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Afro-American Historical Association of Fauquier County VA.

Afro-American Historical Association of Fauquier County VA. AA History, Geneaology, Museum & Research Facility When AAHA launched her maiden voyage at the Mt. White and Mrs.

A Historical Note of the Afro-American Historical Association of Fauquier County

The Afro American Historical Association of Fauquier County (AAHA) owes its birth to two daughters of Fauquier County named Karen in 1992. Our beautiful county is the birthplace of at least eight consecutive generations of Karen Hughes White’s family. Karen King Lavore, though not born in Fauquier, also traces her fa

A Historical Note of the Afro-American Historical Association of Fauquier County

The Afro American Historical Association of Fauquier County (AAHA) owes its birth to two daughters of Fauquier County named Karen in 1992. Our beautiful county is the birthplace of at least eight consecutive generations of Karen Hughes White’s family. Karen King Lavore, though not born in Fauquier, also traces her fa

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Commemorating AAHA 30th Anniversary "Down Through The Years"LISTEN! THE COMMUNITY SPEAKS (2018-2019) was an oral history...
08/11/2022

Commemorating AAHA 30th Anniversary
"Down Through The Years"

LISTEN! THE COMMUNITY SPEAKS (2018-2019) was an oral history project funded by the PATH Foundation to conduct interviews with African Americans from Fauquier County and preserve their memories of growing up 50 years ago or earlier. Audio and video sessions were held at church fellowship halls, the AAHA Resource Library, and even a local restaurant. People were enthused and excited about sharing neighborhood reflections from the 1960s and before. The original concept was regenerated at a roundtable discussion at Mt. Nebo Baptist Church, Morgantown, when a group came together to talk about what it was like to grow up near the Free State area of Marshall. Between 2001 and 2007, AAHA conducted at least 15 similar conversations with elderly African Americans born in Fauquier. Listen! The Community Speaks was a huge success culminating in nearly 20 interviews thus far.
Individuals with the following family names participated in the project or took part in the earlier interviews: Blue, Bolden, Brown, Carter, Champ, Chichester, Davis, Freeman, Gaines, Gaskin, Gibbs, Gibson, Grant, Holmes, Jackson, Johnson, Jolley, Jolly, Jones, Latney, Lewis, Lloyd, Logan, Montgomery, Moore, Nelson, Poles, Reed, Robinson, Roland, Smith, Tapscott, Taylor, Thompson, Tibbs, Walker, Washington, White, Whitmore, and Woods.
Groups or individuals representing the following communities also participated: Ashville, Blackwelltown, Crest Hill, Haiti aka Hayti, Hume, Hurleytown, Madisontown, Morgantown, Oliver City, Orlean, Rectortown, Shipmadilly, Tall Timbers, The Plains, and Waterloo.
If you, or someone you know, would like to provide an oral history about growing up in an African American community in Fauquier 50 years ago or earlier, give AAHA a call at 540-253-7488.

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08/09/2022
AAHA Virtual Genealogy & Local History: Takisha Payne, Author & Ashleigh Webb, Illustrator

Series: AAHA Virtual Genealogy & Local History
Date: August 9, 2022
Time: 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Topic: Children’s Book-Author & Illustrator

Speakers: Takisha Payne & Ashleigh Webb

Takisha Payne was born in Warrenton, Virginia to parents Elaine and George. In 2012, Takisha received her Bachelor’s Degree in Psychology and recognizes that as a significant milestone in her life. Her first book Bitsy Bop Wants to Hippity Hop was published in January 2013 followed by Bitsy Bop Hold Your Head Up High in December 2020 via Mascot Books. In 2021 Takisha started Bitsy Bop Entertainment LLC, an entertainment company with the sole purpose of creating music and animation content for children. The first song You Matter The Most and the first animated video from the Believe Achievers Band are now available on all major platforms.

Ashleigh Webb was born in Warrenton, VA and attended Fauquier County Schools. She has a Bachelor's degree from Virginia Commonwealth University. Ashleigh became interested in doing Illustrations for children’s books when she realized she could serve the youth with art. When a publisher reached out to her to illustrate Layla’s Happiness (Winner of the 2020 Ezra Jack Keats Award), the door to children's books opened. She hopes to shine light on the small moments that bring us joy and connections that fill us with life. She enjoys dancing and the outdoors, and spending time with her family.

Host: AAHA’s Community Outreach Coordinator Christine Taylor Lewis.

Christine is a daughter of Fauquier County spending much of her youth in Warrenton’s Haiti community and is a graduate of William C. Taylor High School and the University of Detroit.

Note: Ashleigh will not be in attendance due to unexpected circumstances.

Series: AAHA Virtual Genealogy & Local HistoryDate: August 9, 2022Time: 1:00 pm - 2:00 pmTopic: Children’s Book-Author &...
08/05/2022

Series: AAHA Virtual Genealogy & Local History
Date: August 9, 2022
Time: 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Topic: Children’s Book-Author & Illustrator
Speakers: Takisha Payne & Ashleigh Webb

Takisha Payne was born in Warrenton, Virginia to parents Elaine and George. In 2012, Takisha received her Bachelor’s Degree in Psychology and recognizes that as a significant milestone in her life. Her first book Bitsy Bop Wants to Hippity Hop was published in January 2013 followed by Bitsy Bop Hold Your Head Up High in December 2020 via Mascot Books. In 2021 Takisha started Bitsy Bop Entertainment LLC, an entertainment company with the sole purpose of creating music and animation content for children. The first song You Matter The Most and the first animated video from the Believe Achievers Band are now available on all major platforms.

Ashleigh Webb was born in Warrenton, VA and attended Fauquier County Schools. She has a Bachelor's degree from Virginia Commonwealth University. Ashleigh became interested in doing Illustrations for children’s books when she realized she could serve the youth with art. When a publisher reached out to her to illustrate Layla’s Happiness (Winner of the 2020 Ezra Jack Keats Award), the door to children's books opened. She hopes to shine light on the small moments that bring us joy and connections that fill us with life. She enjoys dancing and the outdoors, and spending time with her family.

Host: AAHA’s Community Outreach Coordinator Christine Taylor Lewis.
Christine is a daughter of Fauquier County spending much of her youth in Warrenton’s Haiti community and is a graduate of William C. Taylor High School and the University of Detroit.

More Info is available here:
https://www.aahafauquier.org/events-2/rip6qz9bwuiqwf9580gjmklamkqmep-2sa7k-axhy6

30TH Anniversary – Down Through The YearsWhen AAHA’s Director, Karen Hughes White, was asked to reflect on the agency’s ...
08/04/2022

30TH Anniversary – Down Through The Years
When AAHA’s Director, Karen Hughes White, was asked to reflect on the agency’s enormous growth over the past 30 years, she simply recalled those years as “a process” and went on to describe the work as “a big, evolving story, not only about Fauquier County but about a People.” In commemoration of the 30th Anniversary of the Afro-American Historical Association of Fauquier County, this page will provide a look at some of the agency’s initiatives, programs, and services over time.

LEST WE FORGET
It has been described as one of the most striking of all AAHA exhibits. At first sight in person, it can punch the gut or pierce the heart of anyone who is a descendent of the enslaved in America. The very presence of it can become an up-close and painful reminder of the most extreme form of inequality to exist in this country. The Slave Cage, located within yards of the entrance to the AAHA Resource Center and Museum, is a daunting symbol of America’s past. Lest we forget the sufferings of the African American ancestors, despite the discomfort that seeing this cage can produce.

AAHA’s Slave Cage is said to have come from the slave ship, Veronica, around 1850. It was donated to AAHA in November 1998 by an antique dealer in New York who purchased it from an antique picker. Oral history has it that the cage, at one time, had been located in a barn in Pennsylvania.

The Slave Cage was previewed during “A Day of Dedication” at AAHA on October 2, 1999.

30TH Anniversary – Down Through The YearsWhen AAHA’s Director, Karen Hughes White, was asked to reflect on the agency’s ...
07/28/2022

30TH Anniversary – Down Through The Years
When AAHA’s Director, Karen Hughes White, was asked to reflect on the agency’s enormous growth over the past 30 years, she simply recalled those years as “a process” and went on to describe the work as “a big, evolving story, not only about Fauquier County but about a People.” In commemoration of the 30th Anniversary of the Afro-American Historical Association of Fauquier County, this page will provide a look at some of the agency’s initiatives, programs, and services over time.243 Loudoun Ave.
The Plains, VA 20198
THE AAHA MUSEUM has grown to become one of the largest and most extensive of its kind in Northern Virginia. With 4,269 square feet of space, a collection of more than 1600 artifacts, and summaries posted intermittently to describe people and periods in history, the museum is a popular attraction to historians, educators, students, families, and individuals. Equally matched, in terms of learning the history of African Americans in Fauquier County, are the archives and publications located on the agency’s main floor.
THE RESEARCH/RESOURCE ROOM is equipped with seating and two computers that contain software with access to agency files. A long work table and a copier are also accessible. Lateral file cabinets house archival and family files made available with the assistance of staff. There are numerous bookcases with hundreds of notebooks containing thousands upon thousands of archives.
THE MEDIA ROOM primarily holds electronic and print media related to the Black Experience in Fauquier County as well as the broader community. This room preserves over 100 VHS tapes, cassette tapes, newspapers, print and recorded family histories, church anniversary books, yearbooks, census records, AAHA event programs, and much more.
THE RESOURCE LIBRARY houses 2,573 books as of this date. All four walls contain shelves filled with publications by and about African Americans. Keyword searches can be made using the in-house computer software or the AAHA website to determine if a book is in the library. The AAHA library books are solely for resource purposes.
THE AUDITORIUM on the basement level contains traditional church pews and a large stage. It is used for plays, special performances, and community or family gatherings.

07/26/2022
AAHA Virtual Genealogy & Local History: Stories by Stanley Brown about growing up in rural Fauquier County during the 1950s and 60s

Series: AAHA Virtual Genealogy & Local History
Date: July 26, 2022
Time: 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm

Topic: Growing up Colored: Stories by Stanley Brown about growing up in rural Fauquier County during the 1950s and 60s

Stanley Brown is a Fauquier native, born in Remington. He graduated from Fauquier High School, attended Norfolk State College, and received a degree from DeVry University. He served in the US Navy as an Air Traffic Controller and retired from Lockheed Martin after 35 years of service. Stanley resides in Fredericksburg with his wife, Irene. They have five children, 13 grandchildren, and four great-grandchildren. He loves writing, birdwatching, and spending time with his family.

Speaker/Host: AAHA’s Community Outreach Coordinator Christine Taylor Lewis. Christine is a daughter of Fauquier County spending much of her youth in Warrenton’s Haiti community and is a graduate of William C. Taylor High School and the University of Detroit.

Join us on July 26th, when Christine Taylor Lewis shares Stanley Brown’s stories.

Join Zoom Meeting
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83581748746?pwd=WG5aRGx3U3p6VkxRMkoyb2VIRjZvUT09
Meeting ID: 835 8174 8746
Passcode: 735930

AAHA Virtual Genealogy & Local History: Stories by Stanley Brown about growing up in rural Fauquier County during the 19...
07/23/2022

AAHA Virtual Genealogy & Local History: Stories by Stanley Brown about growing up in rural Fauquier County during the 1950s and 60s

Series: AAHA Virtual Genealogy & Local History
Date: July 26, 2022
Time: 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm

Topic: Growing up Colored: Stories by Stanley Brown about growing up in rural Fauquier County during the 1950s and 60s

Stanley Brown is a Fauquier native, born in Remington. He graduated from Fauquier High School, attended Norfolk State College, and received a degree from DeVry University. He served in the US Navy as an Air Traffic Controller and retired from Lockheed Martin after 35 years of service. Stanley resides in Fredericksburg with his wife, Irene. They have five children, 13 grandchildren, and four great-grandchildren. He loves writing, birdwatching, and spending time with his family.

Speaker/Host: AAHA’s Community Outreach Coordinator Christine Taylor Lewis. Christine is a daughter of Fauquier County spending much of her youth in Warrenton’s Haiti community and is a graduate of William C. Taylor High School and the University of Detroit.

Join us on July 26th, when Christine Taylor Lewis shares Stanley Brown’s stories.

Join Zoom Meeting
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83581748746?pwd=WG5aRGx3U3p6VkxRMkoyb2VIRjZvUT09
Meeting ID: 835 8174 8746
Passcode: 735930

07/12/2022
AAHA Virtual Genealogy & Local History: Through the Looking Glass

Series: AAHA Virtual Genealogy & Local History
Date: July 12, 2022
Time: 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM Eastern Standard Time
Topic: Through the Looking Glass: Teaching Slavery Using Local Sources in the Class Room

Speaker: Carolyn Wyrsch
Host: Christine Taylor Lewis

Ms. Wyrsch’s presentation, Through the Looking Glass, is designed to share some practical strategies that she used in the classroom. Her hope is that this resource will encourage other teachers to find new ways to enhance their students’ exposure to a very critical topic in our nation’s history.

Ms. Wyrsch received a BA in History and Secondary Education from Caldwell University and received an MA in History from Rutgers University. Professionally, she served as the History Department Chair at Wakefield School, in The Plains, Virginia and taught as an adjunct instructor of history at Northern Virginia Community College.

https://www.aahafauquier.org/events-2/tncenlpj642kx7wf8bha5end3wf2a0Series: AAHA Virtual Genealogy & Local HistoryDate: ...
07/08/2022

https://www.aahafauquier.org/events-2/tncenlpj642kx7wf8bha5end3wf2a0
Series: AAHA Virtual Genealogy & Local History
Date: July 12, 2022
Time: 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM Eastern Standard Time
Topic: Through the Looking Glass: Teaching Slavery Using Local Sources in the Class Room

Speaker: Carolyn Wyrsch

Host: Christine Taylor Lewis

Ms. Wyrsch’s presentation, Through the Looking Glass, is designed to share some practical strategies that she used in the classroom. Her hope is that this resource will encourage other teachers to find new ways to enhance their students’ exposure to a very critical topic in our nation’s history.

Ms. Wyrsch received a BA in History and Secondary Education from Caldwell University and received an MA in History from Rutgers University. Professionally, she served as the History Department Chair at Wakefield School, in The Plains, Virginia and taught as an adjunct instructor of history at Northern Virginia Community College.

Join Zoom Meeting

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/84563480740?pwd=cGN3WVFZRkhNQXJCUTAxaEdDbmROZz09

30TH Anniversary – Down Through The YearsWhen AAHA’s Director, Karen Hughes White, was asked to reflect on the agency’s ...
07/07/2022

30TH Anniversary – Down Through The Years
When AAHA’s Director, Karen Hughes White, was asked to reflect on the agency’s enormous growth over the past 30 years, she simply recalled those years as “a process” and went on to describe the work as “a big, evolving story, not only about Fauquier County but about a People.” In commemoration of the 30th Anniversary of the Afro-American Historical Association of Fauquier County, this page will provide a look at some of the agency’s initiatives, programs, and services over time.

MANY HATS
The Afro-American Historical Association of Fauquier County has been blessed, down through the years, to maintain a good number of loyal and steadfast supporters from the local community. Chief among them was the Reverend Lemuel A. Montgomery, whose dedication to AAHA’s mission to promote African American history has spanned over two decades. As a man who literally wore many hats, Rev. Montgomery was a pastor, an educator, a musician, a playwright, a drama coach, a family man, and a friend to most.
For many years, he served as Program Director for AAHA’s annual Black History celebrations. The first in a long string of performances was a production held on February 3, 2001, entitled “There Is Hope.” A cast of 30 players in full costume, from Fauquier and beyond, portrayed well-known and lesser-known African Americans who inspired hope by way of skits, songs, dances, and storytelling. Stage plays and performances such as these were held almost every year thereafter until the emergence of Covid-19 in 2020.
In addition to the Black History events, Rev. Montgomery helped to coordinate three annual programs in commemoration of Martin Luther King Jr. Day. Music was rendered by the MLK Community Ensemble which he founded. The programs were co-sponsored by Mt. Zion Baptist Church of Warrenton, Lord Fairfax Community College of Warrenton, and AAHA of The Plains.
The community events mentioned above are but a small example of the legacy left by the man who wore many hats. The Board of Directors, the staff, and the volunteers of AAHA extend our deepest condolences to the Montgomery family.

Address

4243 Loudoun Ave
The Plains, VA
20198

General information

Further, our mission includes the creation of a network for persons with similar interest by making available to those interested in local history and tracing their family roots. AAHA promotes and publishes scholarly research. The facility is open to the public for tours, research and study. This Resource Center houses a museum, reference and research library pertaining to the African American way of life. Avenues to locate and support the preservation and restoration of historic landmarks relative to the African American Culture in Fauquier County, Virginia, is of high priority. Cultural events and educational seminars are held throughout the year. The work of our organization serves as an educational tool for the entire Fauquier County community and outlying areas. Visitors to our Center have all given favorable comments as to its excellent collection, its atmosphere for study and research and to the assistance offered by its staff.

Opening Hours

Tuesday 10am - 3pm
Wednesday 10am - 3pm

Telephone

(540) 253-7488

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