana Harbor. John Singleton Copley's pictorial account of the traumatic ordeal shows nine men rushing to help the boy, while the bloody water proves he has just lost his right foot. What’s more, Copley, who had never visited the Caribbean, consulted maps and prints of Cuba to make the setting in Havana Harbor more believable.

Time stands still as the viewer is forced to ponder Watson's fate. But did you know that the actual Watson was miraculously saved from almost certain death and went on to become a successful British merchant and politician?

Take an even deeper dive to learn more about this heart-pumping work of art ➡️ go.usa.gov/xF7XR

🖼 John Singleton Copley, ”Watson and the Shark,” 1778, oil on canvas, 71 x 90 in., Ferdinand Lammot Belin Fund

What do you think is happening in this painting? 🤔

Drop a comment with your guess. Then scroll down for the answer ⬇️
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·
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When “Watson and the Shark” was first exhibited in London in 1778, it was a sensation. Audiences were astounded by such a grisly subject: the image was an absolute novelty.

In 1749, 14-year-old Brook Watson had been attacked by a shark while swimming in Havana Harbor. John Singleton Copley's pictorial account of the traumatic ordeal shows nine men rushing to help the boy, while the bloody water proves he has just lost his right foot. What’s more, Copley, who had never visited the Caribbean, consulted maps and prints of Cuba to make the setting in Havana Harbor more believable.

Time stands still as the viewer is forced to ponder Watson's fate. But did you know that the actual Watson was miraculously saved from almost certain death and went on to become a successful British merchant and politician?

Take an even deeper dive to learn more about this heart-pumping work of art ➡️ go.usa.gov/xF7XR

🖼 John Singleton Copley, ”Watson and the Shark,” 1778, oil on canvas, 71 x 90 in., Ferdinand Lammot Belin Fund

Marine paintings by Winslow Homer: a mood board 🌊   Did you know that Winslow Homer began his artistic career by working...
08/18/2021

Marine paintings by Winslow Homer: a mood board 🌊

Did you know that Winslow Homer began his artistic career by working as an illustrator at Harper's Weekly? And while working at Harper’s, Homer created and exhibited paintings on the side and had ambitions of becoming a professional oil painter 🖌

In the summer of 1873, Harper’s suggested to Homer that he might find great subject matter in the coastal towns of New England. Homer chose Gloucester, Massachusetts, for his first sustained stay on the coast. He would be drawn to coastal towns repeatedly, including Prouts Neck, Maine, where he lived from 1883. The sea in its many moods inspired Homer to create many of the works we know and love today.
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Winslow Homer, “A Light on the Sea,” 1897, oil on canvas, 28 3/16 × 48 1/8 in., Corcoran Collection

Winslow Homer, “Right and Left,” 1909, oil on canvas, 28 x 48 in., Gift of the Avalon Foundation

Winslow Homer, “The Flirt,” 1874, oil on wood, 8 × 12 in., Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Mellon

Winslow Homer, “East Hampton Beach, Long Island,” 1874, oil on canvas, 10 × 21 in., Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Mellon

08/18/2021
New Exhibit Coming to the National Gallery of Art

“Into Bondage” is a depiction of African people captured into slavery, bound for the Americas, as a central figure gazes toward the sky, conveying a sense of hope. Aaron Douglas, one of the most accomplished and influential visual artists of the Harlem Renaissance, created this painting in 1936 for the “Hall of Negro Life” at the Texas Centennial Exposition, the first recognition of Black culture at a world’s fair.

🆕 Coming to the National Gallery this Spring: "Afro-Atlantic Histories," a new exhibition that visually explores the impact and legacy of the African Diaspora across four continents through works of art from the 17th to 21st centuries, including Douglas’s “Into Bondage.”

Stay tuned for more information about this unprecedented exhibition opening April 10, 2022, at the National Gallery, and get a sneak peek when it debuts at The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston on October 24.

"Afro-Atlantic Histories" is co-organized by the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, and the MASP - Museu de Arte de São Paulo Assis Chateaubriand in collaboration with the National Gallery of Art. Major support for this exhibition is provided by the Ford Foundation.

🖼 Aaron Douglas, “Into Bondage,” 1936, oil on canvas, 48 × 36 in., Corcoran Collection (Museum Purchase and partial gift from Thurlow Evans Tibbs, Jr., The Evans-Tibbs Collection), © 2021 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Camille Pissarro charted a new path for the art world with his boundary-pushing landscapes and still lifes 🖌 #TakeAClose...
08/17/2021

Camille Pissarro charted a new path for the art world with his boundary-pushing landscapes and still lifes 🖌

#TakeACloserLook 🔎 — Pissarro came to paint urban landscapes only late in his career after eye problems prevented him from working outdoors. He rented rooms that afforded him views into the streets of Rouen, Paris, and other cities. He set up a number of easels to work simultaneously on different canvases as light and weather conditions changed. This is one of twenty–eight views he painted of the Tuileries Gardens from a hotel room in the rue de Rivoli.

With this sidelong view, dappled with shade and interrupted on all sides of the picture frame, Pissarro’s composition captures the restless activity of the busy city. His quick brushwork seems to mimic the action it depicts. Notice the wheels of the carriages and buggies, where scoured circles of paint trace motion. With the movement of his brush, Pissarro does not simply paint but reenacts the wheels’ rolling progress. This painting, done more than a quarter century after the first impressionist exhibition, still has the same fresh energy of those early impressionist works.

🖼 Camille Pissarro, “Place du Carrousel, Paris,” 1900, oil on canvas, 21 x 25 in., Ailsa Mellon Bruce Collection

Camille Pissarro charted a new path for the art world with his boundary-pushing landscapes and still lifes 🖌

#TakeACloserLook 🔎 — Pissarro came to paint urban landscapes only late in his career after eye problems prevented him from working outdoors. He rented rooms that afforded him views into the streets of Rouen, Paris, and other cities. He set up a number of easels to work simultaneously on different canvases as light and weather conditions changed. This is one of twenty–eight views he painted of the Tuileries Gardens from a hotel room in the rue de Rivoli.

With this sidelong view, dappled with shade and interrupted on all sides of the picture frame, Pissarro’s composition captures the restless activity of the busy city. His quick brushwork seems to mimic the action it depicts. Notice the wheels of the carriages and buggies, where scoured circles of paint trace motion. With the movement of his brush, Pissarro does not simply paint but reenacts the wheels’ rolling progress. This painting, done more than a quarter century after the first impressionist exhibition, still has the same fresh energy of those early impressionist works.

🖼 Camille Pissarro, “Place du Carrousel, Paris,” 1900, oil on canvas, 21 x 25 in., Ailsa Mellon Bruce Collection

“It is not enough to know your craft. You have to have feeling.” — Édouard Manet Manet is known overwhelmingly for his p...
08/16/2021

“It is not enough to know your craft. You have to have feeling.” — Édouard Manet

Manet is known overwhelmingly for his paintings of people, but he called still life "the touchstone of painting.” And what most attracts people today about these works is their bold style. ✨

Sudden transitions of color—not a gradual modulation of tone—give shape to the objects. Each brushstroke stands independently. They rivet attention on the canvas surface, on the painting itself. The simple tabletop assemblage does not point, either, to any meaning outside itself. Manet's arrangement stands on its own terms, without allegorical allusions—common in earlier still lifes—to abundance or the transitory nature of life. Although his work harkens back to Dutch banquet pictures from the seventeenth century, it has a distinctly modern feel.

Take a deeper dive into the world of Manet ➡️ go.usa.gov/xFve6

🖼 Édouard Manet, “Still Life with Melon and Peaches,” 1866, oil on canvas, 26 x 35 in., Gift of Eugene and Agnes E. Meyer

“It is not enough to know your craft. You have to have feeling.” — Édouard Manet

Manet is known overwhelmingly for his paintings of people, but he called still life "the touchstone of painting.” And what most attracts people today about these works is their bold style. ✨

Sudden transitions of color—not a gradual modulation of tone—give shape to the objects. Each brushstroke stands independently. They rivet attention on the canvas surface, on the painting itself. The simple tabletop assemblage does not point, either, to any meaning outside itself. Manet's arrangement stands on its own terms, without allegorical allusions—common in earlier still lifes—to abundance or the transitory nature of life. Although his work harkens back to Dutch banquet pictures from the seventeenth century, it has a distinctly modern feel.

Take a deeper dive into the world of Manet ➡️ go.usa.gov/xFve6

🖼 Édouard Manet, “Still Life with Melon and Peaches,” 1866, oil on canvas, 26 x 35 in., Gift of Eugene and Agnes E. Meyer

08/16/2021
Alma Thomas Community Celebration

Everything is beautiful. This is how artist Alma Thomas viewed the world.

The National Gallery of Art is proud to honor the life and work of this pioneering artist and Washingtonian through a citywide celebration coming this September. 🎊

And starting September 22, we’re kicking things off with our John Wilmerding Symposium on American Art ✨ In partnership with arts and educational institutions across DC, the symposium will honor the lifelong creative practice and legacy of Alma with an emphasis on Washington history. 🖌

Learn more about Wilmerding and the other outstanding events to come next month ➡️ go.usa.gov/xFvkJ

And in the meantime, visit AlmaThomasDC.org for more details and let us know how you #FindBeautyInTheEveryday
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In proud partnership with The Phillips Collection, American University, Howard University, DC Public Library, Smithsonian American Art Museum and the Renwick Gallery, National Museum of Women in the Arts, The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, Destination DC, and Visit Washington DC.

Address

6th And Constitution Ave NW
Washington D.C., DC
20565

Metro: Judiciary Square (Red Line), Archives-Navy Memorial-Penn Quarter (Yellow/Green Lines), Smithsonian (Blue/Orange Lines) Metrobus: 4th Street and 7th Street NW DC Circulator: 4th Street and Madison Drive and 7th Street and Constitution Avenue NW

Opening Hours

Monday 11am - 4pm
Tuesday 11am - 4pm
Wednesday 11am - 4pm
Thursday 11am - 4pm
Friday 11am - 4pm
Saturday 11am - 4pm
Sunday 11am - 4pm

Telephone

(202) 737-4215

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