National Museum of the Marine Corps

National Museum of the Marine Corps A lasting tribute to U.S. Marines --past, present, and future. Admission and parking are FREE! Open daily from 9 AM-5 PM (except Christmas Day).

Admission to the Museum and parking are FREE! Please note security at the Museum: When you visit the Museum you will be greeted by our security personnel who will ask you to empty your pockets and walk through the metal detector. Average size and smaller handbags will be x-rayed and diaper bags will be hand-checked. Handbags larger than 14" wide x 12" high x 6" wide, briefcases, backpacks, large camera bags and suitcases will NOT be allowed into the Museum. Other prohibited items include: weapons, pepper spray and mace, sharp objects, food or drinks, and pets. (Service animals are, of course, always welcome.) Please leave these items in your vehicle to avoid any inconvenience. If you bring them into the Museum you will be required to either dispose of the item or return it to your vehicle. Museum personnel are not permitted to store items for visitors. Conduct and Page Guidelines ---------------------------------- We strive to provide our audience with information about the National Museum of the Marine Corps while maintaining an issue driven, principle based and audience focused conversation online. While this is an open forum, it's also a family friendly one, so please keep any comments clean. In addition to keeping it family friendly, we ask that you follow our posting guidelines here. Comments and posts that do not follow these guidelines may be removed: -We do not allow graphic, obscene, explicit or racial comments or submissions nor do we allow comments that are abusive, hateful or intended to defame anyone or any organization. -We do not allow solicitations or advertisements. This includes promotion or endorsement of any financial, commercial or non-governmental agency. Similarly, we do not allow attempts to defame or defraud any financial, commercial or non-governmental agency. -We do not allow comments that suggest or encourage illegal activity. -Apparent spam will be removed and may cause the author(s) to be blocked from the page without notice. -You participate at your own risk, taking personal responsibility for your comments, your username and any information provided. - For Official Use Only (FOUO), classified, pre-decisional, proprietary or business-sensitive information should never be discussed here. Don�t post personnel lists, rosters, organization charts or directories. This is a violation of privacy. The appearance of external links on this site does not constitute official endorsement on behalf of the U.S. Marine Corps or Department of Defense. You are encouraged to quote, republish or share any content on this site on your own blog, Web site or other communication/publication. If you do so, please credit the command or the person who authored the content as a courtesy. Semper Fidelis.

Sixty-five years ago today, President Dwight D. Eisenhower signed an Executive Order which officially approved the desig...
06/22/2019

Sixty-five years ago today, President Dwight D. Eisenhower signed an Executive Order which officially approved the design of the Marine Corps Seal.

To mark this anniversary, we asked our Cultural & Material History curator, Jennifer Castro to pull a few Marine Corps seals from our collection that are connected to important dates in the Corps' history. Click on the photos for more information.

These seals will be on display in our Final Phase historical galleries that will open in 2020-21.

#OTD in 1945, Japanese troops were defeated on the Pacific island of Okinawa after one of the longest and bloodiest batt...
06/22/2019

#OTD in 1945, Japanese troops were defeated on the Pacific island of Okinawa after one of the longest and bloodiest battles of World War II. The organized resistance in III Amphibious Corps’ zone ends when the 1st Marine Division takes Hill 81 and the 6th Marine Division reaches the southernmost point of the island of Okinawa.⠀

General Roy Geiger, the first Marine to command a field army, announces that the island is secure. Okinawa was the last critical outpost the United States needed to reclaim before launching an attack on the Japanese home islands. It would be another two months before Emperor Hirohito was forced into an unconditional surrender after the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. ⠀

Learn more about the Battle of Okinawa in our World War II gallery.⠀

📷: Through “Death Valley”. 10 May 1945. Official U.S. Marine Corps Photo.⠀

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#USMCMuseum #OTD #thisdayinhistory #military #marines #wwii #pacific #USMC #Okinawa #Japan #Hill81

Marines have been featured frequently on the silver screen in films that reflect much about the cultural sentiments of t...
06/20/2019

Marines have been featured frequently on the silver screen in films that reflect much about the cultural sentiments of the society and times in which they were produced. Hollywood Marines were billed as classic heroes: defeating the enemy, saving their country, and winning the girls. ⠀

In the gallery next to our Medal of Honor theater, we currently have on display “Hollywood Leathernecks” Movie Posters Inspired by Marines, an exhibit that features posters and lobby cards from our Cultural and Material History Collection. This exhibit provides a glimpse of how Marines were and are portrayed in American popular culture from circa 1920 to the present day.⠀

These artistic signboards are created to entice moviegoers to see a particular film. Poster advertising movies that featured Marines have also collectively crafted a strong impression of the Corps as an elite organization ready to answer the nation’s call to service. Patriotic war movies reinforced our notions of who the heroes and the enemies were, provided a means of escape, and often romanticized a horrific chapter of world history – and sometimes they got facts, uniforms, weapons, and other details WRONG. ⠀

Have you ever caught something “wrong” in a Marine movie? If so, what was it?⠀

📷: Poster for The Fighting Marines, Marine Pictures, 1935. ⠀
📷: Poster for Jarhead, Universal Pictures, 2005.⠀

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#USMCMuseum #military #Marines #USMC #SemperFi #hollywood #movies #posters #history

06/20/2019
Meet our summer intern, Megan Brobst

Meet Megan Brobst, our Visitor Services intern this summer!

Megan will be available this summer to help with Spanish language interpretation every Saturday until August 10th. If you want to take a tour or need questions answered in Spanish, please let our Hospitality Ambassadors know at the front desk.

Please note that Megan is a student and is not a professional interpreter. The service she offers is part of our internship and is offered as a way to share the history of the Corps with Spanish-speaking visitors.

First Lieutenant Hilda M. Stuart was the first woman Marine officer to decorate a returned Marine veteran. She congratul...
06/19/2019

First Lieutenant Hilda M. Stuart was the first woman Marine officer to decorate a returned Marine veteran. She congratulated Corporal Donald J. Lickteig, 2d Marine Division, after awarding him the Purple Heart for being wounded during the invasion of Saipan. ⠀

By the war’s end, nearly 19,000 Women Marines constituted the majority of permanent personnel at all major Marine bases in the country. They served in 225 different military specialties ranging from truck mechanics to parachute riggers. ⠀

Find out more about Women Marines and Battle of Saipan in our WWII Gallery.

📷: 1stLt Stuart congratulating Corporal Donald J. Lickteig. Official USMC Photo. ⠀
📷: Corporal Donald J. Lickteig’s Purple Heart⠀

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#USMCMuseum #Women #military #Marines #USMC #SemperFi #purpleheart #Saipan75

John Philip Sousa is responsible for bringing the United States Marine Band to an unprecedented level of excellence: a s...
06/18/2019

John Philip Sousa is responsible for bringing the United States Marine Band to an unprecedented level of excellence: a standard upheld by ever Marine Band Director since. Today we highlight the Sousa Baton, a custom-made presentation baton given to John Philip Sousa in 1930 by the American Bandmasters Association.⠀

This baton was made to honor Sousa as the most significant and influential band director in America. Sousa grew up near the Marine Barracks in Washington, D.C. where his father was a musician in the Marine Band. At the age of 13, he was enlisted as an apprentice musician in the Marine Band and remained until the age of 20. ⠀

In 1888, John Philip Sousa wrote: “Semper Fidelis” which is traditionally known as the “official” march of the Marine Corps. It was dedicated to “the officers and men of the Marine Corps”. He served for 12 years as the Leader of the Marine Corps Band, “The President’s Own” and served under five Presidents. Perhaps the most significant tribute to Sousa is the designation of “The Stars and Stripes Forever” as the national march of the United States on December 11, 1987.⠀

Be sure to check out the 2019 Summer Concert Series where we will have the Quantico Marine Corps Band, U.S. Navy Concert Band, and more playing at the Museum. ⠀

Find out more about Sousa, “The President’s Own”, and music in the Marine Corps in the Global Expeditionary Force Gallery. ⠀

📷: The Sousa Baton in the Global Expeditionary Force Gallery.⠀
📷: John Philip Sousa – Leader of United States Marine Band, 1880 – 1892. Sousa in uniform of his civilian band, about 1921. Official USMC Photograph. ⠀

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#USMCMuseum #music #military #Marines #USMC #SemperFi #Sousa #SummerConcertSeries #ThePresidentsOwn

For #MarineMonday we are highlighting GySgt Robert H. McCard, USMC, serving with Company A, 4th Tank Battalion, 4th Mari...
06/17/2019

For #MarineMonday we are highlighting GySgt Robert H. McCard, USMC, serving with Company A, 4th Tank Battalion, 4th Marine Division. Awarded the Medal of Honor for his conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving as platoon sergeant of Company A, 4th Tank Battalion, 4th Marine Division, during the battle for enemy Japanese-held Saipan, Marianas Islands on 16 June 1944.⠀

After his tank was put out of action by a battery of enemy 77-mm guns, GySgt. McCard carried on, bringing all the tank’s weapons to bear on the enemy until the severity of the hostile fire caused him to order his crew out of the escape hatch while he exposed himself to enemy guns by hurling hand grenades in order to cover the evacuation of his men. ⠀

GySgt McCard dismantled one of the tank’s machine guns and faced the Japanese to deliver vigorous fire into their position, destroying 16 of the enemy by sacrificing himself to ensure the safety of his crew. He gallantly gave his life for his country. ⠀

Semper Fi, Marine.⠀

To find out more about the Battle of Saipan and the Marianas Islands head to our WWII gallery.⠀

📷: Marines take cover behind one of their medium tanks while cleaning out the extreme northern end of the island of Saipan. Defense Dept Photo (Marine Corps).⠀

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#USMCMuseum #MarineMonday #USMC #Marine #history #SemperFi #WWII #MedalofHonor #military #USMCR #reserves #Saipan75th #Marianas

06/16/2019
U.S. Marine Corps

Here’s to the men who molded us!
#HappyFathersDay

Here’s to the men who molded us.

#HappyFathersDay

#OTD in 1944 the Montford Point Marines see combat for the first time as the 18th and 20th Marine Depot Companies land o...
06/15/2019

#OTD in 1944 the Montford Point Marines see combat for the first time as the 18th and 20th Marine Depot Companies land on Saipan under fire. Members of the 18th Depot Company served as emergency infantrymen during the height of battle, while the rest of the company eliminated Japanese infiltrators the next morning. Landing in the fourth wave of the assault, Private Kenneth Tibbs (a member of the 20th Depot Company) became the first African American Marine killed in action during World War II.

The U.S. Marine Corps resisted the addition of African American recruits until it was ordered by President Franklin D. Roosevelt in the spring of 1942. Camp Montford Point was opened in August 1942 and was the sole installation for African American Marines until 1949. Approximately 19,000+ men passed through the camp with nearly 13,000 serving overseas by war’s end. ⠀

To find out more about the Montford Point Marines and the origins of diversity in the Marine Corps, stop by our WWII Gallery.⠀

📷: USMC Photo – “On D-Day at Saipan, black Marines pause at the beach’s edge before receiving orders to move inland”⠀
📷: USMC Photo – “Men of the 3d Ammunition Company take a break during the fighting on Saipan. Seated on the Japanese bike is PEG Horace Boykin; seated (l to r) are Corporal Wilis T. Anthony and PFCs Emit Shackelford and Eugene Purdy.”⠀
📷: Fleet Marine Force Pacific Service and Supply Shoulder Sleeve Insignia patch worn by segregated Depot and Ammunition companies.
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#USMCMuseum #Saipan75th #military #Marines #USMC #SemperFi #MontfordPointMarines #WWII #history

#OTD in 1944, the invasion of Saipan begins. Within 20 minutes more than 700 armored tracs with 8,000 Marines are ashore...
06/15/2019

#OTD in 1944, the invasion of Saipan begins. Within 20 minutes more than 700 armored tracs with 8,000 Marines are ashore. Commanded by LtGen Holland “Howlin’ Mad” Smith the 2d and 4th Marine Divisions and the Army’s 27th Infantry Division land and begin their attack. ⠀

📷: TAKE COVER – The first wave of Marines to hit the Saipan beach in the Marianas⠀
invasion, take cover behind a sand dune while waiting for the following three waves to⠀
come in. Defense Dept Photo (Marine Corps).⠀
📷: Marines are crawling under enemy fire to their assigned positions. The wet Leatherneck⠀
(closest to camera) took a dunking when the landing craft he came in on was hit by⠀
Japanese mortar fire. In the background are armored “Buffaloes” which supported the⠀
Marines in their invasion of the Marianas. Defense Dept Photo (Marine Corps).⠀
📷: Two Marines take cover in shell hole. Defense Dept Photo (Marine Corps). ⠀

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#USMCMuseum #Saipan75th #military #Marines #USMC #SemperFi

06/14/2019
U.S. Army

Happy 244th Birthday, U. S. Army!

#Armybday

Today, we celebrate 244 years of defending and protecting America, and salute the generations of Soldiers who have answered the call to serve. #ArmyBday

Video by Elliot Valdez

Today is #flagday and what better time than today to highlight an important object we have in the World War II gallery, ...
06/14/2019

Today is #flagday and what better time than today to highlight an important object we have in the World War II gallery, the second flag flown over Mt. Suribachi on Iwo Jima. ⠀

LtCol Chandler W. Johnson realized the first flag that was raised over Mt. Suribachi was too small to be seen across the island. He ordered a larger flag to be taken to the summit. Joseph Rosenthal photographed the second flag-raising, which became the iconic image of the Marines in the Pacific. ⠀

The same photograph later inspired the design of the National Museum of the Marine Corps' architecture and also the United States Marine Corps Memorial in Arlington, Virginia. Next year we will mark the 75th Anniversary of the Battle of Iwo Jima with special events and displays. ⠀

Have you been to the museum and seen the Iwo Jima flag in the World War II Gallery?⠀

📷: Iwo Jima flag on display in the World War II Gallery.⠀
📷: Flag Raising on Mount Suribachi by Joe Rosenthal. Official U.S. Marine Corps Photo.⠀

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#USMCMuseum #flagday #military #Marines #USMC #SemperFi #IwoJima #history

Assaulting the Marianas – The Battle of Saipan 75th AnniversaryJune 11 – July 9, 1944The battle of Saipan marked the...
06/13/2019

Assaulting the Marianas – The Battle of Saipan 75th Anniversary

June 11 – July 9, 1944

The battle of Saipan marked the beginning of the American’s attacking the Mariana Islands – Saipan, Tinian, and Guam. This was the first time the Marines breached Japan’s “Absolute Defensive Sphere” in order to secure airfields within strategic bombing range of the enemy’s homeland.

By the summer of 1944, the Japanese had built a formidable defense of the Marianas. Thirty thousand troops awaited an invasion on Saipan. The 72 square miles were mixed sugar cane fields with rugged, wooded hills and deep ravines.

The three-and half-week battle for Saipan cost 3,225 U.S. dead and 13,061 wounded. It is estimated 30,000 Japanese died, many of them civilians. Saipan was declared secure on July 9, 1944.

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#USMCMuseum #Saipan75th #Marianas #history #USMC #WWII #military

June 12, 1961 ⠀⠀#OTD in history President John F. Kennedy signed the Proclamation 3418 - Display of the flag at the ...
06/12/2019

June 12, 1961 ⠀

#OTD in history President John F. Kennedy signed the Proclamation 3418 - Display of the flag at the United States Marine Corps Memorial in Arlington, Virginia.⠀

Have you visited the United States Marine Corps Memorial in Arlington, Virginia and seen the flag?⠀

The proclamation states:⠀
“WHEREAS the battle between the United States forces and the forces of the Japanese for possession of the island of Iwo Jima, in the North Pacific, was one of the most significant and costly battles of World War II; and⠀

WHEREAS victory in that battle was achieved by our forces after a heroic and prolonged struggle; and⠀

WHEREAS the raising of the American flag during the battle over Mt. Suribachi on February 23, 1945, symbolizes the courage and valor of the American fighting forces in World War II; and⠀

WHEREAS the United States Marine Corps Memorial in Arlington, Virginia, portrays the actual raising of the American flag Mt. Suribachi:⠀

NOW, THEREFORE, I, JOHN F. KENNEDY, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim that the flag of the United States of American shall hereafter be displayed at the United States Marine Corps Memorial in Arlington, Virginia, at all times during the day and night, except when the weather is inclement.”⠀

📷: U.S. Navy photo by Photographer’s Mate 2nd Class Daniel J. McLain (RELEASED)⠀

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#USMCMuseum #OTD #thisdayinhistory #history #JFK #military #Marines #USMC #PresidentialProclamation #WWII #IwoJima #usa #flag #america

Today we highlight Private Michael Owens who #OTD in 1871 fought courageously and was wounded, in hand-to-hand combat on...
06/11/2019

Today we highlight Private Michael Owens who #OTD in 1871 fought courageously and was wounded, in hand-to-hand combat on board the U.S.S. Colorado during the capture of the Korean forts. ⠀

The Korean Expedition, in 1871, was the first American military action in Korea. It took place predominantly on and around Ganghwa Island. The reason for the American presence was to support diplomatic delegation sent to establish trade and political relations with Korea. ⠀

📷: Korean Campaign 1871 – Pvt. Hugh Purvis, Cpl. Charles Brown, Cpt. McLane Tilton. From the collections of Hugh Purvis, COLL/1171, United States Marine Corps Archives & Special Collections. ⠀


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#USMCMuseum #MarineMonday #USMC #Marine #history #SemperFi #MedalofHonor #military

Attention to detail matters! Here's a little preview of the life-cast figures Taylor Studios, Inc. created for our Final...
06/11/2019

Attention to detail matters!

Here's a little preview of the life-cast figures Taylor Studios, Inc. created for our Final Phase galleries.

Attention to detail matters! 🔎Take a look at these lifecast figures we made for the National Museum of the Marine Corps.

Combat Artist Richard Johnson updates us on his trip overseas.  "I am here as part of a small contingent of field artist...
06/09/2019
Flashback 1

Combat Artist Richard Johnson updates us on his trip overseas.

"I am here as part of a small contingent of field artists working on behalf of the National Museum of the Marine Corps in Quantico, Virginia. We have been chasing the possibility of creating live art of Marines in Syria for the last two years. This trip is the culmination of all that planning. Two Marines and two civilians (two teams with one of each). Two youngies and two oldies. The civilians being the oldies. The plan is for us to spread out into Iraq and Syria over the next couple of weeks and illustrate the lives of USMC personnel in the field."

Read his full report here:

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/flashback-1-richard-johnson/

We left Kuwait airport in a convoy of two civilian trucks heading for Ahmad al-Jaber Air Base. It is my first time back here since 2003.

Today’s #flightfriday highlights the famed Douglas SBD-3 Dauntless hanging proudly in our Leatherneck Gallery. ⠀⠀T...
06/08/2019

Today’s #flightfriday highlights the famed Douglas SBD-3 Dauntless hanging proudly in our Leatherneck Gallery. ⠀

The SBD found fame during the Battle of Midway in June 1942. In a few hours, US Navy SBD squadrons sank four Japanese aircraft carriers supporting an invasion fleet heading for the small American outpost of Midway. This action is widely seen as the “turning point” of World War II. Some of the pilots of Marine Scout/Bomber Squadron (VMSB) 241 that flew the SBDs had less than 10 hours of flight time in them. ⠀

Only 6 of the unit’s 19 SBD-2s survived the attack. One Dauntless returned to Midway with 259 bullet holes, and Major Lofton Henderson was killed during the action. ⠀

For more information on the Douglas SBD-3 Dauntless take a look at it in our Leatherneck Gallery and follow the link below to read more about it.⠀

https://www.usmcmuseum.com/Douglas-SBD-3-Dauntless.html

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18900 Jefferson Davis Hwy
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