Lansingburgh Historical Society

Lansingburgh Historical Society The Lansingburgh Historical Society was formed in 1965 to preserve and interpret the community's unique heritage.
Membership in The Lansingburgh Historical Society is inexpensive and keeps you in touch with all the programs and events that the society has to offer. You'll not want to miss the fascinating speakers who present programs on local history, people, and places. We welcome additional members (see membership page) and encourage participation and donations. Our dues year begins April 1 but you may join at any time. Dues received in January, February or March entitle you to membership as of April 1. Basic annual dues are just $5.00 per year Sustaining membership dues are $25.00 per year Patron/Life membership is $100.00
(10)

The headquarters of the Lansingburgh Historical Society is located in the Herman Melville house at 114th Street at 1st Avenue in Lansingburgh. The headquarters is open to groups and individuals by appointment by calling (518) 235-3501. We have no paid staff and receive no regular public funding. We welcome additional members and encourage participation and donations.

Mission: The society initiates various cultural and educational events to highlight Lansingburgh's unique history

05/27/2020

This year more than ever the Lansingburgh Historical Society needs you to renew your membership or if you've recently enjoyed our FB page or attended one of our events last year and enjoyed it, and aren't already a member, we would greatly appreciate it if you decided to become a member.

Due to COVID19 it looks like we won't be having any events or fund raisers to help offset the cost of the upkeep of our well loved house, which was once called home by Herman Melville so these renewal and new memberships are needed.

Any and all additional donations would also be welcomed. We hope to open again before the end of our season in November. Cost of memberships are as follows:

Regular membership $15
Small Business $75.00
Seniors, Students $10.00
Corporate/Professional $200.00
Sustaining Membership $40.00
Contribution_____________

The mailing address is Lansingburgh Historical Society, P.O. Box 219, Troy, NY 12182. Thank you in advance for your renewals, new memberships and donations.

And a prettier update some of the gorgeous iris. Many of which have been donated
05/26/2020

And a prettier update some of the gorgeous iris. Many of which have been donated

Another Herman’s garden update. This one isn’t so pretty but you can see how much weeding, leveling and removing of nast...
05/26/2020

Another Herman’s garden update. This one isn’t so pretty but you can see how much weeding, leveling and removing of nasty bamboo roots the preparation for a future lily and iris patch has been done. Thank you to Toni Dickinson, Leslie Tash, Patricia Dorow, Gary Dorow and our downstairs tenant Jim for the very strenuous hard work

These are the latest pictures of Herman’s garden. Toni Dickinson has been very busy tending our lovely garden with a lit...
05/24/2020

These are the latest pictures of Herman’s garden. Toni Dickinson has been very busy tending our lovely garden with a little help from her friends Patricia Dorow, her husband Gary and Leslie Tash and our new tenant also gave a hand. Thank you! Wish we had thought to take before pictures because the transformation is terrific!

Spindle City Historic Society
05/15/2020

Spindle City Historic Society

Today in Cohoes History: On May 15, 1924, the Halfmoon left the Watervliet Arsenal dock and started for Cohoes. It had considerable difficulty in getting through the draw at the D&H bridge in Troy. Factory whistles in the collar district shrieked out a salute as the little craft, towed by two tugs was being hauled up the river. #Cohoes150

[Image courtesy of Francoamerican Gravy]

OUR BACK GARDEN ON FRIDAY MAY FIRST, 2020!With warm weather around the corner spring gardening will start soon, and we w...
05/02/2020

OUR BACK GARDEN ON FRIDAY MAY FIRST, 2020!

With warm weather around the corner spring gardening will start soon, and we would love your help! (No green thumb needed!)

Last year's volunteers included our President John Ward, Vice-President Mary Ellen Ward, Trustees Pat Dorrow and Toni Dickinson, past Trustee Leslie Tash, and volunteer Tom Hemming.

We are excited to be cleaning out another bed this year for Iris and daylilies, and look forward to getting the pathways in the backyard beds in tip-top shape!

If you're ready to get out of the house, get some sun and exercise, (with social distancing practiced), please let us know by commenting on this post, and we'll keep you posted on our gardening plans!
-------------
These photos of the Herman Melville back garden were taken by truste Toni Dickinson on Friday May 1, 2020. Thank you Toni!

The 1786 Herman Melville House, the home of the Lansingburgh Historical Society, is located at 2 114th Street, Troy, NY 12182

STARTING YOUR GARDEN IN LANSINGBURGH IN 1799?                                                                           ...
05/01/2020

STARTING YOUR GARDEN IN LANSINGBURGH IN 1799?

WHERE TO BUY THE SEEDS?

If you were looking for seeds to start your garden in Lansingburgh in 1799, you no doubt would have seen an advertisement in the Lansingburgh Gazette of May 14, 1799, letting you know that Taylor Fordham has an assortment of seeds for sale. The seeds having been raised by the Shakers at Niskauna [sic].

What sorts of seeds? Well, "Onion, Parsnip, Carrot, Blood Beet, Cucumber, Turnips, Salmon Raddish [sic], Turnip Raddish [sic] Cabbage, Sage, Parsley, Cellery [sic], Head Lettuce, Muskmelon, Watermelon, English Spinage [sic], Lavender, Saffron, Hysop, Burrage (Borage?), Asparagus, Sweet Balm, &c."

Did you notice the many varied spellings? They are close to what we use now, but at that time it was usual to find varied spellings for many words.

We've included a view of the back garden at the Herman Melville House at 2 114th Street, Troy, NY, the home of the Lansingburgh Historical Society.

Spindle City Historic Society
04/29/2020

Spindle City Historic Society

Today in Cohoes History: Mayor Daniel Cosgro issued a proclamation on April 28, 1926, in support of Sacred Heart Church's upcoming tag sale. The purpose of the sale was to raise money for a statue of Father Isaac Jogues. The Mayor said, "I would urge every citizen to give generously. The total sum raised will be in a large way a measure of what value Cohosiers place upon their own part in American history, and how much they esteem the sacrifices of the men who laid the foundations of this free and wonderful nation." #Cohoes150

04/26/2020
myaccount.timesunion.com

Check the front page of the Spaces section of today's Times Union. There is an article on historical markers and on the front page is a picture of the marker for Caroline Gilkey Rogers! The Lansingburgh Historical Society had this marker installed!

Here is the link - not sure if it will work.

https://digital.olivesoftware.com/olive/ODN/AlbanyTimesUnion/Default.aspx

This website contains advanced functionality that is not fully supported in your current version of Internet Explorer. We recommend upgrading your browser to the latest version of Internet Explorer by clicking here to download.

We thought we would share some photos from the front garden of the Herman Melville House. The Herman Melville house is t...
04/25/2020

We thought we would share some photos from the front garden of the Herman Melville House. The Herman Melville house is the home of the Lansingburgh historical society. It's located at 2 114th Street, Troy, New York.

While current restrictions have regrettably closed are open houses so far this year, the work in the gardens, and building upkeep continue at the Herman Melville house.

If you are out for a walk, following all protections of course, please stop by, view our gardens, and enjoy a moment of quiet by the Hudson River.

The 1786 Herman Melville house is truly a treasure of Lansingburgh.

04/17/2020

Former and current Burghers. You may have heard the old Lansingburgh High School building has been sold. It is being cleaned out now and for the next few weeks. We have an offer of yearbooks and trophies. If you would like either please contact John Ward (Lansingburgh Historical Society) at 518-885-4295 or Tammy Fruscio at 518-248-2031. We can pick up whatever you would like and get it to you when the crises is over or mail it to you. Just remember we have a limited time to do this.

Spindle City Historic Society
04/16/2020

Spindle City Historic Society

Today in Cohoes History: Bobby Leach went over the Cohoes Falls in a barrel on April 15, 1899. He made a second trip over the falls a week later. In 1911, Leach would become the second person (and the first man) to go over Niagara Falls in a barrel and survive. #Cohoes150

Spindle City Historic Society
03/31/2020

Spindle City Historic Society

Today in Cohoes History: On March 28, 1826, the State Legislature incorporated the Cohoes Company for hydraulic and manufacturing purposes. Peter Remsen. Charles Dudley, Stephen Van Rensselaer Jr., Francis Olmstead, Canvass White' Henry Wycoff and Daniel Wilkinson were the first directors. #Cohoes150

Spindle City Historic Society
03/28/2020

Spindle City Historic Society

Cohoes Women in History

Faith Barnes

Lady Cop

It was the early 1960s, a time of change for America in general and Cohoes in particular. One of these changes occurred in May 1961, when the Cohoes Police Department hired Faith Barnes, its first female police officer, to work in the Juvenile Bureau.

The Juvenile Bureau's aim was to curb delinquency rather than prosecute crimes. Stolen bicycles, vandalism and abandoned babies came her way, but the majority of her work was dealing with 'wayward' girls. Barnes also did community outreach for the Bureau, speaking to community groups about the Bureau's work, parental responsibilities and other related topics.

Five years into her career, New York State passed an anti-discrimination law. She immediately filed suit, claiming that she was being paid substantially less than her male counterparts with the same amount of seniority.

The Police Department responded by suspending her…twice.

The case gained state-wide attention, as Faith Barnes was the first person to file a complaint under the new law. After a bitter four months of charges and counter charges, in February 1966, the State Commission for Human Rights ruled in her favor. The city agreed to give her the difference in pay for the six week period between the time the law went into effect and the when the city raised her salary to that of her male counterparts.

Mrs. Barnes said that although it was not a great amount of money, it left her with a sense of satisfaction. Having made her point, Faith Barnes handed in her resignation and left the Police Department.

03/24/2020

222 YEARS AGO IN LANSINGBURGH, NEW YORK

LANSINGBURGH ACADEMY,

Has forty Scholars, who are instructed in the English Language and Grammar. The Trustees have provided a convenient building, consisting of two rooms on the first, and three on the second floor, but as yet unfinished; and they have contracted with a person to teach the Latin language; and from the increase of Lansingburgh, and the other towns in the vicinity, and the zeal of the Trustees, the committee was induced to pay to them the sum appropriated by the Regents during the last year.

It is only necessary for the Regents to request the attention of the Legislature to the real and personal property vested in the Regents by law, and they respectfully suggest the propriety of enabling the Regents to make such disposition thereof, by sale or otherwise, as that an annual income may result to the University, to be disposed of by the Regents, is their discretion, for promoting literature.

By order of the Regents.
JOHN JAY, Chancellor.

By command of the Chancellor.
DAVID S. JONES, Secretary.
Albany, March 6, 1797.

Albany Chronicle. April 24, 1797: 2.

03/18/2020

Good morning fellow Burghers. In light of the Coronavirus and to keep all safe we are canceling all events until May so far. We will look at what is going on in May and make announcements further at that time. Stay healthy wash your hands

THE FIRST MELVILLE OPEN HOUSE OF 2020 WILL CONTINUE AS PLANNED TOMORROW, MARCH 14, FROM 10 AM TO 2 PM We invite you to v...
03/13/2020

THE FIRST MELVILLE OPEN HOUSE OF 2020 WILL CONTINUE AS PLANNED TOMORROW, MARCH 14, FROM 10 AM TO 2 PM

We invite you to visit during those hours, meet some of our knowledgeable Trustees, tour one of the oldest homes in Lansingburgh, and enjoy our collection of artifacts related to the industry and early years of our Lansingburgh Community!

We do regret to share that JUDE HANLEY'S LECTURE ON STONEWARE PLANNED FOR NOON, IS BEING RESCHEDULED. There has been enormous interest in this event and we look forward to rescheduling this event in the very near future!

You will find the 1786 Herman Melville House on the corner of First Avenue and 114th Street (2 114th St, Troy, NY 12182)

Your $5 Donation supports the education and preservation efforts of the Lansingburgh Historical Society.

We are pleased to announce that our FIRST OPEN HOUSE OF 2020, will be held on SATURDAY, MARCH 14, FROM 10 AM TO 2 PM,  a...
03/10/2020

We are pleased to announce that our FIRST OPEN HOUSE OF 2020, will be held on SATURDAY, MARCH 14, FROM 10 AM TO 2 PM, at the HERMAN MELVILLE HOUSE, 2 114th Street, Troy, NY, 12182, when we will welcome guest lecturer, JUDE HANLEY. A local artist, and teacher, Jude is an avid collector of New York Stoneware.

Jude primarily collects pre-1800 crocks. He tells us that Lansingburgh crocks are rare, and very desirable. Jude will be talking about the crocks we have here in our Lansingburgh Historical Society Collection at the Melville House, and will also bring some favorite pieces from his collection to share with us.

If you are a fan of local history, stoneware, or would just enjoy learning something new from an engaging and enthusiastic speaker, we warmly invite you to join us on Saturday, March 14th!

Jude will speak at Noon, and will happily take your questions following his talk.

See you then!

(Your $5 donation supports the education and preservation work of the Lansingburgh Historical Society)

We're so happy to share two more photos from our Historic Homes of Lansingburgh Tour of 2018! Do you live in the 12182? ...
03/01/2020

We're so happy to share two more photos from our Historic Homes of Lansingburgh Tour of 2018!

Do you live in the 12182? And are you a Lansingburgh homeowner with a jewel of home that you've restored, maintained, and treasured?

If you answered yes, we would love to invite you to participate in our Historic Homes of Lansingburgh Tour this May!

A fundraiser for the preservation and education activities of the Lansingburgh Historical Society, this popular event invites you to open your home for a few hours on Saturday, May 16, 2019, when a member of the historical society will join you as you show off the unique characteristics of your historic home!

We are delighted with our response to date, but are eager to add several more homes to the tour! Will you share your beautiful and unique Lansingburgh home with your friends and neighbors?!

Please give a call, or send an email to Mary Ellen Ward at 518-885-4295, or [email protected]

We're looking forward to hearing from you!

We are pleased to announce that our first Open House of 2020, will be held on Saturday, March 14, from 10 AM to 2 PM, at...
02/23/2020

We are pleased to announce that our first Open House of 2020, will be held on Saturday, March 14, from 10 AM to 2 PM, at the Herman Melville House, 2 114th Street, Troy, NY, 12182, when we will welcome guest lecturer, Jude Hanley. A local artist, and teacher, Jude is an avid collector of New York Stoneware.

Jude primarily collects pre-1800 crocks. He tells us that Lansingburgh crocks are rare, and very desirable. Jude will be talking about the crocks we have here in our Lansingburgh Historical Society Collection at the Melville House, and will also bring some favorite pieces from his collection to share with us.

If you are a fan of local history, stoneware, or would just enjoy learning something new from an engaging and enthusiastic speaker, we warmly invite you to join us on Saturday, March 14th!

Jude will speak at Noon, and will happily take your questions following his talk.

See you then!

02/23/2020

We are pleased to announce that our first Open House of 2020, will be held on Saturday, March 14, from 10 AM to 2 PM, when we will welcome guest lecturer, Jude Hanley. A local artist, and teacher, Jude is an avid collector of New York Stoneware.

Jude primarily collects pre-1800 crocks. He tells us that Lansingburgh crocks are rare, and very desirable. Jude will be talking about the crocks we have here in our Lansingburgh Historical Society Collection at the Melville House, and will also bring some favorite pieces from his collection to share with us.

If you are a fan of local history, stoneware, or would just enjoy learning something new from an engaging and enthusiastic speaker, we warmly invite you to join us on Saturday, March 14th, at the Herman Melville House, 2 114th Street, Troy, NY 12182.

Jude will speak at Noon, and will happily take your questions following his talk.

See you then!

02/22/2020
Before there was Lindsay’s Pharmacy in Lansingburgh, there was Russell Forsyth and Co. The below taken from the Tuesday,...
02/12/2020

Before there was Lindsay’s Pharmacy in Lansingburgh, there was Russell Forsyth and Co.

The below taken from the Tuesday, February 12, 1799, edition of the Lansingburgh Gazette, Page 1, Column 2
____________

DRUGS & MEDICINES
PAINTER’S COLOURS
And DYE-STUFFS.

Russell Forsyth and Co.
Have just received, by the last vessels,
A general ASSORTMENT of DRUGS and MEDICINES,
Warranted genuine; which thy are now opening at LANSINGBURGH, in the north part of Mr. Jonas Morgan’s house, directly opposite Messrs. Shubael Gorham and Co.’s Store

PHYSICIANS and APOTHECARIES may furnish themselves, at the most reduced prices, with almost any article in the Druggist Line, by Wholesale or Retail, for Cash or approved Notes.

Amongst which are the following, viz.

LOGWOOD Black Lead,
Redwood, Lithurge,
Camwood, Fustic, Gold Leaf
Madder, Copperas, White Lead, dry,
Allum Do. Do. Ground
Blue & Oil Vitriol, Spanish Brown, dry
White do. Do. Do. Ground
Nutgalls, Indigo, Spanish White
Prussian Blue, Patent Yellow,
Rozin, Glue, Vermillion,
Spirits Turpentine, Verdigrise,
Pres Papers, Arnatto, &c. &c.
Rotten Stone, ALSO

Surgeon’s Pocket Instruments,
Tooth do, and Lancets.
A (?) Supply of the above Articles may be depended on, and all orders executed with dispatch.

Lansingburgh, Dec. 11, 1798 (First publication of advert?)

House Proud?Many homes in Lansingburgh have been lovingly restored to their former elegance. We invite you to show off y...
02/09/2020

House Proud?

Many homes in Lansingburgh have been lovingly restored to their former elegance. We invite you to show off your restored home and your commitment to the Lansingburgh community by sharing your preservation efforts with your friends and neighbors by listing your home with the Spring 2020 Historic Homes of Lansingburgh Tour!

This one day event invites community members to open their homes for a few hours one Saturday afternoon in a benefit for the Lansingburgh Historical Society. We invite you to reach out to John and Mary Ellen Ward at 518-885-4295 for details on this well-organized, and well-received May event!

Below please see some photos from 554 First Avenue, a home on one of our first historic homes tours! A treasure of Lansingburgh!

Address

2 114th Street, PO Box 219
Troy, NY
12182

CDTA

General information

The Lansingburgh Historical Society was formed in 1965 to preserve and interpret the community's unique heritage. At that time, the elegant and historic Lansing House, which was built in 1749, was demolished. This great loss encourages local support to preserve remaining historic treasures, including the home of Herman Melville (Melville wrote his first two novels in the nine years he lived there); the Lansingburgh Academy, where President Chester Arthur taught and Herman Melville was a student; and the Oakwood Cemetery, burial place for "Uncle Sam" Wilson. The Village of Lansingburgh, until its annexation by Troy in 1901, was the oldest incorporated village in New York. Comprising about one-third of Troy at its north end, Lansingburgh still maintains a distinct historic identity, its own zip code, and its own school district. The headquarters of the Lansingburgh Historical Society is located in the Herman Melville house at 114th Street at 1st Avenue in Lansingburgh. The society initiates various cultural and educational events to highlight Lansingburgh's unique history (see events page). The headquarters is open to groups and individuals by appointment by calling (518) 986-2285 (Jenny-Corresponding Secretary) or (518) 235-3501 (Society-Leave message). We have no paid staff and receive no regular public funding.

Opening Hours

Saturday 10:00 - 14:00

Telephone

(518) 235-3501

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when Lansingburgh Historical Society posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Contact The Museum

Send a message to Lansingburgh Historical Society:

Videos

Category

Nearby museums


Other History Museums in Troy

Show All

Comments

My Great Grandfather was John Diack, one of the brothers who owned and operated Diack Brothers Brush Factory in Lansingburg. This picture is from the company letterhead.
Why are they getting rid of all the yearbooks and trophys that represents our school's history?
May 2020 will mark my 2nd year in ownership of Jack Troy's Auto Body Works Inc. As a business that has been in operation for over one hundred years in historic Lansingburgh, I was wondering if anyone has any photos or memories to share of the building or the interior. Thank you!
Hello all! I am the new owner of Jack Troy's, I purchased the business a year and a half ago. Since it's been in operation for so long I was hoping someone might have old photos of the place. As we are always updating to state of the art equipment, we also love to see the history of where we came from. Thanks!
I'm hoping you can help me locate the name of a company that used to be located at the foot of Northern Drive where the Old Daley Inn Catering is now. My Grandmother worked there sometime during the 1950's-1960's. I believe they did advertising possibly on billboards. I'm not positive of the name but Witmere and/or Ferris seems familiar. Thanks in advance.
1st house is on 112th. My Grandma Malone’s ice cream store next to the gray house. We moved to the big brick house on 4th Ave by the time Genes Fish Fry moved in and is still so popular! Whipper Grammar School, love it!
O-ED: AFTER 200 YEARS, HERMAN MELVILLE IS STILL RELEVANT By: Aaron Sachs, Cornell University 2 days ago Navy Times Outside of American literature courses, it doesn’t seem likely that many Americans are reading Herman Melville these days. But with Melville turning 200 on Aug. 1, I propose that you pick up one of his novels, because his work has never been more timely. This is the perfect cultural moment for another Melville revival. The original Melville revival started exactly a century ago, after Melville’s works had languished in obscurity for some 60 years. In the immediate aftermath of World War I, scholars found his vision of social turmoil to be uncannily relevant. Once again, Melville could help Americans grapple with dark times – and not just because he composed classic works of universal truths about good and evil. Melville still matters because he was directly engaged with the very aspects of modern American life that continue to haunt the country in the 21st century. Melville’s books deal with a host of issues that are relevant today, from race relations and immigration to the mechanization of everyday life. Yet these aren’t the works of a hopeless tragedian. Rather, Melville was a determined realist. The typical Melville character is depressed and alienated, overwhelmed by societal changes. But he also endures. Ultimately, “Moby-Dick” is about the quest of the narrator, Ishmael, the story’s lone survivor, to make meaning out of trauma and keep the human story going. Ishmael goes to sea in the first place because he’s feeling a particularly modern form of angst. He walks the streets of Manhattan wanting to knock people’s hats off, furious that the only available jobs in the new capitalist economy leave workers “tied to counters, nailed to benches, clinched to desks.” The whaling ship is no paradise, but at least it affords him a chance to work in the open air with people of all races, from all over the world. When the crewmen sit in a circle squeezing lumps of whale sperm into oil, they find themselves clasping each other’s hands, developing “an abounding, affectionate, friendly, loving feeling.” Then there’s Melville’s novel “Redburn,” one of the author’s lesser-known works. It’s mostly a story of disillusionment: A young naïf joins the merchant marine to see the world, and in Britain all he finds are “masses of squalid men, women, and children” spilling out from the factories. The narrator is abused by the ship’s cynical crew and swindled out of his wages. But his hard experience nonetheless broadens his sympathies. As he sails home to New York with some Irish families fleeing the famine, he remarks: “Let us waive that agitated national topic, as to whether such multitudes of foreign poor should be landed on our American shores; let us waive it, with the one only thought, that if they can get here, they have God’s right to come…. For the whole world is the patrimony of the whole world.” Melville’s fall and rise In November 1851, when “Moby-Dick” was published, Melville was among the best-known authors in the English-speaking world. But his reputation started to decline just months later, when a review of his next book, “Pierre,” bore the headline, “Herman Melville Crazy.” That opinion was not atypical. By 1857, Melville had mostly stopped writing; his publisher was bankrupt; and those Americans who still knew his name may well have thought he’d been institutionalized. Yet in 1919 – the year of Melville’s centennial – scholars started returning to his work. They found a writer of grim, tangled epics delving into the social tensions that would ultimately lead to the Civil War. It just so happened that 1919 was a year of labor strife, mail bombs, weekly lynchings, and race riots in 26 cities. There were crackdowns on foreigners, privacy, and civil liberties, not to mention the lingering trauma of World War I and the Spanish flu pandemic. Over the ensuing three decades – an era that included the Great Depression and World War II – Melville was canonized, and all of his works were reprinted in popular editions. “I owe a debt to Melville,” wrote critic and historian Lewis Mumford, “because my wrestling with him, my efforts to plumb his own tragic sense of life, were the best preparations I could have had for facing our present world.” Why Melville still matters America is now dealing with its own dark times, full of foreboding over climate change, extreme class divisions, racial and religious bigotry, refugee crises, mass shootings, and near-constant warfare. Go back and read Melville, and you’ll find apt depictions of white privilege and obliviousness in “Benito Cereno.” Melville paints consumer capitalism as an elaborate con game in “The Confidence-Man,” while excoriating America’s imperial ambitions in “Typee” and “Omoo.” He was even inspired to break his silence at the end of the Civil War and write an earnest plea for “Re-establishment” and “Reconstruction.” “Those of us who always abhorred slavery as an atheistical iniquity,” he wrote, “gladly we join the exulting chorus of humanity over its downfall.” But now it was time to find ways for everyone to get along. His 1866 book “Battle-Pieces,” though full of bitter fragments, has a final section dominated by idealistic nouns: common sense and Christian charity, patriotic passion, moderation, generosity of sentiment, benevolence, kindliness, freedom, sympathies, solicitude, amity, reciprocal respect, decency, peace, sincerity, faith. Melville was trying to remind Americans that in democracies there is a perpetual need to carve out common ground. It’s not that society doesn’t or shouldn’t change; it’s that change and continuity play off each other in surprising and sometimes bracing ways. In dark times, the rediscovery that human beings have almost always had to confront terrible challenges can produce powerful emotions. You might feel like knocking someone’s hat off. But you might also feel like giving the Ishmaels of the world a gentle squeeze of the hand. And in doing so, you might help to keep the human story going. Dr. Aaron Sachs is a Professor of History at Cornell University, but his doctorate is in American Studies, which means he brings an interdisciplinary approach to his scholarship and teaching — History, English Literature, Science, Technology, Urban Planning and other fields. His views might not represent those of Navy Times or its staffers.
Couldnt tag you: Please see July 25th posting by C. H. Evans Brewing Albany Pump Station... about Melville passion in Albany....
Found it. Thank you
Looking for help. Trying to find a photograph of Trooper William H Curley (died 1922). The Troy Times evening addition from October 4th 1922 had a photo of him but the copy isn’t great. He was born and raised and buried in Lansingburgh. I believe he was born in 1886. Maybe an old high school yearbook.