Vista Historical Society and Museum

Vista Historical Society and Museum Vista Historical Museum This is a non profit museum focusing on the History of the Vista community. The Vista Historical Museum is located in the 3200 square foot historic house built in 1934 by Nick and Bessie Huntalas.
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Mission: MISSION STATEMENT VISTA HISTORICAL SOCIETY The Society is a non-profit California corporation which is concerned with the discovery, recording, collecting and preservation of historical facts, properties, and other materials regarding the history of Southwestern United States, particularly the settlement and development of this region in San Diego County also preserving and perpetuating for public benefits those artifacts, historical objects and documents for all to see.

Operating as usual

11/11/2020

Because of the descent of San Diego County into the Purple Tier, the Vista Historical Museum is closed until the health rules allow reopening.

10/27/2020

The Vista Historical Museum is currently not open for tours. Beginning November 18, the Vista Historical Museum will again be open for scheduled tours only. All tours are free. We will be open for tours most Wednesdays, Thursdays and Fridays from 10 am to 2 pm. Tours of up to two hours for up to four people can be booked by calling 760-630-0444 or e mailing [email protected] a minimum 24 hours in advance. Only one tour group is allowed in the museum at a time. All tours will include temperature check and social distancing. Masks are required at all times. For more information call 760-630-0444.

Photos from Vista Historical Society and Museum's post
10/19/2020

Photos from Vista Historical Society and Museum's post

09/16/2020

The Vista Historical Society Old Fashioned Pit Barbecue, scheduled for Saturday October 3, 2020 has been canceled due the pandemic. It will be rescheduled next year for more information call 760-630-0444.

09/04/2020
09/04/2020

BBQ AT THE MUSEUM CHANGED TO
OCTOBER 3
By Jack Larimer
The Vista Historical Society and Museum at Rancho Minerva announces a new date for our annual Old Fashioned Pit Barbeque, Our new date is Saturday, October 3, 2020 at our museum from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. health rules permitting. The cost will be $25 for adults and $5 for children 10 years and younger. The meat will be cooked on site in our deep pit barbeque. The menu will also include great side dishes' and. Dessert. Wine and beer will be available for an additional $3 per glass. There will also be great entertainment. We will have popcorn and cotton candy for all. There will again be an apple dessert contest. Bring your favorite apple dessert for judging to attempt and win a cash prize of $100 for 1st place, $50 for 2nd place, or $25 for 3rd place. Raffle prizes will be available. Sponsorships for the event are available, and each $100 donation will receive two free barbeque dinners. Reservations are not required. For additional information or to purchase tickets, contact the museum at 760-630-0444. Make sure to put us on your calendar and come and join us for a wonderful evening at the museum.

Photos from Vista Historical Society and Museum's post
09/04/2020

Photos from Vista Historical Society and Museum's post

09/04/2020

Beginning September 9, 2020, the Vista Historical Museum will be open for scheduled tours only. We will be open for tours most Wednesdays, Thursdays and Fridays from 10 am to 2 pm. Tours of up to two hours for up to four people can be booked by calling 760-630-0444 or e mailing [email protected] a minimum 48 hours in advance. Only one tour group is allowed in the museum at a time. All tours will include temperature check and social distancing. Masks are required at all times. For more information call 760-630-0444.
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09/04/2020
July-August 2020 newsletter
07/06/2020

July-August 2020 newsletter

07/04/2020
The Vista Historical Museum is closed because of the pandemic
07/01/2020

The Vista Historical Museum is closed because of the pandemic

The Vista Historical Museum is closed because of the pandemic

2020 NEW HALL OF FAME MEMBERS
06/22/2020

2020 NEW HALL OF FAME MEMBERS

GREAT NEWSVISTA HISTORICAL MUSEUM OPENBeginning June 24, 2020, the Vista Historical Museum will be open for scheduled to...
06/17/2020

GREAT NEWS
VISTA HISTORICAL MUSEUM OPEN
Beginning June 24, 2020, the Vista Historical Museum will be open for scheduled tours only. We will be open for tours most Wednesdays, Thursdays and Fridays from 10 am to 2 pm. Tours of up to two hours for up to four people can be booked by calling 760-630-0444 or e mailing [email protected] a minimum 48 hours in advance. Only one tour group is allowed in the museum at a time. All tours will include temperature check and social distancing. Masks are required at all times.

Vista was founded as an agricultural community in the 19th century and came to its own in the first half of the 20th cen...
05/20/2020

Vista was founded as an agricultural community in the 19th century and came to its own in the first half of the 20th century. Agriculture came hard to Vista because of the lack of water in the area which was only solved with the founding of the Vista Irrigation District in 1923.
This display is a summary of the agriculture timeline in Vista.
1. The first inhabitants of the Vista area were known to the Europeans as the
Luisenos. They lived here for thousands of years. They made good use of the natural flora and fauna to create a very diverse diet using what was on hand. Their principal and favorite food was acorns which they made into a mush or bread. Acorns were difficult to prepare because of the presence of tannin in the acorns which is the poison. The first sheet shows the general location of the various villages in the area. In reality the natives moved from place to place depending on the season. The second photo shows a demonstration of preparing the acorns. This took place at the dedication of the site in the Vista Conservancy in 2013.
2. The second sheet shows the San Luis Rey Mission. The Spanish arrived to stay in California in the late 18th century. They were there to spread Christianity as well as the Spanish Empire. They did so by founding missions stretching from Baja California to Northern California. The San Luis Rey Mission, which was founded in 1798, was one of the largest and richest of the missions. The missionaries forced many of the residents to live on the mission lands. They taught the natives farming and other agricultural pursuits. For trading purposes the mission raised cattle for local consumption and to trade the hides and tallow.
3. After the civil wars in the Spanish colonies in America, in the early 19th century, Mexico replaced Spain in California. They took possession of most of the mission lands which were very extensive. A mission had direct ownership of all land within 15 miles of the mission. The lands were distributed to friends of those in power and sometimes to the Indians who lived on the land. What is now Vista had parts of three of the land grant ranchos all founded in the 1840's. Rancho Buena Vista, a ranch of 1184 acres is what today is downtown Vista. The main dwelling is now in a city park. Rancho Guajome was a ranch of about 2,200 acres located on North Santa Fe Ave. and is now a San Diego County Park. The third ranch is known as Rancho Agua Hedionda y Los Monos. It was originally over 13,000 acres in size and was located in what is today Oceanside, Carlsbad and South Vista. Most of this area has been developed as housing, commercial, or industrial development. During the heyday of the Ranchos, they raised cattle and planted groves and other crops. The age of the Rancho declined and vanished when the United States took over California. Because of the differences in Spanish and American law many of the ranchos we're lost by the original owners. Also because of the hard times due to drought much land had to be sold for taxes.

4. The fourth sheet shows what happened in the late 19th and early 20th century in Vista. There was one winery known as the Buena Vista Winery of several hundred acres headquartered at the corner of Foothill and East Vista Way; however, the lack of water in most of the Vista area required dry farming which produced hay, barley, and similar crops. The first picture shows the winery which lasted from 1886 to 1920. It ended because of prohibition, and the land was converted to other agricultural uses. The second picture from 1910 shows hay baling which is the harvesting of a common crop of the day.

5. Water became available in large amounts in 1926. This became possible with the formation of the Vista Irrigation District in 1923 and the district's agreement with the San Diego water company in 1924 for access to Lake Henshaw on the Warner Ranch. It took the district around two years to construct infrastructure to get the water from Lake Henshaw to Vista. This sheet shows how irrigation worked in the 1920s in the first picture and the planting of avocado seedlings in the second picture. Avocados became the most well-known crop in Vista although there were also plenty of citrus groves.

6. This sheet shows the result of the agricultural growth in Vista. Calavo at that time was a cooperative of avocado growers for packing and distribution of the product. The packing plant in Vista located about where the Wave is today was built in 1934 and became the largest packing plant for avocados in the world before it burned to the ground in 1949. The picture of Rancho Minerva in 1940 was typical of most of the avocado and citrus ranches in the area at the time. Agricultural uses continued to expand until after World War II when many of the groves where displaced with housing for the many veterans who settled here.

7. Even though agriculture is not as important to the area as it once was, it still existed after World War II and still does exist. This sheet shows one of the two dairies in Vista. The Golden Arrow Dairy was built in 1955 and replaced by a shopping center in 1980. It was located at 2014 West Vista Way. Originally cows were kept there and milked there but the land became more expensive they were moved to other locations and the dairy became a retail store. The second dairy, the Miller Dairy was located on Emerald Drive north of today's freeway. It went out of business in the mid-twentieth century.

8. Vista agriculture today is varied with several crops which include strawberries and cactus farms.

Vista was founded as an agricultural community in the 19th century and came to its own in the first half of the 20th century. Agriculture came hard to Vista because of the lack of water in the area which was only solved with the founding of the Vista Irrigation District in 1923.
This display is a summary of the agriculture timeline in Vista.
1. The first inhabitants of the Vista area were known to the Europeans as the
Luisenos. They lived here for thousands of years. They made good use of the natural flora and fauna to create a very diverse diet using what was on hand. Their principal and favorite food was acorns which they made into a mush or bread. Acorns were difficult to prepare because of the presence of tannin in the acorns which is the poison. The first sheet shows the general location of the various villages in the area. In reality the natives moved from place to place depending on the season. The second photo shows a demonstration of preparing the acorns. This took place at the dedication of the site in the Vista Conservancy in 2013.
2. The second sheet shows the San Luis Rey Mission. The Spanish arrived to stay in California in the late 18th century. They were there to spread Christianity as well as the Spanish Empire. They did so by founding missions stretching from Baja California to Northern California. The San Luis Rey Mission, which was founded in 1798, was one of the largest and richest of the missions. The missionaries forced many of the residents to live on the mission lands. They taught the natives farming and other agricultural pursuits. For trading purposes the mission raised cattle for local consumption and to trade the hides and tallow.
3. After the civil wars in the Spanish colonies in America, in the early 19th century, Mexico replaced Spain in California. They took possession of most of the mission lands which were very extensive. A mission had direct ownership of all land within 15 miles of the mission. The lands were distributed to friends of those in power and sometimes to the Indians who lived on the land. What is now Vista had parts of three of the land grant ranchos all founded in the 1840's. Rancho Buena Vista, a ranch of 1184 acres is what today is downtown Vista. The main dwelling is now in a city park. Rancho Guajome was a ranch of about 2,200 acres located on North Santa Fe Ave. and is now a San Diego County Park. The third ranch is known as Rancho Agua Hedionda y Los Monos. It was originally over 13,000 acres in size and was located in what is today Oceanside, Carlsbad and South Vista. Most of this area has been developed as housing, commercial, or industrial development. During the heyday of the Ranchos, they raised cattle and planted groves and other crops. The age of the Rancho declined and vanished when the United States took over California. Because of the differences in Spanish and American law many of the ranchos we're lost by the original owners. Also because of the hard times due to drought much land had to be sold for taxes.

4. The fourth sheet shows what happened in the late 19th and early 20th century in Vista. There was one winery known as the Buena Vista Winery of several hundred acres headquartered at the corner of Foothill and East Vista Way; however, the lack of water in most of the Vista area required dry farming which produced hay, barley, and similar crops. The first picture shows the winery which lasted from 1886 to 1920. It ended because of prohibition, and the land was converted to other agricultural uses. The second picture from 1910 shows hay baling which is the harvesting of a common crop of the day.

5. Water became available in large amounts in 1926. This became possible with the formation of the Vista Irrigation District in 1923 and the district's agreement with the San Diego water company in 1924 for access to Lake Henshaw on the Warner Ranch. It took the district around two years to construct infrastructure to get the water from Lake Henshaw to Vista. This sheet shows how irrigation worked in the 1920s in the first picture and the planting of avocado seedlings in the second picture. Avocados became the most well-known crop in Vista although there were also plenty of citrus groves.

6. This sheet shows the result of the agricultural growth in Vista. Calavo at that time was a cooperative of avocado growers for packing and distribution of the product. The packing plant in Vista located about where the Wave is today was built in 1934 and became the largest packing plant for avocados in the world before it burned to the ground in 1949. The picture of Rancho Minerva in 1940 was typical of most of the avocado and citrus ranches in the area at the time. Agricultural uses continued to expand until after World War II when many of the groves where displaced with housing for the many veterans who settled here.

7. Even though agriculture is not as important to the area as it once was, it still existed after World War II and still does exist. This sheet shows one of the two dairies in Vista. The Golden Arrow Dairy was built in 1955 and replaced by a shopping center in 1980. It was located at 2014 West Vista Way. Originally cows were kept there and milked there but the land became more expensive they were moved to other locations and the dairy became a retail store. The second dairy, the Miller Dairy was located on Emerald Drive north of today's freeway. It went out of business in the mid-twentieth century.

8. Vista agriculture today is varied with several crops which include strawberries and cactus farms.

When the Vista Historical Museum reopens, these owls from around the world will be on display.
05/06/2020

When the Vista Historical Museum reopens, these owls from around the world will be on display.

05/05/2020

TODAY IS GIVING TUESDAY

If you would like to make a donation to the Vista Historical Society and Museum our contact information is:

Mail
Vista Historical Society
P.O. Box 1032
Vista, Ca 92085

Website
Vistahistoricalsociety.com

Phone
760-630-0444

E mail
[email protected]

Questions? Please call or e mail

Thanks for your support

Jack Larimer
Museum Director

SENIOR MEALS
05/01/2020

SENIOR MEALS

MAY-JUNE 2020 NEWSLETTER
05/01/2020

MAY-JUNE 2020 NEWSLETTER

2020 VISTA HALL OF FAME VOL 1 OF 3
05/01/2020

2020 VISTA HALL OF FAME VOL 1 OF 3

2020 VISTA HALL OF FAME VOL 2 OF 3
05/01/2020

2020 VISTA HALL OF FAME VOL 2 OF 3

2020 VISTA HALL OF FAME VOL 3 OF 3
05/01/2020

2020 VISTA HALL OF FAME VOL 3 OF 3

MARCH-APRIL 2020 NEWSLETTER
05/01/2020

MARCH-APRIL 2020 NEWSLETTER

Address

Physical Address:2317 Old Foothill Dr Mailing Address: PO Box 1032
Vista, CA
92084

General information

The museum public hours are 10 am to 2:30 pm Wednesday to Friday and the first two Saturdays of the month. The office hours are 8 am to 4 pm Monday to Friday. We also provide offsite presentations and lectures. We rent the site for events such as weddings and reunions.

Opening Hours

Wednesday 10:00 - 17:00
Thursday 10:00 - 14:30
Friday 10:00 - 14:30

Telephone

(760) 630-0444

Alerts

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Comments

Second place! Apple dumplings.
Apple Dumplings | The Pioneer Woman
I won second place apple contest on September 14th at the BBQ event. Here is where I got the delicious recipe. Rea Drummond's apple dumpling.
The WAGS 36th Annual Seminar will be held on January 26, 2019. We are fortunate to have scheduled an outstanding speaker, John P. Colletta. He is one of America’s most popular genealogical lecturers. Knowledgeable, experienced and entertaining, he resides in Washington, D.C. For twenty years, while laying the foundation for his career in genealogy, he worked half-time at the Library of Congress and taught workshops at the National Archives
The 18 piece BIG BAND JAZZ HALL OF FAME ORCHESTRA will present its final concert of the summer 2018 season on the Willowbrook Concert Series on Saturday August 25, 2018 at 4 pm, Vista, CA. The concert will celebrate the classic sounds of the 1930s & 40s "Swing Era" with the music of Benny Goodman, Glenn Miller, Duke Ellington, Tommy Dorsey, Artie Shaw, Count Basie, and many more. Bring your dancing shoes if you are inclined to "jitterbug" or dance the Big Apple. Tickets on sale at the gate; free parking. 2732 Hutchison Vista, CA. 92084 for tickets and info: (760) 726-8909
If you attended our BBQ in August on lost a cane, please contract our director, Jack Larimer, 760-630-0444