U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service History

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service History The USFWS Museum/Archives at NCTC holds nearly 500,000 items relating to the history of the Fish and Wildlife Service and American Conservation History.
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Currently the USFWS Museum/Archives at NCTC holds in excess of 492,424 items: 31,591 objects, 10,324 historic books, 41,689 historic photos, 4,855 historic films, 922 oral histories, and 403,133 historic research papers from the Fish and Wildlife Reference Library. The Archive scope of collection includes all aspects of American Conservation History with a focus on the USFWS including extensive re

cords on refuges, endangered species, law enforcement, and migratory birds. The state of the art facility is open to the public 7:30am-5:00pm on Mondays, 6:30 am-5:00pm Tuesdays-Fridays, and other times by appointment. A Museum Aide, the FWS National Historian, an oral history transcriptionist, and a Museum Curator staff the USFWS Museum/Archives at NCTC.

Conservation Lecture Series:  "The Land We Share: A Love Affair Told in Hunting Stories" Wednesday April 3, 2024 at 7:00...
04/02/2024

Conservation Lecture Series: "The Land We Share: A Love Affair Told in Hunting Stories" Wednesday April 3, 2024 at 7:00 pm at the National Conservation Training Center

Authors Christine Cunningham and Steve Meyer will present on their new book The Land We Share: A Love Affair Told in Hunting Stories in the Byrd Auditorium at the National Conservation Training Center, 698 Conservation Way, Shepherdstown, WV 25443.



Welcome to The Land We Share, where relationships and connections are forged through experiencing the migration of caribou, the winged movement of waterfowl, and misty mornings in the field. Here the too-short lives of good dogs intersect those of the people with whom they hunt for elusive birds and inspiration in the wild public lands of Alaska and the Dakotas. These essays are written by Steve Meyer, a lifelong hunter, and Christine Cunningham, a lifelong Alaskan who embraced hunting later in life. Accompanied by a family of bird dogs, the two authors delve into how hunting on public lands nurtures the human spirit, sustains physical health, and deepens appreciation for the natural world. Although most stories are set in Alaska and the Dakotas, their messages and themes resonate across the nation, appealing to both hunting advocates and those with a profound connection to the outdoors. The 61 short stories about a large family of bird dogs take place in beautiful settings with a resonant core of day-to-day appreciation for the natural world that nurtures the spirit, sustains health, and connects us to the land we share.



These talks are a part of the NCTC Conservation Lecture Series, which is cosponsored by The Friends of the NCTC - http://www.friendsofnctc.org. and the WV Chapter of Backcountry Hunters & Anglers. No tickets or reservations are required. All are welcome!



For more information, please contact Mark Madison (304-876-7276) [email protected]

Join the National Conservation Training Center Wednesday, March 13th at 3pm ET, for Indigenous Connections Roundtable to...
03/11/2024

Join the National Conservation Training Center Wednesday, March 13th at 3pm ET, for Indigenous Connections Roundtable to honor renowned storyteller N. Scott Momaday. Link to join: https://livestream.com/nctc

Join NCTC as we honor renowned storyteller Navarre Scott Momaday, Kiowa, on Wednesday, March 13th, 3 pm ET, for this month's Indigenous Connections Roundtable. During the broadcast, we will take a look at the film Remembered Earth: New Mexico's High Desert, in which Momaday and Irene Bedard, Iñupiat/Cree, present a vision of hope for the natural world by interpreting the myth, beauty, and power of a scarred but sacred landscape in the American West. Momaday's legacy lives on, a testament to the power of stories to connect us and inspire action, reminding us that nature and heritage are two sides of a precious coin. After the film, we will speak with documentarian John Grabowska.

Grabowska makes award-winning films. He has lectured on natural history filmmaking at The National Geographic Society and the Smithsonian Institution, led environmental media workshops in Argentina and Panama, cofounded the American Conservation Film Festival, and is a Smithsonian Journeys Expert. The Washington Post calls him “one of the virtuoso environmental filmmakers in the country.”

Link to join the broadcast: https://livestream.com/nctc

Image of N. Scott Momaday and John Grabowska filming on location in New Mexico’s high desert, courtesy of John Grabowska.

On Monday March 11 at 7:00 pm author and Professor of Law Zygmunt Plater will present Illuminating the Beleaguered Endan...
03/08/2024

On Monday March 11 at 7:00 pm author and Professor of Law Zygmunt Plater will present Illuminating the Beleaguered Endangered Species Act for Its Public in the Byrd Auditorium at the National Conservation Training Center, 698 Conservation Way, Shepherdstown, WV 25443.



Zygmunt J. B. Plater is law professor emeritus at Boston College. Plater is the author of The Snail Darter and the Dam: How Pork-Barrel Politics Endangered a Little Fish and Killed a River. Plater has taught on eight law faculties in the U.S. and abroad, teaching and researching environmental law, property, land use and administrative agency law. Over the past 30 years he has been involved with multiple issues of environmental protection and land use regulation, including service as petitioner and lead counsel in the extended endangered species litigation and congressional battles over the Tennessee Valley Authority's Tellico Dam. He was chairman of the State of Alaska Oil Spill Commission’s Legal Task Force after the wreck of the M/V Exxon-Valdez.

This program will be recorded and broadcast online –- Thursday March 28, 2024 at 2:00 pm ET at: https://livestream.com/nctc.

The USFWS 150th Anniversary Hatchery Quilt is currently on exhibit in the USFWS Museum! The quilt will be at the Nationa...
02/26/2024

The USFWS 150th Anniversary Hatchery Quilt is currently on exhibit in the USFWS Museum! The quilt will be at the National Conservation Training Center until March 7, when it moves to Genoa National Fish Hatchery. The quilt and its nationwide tour is a project created by the National Fish and Aquatic Conservation Archives at D.C. Booth Historic National Fish Hatchery in Spearfish, South Dakota, and the hatchery’s friends’ group. The quilt celebrates the Service’s current national fish hatcheries, fish technology centers, and fish health centers.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Museum at the National Conservation Training Center has over half a million items. Discover these artifacts each !

Image of the USFWS 150th Anniversary Hatchery Quilt courtesy of Alex Henry, USFWS

February 13 at 2:00 pm ET  "Crossings: How Road Ecology Is Shaping the Future of Our Planet" with author Ben GoldfarbOnl...
02/08/2024

February 13 at 2:00 pm ET "Crossings: How Road Ecology Is Shaping the Future of Our Planet" with author Ben Goldfarb
Online at: https://livestream.com/nctc

Join us online February 13 at 2:00 pm ET for a lively discussion with author Ben Goldfarb, on his new book Crossings: How Road Ecology Is Shaping the Future of Our Planet, named one of the best books of 2023 by the New York Times.

Some 40 million miles of roadways encircle the earth, yet we tend to regard them only as infrastructure for human convenience. While roads are so ubiquitous they’re practically invisible to us, wild animals experience them as entirely alien forces of death and disruption. In Crossings, environmental journalist Ben Goldfarb travels throughout the United States and around the world to investigate how roads have transformed our planet. A million animals are killed by cars each day in the U.S. alone, but as the new science of road ecology shows, the harms of highways extend far beyond roadkill. Creatures from antelope to salmon are losing their ability to migrate in search of food and mates; invasive plants hitch rides in tire treads; road salt contaminates lakes and rivers; and the very noise of traffic chases songbirds from vast swaths of habitat.

Yet road ecologists are also seeking to blunt the destruction through innovative solutions. Goldfarb meets with conservationists building bridges for California’s mountain lions and tunnels for English toads, engineers deconstructing the labyrinth of logging roads that web national forests, animal rehabbers caring for Tasmania’s car-orphaned wallabies, and community organizers working to undo the havoc highways have wreaked upon American cities.

Today, as our planet’s road network continues to grow exponentially, the science of road ecology has become increasingly vital. Written with passion and curiosity, Crossings is a sweeping, spirited, and timely investigation into how humans have altered the natural world—and how we can create a better future for all living beings.

Ben Goldfarb is an independent conservation journalist and author of Eager: The Surprising, Secret Life of Beavers and Why They Matter, winner of the 2019 PEN / E.O. Wilson Literary Science Writing Award. His writing has appeared in The Atlantic, Science, The New York Times, The Washington Post, National Geographic, Orion Magazine, High Country News, Outside Magazine, Smithsonian, Audubon Magazine, Scientific American, and other publications. Goldfarb's non-fiction has been anthologized in The Best American Science & Nature Writing and Cosmic Outlaws: Coming of Age at the End of Nature.

These talks are a part of the NCTC Conservation Lecture Series, which is cosponsored by The Friends of the NCTC - http://www.friendsofnctc.org No tickets or reservations are required.
All are welcome!

Upcoming Events - NCTC Conservation Lecture Series at the Byrd Auditorium

March 11 at 7:00 pm - Zygmunt Plater, Professor & Author “Environmental Law and Policy: Nature, Law, and Society"

April 3 at 7:00 pm - Christine Cunningham and Steve Meyer, "The Land We Share: A Love Affair Told in Hunting Stories"

May 11 - NCTC Open House, from 10:00 am – 3:00 pm

For more information, please contact Mark Madison (304-876-7276) [email protected]
Past lectures are available for viewing at the NCTC Broadcast Library: https://www.fws.gov/nctc-archived-broadcast

NCTC Conservation Lecture Series and Potomac Valley Audubon Society Present:"Quantifying the Threat Posed by and Develop...
01/18/2024

NCTC Conservation Lecture Series and Potomac Valley Audubon Society Present:

"Quantifying the Threat Posed by and Developing Sustainable Solutions for Invasive Spotted Lanternfly" with Dr. Tracy Leskey

January 18, 2024 - 2pm ET at: https://livestream.com/nctc

Dr. Leskey will present the spotted lanternfly life history and invasion patterns, current research on the host plants that are at risk to injury (wine grapes) and those likely not to be impacted, how scientists monitor for their presence (traps and eDNA), and some sustainable solutions for their management (biological control, entomopathogenic fungi).

Tracy Leskey holds a PhD in Entomology from the University of Massachusetts, a MS in Ecology from the Pennsylvania State University, and a BS from Wilson College. Dr. Leskey has been employed by the USDA-ARS, Appalachian Fruit Research Station in Kearneysville for over 20 years where she serves as Station Director and Research Entomologist. Her research has focused on development of behaviorally-based management tools for invasive and persistent native pests of fruit crops. She has published over 180 peer-reviewed journal articles and several patents. Dr. Leskey has been interviewed by the New York Times, Washington Post and NPR on numerous occasions and appeared live on Fox News and C-SPAN and has done several stories with National Geographic. She has served on the Governing Board of the Entomological Society of America and currently serves on the Board of Trustees at Wilson College.

Livestream.com Follow National Conservation Training Center’s profile on Livestream for updates on live events.

National Conservation Training Center Conservation Lecture Series and Potomac Valley Audubon Society Present:"Quantifyin...
01/07/2024

National Conservation Training Center Conservation Lecture Series and Potomac Valley Audubon Society Present:

"Quantifying the Threat Posed by and Developing Sustainable Solutions for Invasive Spotted Lanternfly" with Dr. Tracy Leskey

Wednesday January 10, 2024, at 7:00 pm ET
Byrd Auditorium, National Conservation Training Center
Shepherdstown, WV

And re-broadcast online –- January 18, 2024 at 2:00 pm ET at: https://livestream.com/nctc.

Dr. Leskey will present the spotted lanternfly life history and invasion patterns, current research on the host plants that are at risk to injury (wine grapes) and those likely not to be impacted, how scientists monitor for their presence (traps and eDNA), and some sustainable solutions for their management (biological control, entomopathogenic fungi).

Tracy Leskey holds a PhD in Entomology from the University of Massachusetts Amherst , a MS in Ecology from the Penn State University , and a BS from Wilson College . Dr. Leskey has been employed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture-ARS, Appalachian Fruit Research Station in Kearneysville for over 20 years where she serves as Station Director and Research Entomologist. Her research has focused on development of behaviorally-based management tools for invasive and persistent native pests of fruit crops. She has published over 180 peer-reviewed journal articles and several patents. Dr. Leskey has been interviewed by the New York Times, Washington Post and NPR on numerous occasions and appeared live on Fox News and C-SPAN and have done several stories with National Geographic. She has served on the Governing Board of the Entomological Society of America and currently serves on the Board of Trustees at Wilson College.

Holiday Cards from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Archives and Museum at the National Conservation Training Center. ...
12/21/2023

Holiday Cards from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Archives and Museum at the National Conservation Training Center.

Christmas card with original artwork by Olaus Murie, a wildlife biologist for the U.S. Biological Survey and later the USFWS from 1920-1945.

"You Write the Caption Contest--Holiday Edition!"Place your cleverest caption below and the winner will be chosen next w...
12/21/2023

"You Write the Caption Contest--Holiday Edition!"
Place your cleverest caption below and the winner will be chosen next week. The best caption will receive a USFWS History Challenge Coin.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's Museum/Archives at the National Conservation Training Center has over 100,000 historic images, many not captioned. This weekly contest provides a chance to share those images and also bring a bit of whimsy to history.

NCTC Conservation Lecture Series Broadcast: December 14 at 2:00 pm ET "Silent Spring Revolution" with author Douglas Bri...
12/12/2023

NCTC Conservation Lecture Series Broadcast:
December 14 at 2:00 pm ET "Silent Spring Revolution" with author Douglas Brinkley
Online at: https://livestream.com/nctc/events/11037373

In Silent Spring Revolution, Douglas Brinkley pays tribute to those who combated the mauling of the natural world: Rachel Carson (marine biologist and author), David Brower (director of the Sierra Club), Barry Commoner (environmental justice advocate), Coretta Scott King (antinuclear activist), Stewart Udall (Secretary of the Interior), William O. Douglas (Supreme Court justice), Cesar Chavez (labor organizer), and other crusaders are profiled with verve and insight.

Carson’s book, Silent Spring, published in 1962, depicted how detrimental DDT was to living creatures. The exposé launched an ecological revolution that inspired such landmark legislation as the Wilderness Act (1964), the Clean Air Acts (1963 and 1970), and the Endangered Species Acts (1966, 1969, and 1973). In intimate detail, Brinkley extrapolates on such epic events as the Donora (Pennsylvania) smog incident, JFK’s Limited Nuclear Test Ban Treaty, Great Lakes preservation, the Santa Barbara oil spill, and the first Earth Day.

Dr. Douglas Brinkley is the Katherine Tsanoff Brown Chair in Humanities and Professor of History at Rice University, a CNN Presidential Historian, and a contributing editor at Vanity Fair. He has received seven honorary doctorates in American Studies. He works in many capacities in the world of public history, including for boards, museums, colleges and historical societies. Six of his books were named New York Times “Notable Books of the Year” and seven became New York Times bestsellers.

Recorded in the Byrd Auditorium at the National Conservation Training Center, Shepherdstown, WV on November 30, 2023.

These talks are a part of the NCTC Conservation Lecture Series, which is cosponsored by The Friends of the NCTC - http://www.friendsofnctc.org

Watch National Conservation Training Center's Conservation Lecture Series: "Silent Spring Revolution: John F. Kennedy, Rachel Carson, Lyndon Johnson, Richard Nixon, and the Great Environmental Awakening” with author Douglas Brinkley on Livestream.com. New York Times bestselling author and acclaime...

Ripple of Hope: 50 Years of the Endangered Species Act and Triumphs in Freshwater Mussel Conservation Thursday December ...
12/04/2023

Ripple of Hope: 50 Years of the Endangered Species Act and Triumphs in Freshwater Mussel Conservation Thursday December 7 at 2:00pm [ET] at the National Conservation Training Center and via Livestream at: https://livestream.com/nctc/events/11013315

Dive into the fascinating world of underwater heroes! 🌊 Join us at the National Conservation Training Center on December 7, 2023, at 2:00 pm ET for the Ripple of Hope event, a celebration of the 50th anniversary of the Endangered Species Act (ESA)! This special occasion will shine a spotlight on success stories, especially those involving the unsung heroes of rivers and streams - freshwater mussels.

Did you know that freshwater mussels are among the most endangered animals? Discover their incredible importance to our ecosystems and learn about recent technological innovations, such as 3D scanning and printing mussel shell replicas, that are revolutionizing our understanding of these delicate creatures.

Join us in exploring the intersection of conservation and technology at this event! Let's celebrate the efforts that have been made over the past 50 years through the ESA and look forward to the future of protecting our underwater allies. Don't miss out on this unique opportunity to deepen your connection with the incredible world beneath the surface.

Event Page: https://www.fws.gov/event/ripple-hope-50-years-endangered-species-act-and-triumphs-freshwater-mussel

Watch National Conservation Training Center's Ripple of Hope: 50 Years of the Endangered Species Act and Triumphs in Freshwater Mussel Conservation on Livestream.com. Join us on December 7, 2023, to help celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Endangered Species Act (ESA) and learn more about freshwat...

NCTC Conservation Lecture Series:"Silent Spring Revolution: John F. Kennedy, Rachel Carson, Lyndon Johnson, Richard Nixo...
11/28/2023

NCTC Conservation Lecture Series:
"Silent Spring Revolution: John F. Kennedy, Rachel Carson, Lyndon Johnson, Richard Nixon, and the Great Environmental Awakening”
with author Douglas Brinkley
Thursday, November 30, at 7:30 pm ET
Byrd Auditorium, National Conservation Training Center
Shepherdstown, WV

On Thursday, November 30, at 7:30 PM ET at the National Conservation Training Center in Shepherdstown WV, New York Times bestselling author and acclaimed presidential historian Douglas Brinkley will chronicle the rise of environmental activism during the Long Sixties (1960-1973), telling the story of an indomitable generation that saved the natural world under the leadership of John F. Kennedy, Lyndon Johnson, and Richard Nixon.

In Silent Spring Revolution, Douglas Brinkley pays tribute to those who combated the mauling of the natural world: Rachel Carson (marine biologist and author), David Brower (director of the Sierra Club), Barry Commoner (environmental justice advocate), Coretta Scott King (antinuclear activist), Stewart Udall (Secretary of the Interior), William O. Douglas (Supreme Court justice), Cesar Chavez (labor organizer), and other crusaders are profiled with verve and insight.

Carson’s book I, published in 1962, depicted how detrimental DDT was to living creatures. The exposé launched an ecological revolution that inspired such landmark legislation as the Wilderness Act (1964), the Clean Air Acts (1963 and 1970), and the Endangered Species Acts (1966, 1969, and 1973). In intimate detail, Brinkley extrapolates on such epic events as the Donora (Pennsylvania) smog incident, JFK’s Limited Nuclear Test Ban Treaty, Great Lakes preservation, the Santa Barbara oil spill, and the first Earth Day.

Dr. Douglas Brinkley is the Katherine Tsanoff Brown Chair in Humanities and Professor of History at Rice University, a CNN Presidential Historian, and a contributing editor at I. He has received seven honorary doctorates in American Studies. He works in many capacities in the world of public history, including for boards, museums, colleges and historical societies. Six of his books were named New York Times “Notable Books of the Year” and seven became New York Times bestsellers.

These talks are a part of the NCTC Conservation Lecture Series, which is cosponsored by The Friends of the NCTC - http://www.friendsofnctc.org . No tickets or reservations are required.
All are welcome!

Upcoming Events - NCTC Conservation Lecture Series

Wednesday, Jan. 10, 7:00 pm: Tracy Leskey, USDA Researcher, “Spotted Lanternflies”

For more information, please contact Mark Madison (304-876-7276) [email protected].

Thanksgiving Fun Facts: TURKEY, n. A large bird whose flesh when eaten on certain religious anniversaries has the peculi...
11/23/2023

Thanksgiving Fun Facts:

TURKEY, n. A large bird whose flesh when eaten on certain religious anniversaries has the peculiar property of attesting piety and gratitude. Incidentally, it is pretty good eating.
--Ambrose Bierce, The Devil's Dictionary (1911)

If Benjamin Franklin had his way we might have eaten bald eagles on Thanksgiving and put turkeys on our money. Franklin wrote in 1784: “I wish the Bald Eagle had not been chosen as the representative of our country; he is a bird of bad moral character; like those among men who live by sharking and robbing, he is generally poor, and often very lousy. The turkey is a much more respectable bird.”

President Abraham Lincoln made Thanksgiving a national holiday in 1863 establishing the date as the last Thursday in November. In 1941 President Franklin Roosevelt changed Thanksgiving to the fourth Thursday of November.

President John F. Kennedy was the first President to spare a turkey given to the White House on November 19, 1963. The modern turkey pardon did not become an annual tradition until the administration of George H.W. Bush. In 1989, President Bush quipped: “But let me assure you, and this fine tom turkey, that he will not end up on anyone’s dinner table, not this guy—he’s presented a Presidential pardon as of right now—and allow him to live out his days on a children’s farm not far from here.” It has been an annual tradition ever since.

In the United States more 46 million turkeys are eaten each Thanksgiving. Minnesota is the top turkey producing stated in the U.S. with an annual production of 37 million turkeys.

As for the Pilgrims, did they really eat turkey on the first Thanksgiving in October 1621? The only items we know for sure that the Pilgrims ate were venison, corn, and “wildfowl.” The “wildfowl” on the menu may well have been ducks, geese, or even passenger pigeons, not necessarily turkeys. Historians are fairly certain abundant seafood near Plymouth colony would have been on the menu including mussels, bass, and even lobster. So, if all this turkey talk has made you squeamish about eating one, you can always drown your qualms in lobster and melted butter.

Turkey Trivia: Fun Facts About Wild Turkeys for ThanksgivingThe wild turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) is one of only two bir...
11/22/2023

Turkey Trivia: Fun Facts About Wild Turkeys for Thanksgiving

The wild turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) is one of only two birds native to North America that has been regularly domesticated, the other being the Muscovy duck.

Wild turkeys were first domesticated by the Mayan peoples of what is now Mexico around 800 b.c.

The English name “Turkey” derives from historic shipping routes that passed through the country of Turkey on their way to delivering the birds to European markets.

There are five distinct subspecies of wild turkeys: Eastern, Osceola, Rio Grande, Merriam’s and Gould’s.

Adult male turkeys are called gobblers or toms, females are called hens. Young chicks are poults, while juvenile males are jakes and juvenile females are jennies. A flock of turkeys can be called a crop, dole, gang, posse, or rafter. Or you can just call them a “flock.”

Wild turkeys can run at speeds up to 25 miles per hour and fly briefly up to 55 miles per hour. When they need to, turkeys can swim by tucking their wings in close, spreading their tails, and kicking. Domesticated turkeys cannot fly.

A male turkey’s gobble can be heard up to a mile away.

Although wild turkey numbers were decimated by the 1930s, perhaps reaching a low of 30,000 in the United States by 1940, today successful restoration efforts have led to more than 6 million wild turkeys in North and Central America including turkeys in habitats they had historically not occupied. It is probably the most successful game bird restoration in history.

Wild turkeys are found on many units of the USFWS National Wildlife Refuge System including St. Marks and St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuges (FL), Piedmont National Wildlife Refuge (GA), Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge (IL), Parker River National Wildlife Refuge (MA), Minnesota Valley National Wildlife Refuge , Sherburne National Wildlife Refuge (MN), Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge (NM), Iroquois National Wildlife Refuge (NY), Carolina Sandhills National Wildlife Refuge (SC), and Hagerman National Wildlife Refuge (TX).

Image: Painting of a tukey from USFWS illustrator Robert Hines housed at USFWS Museum/Archives at the National Conservation Training Center.

NCTC Conservation Lecture Series “2023 International Fly-Fishing Film Festival” Wednesday, November 29, at 7:00 pm ETNat...
11/21/2023

NCTC Conservation Lecture Series
“2023 International Fly-Fishing Film Festival” Wednesday, November 29, at 7:00 pm ET
National Conservation Training Center
Shepherdstown, WV

On Wednesday November 29 from 7:00-9:00 pm the National Conservation Training Center in Shepherdstown, WV will host the 2023 International Fly Fishing Film Festival, the world’s leading fly-fishing film event, consisting of films produced by professional filmmakers from all corners of the globe showcasing the passion, lifestyle, and culture of fly fishing. It is a gathering place for the fly-fishing community and a celebration of friendship and fishing stories. For a preview of the featured films, visit: https://www.flyfilmfest.com/films.

Nine films will be screened including Father Nature, a new film featuring former U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Director John Turner and his family (who will be attending). The Turner family has guided the Snake River in Grand Teton National Park for over one hundred years. Like all of us who go to the river and mountains with fly rod in hand, it’s hard to come back the same person. Wild places forever change us – imbedding a deep and spiritual reverence for things greater than ourselves. This western idea was the underpinnings to one of America’s best inventions – the National Park System. This is their story – a family’s blessing to work, live, and share one of the most beautiful river corridors anywhere in the world. A gift that has instilled an even greater passion to protect things “wild” for many generations to come.

This program is a part of the NCTC Conservation Lecture Series, which is cosponsored by The Friends of the NCTC - http://www.friendsofnctc.org . No tickets or reservations are required.
All are welcome!

Upcoming Events - NCTC Conservation Lecture Series

Thursday, November 30, 7:30 pm: Doug Brinkley, author "Silent Spring Revolution"

Wednesday, Jan. 10, 7:00 pm: Tracy Leskey, USDA Researcher “Spotted Lanternflies”


For more information, please contact Mark Madison (304-876-7276) [email protected].

11/11/2023

📣New blog alert! 📣

We’ve started a Southeast regional blog: Tails, Tales, and Trails in the Southeast!

Our first installment? None other than a feature on the very first national wildlife refuge (Pelican Island) and how it came to be in 1903!

Read the story here: https://www.fws.gov/story/how-two-people-saved-millions-birds

📸Photo of Warden Paul Kroegel, the first federal national wildlife refuge manager/USFWS

Five Interesting Historical Facts About Veterans Day November 11, 2023:1. Veterans Day began as Armistice Day which comm...
11/10/2023

Five Interesting Historical Facts About Veterans Day November 11, 2023:
1. Veterans Day began as Armistice Day which commemorated an armistice between Germany and the Allies on the eleventh hour, of the eleventh day of the eleventh month on November 11, 1918. The first Armistice Day was celebrated November 11, 1919.

2. On June 1, 1954, Armistice Day was renamed Veterans Day. Whereas Armistice Day had recognized World War I veterans, Veterans Day included those vets from World War II.

3. The word "veteran" derives from French vétéran (from Latin veteranus) meaning "old, aged, that has been long in use," especially of soldiers. It was first used in this sense in the 1590s.

4. The original concept for Veterans Day was for a day observed with parades and public meetings and a brief suspension of business beginning at 11:00 a.m.

5. There are approximately 16.2 military veterans in the U.S. Veterans make up approximately 31% of the federal workforce.

Image: Armistice Day parade, Omaha, Nebraska November 11, 1938. Credit: Library of Congress.

Winner of Last Week's "You Write the Caption Contest!"  Congratulations to  Coastal Delaware National Wildlife Refuges f...
10/31/2023

Winner of Last Week's "You Write the Caption Contest!" Congratulations to Coastal Delaware National Wildlife Refuges for their clever caption:

"FWS biologist distributes food at the experimental Flying Fish hatchery."

A big thanks to all the Captioneers who provided a little whimsy for our week! The original hand-written caption by photographer Ken Roahen reads "Emergency Duck Feeding at Fort Peck Game Range--now Charles M. Russell National Wildlife Refuge.

5 Horrifying History Facts About Halloween1. Trick-or-treating evolved from the ancient Celtic holiday of Samhain that m...
10/31/2023

5 Horrifying History Facts About Halloween

1. Trick-or-treating evolved from the ancient Celtic holiday of Samhain that marked the end of the Celtic calendar year and the beginning of winter. Treats and food were put out to placate spirits who roamed the streets this time of year.

2. Hallowmas is a three-day Catholic holiday where saints are honored and people pray for the recently deceased. At the start of the 11th century, it was decreed by the Pope that it would last from Oct. 31 (All Hallow's Eve) until Nov. 2, because that was when Samhain was celebrated and the church was trying to convert the “pagans.” "All Hallow's Eve" then evolved into "All Hallow's Even," and by the 18th century it was commonly referred to as "Hallowe'en."

3. Trick or Treating may have arisen from the Medieval tradition of “Souling.” On Hallowmas (November 1), the poor would go door-to-door offering prayers for the dead in exchange for soul cakes.

4. The first Jack O’Lanterns were actually made from turnips.

5. The heaviest pumpkin ever measured in the world was grown this year (2023) by Travis Gienger of Anoka, Minnesota, who broke the previous world record of 2,702 pounds with his 2,749 lb. pumpkin.

Image: Costumed riders and horses circa 1920s.

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