Paul W. Zuccaire Gallery at Stony Brook University

Paul W. Zuccaire Gallery at Stony Brook University Exhibitions of professional and student artists in a 5000 square foot space on the first floor of the Staller Center for the Arts at Stony Brook University
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Operating as usual

Happy Valentines Day! Join our education interns today to learn about the art of Mickalene Thomas and practice self-love...
02/14/2021

Happy Valentines Day! Join our education interns today to learn about the art of Mickalene Thomas and practice self-love by crafting a diva self-portrait. TODAY at 5pm. Learn more & Register: https://bit.ly/2NfhPNI

Image: Mickalene Thomas, Brawlin' Spitfire Wrestlers, 2007

Art History & Crafts: The Art of Mickalene Thomas & Diva Self-Portrait, virtual eventSunday, February 14 at 5pm. Click h...
02/10/2021

Art History & Crafts: The Art of Mickalene Thomas & Diva Self-Portrait, virtual event
Sunday, February 14 at 5pm. Click here to register: https://bit.ly/3q95RUC

Join the Zuccaire Gallery education interns for a fun and interactive zoom art presentation followed by a craft workshop themed around the work of artist Mickalene Thomas. Come prepared to make a Diva Self-Portrait to celebrate loving oneself with body positivity.

Supplies to Bring
1. Picture print out of self (may be substituted for a picture of an animal, friend, or other) in a glam pose. This can be on picture paper or regular printer paper.
2. Tracing paper (parchment paper or baking paper works too)
3. Glue (Modge Podge, Nori, Elmer’s Glue, etc.)
4. Magazine/ paper scraps/ notebook paper/ hand-colored paper/ etc.
5. Optional but encouraged: bedazzling items (glitter/ glitter/ nail polish/ rhinestones/ beads/ sequins/ needle and thread to sew the beads on.)

Image: Mickalene Thomas, Brawlin' Spitfire Wrestlers, 2007, Hydrocal (painted), flier design by Kiana Lom

“It’s a time to reflect thoroughly on the centuries of historical injustice that preceded this Black History Month of 20...
02/02/2021

“It’s a time to reflect thoroughly on the centuries of historical injustice that preceded this Black History Month of 2021, but also a time to recognize that history is still happening now” - Gianna Coscia, SBU ‘22, student artist featured in RECKONING.
Congrats to the students whose artwork is featured on the @stonybrooku homepage for Black History Month! Read more about what Stony Brook University is doing this month at stonybrook.edu

Closed today due to snow. Regular hours start tomorrow. We're here Monday-Friday 12-2pm with additional hours by appoint...
02/01/2021

Closed today due to snow. Regular hours start tomorrow. We're here Monday-Friday 12-2pm with additional hours by appointment. Open to the Stony Brook University Campus Community.

RECKONING: Student Mural open through March 1.

Happy move-in weekend, Seawolves! Drop by this week (Wednesday-Sunday) between 11am-1pm to visit RECKONING: Student Mura...
01/27/2021

Happy move-in weekend, Seawolves! Drop by this week (Wednesday-Sunday) between 11am-1pm to visit RECKONING: Student Mural. Regular hours start next week, February 1, M-F 12-2pm.

Paul W. Zuccaire Gallery at Stony Brook University's cover photo
01/26/2021

Paul W. Zuccaire Gallery at Stony Brook University's cover photo

Lots of progress this week! See you soon, Seawolves.
01/22/2021

Lots of progress this week! See you soon, Seawolves.

FACES AND PLACES: Photographs from the Kellerman Family, on view at the Zuccaire Gallery 2018.  Over 60 photographs dona...
01/21/2021

FACES AND PLACES: Photographs from the Kellerman Family, on view at the Zuccaire Gallery 2018. Over 60 photographs donated to Stony Brook University by the Kellerman family. The collection focuses on striking images of people and places from the 1960s through the present. Today, you can find some of these photos on display in Stony Brook administrative offices across campus.

The exhibition featured works by more than ten artists, including Irina Ionesco and Ralph Gibson, who present dramatic light and shadow play across people and architecture; Walter Iooss's sports stars at rest and in action; and artists working through a photojournalistic lens, such as James Nachtwey and Kristin Capp, who capture the beauty and humanity of people around the world.

Thom Thompson: Retro: A Selection of Works from 1969 to 2000September 12–October 21, 2000Years and experiences have move...
01/19/2021

Thom Thompson: Retro: A Selection of Works from 1969 to 2000
September 12–October 21, 2000

Years and experiences have moved by so fast that neither of us finds it easy to recollect what we now refer to as “the early days”…Good teachers and good mentors are essential: They inspire perpetual learning and teach us how to communicate ideas. Thom Thompson is both. -Dan Cassano.

While Thompson photographs the drive-in at a distance, he photographs commercial ships close-up creating luminous, abstract compositions. Being this close creates a solitary experience. His landscapes, on the other hand, viewed from the distance panoramically, also create a sense of the solitude of the individual traveler. Like the drive-ins, the carnival photographs reflect an era present and past, current in small towns and cities. There is a sense that the viewer is the remote witness to a "landscape" devoid of humans, each mechanism portrayed at rest. This creates an air of sadness or nostalgia for that which has been temporarily abandoned as it awaits a new interaction or becomes a thing of the past. - Excerpt from catalog, written by Howardena Pindell

The Paul W. Zuccaire Gallery is proud to present RECKONING: Student Mural on view February 1 - March 1, 2021. RECKONING ...
01/16/2021

The Paul W. Zuccaire Gallery is proud to present RECKONING: Student Mural on view February 1 - March 1, 2021. RECKONING presents artwork from Stony Brook students across campus in response to the challenges and issues of the day. Add your own voice on a large paper mural included in the exhibition. In addition, artwork from RECKONING: Faculty Exhibition will be projected on the gallery wall. Open Monday-Friday 12-2pm with additional hours by appointment. Learn more https://bit.ly/3scXZTr

Warren Brandt: A Retrospective, July 1-August 7, 1993, Zuccaire GalleryIn his early years in mid·century New York, Warre...
01/14/2021

Warren Brandt: A Retrospective, July 1-August 7, 1993, Zuccaire Gallery

In his early years in mid·century New York, Warren Brandt - native of Greensboro, North Carolina, and future, full-fledged "child of Matisse" - seemed to have handily adapted the Abstract Expressionism ethic. He was painting free form and expressively and hanging out evenings at the Cedar Tavern with Accion Painting chums Willem de Kooning, Fram Kline, Paul Jenkins, and Milton Resnick. In his early thirties, Brandt already had impressive credentials: studies with Yasuo Kuniyoshi at the Art Students' League (a soft, Renoiresque Nude from 1946 strongly displays the influence); five years in the Army in the privileged, perk-laden position of official portraitist to the commandants; and then, at Washington University in St. Louis on the G.I. Bill, study with, first, Philip Guston, then Max Beckmann. Gymnast (1948) reveals how deeply Brandt felt toward both the tutelage and the art of the fabled German expressionist.

Susan Shatter: Tracking the Terrain: Landscapes, Seascapes, BodyscapesOn view November 11-December 13, 2003 at the Zucca...
01/12/2021

Susan Shatter: Tracking the Terrain: Landscapes, Seascapes, Bodyscapes
On view November 11-December 13, 2003 at the Zuccaire Gallery.

Susan Shatter's landscapes have a kind of intransigent objectivity, as though the artist were refusing all communion with her theme–– every attempt to see nature from some imaginary within. Shatter refuses to fall–– coyly and knowingly, as is the custom–– into the pathetic fallacy, to take nature as a rich realm of emotional connotation, even though that sometimes seems its gift to us. She neither mythologizes nor de-mythologizes it, she begins with it simply as there.

The Bodyscapes were made in response to chemotherapy, which added to Shatter's sense of victimization–– not only was she gratuitously victimized by the nature to which she has devoted her art, but science also seemed to victimized her body, however hard it struggled to heal the damage done by nature–– and to psychotherapy, which tried to repair the damage done to her psyche by her death-threatening bodily ailment

Christa Erickson: Prosthetic Memory, Bodies, Bits, & DevicesJanuary 30-February 24, 2007In Erickson's work, playing sugg...
01/07/2021

Christa Erickson: Prosthetic Memory, Bodies, Bits, & Devices
January 30-February 24, 2007

In Erickson's work, playing suggests the possibility of transgression at the same time as tt reminds us of the methods by which we are prevented from playing freely and made to conform. Just as her work reverses our understanding of memory as a practice that moves from the Inside out to one that moves from the outside in, she also reverses our understanding of surveillance from a practice that moves from the outside In to one that moves from the inside out. Just as a memory is not something we have, but something that has us, the gaze is not only extemal to us, but becomes most effective when it is internalized by us. Surveillance as a mode of subjectification is demonstrated in several of the installations here, including Search, Leaming Distance, Dataskins, Debt Reducer, and Dis-ease. Our movements are literally and figuratively traced throughout the show.

Mel Pekarsky: Things in the Desert, November 7-December 12, 2009 at the Zuccaire Gallery.Determined to escape this fatal...
01/05/2021

Mel Pekarsky: Things in the Desert, November 7-December 12, 2009 at the Zuccaire Gallery.

Determined to escape this fatal vulgarity, Pekarsky retreats from it to "the utter desert wastes" in search of unmodified nature, and to have the solitude in which he can explore his own unmodified art that avant-gardism has become. Thus the desert becomes Pekareky's creative garden of paradise.
Peltaraky varies his material medium–– crayon, challc, pencil, oil–– and touch to reflect the different densities and changing texture of the desert landscape, unconsciously scanning the scene to bring us to haptic as well as visual consciousness of it, even as its complexities and subtleties–– memorable randomness–– seem too slippery to take in with a single glance, suggesting that it can never be comprehended as a whole, and thus, however carefully observed, is felt to be enigmatic.

What is your favorite natural place to visit?

RECKONING: Faculty Exhibition 2020Online Exhibition, launching October 1, 2020Kicking off the end of the year with a thr...
12/31/2020

RECKONING: Faculty Exhibition 2020
Online Exhibition, launching October 1, 2020

Kicking off the end of the year with a throwback to our most recent online exhibition. 2020 has been a crazy year, but we did it!
RECKONING presents artwork created in 2020 that expresses a range of individual and collective experiences we are living through and the underlying conditions that have brought us to this crossroads. RECKONING is presented as an online Faculty Exhibition featuring the work of Stony Brook University's world-renowned faculty artists, as well as a student exhibition titled RECKONING: Student Digital Mural.
In 2020, we experienced a pandemic, quarantine, major changes to how we work and live, support of essential workers, xenophobia, racial injustice, Black Lives Matter protests, political activism and divisiveness, controversy over monuments, climate change, #MeToo, uncertainty of the future, and more. In light of the challenges the world is facing today, creative responses form a crucial component of expression, activism and hope for the future.

“I’m not a feminist. But if I was this is what I would complain about”... NOT READY TO MAKE NICE: Guerrilla Girls in the...
12/29/2020

“I’m not a feminist. But if I was this is what I would complain about”... NOT READY TO MAKE NICE: Guerrilla Girls in the Artworld and Beyond, featured at the Zuccaire Gallery 2016.

Not Ready to Make Nice, a major presentation of the Guerrilla Girls, illuminates and contextualizes the important historical and ongoing work of these highly original, provocative and influential artists who champion feminism and social change. The Guerrilla Girls have been powerfully and consistently active since first breaking onto the art scene in 1985. Appearing only in gorilla masks and assuming the names of dead women artists, the activist group has remained anonymous for nearly three decades while revealing shocking truths about sexism and prejudice in the artworld and beyond.
Focusing primarily on recent work from the past decade, the exhibition features rarely shown international projects that trace the collective’s artistic and activist influence around the globe.

Imagine PeaceYoko Ono Imagine Peace: Featuring John and Yoko’s Year of Peace on view at the Zuccaire Gallery 2011. Origi...
12/24/2020

Imagine Peace

Yoko Ono Imagine Peace: Featuring John and Yoko’s Year of Peace on view at the Zuccaire Gallery 2011. Originally organized by the Myers School of Art at The University of Akron, the exhibition was curated by Kevin Concannon and John Noga. It was the first venue in New York to present this traveling exhibition. On closing night, Sean Lennon, the musician son of John and Yoko, and Charlotte Kemp Muhl — together they make up the Ghost of a Saber Tooth Tiger —performed at the Staller Center.
Yoko Ono was among the earliest of artists working in the genre of Conceptual Art. Ono has consistently employed the theme of peace and used the medium of advertising In her work since the early 1960s.

YOKO ONO IMAGINE PEACE Featuring John & Yoko’s Year of Peace explores these aspects of her work over the course of more than forty years. The project carries forward conceptual and formal strategies the artist has employed from the earliest years of her career, not only in her seminal solo works, but in her collaborations with John Lennon. In 1965, she created works specifically for the advertising pages of The New York Arts Calendar.
Photos by Kathy Kmonicek for The New York Times

Jason Paradis, 08.19.2020.22:26, 2020, ink, carbon, and acrylic on paper, 10 x 9″, from RECKONING: Faculty Exhibition 20...
12/21/2020

Jason Paradis, 08.19.2020.22:26, 2020, ink, carbon, and acrylic on paper, 10 x 9″, from RECKONING: Faculty Exhibition 2020. See the full series here: https://bit.ly/37k7FlA

For Reckoning, I will be submitting on ongoing drawing project “documenting” events of 2020. These events will range from the global to the personal. Some will be of contextually large-scale concerns while others will be of my individual daily moments. The only indication revealing the source of each will be numerical titles that catalog the date and time. Each drawing will start with the transfer of a map recording the exact location of the stars and planets on the particular date (and time) of the event. The drawing process will be the same for every piece as individually layered ink-lines abstract the impetus. Every few days a new drawing will be added to the series. The resulting compilation of similar looking images with slight, possibly indiscernible, variations alludes to the desire for significant change but reflects the reality of consistency and constant repetition.

Patricia Maurides, Charmolypi, 2020, Photography – archival pigment print, from RECKONING: Faculty Exhibition. During th...
12/18/2020

Patricia Maurides, Charmolypi, 2020, Photography – archival pigment print, from RECKONING: Faculty Exhibition.

During the past several months, I felt lodged between a state of grief together with a feeling of hope. There is a Greek untranslatable word for this, ‘Charmolypi’ (χαρμολύπη) which means sorrow and joy at the same time.

ANTIFORM: Packer, Patrick & Ros  January 24 – February 18, 2017Lindsay Packer uses found materials, colored light and sh...
12/17/2020

ANTIFORM: Packer, Patrick & Ros
January 24 – February 18, 2017

Lindsay Packer uses found materials, colored light and shadow, along with existing architectural elements, to create unexpected optical projections. Packer is creating some of her pieces on-site and is also showing video work.

John Ros‘ interventions are constructed on-site and can include building materials, refuse and discarded objects, light sources, natural light and sound, to draw attention to subtleties of place. Ros is constructing all of his work on-site during the installation period, using materials found in and around the Staller building and responding to physical elements of the gallery itself, such as its architectural features, as well as shadow and light.

Mitch Patrick brings this practice into the digital arena, using video and 3D printing to examine the relationship of viewers, screens and pixels. All three of the artists are interested in focusing our awareness and perception of the actual or virtual spaces we inhabit.

Isabel Manalo: Skin CodesNovember 7 – December 12, 2015We’re digging through our archives to highlight some of the artis...
12/15/2020

Isabel Manalo: Skin Codes
November 7 – December 12, 2015

We’re digging through our archives to highlight some of the artists, artwork, and exhibitions that have been at the Zuccaire Gallery. This time five years ago, we had Isabel Manalo’s Skin Codes on exhibit.

Isabel Manalo is an interdisciplinary visual artist whose work addresses ideas of power and identity as defined by race, ethnicity, geography and class. Combining photography with drawing, painting, sewing and writing, her work embraces visual clues and coding.
Manalo's latest works respond to trends in social media surrounding potent issues such as racially charged police violence in the United States and the refugee crisis in Syria. This exhibition included work from these series, as well as a new large stitched wall piece she created specifically for the Zuccaire Gallery's expansive space.

Qin Han, New Growth – Globalization, 2020, from RECKONING: Faculty Exhibition 2020. you.stonybrook.edu/reckoning2020New ...
12/14/2020

Qin Han, New Growth – Globalization, 2020, from RECKONING: Faculty Exhibition 2020. you.stonybrook.edu/reckoning2020

New Growth is a series of short animations reacting to the historical pandemic in 2020. It was inspired by a dead tree bursting new leaves in a trail on Long Island, NY, during summer 2020. New Growth comments on the new growth on a dead tree with the changes of globalization and social networks. When human life is turning virtual, nature becomes preciously admirable.

I started with charcoal drawing in nature, then turn the drawing into an animation. Thinking of the world is going online, the artwork should “net born” as well. So I started to transfer the drawings into animation, using neon light simulations to imitate the collapse of post-pandemic globalization. The text contexts are sourced online from news websites and published papers.

It discusses the growing changes, concepts, individuals, objects, things, and events under the pandemic situation. The series is an appreciation of life through the ever-changing landscape.

Toby Buonagurio, EVERYONE, 2020, video, 1:26 min, from RECKONING Faculty Exhibition 2020, watch the video here https://b...
12/12/2020

Toby Buonagurio, EVERYONE, 2020, video, 1:26 min, from RECKONING Faculty Exhibition 2020, watch the video here https://bit.ly/2HRnJ5q

RECKONING is the first themed studio faculty exhibition to take place at the Paul W. Zuccaire Gallery, Stony Brook University. I realized the uniqueness of this timely exhibition required a different conceptual and visual approach on my part; a departure from my figurative ceramic sculpture.

I set out to create a singular photograph. My intention was to use a sparkling display to serve as a metaphor for optimism. The lighted arrangement, to be photographed, produced an array of changing, flickering lights, visible to my naked eye, but not adequately captured in a still image. This short video resulted. The changing punctuations of light reminded me of a fireworks display projected onto a night sky filled with flickering stars, creating at least momentarily, our own beautiful contribution to the cosmos.

"Sunrise," the prelude to Richard Strauss' 1896 composition Also sprach Zarathustra immediately came to mind—the iconic soundtrack from Stanley Kubrick's 1968 film, 2001: A Space Odyssey.

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1220 Staller Center For The Arts
Stony Brook, NY
11794

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Paul W. Zuccaire Gallery

The Paul W. Zuccaire Gallery presents dynamic professional and student exhibitions in a 5,000 square foot space in the Staller Center for the Arts at Stony Brook University.

Exhibitions bring works by celebrated artists to the campus, including Yoko Ono, Larry Rivers, Elizabeth Murray, Philip Pearlstein, Kate Gilmore and the Guerrilla Girls. In addition, each year the gallery presents exhibitions featuring the work of Stony Brook University undergraduate and graduate students as well as triennial exhibitions featuring the distinguished faculty of the Art Department.

The gallery was established in 1975 as the Stony Brook University Art Gallery. The Staller Center dedicated its art gallery space with the new name of Paul W. Zuccaire Gallery on April 4, 2013 in appreciation of the generosity of Alice Zuccaire and the Paul W. Zuccaire Foundation. The mission of the Paul W. Zuccaire Foundation is to perpetuate the memory and the spirit of Paul W. Zuccaire by the encouragement, promotion and support of the arts, education, health, humanitarian and other related activities through grants to not-for-profit institutions and organizations. The Foundation was established in 1999 by Estelle Zuccaire in loving memory of her husband.

Under the directorship of Karen Levitov, the Zuccaire Gallery engages the campus and regional communities through lively programming and museum-quality exhibitions of contemporary art. All exhibitions, programs and events are free and open to the public.