Native Nations Museum { Mobile }

Native Nations Museum { Mobile } Native Nations Museum Teaching Mobile , Chippawa { Bonnie Jones } Owner/Founder ****PRIVACY NOTICE***** Warning--any person and/or institution and/or Agent and/or Agency of any governmental structure including but not limited to the United States Federal Government/Federal/Provincial Governments of Canada also using or monitoring/using this website or any of its associated websites, you do NOT have my permission to utilize any of my profile information nor any of the content contained herein including, but not limited to my photos, and/ or the comments made about my photo's or any other "picture" art posted on my profile.

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WALK NOW IN BEAUTYThe Navajo Legend of Changing WomanLong long ago Dawn came to Darkness and Changing Woman was born. Go...
10/10/2021

WALK NOW IN BEAUTY
The Navajo Legend of Changing Woman

Long long ago Dawn came to Darkness and Changing Woman was born. Golden rays carried her from the sky to a mountain top. Four Winds swept down and breathed life into her, printing spirals onto her fingers, her head and her toes. Flowers surrounded and cradled her. Joyfully, the Blue Birds sang.

The Holy People who lived below, sent Talking God to find out what all the commotion was about. When he reached the peak of the mountain, he found a beautiful baby girl lying in the grass. Gathering her into his arms, he carried her down to the People, who were delighted and fed her pollen, animal broth, and dew from the loveliest of flowers. The little girl began to run races, Talking God sang to her, and in four days she was fully grown.

Now bright red drops rained from inside her. The People stroked and painted her, and dressed her in fine deer-skin, shells and turquoise. She moves, they sang. She moves, she moves, she moves. While they sang, the young maiden changed into an old woman. Then she changed back into a young woman. Again she changed into an old woman. Again she changed back into a young woman. Old, young, old, young, old, young, old, young—four times she changed until she became the finest young woman.

One day when Changing Woman was out gathering seeds and berries, Sun came riding by on his white horse in his whitest clothes. Stunned by the young woman’s beauty, he blazed brilliantly and begged her to follow him on his journey to the distant West. But Changing Woman protested. I would be too lonely, She replied. Still Sun persisted, Follow me, and we will be closer than we have ever been.

Finally Changing Woman was persuaded. She stepped on the back of a Fog and followed Sun westward to a majestic wild mountain in the middle of the ocean. Wind and Light came along to help Changing Woman build her new house. In the East, where Sun stood in the morning, they built a room entirely of white shell. In the West, they made a room of yellow abalone. Black Thunder arrived from the North and sat down by a black cornstalk—there they built a room of pure black jet. In the South, they made a turquoise room with a turquoise door and turquoise footprints that lead to the door.

Changing Woman's house was constructed of four stories with ladders leading to each one. Little suns were placed in every room. In the center of the house, they built a rock crystal altar reflecting every color in the rainbow. There, in Crystal House, Changing Woman lived happily with Sun. She spat hailstones to clear the land of monsters. And one day, while resting below a shimmering waterfall, she conceived the twins, Monster Slayer and Child of the Waters.

Changing Woman taught the twins all of her songs and dances. When the twins were fully grown, she put prayer sticks in their blankets and sent them on their way. Then she let out a piercing cry that wrapped the whole island in grief. She rubbed the skin off her body, and stirring in shells, stone, sand, clay, pollen and foam—she made Chickens, Dogs, Goats, Sheep, Antelope and Horses. Finally, so she would never be lonely, she created Human Beings. She gave them pets, and stone canes for drawing water from the desert. Lifting her great bow, she shot rainbows into them and blew them out over the wide ocean.

When Changing Woman was very old, so old she could barely move, Talking God reappeared at her door. This time he brought with him a human boy and girl. In a flash they had traveled on a bright rainbow to the coast, crossing the green ocean on an underwater spiral. They followed the white trail to her house, and greeted the Four Directions. When Changing Woman’s door opened, they saw the most beautiful young woman they had ever seen dancing joyfully before her crystal altar. The children bowed. Changing Woman bathed them in her crystal bowl, dressed them in white, and put feathers into their hair.

Then She sang: Beauty before you, Beauty behind you, Beauty above you, Beauty below you. Walk now with Beauty around you and your way will be beautiful.

Changing Woman sat down under a cornstalk. Blue Bird sat on a corn tassel. And Changing Woman sang every song she knew. Dancing through the pollen, She left her golden footprints everywhere....

—retold by JANINE CANAN

Walk Now in Beauty: The Legend of Changing Woman, illustrated by Ernest Posey, available on Amazon in English and an English-Spanish-Japanese version, is read in the Navajo Literacy Project This refreshed version I offer to the Public Domain in honor of the Navajo. PLEASE SHARE.

WALK NOW IN BEAUTY
The Navajo Legend of Changing Woman

Long long ago Dawn came to Darkness and Changing Woman was born. Golden rays carried her from the sky to a mountain top. Four Winds swept down and breathed life into her, printing spirals onto her fingers, her head and her toes. Flowers surrounded and cradled her. Joyfully, the Blue Birds sang.

The Holy People who lived below, sent Talking God to find out what all the commotion was about. When he reached the peak of the mountain, he found a beautiful baby girl lying in the grass. Gathering her into his arms, he carried her down to the People, who were delighted and fed her pollen, animal broth, and dew from the loveliest of flowers. The little girl began to run races, Talking God sang to her, and in four days she was fully grown.

Now bright red drops rained from inside her. The People stroked and painted her, and dressed her in fine deer-skin, shells and turquoise. She moves, they sang. She moves, she moves, she moves. While they sang, the young maiden changed into an old woman. Then she changed back into a young woman. Again she changed into an old woman. Again she changed back into a young woman. Old, young, old, young, old, young, old, young—four times she changed until she became the finest young woman.

One day when Changing Woman was out gathering seeds and berries, Sun came riding by on his white horse in his whitest clothes. Stunned by the young woman’s beauty, he blazed brilliantly and begged her to follow him on his journey to the distant West. But Changing Woman protested. I would be too lonely, She replied. Still Sun persisted, Follow me, and we will be closer than we have ever been.

Finally Changing Woman was persuaded. She stepped on the back of a Fog and followed Sun westward to a majestic wild mountain in the middle of the ocean. Wind and Light came along to help Changing Woman build her new house. In the East, where Sun stood in the morning, they built a room entirely of white shell. In the West, they made a room of yellow abalone. Black Thunder arrived from the North and sat down by a black cornstalk—there they built a room of pure black jet. In the South, they made a turquoise room with a turquoise door and turquoise footprints that lead to the door.

Changing Woman's house was constructed of four stories with ladders leading to each one. Little suns were placed in every room. In the center of the house, they built a rock crystal altar reflecting every color in the rainbow. There, in Crystal House, Changing Woman lived happily with Sun. She spat hailstones to clear the land of monsters. And one day, while resting below a shimmering waterfall, she conceived the twins, Monster Slayer and Child of the Waters.

Changing Woman taught the twins all of her songs and dances. When the twins were fully grown, she put prayer sticks in their blankets and sent them on their way. Then she let out a piercing cry that wrapped the whole island in grief. She rubbed the skin off her body, and stirring in shells, stone, sand, clay, pollen and foam—she made Chickens, Dogs, Goats, Sheep, Antelope and Horses. Finally, so she would never be lonely, she created Human Beings. She gave them pets, and stone canes for drawing water from the desert. Lifting her great bow, she shot rainbows into them and blew them out over the wide ocean.

When Changing Woman was very old, so old she could barely move, Talking God reappeared at her door. This time he brought with him a human boy and girl. In a flash they had traveled on a bright rainbow to the coast, crossing the green ocean on an underwater spiral. They followed the white trail to her house, and greeted the Four Directions. When Changing Woman’s door opened, they saw the most beautiful young woman they had ever seen dancing joyfully before her crystal altar. The children bowed. Changing Woman bathed them in her crystal bowl, dressed them in white, and put feathers into their hair.

Then She sang: Beauty before you, Beauty behind you, Beauty above you, Beauty below you. Walk now with Beauty around you and your way will be beautiful.

Changing Woman sat down under a cornstalk. Blue Bird sat on a corn tassel. And Changing Woman sang every song she knew. Dancing through the pollen, She left her golden footprints everywhere....

—retold by JANINE CANAN

Walk Now in Beauty: The Legend of Changing Woman, illustrated by Ernest Posey, available on Amazon in English and an English-Spanish-Japanese version, is read in the Navajo Literacy Project This refreshed version I offer to the Public Domain in honor of the Navajo. PLEASE SHARE.

*** Hopi Life ***Around the month of October or Toho'osmuya is the Winter Solstice Season and the month of harvest. By t...
10/10/2021

*** Hopi Life ***

Around the month of October or Toho'osmuya is the Winter Solstice Season and the month of harvest. By this time,
a majority of the plants have now fully matured, including corn, beans and some melons and are ready to be harvested.
The crops are gathered by the men and brought to the women for caring and preparation for storage.
It is also time for the women's ceremonies, called Lalkon and O'waqölt, also known as Basket Dances.
These dances serve as meditations for fertility and maternal happiness.
During this ceremony there is usually a footrace that takes place to test the young men's endurance and also to announce the time for deer and antelope hunting.

10/09/2021
Shihiro Nihihiro Little Nate & Bro 1a Happy and smilin troupers de e-pow wow!
09/23/2021

Shihiro Nihihiro
Little Nate & Bro 1a
Happy and smilin troupers de e-pow wow!

Shihiro Nihihiro
Little Nate & Bro 1a
Happy and smilin troupers de e-pow wow!

We Definitely Need More of these in Our World..
09/20/2021

We Definitely Need More of these in Our World..

We Definitely Need More of these in Our World..

15 Cool Facts About Breastfeeding1.  Human milk boosts a baby’s immune system big time—helping baby fight viral, bacteri...
09/20/2021

15 Cool Facts About Breastfeeding

1. Human milk boosts a baby’s immune system big time—helping baby fight viral, bacterial, and parasitic infections, including:
Respiratory tract infections
Ear infections
Bacterial meningitis
Pneumonia
Urinary tract infections
Infant diarrhea
Common colds and flus

2. Breastfeeding can actually reduce baby’s risk of disease later in life, including:
Type I and II diabetes
Hodgkin’s disease
Leukemia
Obesity
High blood pressure
High cholesterol levels
Crohn’s disease
Ulcerative colitis
Asthma
Eczema

3. Breastfeeding reduces mama’s risk of ovarian and breast cancer, heart disease, and osteoporosis. The longer she breastfeeds, the higher the benefit. In fact, a woman who breastfeeds for 8 years has nearly a 0% risk of breast cancer.

Get this—breastfeeding a baby girl actually reduces her lifetime risk of breast cancer by 25%.

4. Breastfeeding saves a family approximately $2 to 4 thousand dollars annually (compared to cost of formula).

5. Breastfeeding helps mama heal faster in the postpartum, helping her uterus return to pre-pregnancy size faster and lowering overall postpartum blood loss.

6. Breastfeeding can help mama return to her pre-baby weight. It takes 1000 calories a day on average to produce breast milk. Women are advised to consume an extra 500 calories a day, and the body dips into reserves it built up in pregnancy to make the rest (it’s important to consume those extra calories or the body actually goes into “starvation mode” and holds onto the reserves).

7. Producing breast milk consumes 25% of the body’s energy; the brain only uses 20% by comparison.

8. On average, babies remove 67% of the milk mama has available—they eat until fullness, not until the breast is emptied.

9. Almost 75% of all moms produce more milk in their right breast, whether they are right- or left- handed.

10. Mama’s body is constantly making the perfect milk for baby. Milk changes its nutritional profile as baby grows (milk made for a 3 month old is different than for a 9 month old). Milk can even change day to day—for example, water content may increase during times of hot weather and baby-sickness to provide extra hydration.

11. Human milk contains substances that promote sleep and calmness in babies (who doesn’t love that?) Breastfeeding also calms mama and helps her bond to baby.

12. Breastfed infants are at lower risk for sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS)

13. Mama’s breasts can detect even a one degree fluctuation in baby’s body temperature and adjust accordingly to heat up or cool down baby as needed. This is one reason skin-to-skin contact in the early days is so crucial.

14. Breastfeeding reduces baby’s risk of cavities later on and may lower the chance they will need braces as kids.

15. Breastfeeding mamas sleep on average 45 minutes more a night, compared to those who formula feed.

http://healthfoundationsbirthcenter.com/2013/11/19/15-cool-facts-about-breastfeeding/

Photo- Woman nursing two babies, Alaska.
Date: [ca. 1903-1908]
Photographer/Illustrator: Lomen Brothers, Nome, Alaska / Dobbs, B.B.

15 Cool Facts About Breastfeeding

1. Human milk boosts a baby’s immune system big time—helping baby fight viral, bacterial, and parasitic infections, including:
Respiratory tract infections
Ear infections
Bacterial meningitis
Pneumonia
Urinary tract infections
Infant diarrhea
Common colds and flus

2. Breastfeeding can actually reduce baby’s risk of disease later in life, including:
Type I and II diabetes
Hodgkin’s disease
Leukemia
Obesity
High blood pressure
High cholesterol levels
Crohn’s disease
Ulcerative colitis
Asthma
Eczema

3. Breastfeeding reduces mama’s risk of ovarian and breast cancer, heart disease, and osteoporosis. The longer she breastfeeds, the higher the benefit. In fact, a woman who breastfeeds for 8 years has nearly a 0% risk of breast cancer.

Get this—breastfeeding a baby girl actually reduces her lifetime risk of breast cancer by 25%.

4. Breastfeeding saves a family approximately $2 to 4 thousand dollars annually (compared to cost of formula).

5. Breastfeeding helps mama heal faster in the postpartum, helping her uterus return to pre-pregnancy size faster and lowering overall postpartum blood loss.

6. Breastfeeding can help mama return to her pre-baby weight. It takes 1000 calories a day on average to produce breast milk. Women are advised to consume an extra 500 calories a day, and the body dips into reserves it built up in pregnancy to make the rest (it’s important to consume those extra calories or the body actually goes into “starvation mode” and holds onto the reserves).

7. Producing breast milk consumes 25% of the body’s energy; the brain only uses 20% by comparison.

8. On average, babies remove 67% of the milk mama has available—they eat until fullness, not until the breast is emptied.

9. Almost 75% of all moms produce more milk in their right breast, whether they are right- or left- handed.

10. Mama’s body is constantly making the perfect milk for baby. Milk changes its nutritional profile as baby grows (milk made for a 3 month old is different than for a 9 month old). Milk can even change day to day—for example, water content may increase during times of hot weather and baby-sickness to provide extra hydration.

11. Human milk contains substances that promote sleep and calmness in babies (who doesn’t love that?) Breastfeeding also calms mama and helps her bond to baby.

12. Breastfed infants are at lower risk for sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS)

13. Mama’s breasts can detect even a one degree fluctuation in baby’s body temperature and adjust accordingly to heat up or cool down baby as needed. This is one reason skin-to-skin contact in the early days is so crucial.

14. Breastfeeding reduces baby’s risk of cavities later on and may lower the chance they will need braces as kids.

15. Breastfeeding mamas sleep on average 45 minutes more a night, compared to those who formula feed.

http://healthfoundationsbirthcenter.com/2013/11/19/15-cool-facts-about-breastfeeding/

Photo- Woman nursing two babies, Alaska.
Date: [ca. 1903-1908]
Photographer/Illustrator: Lomen Brothers, Nome, Alaska / Dobbs, B.B.

Meanwhile is Saskatchewan💜 The Tipi is the spirit and body of woman, because she represents the foundation of family and...
09/18/2021

Meanwhile is Saskatchewan💜

The Tipi is the spirit and body of woman, because she represents the foundation of family and community. It is through her that we learn the values that bring balance into our lives. That is why, when you construct a tipi, it involves ceremony: because the ceremony of making a tipi represents the value of women’s teachings.
Love my Sisters

This picture illustrates unity, strength and womanhood

Meanwhile is Saskatchewan💜

The Tipi is the spirit and body of woman, because she represents the foundation of family and community. It is through her that we learn the values that bring balance into our lives. That is why, when you construct a tipi, it involves ceremony: because the ceremony of making a tipi represents the value of women’s teachings.
Love my Sisters

This picture illustrates unity, strength and womanhood

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Just in time for Valentine's Day - The Ancient Story of Chocolate! The story of chocolate grew from a local Mesoamerican drink (probably as a by-product of beer production) to an internationally-coveted sweet. It is the story of many cultures and continues to deepen and broaden as new discoveries are being made. Learn more about the delicious, sensuous treat we have all come to love from Dr. Rosemary Joyce, one of the archaeologists who has been at the forefront of research on cacao. What a gift South America gave the world!
.....................Black Coyote (Watangaa aka Black Coyote, aka Black Coyote-claw Necklace) - 1891...................eu havia lido este relato aqui no Brasil no livro Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee e sempre imaginei a cena com o nativo Coiote Preto do qual tentaram tirar o rifle e ele não ouviu deflagrando então o massacre final.........eis sua foto abaixo e sua biografia, RESPEITO TOTAL a todos que morreram neste massacre............ Black Coyote (died 29 December 1890) was a deaf Lakota man (the deaf-mute son of Sitting Bull) whose refusal to give up his gun to the US Army led to the Wounded Knee Massacre, in which he was killed. Biography Black Coyote was born to the Lakota Sioux tribe, the son of Sitting Bull, and he was a deaf-mute man. He was one of the Lakota who left for the Pine Ridge Reservation alongside Chief Spotted Elk, and he was one of the Native Americans that was accosted by US Army troops in 1890 at the Wounded Knee camp when the soldiers attempted to force the Indians to surrender. A deaf and mute Black Coyote did not hear the order to give up his weapon, and he accidentally fired it, leading to the American troops massacring the Indians. Black Coyote was killed in the ensuing massacre.
Are there any pot washed bones or bones with marks of Comanche cannibalism on them on display? Askin for a friend :)
The Spirit-Bride A story is told of a young Algonquin brave whose bride died on the day fixed for their wedding. Before this sad event he had been the most courageous and high-spirited of warriors and the most skillful of hunters, but afterward his pride and his bravery seemed to desert him. In vain his friends urged him to seek the chase and begged him to take a greater interest in life. The more they pressed him the more melancholy he became, till at length he passed most of his time by the grave of his bride. He was roused from his state of apathy one day, however, by hearing some old men discussing the existence of a path to the Spirit-world, which they supposed lay to the south. A gleam of hope shone in the young brave's breast, and, worn with sorrow as he was, he armed himself and set off southward. For a long time he saw no appreciable change in his surroundings--rivers, mountains, lakes, and forests similar to those of his own country environed him. But after a weary journey of many days he fancied he saw a difference. The sky was more blue, the prairie more fertile, the scenery more gloriously beautiful. From the conversation he had overheard before he set out, the young brave judged that he was nearing the Spirit-world. Just as he emerged from a spreading forest he saw before him a little lodge set high on a hill. Thinking its occupants might be able to direct him to his destination, he climbed to the lodge and accosted an aged man who stood in the doorway. "Can you tell me the way to the Spirit-world?" he inquired. "Yes," said the old man gravely, throwing aside his cloak of swan's skin. "Only a few days ago she whom you seek rested in my lodge. If you will leave your body here you may follow her. To reach the Island of the Blessed you must cross yonder gulf you see in the distance. But I warn you the crossing will be no easy matter. Do you still wish to go?" "Oh, yes, yes," cried the warrior eagerly, and as the words were uttered he felt himself grow suddenly lighter. The whole aspect, too, of the scene was changed. Everything looked brighter and more ethereal. He found himself in a moment walking through thickets which offered no resistance to his passage, and he knew that he was a spirit, travelling in the Spirit-world. When he reached the gulf which the old man had indicated he found to his delight a wonderful canoe ready on the shore. It was cut from a single white stone, and shone and sparkled in the sun like a jewel. The warrior lost no time in embarking, and as he put off from the shore he saw his pretty bride enter just such another canoe as his and imitate all his movements. Side by side they made for the Island of the Blessed, a charming woody islet set in the middle of the water, like an emerald in silver. When they were about half-way across a sudden storm arose, and the huge waves threatened to engulf them. Many other people had embarked on the perilous waters by this time, some of whom perished in the furious tempest. But the youth and maiden still battled on bravely, never losing sight of one another. Because they were good and innocent, the Master of Life had decreed that they should arrive safely at the fair island, and after a weary struggle they felt their canoes grate on the shore. Hand in hand the lovers walked among the beautiful sights and sounds that greeted their eyes and ears from every quarter. There was no trace of the recent storm. The sea was as smooth as glass and the sky as clear as crystal. The youth and his bride felt that they could wander on thus for ever. But at length a faint, sweet voice bade the former return to his home in the Earth-country.
The Spirit Lake Sea Monster Otherwise know as the Devils Lake Sea Monster Many, many moons ago, it seems, rumors had circulated among the Native Americans about a huge sea monster that had wiped out a whole army of Native Americans. After his appearance, the water in Devils Lake had become so polluted that all the fish disappeared. The native Americans became so uneasy about the whole matter that Little Shell, Chief of our tribe, sent Ke-ask-ke (Big Liar), our medicine man and inventor, to investigate. Ke-ask-ke found a band of Sioux Native Americans living at the lake. The old Sioux medicine man related this strange story of how there had appeared to them Owanda, the Seer. It seems the Sioux had just completed a bloody battle, and victorious, had driven the Chippewa's to the Canadian border. The Sioux had planned another attack on the Chippewas to drive them beyond the border, when there appeared to them the Great Spirit Man, Owanda the Seer, with the warning that if they did, a huge monster would come out of the lake and swallow them up. They did not heed this warning. The Chief of the Sioux warriors ordered the strongest men to dress in full war regalia. Drums began beating. The native Americans began howling, Ki-ya-ya, Ki-ya-ya. Bows, arrows and hatchets flew. Oh! what a fierce people. Native American women also danced in a circle. Even young boys were dressed in full war clothing, dancing. But just as they were ready to go on the warpath, they saw the water rise and boil. The earth seemed to tremble from under their feet. A large ugly monster came out of the water, his saucer like eyes flashed like a copper fire. The Sioux became terrified. Never in their lives had they seen such an animal. He had short legs, a short chubby neck and a large head. He made for the Sioux. They fought for their lives, but the demon was too powerful. One by one he swallowed everyone in sight. However, a few got away to other Native American camps. The medicine man, who had left upon the warning of the Spirit Man, returned a few days later with another band of Native Americans. That was the beginning of mysteries. The lake water became salty, like that of the sea. The medicine man was baffled. The fish disappeared as if by magic. Not even a dead fish could be found. Fish had been plentiful. In fact, the Native Americans, formerly, had taken them out in the spring time with a pitchfork and hauled them away in wagon loads. The old Sioux medicine man sent for other tribal medicine men to help investigate. That was the reason our Chief Little Shell had sent Ke-ask-ke. They prepared a seance, known as brains of Know-it-all. All night the Native Americans feasted, danced, sang and prayed. At last Ma-che-gambe said he had the answer. He ordered the largest boat and with the medicine men set off on the lake. They came to an area of water which had suddenly turned to a stormy sea. A few yards off they saw large bubbles on the surface. The medicine men became panic stricken. "Ma-che-gombe is crazy," they said, "to bring us face to face with the sea monster. We have no chance of overpowering him." They wanted to cast him overboard. However, Ma-che-gambe convinced them they need not fear. But the whirlpool pitched one of the medicine men overboard. When he hit the water he began spinning around, going deeper and deeper. Then he disappeared-"vanished to the grave of the sea monster," his companions thought. This was enough. The medicine men started sharpening their knives. It was time to kill Ma-che-gombe. "Do you know," Ma-che-gombe said, "that he who fell into the water is the Spirit Man of the Water?" "The Great Spirit will not suffer us loss of our brother. This problem is not a matter of one man, but one of concern to all the Native Americans welfare and it is our mission to solve their problem." The medicine men for once agreed. They rowed along the boiling hole until the Spirit Man who had fallen into the water appeared again. He described what he had discovered. Deep in the water he said he found a hole where the water came out boiling. This was the mouth of a subterranean passage connecting with an underground river that ran across the country to the Gulf of Mexico. They decided the monster came to Devils Lake from the sea through this underground river. And as he made his way into Devils Lake, the salt drew all the fish into this underground river and they were never able to get back into the lake.