Warner Historical Society

Warner Historical Society Warner Historical Society 15 West Main Street 456-2437 [email protected] www.warnerhistorical.org Upton Chandler House Museum 10 West Main Street 456-2461 Barn Sale Tuesdays 1:00 - 4:00 p.m.
(2)

Saturdays 9:00-12:00 p.m.

Operating as usual

The Barn Sale will be open today 9am-1pm! Masks are required.
10/03/2020

The Barn Sale will be open today 9am-1pm! Masks are required.

Check out our railroad scavenger hunt.  Can be done outdoors and/or online, whatever is best for your family.  Everyone ...
10/02/2020

Check out our railroad scavenger hunt. Can be done outdoors and/or online, whatever is best for your family. Everyone who completes the quiz will receive a railroad calendar. Grand prize is the game Ticket to Ride. Drawing is December 5 - so start hunting for those old stations! https://sites.google.com/view/warner-trains

Come on down this Saturday! 🍁🍂🍃
09/29/2020

Come on down this Saturday! 🍁🍂🍃

09/19/2020
Did you know that the railroad changed barns?  Changes in agriculture and markets due to the railroad had a profound eff...
09/17/2020

Did you know that the railroad changed barns? Changes in agriculture and markets due to the railroad had a profound effect on how barns were built. Join us for a talk by John Porter on Interesting Features of Barns to learn all about it. Porter will speak online as part of our Annual Meeting on September 24. The business meeting begins at 7pm and Porter's talk begins at 8pm. Email [email protected] to receive the zoom link. Space is limited to 100, so ask for your link today! (Sponsored in part by a grant from New Hampshire Humanities and the National Endowment for the Humanities)

Horses provided another mode of transportation to the Simonds School.  Charles Anderson brought kids from the North Vill...
09/10/2020

Horses provided another mode of transportation to the Simonds School. Charles Anderson brought kids from the North Village to school using his horses.

We are mounting an exhibit in the Simonds School with photos and objects showing the history of the school.  We thought ...
09/01/2020

We are mounting an exhibit in the Simonds School with photos and objects showing the history of the school. We thought the kids would be interested to see how kids used to get to school before there were school buses. Here is a photo of the Andrews family from Kearsarge Gore coming to school by "Oxmobile."

It's the 100th Anniversary of the 19th Amendment granting women the right to vote.  The fight didn't end there however. ...
08/25/2020

It's the 100th Anniversary of the 19th Amendment granting women the right to vote. The fight didn't end there however. African American women in the south were essentially blocked from exercising their right. The Voting Rights Act of 1965 was intended to rectify this situation. Many Native American women were excluded until the 1940s or later. Asian American women faced barriers through the 1940s and 1950s as well.

Thank you to Becky MacDonald and her husband for the banner and for the women of Warner who researched women's suffrage history. Look for more banners the group has placed along Main Street, then make sure you exercise your right to vote!

Volunteer Nancy Jo Chabot has been photographing the objects in our collection and entering basic information into our d...
08/20/2020

Volunteer Nancy Jo Chabot has been photographing the objects in our collection and entering basic information into our database. This is one of her favorite objects. It's described as a Delmo Ray electric hat. It's sitting on it's ceramic base. We're not quite sure what it was used for. Any ideas?

A big thank you to Linda Donovan for cleaning three of Warner artist Ralph Pratt's paintings we acquired recently.  The ...
08/04/2020

A big thank you to Linda Donovan for cleaning three of Warner artist Ralph Pratt's paintings we acquired recently. The larger one is a view of Mount Kearsarge and the two smaller are the Baker River at Wentworth (in autumn) and the Warner River (in spring or summer). We are truly fortunate to have such a talented conservator right here in Warner. The colors in these lovely paintings really stand out now.

07/27/2020
The Train Comes to Lake Sunapee

Enjoy "The Train Comes to Sunapee" by the Sunapee Historical Society. The video presentation is part of the MUSE project All Aboard! (nhmuse.org) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=osdVSzhjvSM

This video is a production of the Sunapee Historical Society and one of the All Aboard! presentations of MUse (Museums Sharing Experiences--nhmuse.org) sched...

A big thank you to the volunteers who keep our flower gardens looking nice.  Thank you Nan Cogswell, Susan Grace and Lin...
07/06/2020

A big thank you to the volunteers who keep our flower gardens looking nice. Thank you Nan Cogswell, Susan Grace and Linda Hartman for planting, weeding & watering. Thank you to the WHS board for watering at the Main Street Office.

Since we are closed for the season we will be posting items for sale on the WHS page. If you are interested in ...
07/04/2020

Since we are closed for the season we will be posting items for sale on the WHS page. If you are interested in an item please email Molly Wyeth at [email protected] to verify availability and pickup.

Since we are closed for the season we will be posting items for sale on the WHS page. If you are interested in an item please email Molly Wyeth at [email protected] to verify availability and pickup.

Since we are closed for the season we will be posting items for sale on the WHS page. If you are interested in ...
07/03/2020

Since we are closed for the season we will be posting items for sale on the WHS page. If you are interested in an item please email Molly Wyeth at [email protected] to verify availability and pickup.

Since we are closed for the season we will be posting items for sale on the WHS page. If you are interested in an item please email Molly Wyeth at [email protected] to verify availability and pickup.

07/01/2020
Frederick Douglass Promo Rough

Warner residents Brick Moltz, Gabe Nelson & Laura Russell will be on NH PBS this weekend taking part in "Reading Frederick Douglass" Gabe is in the promotional video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Hq9z9_KrAs

On July 5, 1852, former slave and the abolitionist movement leader, Frederick Douglass delivered one of his most famous speeches - What to the slave is your Fourth of July? In addressing a group of women who invited him to speak in celebration of America's independence, Douglass delivered a stirring speech that is as meaningful today as it was on that day in Rochester, New York.

For the past several years, on July 3rd, the Black Heritage Trail of New Hampshire has collaborated with communities around the Granite State to come together to read Douglass’ historic protest speech and to reflect on its meaning.

In 2020, the COVID-19 pandemic and physical distancing requirements caused communities to amend the delivery of this public reading. And that's where the idea of this program was born.

The Black HeritageTrail of New Hampshire invite you to watch and listen to this virtual reading on NH PBS:
Saturday July 4th at 7pm
Saturday July 4th at 10pm
Sunday July 5th at 8:30pm

06/27/2020
New England was always in competition with the mid-west in regards to producing butter, cheese, grain, meat production a...
06/24/2020

New England was always in competition with the mid-west in regards to producing butter, cheese, grain, meat production and later poultry. These goods could be shipped by rail cheaply from the large farms in the west and undercut the market of farmers in the east. Join us Friday at 7pm online to learn lots more about agriculture and rural industries in Warner during the railroad era. Email [email protected] to register and receive a zoom link.

06/15/2020
Samuel Dow’s son, Herman and his crew are working in the lower field along the Warner River in spring of 1905.  The two ...
05/27/2020

Samuel Dow’s son, Herman and his crew are working in the lower field along the Warner River in spring of 1905. The two oxcarts are dumping manure and the team of horses is plowing it under. The men are from L to R: Herman Dow, Will Frazier, Simon Simoneau, Hudson Hartshorn, Andrew Story and Charles Gove.

Can you spot the train headed toward Warner, speeding along the track between the field and the house?

The Glendon at Davisville  – Photo restoration Meredith Davis NightingaleHerbert and Mary Bean enlarged and remodeled th...
05/21/2020

The Glendon at Davisville – Photo restoration Meredith Davis Nightingale

Herbert and Mary Bean enlarged and remodeled their farmhouse making several more rooms available for summer boarders. They eventually remodeled the barn into sleeping rooms and in 1912 built a dormitory for twenty-four more sleeping rooms. An advertisement for their Seventeenth Season invited guests to stay and enjoy the boating, bathing, fishing, tennis, dance pavilion, lawn swings, hammocks, piano, electric lights, good beds, home cooked food, cream, milk, eggs, vegetables, and Chicken Dinner Sunday.

Guests were picked up at the train station in Contoocook and conveyed for free.

Summer rents were: Ladies, $12 a week, two in a room; single room, $14. Gents, $13 a week, two in a room; single $15. Single day, $3 per person. They must have felt men ate more! The rates increased from August to Labor Day. They liked to have their guests say, “I have gained a few pounds on vacation

These men are working on the bridge at the Roby Depot.
05/15/2020

These men are working on the bridge at the Roby Depot.

Railroad Crews on Car – Do you recognize anyone?Railroad crews were responsible for the maintenance of the track and bui...
05/12/2020

Railroad Crews on Car – Do you recognize anyone?

Railroad crews were responsible for the maintenance of the track and buildings. They repaired the track bed, checked the railroad ties and switches, shoveled snow and extinguished grass fires during the dry season.

The B & M railroad has a gang of men employed laying a spur track into the fairgrounds (Chemical road), which will be a great convenience for the wood alcohol manufacturing plant. Kearsarge Independent, May 25, 1900

“Cattle, hogs, and sheep from Warner were loaded into freight cars every Monday morning. It was said the crew would load anything that could walk, but nothing that had to be dragged in. Carloads of apples were among the many other Warner products shipped by freight.” Warner, N.H. 1880-1974

05/07/2020
Dimond StationThe Dimond station was an unheated flag station located in Davisville.  The mills at Davisville would haul...
05/05/2020

Dimond Station

The Dimond station was an unheated flag station located in Davisville. The mills at Davisville would haul their products in freight wagons to the railroad siding and telegraph the office in Concord when the train could pick up a full carload. Farmers in the area would also deliver their milk, produce, or animals for market at this station as well.

Some local entrepreneurs decided to take advantage of the tourist industry and established the Lake Tom Association which consisted of 50 persons who each held shares valued at $5. With the money, the association leased a good grove of trees near the sandy shore, built a large pavilion and opened it to the public. It consisted of a main hall 36 by 40 feet with a 10-foot piazza in front and a cook room 18 by 20 feet in the back. The establishment opened for business on July 4, 1884. The Dimond station served as a stop to disembark families for a day of swimming, boating, and picnics on its shores. Unfortunately, sparks from a locomotive set fire to the woods at Dimond’s Corner in May of 1894 and the fire spread rapidly, burning the grove of woods and destroying the pavilion. It was not rebuilt; however, there is still a Tom Pond Association today.

Phineas Davis (1792-1835) of Davisville is said to have walked, barefoot, to York, Pennsylvania, arriving in 1809.  Davi...
04/30/2020

Phineas Davis (1792-1835) of Davisville is said to have walked, barefoot, to York, Pennsylvania, arriving in 1809. Davis became a renowned watchmaker, jeweler and steam engine inventor. He designed the engine for the first iron-hulled steamboat, the Cordorus, which launched in 1825. Davis next applied his skills to inventing a steam engine in 1831 for the newly formed Baltimore and Ohio Railroad (the B&O Railroad we know from Monopoly games). His engine, the “York,” won a contest put on by the B&O. Its performance was so impressive that Davis was hired as the chief constructor of engines for the nascent railroad giant. Tragically, Davis died when his engine derailed on a trip to Washington, DC in 1835.

This is a model of Davis’ famous engine “York” built for the B&O Railroad’s 100th Anniversary. It was the first coal-burning steam engine and could haul 15 tons at 15 miles an hour. Davis’ engines were called Grasshoppers because their two vertical rods resembled grasshopper legs in motion. Thanks to WHS board member Abbey Strauss for the photo.

The train is approaching the Lower Warner railroad station whose roof eaves are shown in the lower right of the photogra...
04/28/2020

The train is approaching the Lower Warner railroad station whose roof eaves are shown in the lower right of the photograph. Notice the large stately elms located along the dirt road and the wooden bridge over the railroad tracks. The Lower Warner village school is the white building seen just over the tracks. Corn has been planted in the intervale and a rugged stonewall and a wooden rail fence are located in the foreground.

A favorite pastime of the neighborhood children was to hang an apple on a string for the engineer to catch as he slowed approaching the station. The empty station was a popular place for children to play in and watch the train go by. Sibley Wilkins remembered her grandfather sitting on the bench and rising up brought the bench with him as he was stuck on a pine knot.

Melvin Mills Depot Walter Melvin stands to the left of the station. He also tended a garden next to the depot and a benc...
04/22/2020

Melvin Mills Depot

Walter Melvin stands to the left of the station. He also tended a garden next to the depot and a bench sits in the shade for people to rest and wait for the next up or down train. Notice the bridge has covered trusses.

In 1894 when Weare Melvin died, Walter decided to move the post office to the RR station. After his death in 1922 Oscar Ricard bought the store and became postmaster. Later Ansel Moshier bought the store and post office and his wife, Florence was postmistress from 1942 and the office was closed in June 30, 1955.

Inez & George Brockway stand patiently on the station platform.  The Main Street Depot was the first station built in Wa...
04/14/2020

Inez & George Brockway stand patiently on the station platform. The Main Street Depot was the first station built in Warner for the opening of the railroad in 1849. William Henry Dole was the first station agent until John Kimball replaced him in 1851. George Brockway was station agent at the Main Depot from 1896-to 1937. The station was known for its beautiful flower gardens. Mr. Brockway kept a beautiful flower garden across the track and along the river. And there was a footbridge to the ball field where the famous Saturday baseball games were played between Warner and neighboring towns. People would arrive on the train to cheer their favorite team to victory.

Nancy Jo Chabot and director Lynn Clark have known each other since they were youngsters in grad school and have worked ...
04/06/2020

Nancy Jo Chabot and director Lynn Clark have known each other since they were youngsters in grad school and have worked in museums together often. Nancy Jo was laid off from one of her museum jobs so Lynn asked if she'd like to keep busy by volunteering for WHS. So say hello to our newest volunteer. She's working from her house, entering information into our PastPerfect database about all the objects we had on display last year. Nancy Jo loves getting to know our collection!

Becky MacDonald has been making face masks to send to Concord Hospital.  She graciously shared this photo of herself wit...
04/02/2020

Becky MacDonald has been making face masks to send to Concord Hospital. She graciously shared this photo of herself with her works in progress for us to preserve. We’d love to preserve more photos of life in Warner during the pandemic. What’s different in your life? One hundred years from now people will want to know what everyday life is like right now. Send us a photo: [email protected]

The Barn Sale won’t be accepting donations until May 4!
03/29/2020

The Barn Sale won’t be accepting donations until May 4!

During WWI local people responded to the shortage of medical supplies by sewing and knitting items for the newly formed ...
03/26/2020

During WWI local people responded to the shortage of medical supplies by sewing and knitting items for the newly formed Red Cross. NH residents are stepping up once again by sewing face masks for health care workers. We’d like to document this outpouring of support. If you’re sewing face masks, please send photos of you sewing, of your completed masks or any part of the process you’d like to share with the future to [email protected] Thanks!

https://www.concordmonitor.com/People-aren-t-masking-their-fears-33486360

03/18/2020

Address

15 W Main St
Warner, NH
03278

Opening Hours

Tuesday 13:00 - 16:00
Saturday 09:00 - 12:00

Telephone

(603) 456-2437

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Comments

I would like the info for Thursday night's program. [email protected]. Thanks Diane Hill
I was out exploring the Railbed west of town and just below Melvin, Noticed a pile of rocks and was thinking it was an abutment to an a Crib Dam for a mill. A closer look tells me it was possibly a bridge or maybe a place where pulp logs were dropped in the river. I couldn't see and abutment on the far side of the river. I was thinking it was an early bridge and the building of the railroad obliterated or burried the far abutment. I'll have to check the other side to see what I can find on another day.
GENEALOGY: My 4x GGF, Charles Barnard, at the 1775 Siege of Boston in Col. Poor's Regt. on Winter Hill NW of Charlestown. Charles Barnard settled in Warner on Burnt Hill.
looking for information on a home in town. I believe the Pillsbury family lived there.
CHARLES BARNARD WAS A REVOLUTIONAY WAR VETERAN FROM WARNER NH. HE WAS BORN IN AMESBURY, MA IN 1742, HE WAS MY 4X GREATGRANDFATHER. HIS DAUGHTER, MEHITABLE MARRIED MY REUBEN CROWELL IN 1826. I FOUND AND TRANSCRIBED HIS 1817 WILL. IT WAS PROVED IN 1823. MEHITABLE WAS A SCHOOL TEACHER. SHE GAVE REUBEN 2 TWO SONS. CHARLES LIVED ON BURNT HILL OFF OF BROWN ROAD.
FREE EVENT! On Sunday July, 14, /2019 at 2:00 PM the Society for the Preservation of the Old Meeting House at 1220 Battle Street, Webster, NH hosts the program: Going to School: Education in Early New Hampshire This New Hampshire Historical Society program explores the evolving ideas of education and different classroom experiences between the 17th and early 20th centuries. The presentation includes an illustrated lecture, historic artifacts that support the lecture, and time for discussion. It will be presented by Museum Educator Peggy Halacy, a retired fourth-grade teacher in Webster schools. The New Hampshire Historical Society is an independent, nonprofit organization dedicated to saving, preserving, and sharing New Hampshire’s history.
"I wonder if home values are going to go down."
New info added!
Warner's little-known black history (New info added!) /
The truth about black history in Warner is still being uncovered. (Thanks to Rebecca!)
Brown Edelmann also addressed management-related issues, noting that ‘documentation is critical’ whenever a manager has a ‘problem employee.’
‘The selectmen are not doing anything about it. And it’s effecting employees and the townspeople.’ – Judy Newman-Rogers, Warner Town Clerk