National Gallery of Art

National Gallery of Art The National Gallery of Art serves the nation by welcoming all people to explore and experience art, creativity, and our shared humanity. Admission is always free.
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FREE ADMISSION

About the Gallery:
Masterworks by the most renowned European and American artists, including the only painting by Leonardo da Vinci in the Americas and the largest mobile ever created by Alexander Calder, await visitors to the National Gallery of Art, one of the world's preeminent art museums. The Gallery’s collection of paintings, drawings, prints, photographs, sculpture, medals, and decorative arts traces the development of Western art from the Middle Ages to the present. Open to the public free of charge, the Gallery was created for the people of the United States of America by a joint resolution of Congress accepting the gift of Andrew W. Mellon in 1937. The Gallery’s campus includes the original neoclassical West Building designed by John Russell Pope, which is linked underground to the modern East Building designed by I.M. Pei, and the verdant 6.1-acre Sculpture Garden. Temporary special exhibitions spanning the world and the history of art are presented frequently.

Operating as usual

What’s a painting that always puts you in a good mood? We’ll go first: “Landscape at Les Pâtis, Pontoise” by Camille Pis...
05/06/2021

What’s a painting that always puts you in a good mood?

We’ll go first: “Landscape at Les Pâtis, Pontoise” by Camille Pissarro

🖼 Camille Pissarro, “Landscape at Les Pâtis, Pontoise,” 1868, oil on canvas, 31 7/8 x 39 3/8 in., Gift of Mr. and Mrs. David Rockefeller

What’s a painting that always puts you in a good mood?

We’ll go first: “Landscape at Les Pâtis, Pontoise” by Camille Pissarro

🖼 Camille Pissarro, “Landscape at Les Pâtis, Pontoise,” 1868, oil on canvas, 31 7/8 x 39 3/8 in., Gift of Mr. and Mrs. David Rockefeller

05/05/2021
“Ommah” by Nam June Paik

Ever wonder where video sculpture originated? 🤔

This modern art form was invented by none other than artist Nam June Paik in the early 1960s 📺✨

Paik was a pioneer in performance and technology-based art. He was the first artist to show abstract forms on a television, using a magnet to distort the image (in 1963), and the first to use a small portable video camera (in 1965).

In 2005, Paik created “Ommah” (Korean for “mother”) as a moving summary and look back at his long, winding career: 🔎 A traditional silk robe for a child hangs over an LCD TV monitor which shows a looping video of three Korean American girls in traditional dress dancing and playing. The background of the video shows close-up views of early video games, footage from TV shows, as well as material from “Global Groove,” a video Paik made for WNET-TV in 1974. 🎮

Learn more about the work of this innovative artist on our podcast, Sound Thoughts on Art, in an episode featuring electroacoustic composer Bora Yoon ➡️ apple.co/2PWbgBE

🖼 Nam June Paik, “Ommah,” 2005, one-channel video installation on 19-inch LCD monitor, silk robe, Gift of the Collectors Committee

Paintings by Georges Seurat from the 1880s🖌Seurat lived in the bustling city of Paris, yet he preferred to depict scenes...
05/04/2021

Paintings by Georges Seurat from the 1880s🖌

Seurat lived in the bustling city of Paris, yet he preferred to depict scenes of calm and leisure. 🙏

Take an even closer look at these striking works…notice the tiny strokes and small dots of paint placed side by side… Seurat was very interested in color and light, and how artists could make paintings appear to shimmer or sparkle.

🖼Georges Seurat, “Bathers (Study for ‘Bathers at Asnières’),” 1883/1884, oil on wood, Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Mellon

🖼Georges Seurat, “Haystacks,” 1882, oil on wood, 6 1/4 × 9 3/4 in., Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Mellon

🖼Georges Seurat, “Horse and Boats (Study for ‘Bathers at Asnières’),” 1883/1884, oil on wood, 6 1/4 × 9 7/8 in., Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Mellon

🖼Georges Seurat, “The Lighthouse at Honfleur,” 1886, oil on canvas, 26 1/4 x 32 1/4 in., Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Mellon

The look when your kids wake you up before your alarm rings…⏰ Known for her perceptive depictions of women and children,...
05/03/2021

The look when your kids wake you up before your alarm rings…⏰

Known for her perceptive depictions of women and children, Mary Cassatt was one of the few American artists active in the 19th-century French avant-garde.

During her long residence in France, Cassatt sent paintings back to exhibitions in the United States—hers were among the first impressionist works seen in this country. By advising wealthy American patrons on acquisitions, she also played a crucial role in forming some of the most important collections of impressionist art in America.🖌

Discover more works by Mary Cassatt ➡️ go.usa.gov/xHUvd

🖼 Mary Cassatt, “Woman with a Fan,” 1878/1879, oil on canvas, 33 x 25 in., Chester Dale Collection

The look when your kids wake you up before your alarm rings…⏰

Known for her perceptive depictions of women and children, Mary Cassatt was one of the few American artists active in the 19th-century French avant-garde.

During her long residence in France, Cassatt sent paintings back to exhibitions in the United States—hers were among the first impressionist works seen in this country. By advising wealthy American patrons on acquisitions, she also played a crucial role in forming some of the most important collections of impressionist art in America.🖌

Discover more works by Mary Cassatt ➡️ go.usa.gov/xHUvd

🖼 Mary Cassatt, “Woman with a Fan,” 1878/1879, oil on canvas, 33 x 25 in., Chester Dale Collection

05/02/2021
Reversal: A. W. Mellon Lecture

“It was the best of times, it was the worst of times…”

One of the sources of inspiration for Glenn Ligon’s electrifying neon sculpture was Charles Dickens’ “A Tale of Two Cities,” specifically its opening lines dripping with double meaning.

According to Harvard University professor Jennifer L. Roberts, to reverse something is either to validate it or to expose its weaknesses…to prove it or to uncover another meaning. Just like Ligon’s work, every pre-digital print process produces some form of reversal — in fact, the entire history of printing is based on the reversal of information.

Learn more about this fascinating concept in an excerpt of today’s new A. W. Mellon Lecture, “Reversal,” and watch the full video on nga.gov ➡️ go.usa.gov/xHmZZ

🖼Glenn Ligon, “Double America 2,” 2014, neon and paint, 48 x 145 x 3 inches, edition of 3 and 2 APs © Glenn Ligon; courtesy of the artist, Hauser & Wirth, New York, Regen Projects, Los Angeles, Thomas Dane Gallery, London and Chantal Crousel, Paris

You never know what you’ll find when you get lost among our modern sculptures…you may stumble upon a budding eastern blu...
05/01/2021

You never know what you’ll find when you get lost among our modern sculptures…you may stumble upon a budding eastern bluestar, or you might discover a sea of cherry laurel that takes your breath away.

🌷🌻Come frolic with us through our vibrant Sculpture Garden, open every day from 11:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., with no passes required. Read our visitor guidelines before you visit: go.usa.gov/x7YAq

📸s by National Gallery gardener Charles Bauduy

The energetic brushwork…the thick, textured surface… 🔎 Take a close look at Vincent van Gogh’s 1890 masterpiece, “Green ...
04/30/2021

The energetic brushwork…the thick, textured surface… 🔎 Take a close look at Vincent van Gogh’s 1890 masterpiece, “Green Wheat Fields, Auvers” ✨

In “Green Wheat Fields, Auvers,” Van Gogh's vibrant strokes describe the movement of grassy stalks in the breeze and the patterned undulations of large white and blue clouds swirling above the hills...☁️The artist wrote of his return to northern France as a kind of homecoming, a peaceful restoration of his mental state in which the vibrant, hot colors of the south were replaced by cool, gentle hues in green and blue.

Take an even closer look at this magnificent work of art ➡️ go.usa.gov/xHUf3

🖼 Vincent van Gogh, “Green Wheat Fields, Auvers,” 1890, oil on canvas, 28 × 36 in., Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Mellon

The energetic brushwork…the thick, textured surface… 🔎 Take a close look at Vincent van Gogh’s 1890 masterpiece, “Green Wheat Fields, Auvers” ✨

In “Green Wheat Fields, Auvers,” Van Gogh's vibrant strokes describe the movement of grassy stalks in the breeze and the patterned undulations of large white and blue clouds swirling above the hills...☁️The artist wrote of his return to northern France as a kind of homecoming, a peaceful restoration of his mental state in which the vibrant, hot colors of the south were replaced by cool, gentle hues in green and blue.

Take an even closer look at this magnificent work of art ➡️ go.usa.gov/xHUf3

🖼 Vincent van Gogh, “Green Wheat Fields, Auvers,” 1890, oil on canvas, 28 × 36 in., Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Mellon

Here’s to those who dare to let their imagination run off the page. 📖This 1769 painting by Jean Honoré Fragonard gets re...
04/29/2021

Here’s to those who dare to let their imagination run off the page. 📖This 1769 painting by Jean Honoré Fragonard gets reimagined through a modern lens — proof that you’re never too old to play dress up. ✌️✨

Is there a work of art that inspires you? Show us your costume design skills ➡️ #ArtReimagined

📸 by @matchwithart

🖼 Jean Honoré Fragonard, “Young Girl Reading,” 1769, oil on canvas, 31 x 25 in., Gift of Mrs. Mellon Bruce in memory of her father, Andrew W. Mellon

Here’s to those who dare to let their imagination run off the page. 📖This 1769 painting by Jean Honoré Fragonard gets reimagined through a modern lens — proof that you’re never too old to play dress up. ✌️✨

Is there a work of art that inspires you? Show us your costume design skills ➡️ #ArtReimagined

📸 by @matchwithart

🖼 Jean Honoré Fragonard, “Young Girl Reading,” 1769, oil on canvas, 31 x 25 in., Gift of Mrs. Mellon Bruce in memory of her father, Andrew W. Mellon

Which 19th-century painter created this masterpiece? 🤔#ArtJeopardyDrop a comment with your guess ⬇️Are you an art histor...
04/28/2021

Which 19th-century painter created this masterpiece? 🤔#ArtJeopardy

Drop a comment with your guess ⬇️

Are you an art history aficionado? 🔎 See if you’ve answered correctly: go.usa.gov/xHPqb

Which 19th-century painter created this masterpiece? 🤔#ArtJeopardy

Drop a comment with your guess ⬇️

Are you an art history aficionado? 🔎 See if you’ve answered correctly: go.usa.gov/xHPqb

Earlier this year, the National Gallery of Art acquired a new work by Christopher Myers that addresses the experiences o...
04/27/2021

Earlier this year, the National Gallery of Art acquired a new work by Christopher Myers that addresses the experiences of people of color around the world.

Inspired by the Black Lives Matter movement, “What Does It Mean to Matter (Community Autopsy)” memorializes the men and women who have died at the hands of police violence.

About his work, Myers says: “I wonder what can be done to tell our young people that they matter, before they are inscribed in a coroner’s report? The image of the autopsy sheet marked by a coroner has become central to the imagery and conversations of Black Lives Matter. Included in the piece are the autopsies of Laquan McDonald, Sandra Bland, Tamir Rice, Michael Brown Jr., Antwon Rose Jr., Miriam Carey, Emantic Fitzgerald Bradford Jr., Ezell Ford, and Jordan Edwards.”

Take a closer look and learn more about this new acquisition ➡️ go.usa.gov/xHnhE

🖼 Christopher Myers, “What Does It Mean to Matter (Community Autopsy),” 2019, cotton appliquéd on furnishing and specialty fabrics, Purchased as the Gift of Glenstone Foundation, Courtesy of the artist and Fort Gansevoort

Earlier this year, the National Gallery of Art acquired a new work by Christopher Myers that addresses the experiences of people of color around the world.

Inspired by the Black Lives Matter movement, “What Does It Mean to Matter (Community Autopsy)” memorializes the men and women who have died at the hands of police violence.

About his work, Myers says: “I wonder what can be done to tell our young people that they matter, before they are inscribed in a coroner’s report? The image of the autopsy sheet marked by a coroner has become central to the imagery and conversations of Black Lives Matter. Included in the piece are the autopsies of Laquan McDonald, Sandra Bland, Tamir Rice, Michael Brown Jr., Antwon Rose Jr., Miriam Carey, Emantic Fitzgerald Bradford Jr., Ezell Ford, and Jordan Edwards.”

Take a closer look and learn more about this new acquisition ➡️ go.usa.gov/xHnhE

🖼 Christopher Myers, “What Does It Mean to Matter (Community Autopsy),” 2019, cotton appliquéd on furnishing and specialty fabrics, Purchased as the Gift of Glenstone Foundation, Courtesy of the artist and Fort Gansevoort

04/27/2021
Museum Meditation

Art can be healing…especially when paired with a relaxing meditation 🧘🏾🧘🏽🧘🏼

Take a break from doom scrolling and enjoy this much-needed calming, guided escape…*ahhh*

Transport your mind to the quiet, secluded Holland coast that is Rembrandt’s “The Mill.” Explore the rich, masterfully composed scene in a new way while centering yourself and soothing your mind. Just in time for #NationalMeditationMonth ✨

Get the full experience on our YouTube channel ➡️ bit.ly/32Na327

🖼Rembrandt van Rijn, “The Mill,” 1645/1648, oil on canvas, 34 x 41 in., Widener Collection

Opened in 1978, the National Gallery of Art’s East Building was designed by the legendary architect I. M. Pei, who was b...
04/26/2021

Opened in 1978, the National Gallery of Art’s East Building was designed by the legendary architect I. M. Pei, who was born on this day in 1917 ✨

In this newly acquired work, “Portrait of I. M. Pei” (1996), artist Richard Estes honors Pei and his contribution to the Nation. The painting will be on view in the East Building Study Center—the space where Pei is depicted standing—when it reopens (stay tuned for a specific date!).

🖼Richard Estes, “Portrait of I. M. Pei,” 1996, oil on canvas, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Gift of Ian M. and Annette P. Cumming

Opened in 1978, the National Gallery of Art’s East Building was designed by the legendary architect I. M. Pei, who was born on this day in 1917 ✨

In this newly acquired work, “Portrait of I. M. Pei” (1996), artist Richard Estes honors Pei and his contribution to the Nation. The painting will be on view in the East Building Study Center—the space where Pei is depicted standing—when it reopens (stay tuned for a specific date!).

🖼Richard Estes, “Portrait of I. M. Pei,” 1996, oil on canvas, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Gift of Ian M. and Annette P. Cumming

04/25/2021
A. W. Mellon Lectures

How to print like Jasper Johns? Start by imagining that a print is a window into an artist’s intimate relationship with their work.

If you find the printmaking process to be as fascinating as we do, join Harvard professor Jennifer L. Roberts in a deep dive into the world of print, peeling back the curtain on a process more thrilling than meets the eye.

The 70th A. W. Mellon Lectures in the Fine Arts start today! The first of six lectures, “Pressure,” is now available.

Watch the full video ➡️ go.usa.gov/xH8TZ

“I seek a form of language which will express my ideas for our time” ― Arshile Gorky Sometimes a profound, unknown truth...
04/24/2021

“I seek a form of language which will express my ideas for our time” ― Arshile Gorky

Sometimes a profound, unknown truth is best communicated through paint.🖌

Arshile Gorky, born Vostanik Manoug Adoian, was a survivor of the systemic mass extermination of 1.5 million Armenians by the Ottoman government between 1914 and 1923. He fled to the United States with his sister a year after he watched his mother, Shushan, die from starvation in 1919.

When he arrived in New York, his father gave him the only remaining family photograph he had, upon which this painting and another version owned by the @WhitneyMuseum are based. Gorky labored over both paintings for many years, especially on the intricate details throughout including the rendering of the hands.

Learn more and take a closer look at this remarkable work ➡️ go.usa.gov/xHKFE

🖼Arshile Gorky, “The Artist and His Mother,” 1926–c. 1942, oil on canvas, 59 15/16 x 50 in., Ailsa Mellon Bruce Fund © 1997 The Estate of Arshile Gorky / Artists Rights Society (ARS)

“I seek a form of language which will express my ideas for our time” ― Arshile Gorky

Sometimes a profound, unknown truth is best communicated through paint.🖌

Arshile Gorky, born Vostanik Manoug Adoian, was a survivor of the systemic mass extermination of 1.5 million Armenians by the Ottoman government between 1914 and 1923. He fled to the United States with his sister a year after he watched his mother, Shushan, die from starvation in 1919.

When he arrived in New York, his father gave him the only remaining family photograph he had, upon which this painting and another version owned by the @WhitneyMuseum are based. Gorky labored over both paintings for many years, especially on the intricate details throughout including the rendering of the hands.

Learn more and take a closer look at this remarkable work ➡️ go.usa.gov/xHKFE

🖼Arshile Gorky, “The Artist and His Mother,” 1926–c. 1942, oil on canvas, 59 15/16 x 50 in., Ailsa Mellon Bruce Fund © 1997 The Estate of Arshile Gorky / Artists Rights Society (ARS)

Do you miss this view? Well, it misses you too. And that’s why the National Gallery of Art is thrilled to announce that ...
04/23/2021

Do you miss this view? Well, it misses you too.

And that’s why the National Gallery of Art is thrilled to announce that we will reopen our West Building to the public on May 14. 💛✨

That’s right! Our daily hours will be from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. and timed passes will be required (capacity is limited to allow for social distancing). All previous health and safety guidelines will be in place—including requirements for masks and social distancing. Free, timed passes will become available each Monday at 10 a.m. for the following week, starting May 10.

The 6th Street entrance will once again serve as the only entrance into the West Building; all other exits will be open.

See you then✌️ And in the meantime, learn more about this exciting news ➡️ nga.gov/reopening

📸 by @jlphotographic

Do you miss this view? Well, it misses you too.

And that’s why the National Gallery of Art is thrilled to announce that we will reopen our West Building to the public on May 14. 💛✨

That’s right! Our daily hours will be from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. and timed passes will be required (capacity is limited to allow for social distancing). All previous health and safety guidelines will be in place—including requirements for masks and social distancing. Free, timed passes will become available each Monday at 10 a.m. for the following week, starting May 10.

The 6th Street entrance will once again serve as the only entrance into the West Building; all other exits will be open.

See you then✌️ And in the meantime, learn more about this exciting news ➡️ nga.gov/reopening

📸 by @jlphotographic

Address

6th And Constitution Ave NW
Washington D.C., DC
20565

Metro: Judiciary Square (Red Line), Archives-Navy Memorial-Penn Quarter (Yellow/Green Lines), Smithsonian (Blue/Orange Lines) Metrobus: 4th Street and 7th Street NW DC Circulator: 4th Street and Madison Drive and 7th Street and Constitution Avenue NW

Opening Hours

Monday 11:00 - 16:00
Tuesday 11:00 - 16:00
Wednesday 11:00 - 16:00
Thursday 11:00 - 16:00
Friday 11:00 - 16:00
Saturday 11:00 - 16:00
Sunday 11:00 - 16:00

Telephone

(202) 737-4215

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