Hagerstown Model Railroad Museum

Hagerstown Model Railroad Museum The Hagerstown Model Railroad Museum (HMRRM) is a non-profit organization incorporated in 1937 and is active in promoting the hobby to the general public.

Norfolk Southern Corp
06/20/2019

Norfolk Southern Corp

It’s Throwback Thursday! A yard crew in Bluefield, West Virginia, stopped in 1906 to pose for a photograph with Norfolk & Western locomotive #806. Pictured (from left) are yard conductor William Doak; yard engineer Eggleston Price; yard fireman William Neal; and yard brakemen John R. Price, John H. Bowling, and William J. Schoonover.

At 2,750 feet above sea level, Bluefield was the highest point on the N&W main line. The Norfolk and Western Magazine described the natural gravity yard as “modern and complete in every detail . . . one of the most up-to-date freight handling plants in the United States.”

Then and now, #innovation is an important part of the Norfolk Southern story. NS has served the freight transportation needs of America for nearly two centuries—creating jobs, supporting economies, and transporting goods on safe, environmentally friendly rail.

To learn more about what Norfolk Southern moves by rail in the Mountain State, visit

http://www.nscorp.com/content/nscorp/en/about-ns/ns-state-facts/west-virginia-statefacts.html

Norfolk & Western Historical Society #tbt #history

This is a must see! Visited this little gem a few weeks ago and learned a lot about the trolley and local history. Make ...
06/20/2019

This is a must see! Visited this little gem a few weeks ago and learned a lot about the trolley and local history. Make it a destination this weekend!

The Boonsboro Trolley Station Museum 1902-1938, located at 220 N. Main St., Boonsboro, MD, will be open to visitors on Sunday, June 23rd from 2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. Come and discover this restored Trolley Station, used for passengers and freight, is a part of Boonsboro’s rich heritage. http://boonsborohistoricalsociety.org/trolley-museum/

That's a big locomotive!
05/29/2019

That's a big locomotive!

On May 28, 1946, Robert H. Smith became Norfolk & Western’s seventh president.

Smith and his management team supported an experimental new type of coal-burning, steam turbine, electric drive locomotive. The N&W received a prototype turbine engine from the Baldwin-Lima-Hamilton Corporation in 1954.

The engine—numbered 2300—was 106 feet long (plus a 55-foot water tender), carried 20 tons of coal in a large bunker at the front, used a reaction turbine to drive DC generators, and weighed 1 million pounds with tender. Today’s photograph shows the turbine engine next to a J class locomotive.

Steam turbines like N&W’s No. 2300 could pull heavy trains economically, but they were also expensive to purchase and maintain. Despite Smith’s support for steam and interest in experimentation, N&W began ordering diesels in 1955 and retired No. 2300 in 1957. #todayinhistory
Norfolk & Western Historical Society

05/26/2019
Fire Up 611

Fire Up 611

The Norfolk & Western Class J 611 doing what she does best. Virginia Museum of Transportation (Video courtesy of Joshua Crews.)

05/23/2019
Fire Up 611

Fire Up 611

The Norfolk & Western Class J 611 is the most powerful steam passenger locomotive ever built. She's a combination of beauty, power, and superb mechanical engineering.

05/05/2019
The Steam Channel

Awesome!

Big Boy #4014 rolls out of the UP shop under his own power for the first time in 50+ years. Shared via Jacob Narup

04/24/2019
Fire Up 611

Nice!

The Norfolk & Western Class J 611 doing what she does best. Virginia Museum of Transportation (Video courtesy of Joshua Crews.)

04/16/2019
Steamtown National Historic Site

Check this out!

Our Baldwin no. 26 steam engine, also known as "Chugga," was on the move after some adjustments. Engineer Chris LaBar is at the throttle for this short trip. Conductor is Bruce Mowbray, and our acting superintendent Rob Parrish is on for a ride in the cab. NPS Video, Tim O'Malley

04/16/2019
Fire Up 611

Whoa!

Listen to that sound.
Video by Logan Dahir

Looking good!
04/06/2019

Looking good!

Getting set up for this train show this weekend

A little local history.
04/05/2019

A little local history.

It’s Throwback Thursday! Boyce, Virginia, was founded in 1880 at the intersection of the Millwood-Winchester Turnpike and the newly-built Shenandoah Valley Railroad. The town became a major commercial center and shipping point for local farmers in Clarke County.

The Norfolk & Western acquired the Shenandoah Valley Railroad in 1890 and replaced the town’s depot in 1913 with “a handsome railroad station” — seen here in the 1920s — that had running water, a Western Union telegraph office, and a Railway Express Agency.

Then and now, railroads provide economic opportunities, stimulate the development of communities, and tie the country together. Norfolk Southern has served the freight transportation needs of America for nearly two centuries, connecting businesses and communities to the marketplaces of the world — creating jobs, supporting economies, and transporting goods on safe, environmentally friendly rail. #history #throwbackthursday #tbt

Modelers! Looking for some tips? Be sure to come to this clinic just for model railroaders! We will have a table at the ...
03/23/2019

Modelers! Looking for some tips? Be sure to come to this clinic just for model railroaders! We will have a table at the event, so come and visit us while you are there!

Be sure and mark your calendar for April 13, 2019. Once again the South Mountain Division of the NMRA is presenting Clinics Day. Last year they had over 2 dozen helpful "How to Clinics", on everything from upgrading rolling stock, to casting and coloring rocks. So I believe this year will be even better. Come check it out for yourself, bring a friend. Admission is FREE. For more details from this link to the SMD page - https://smdnmra.org/blog/?author=1
Doors OPEN at 9:00 am, clinics end at 1:00 pm, formal presentations start at 1:00 pm, doors close at 4:00 pm. Also everything in the store has an additional 10% OFF the marked price for this day only.

What a neat story!
03/15/2019

What a neat story!

Happy 107th Birthday to the Girl Scouts!

In June 1953, thirty-seven Roanoke, Virginia, Girl Scouts from three troops traveled to New York City in a special Norfolk & Western coach. Pictured here are two of the group’s chaperones, Beatrice Bell and Clara E. Jackson. Ready to board the train and earn their Girl Scout travel badges were Georgia Ann Jackson, daughter of Harold J. Jackson, a machinist in the Wheel Shop; Bette Lee Ferguson, daughter of Clarence N. Ferguson, a clerk in the Purchasing Department; Patty Bower, daughter of Noel Bower, a machinist at the Railway Express Agency; Ruth Tinsley, daughter of Brodie Tinsley, a watchman at the Roanoke Terminal, and Linda Belle Rader, daughter of N&W photographer Frank Rader.

The #GirlScouts earned money for the trip by mowing lawns—and by selling cookies.
Norfolk & Western Historical Society

Last week, the HMRRM hosted its annual Boy Scout Railroading Merit Badge class at Antietam Station. The Scouts worked ha...
03/14/2019

Last week, the HMRRM hosted its annual Boy Scout Railroading Merit Badge class at Antietam Station. The Scouts worked hard and did a wonderful job earning their badges!

Sorry folks! Been having computer problems all week so I am very late in writing this post! We had a very successful mod...
02/17/2019

Sorry folks! Been having computer problems all week so I am very late in writing this post!

We had a very successful model train sale last week with one of the largest turn outs ever! Thank you so much to all our wonderful vendors and patrons who make this event possible! Then HMRRM truly appreciates everyone's support!

Don't miss this event!
01/21/2019

Don't miss this event!

Open House Canceled for Sunday. Because of the forecast of icy conditions Sunday, January 20, we have decided to cancel ...
01/17/2019

Open House Canceled for Sunday. Because of the forecast of icy conditions Sunday, January 20, we have decided to cancel the Open House scheduled for that day. We want everyone to be safe and not risk traveling in potentially dangerous weather. We apologize for the inconvenience, and we will monitor weather conditions for the following week. Thank you!

Amazing engineers!
01/15/2019

Amazing engineers!

Today is #NationalHatDay.
Top photo: N&W engineer Ottie R. Jewell wears the hat in this 1943 photo, taken at Roanoke Terminal. A native of Shawsville, Va., Jewell worked for the railroad for 50 years, beginning his career in 1907 as a trackman. He worked in the signal department and as a fireman before being promoted to locomotive engineer. He served in that capacity until his retirement, with the exception of his World War I military service.

Bottom photo: Locomotive engineer Danny Burgess, wearing one of his favorite hats, at Portlock Yard in Chesapeake, Va. Danny, a 3rd generation railroader, will reach 30 years of service in March of this year.

Norfolk Southern is proud of and thankful for its employees, whatever hat they wear. Behind every NS train is a team of dedicated employees who work around the clock to provide safe and reliable rail transportation. #teamwork

Wow! Thank you Visit Hagerstown-Washington County Convention & Visitors Bureau for the share!!!
01/10/2019

Wow! Thank you Visit Hagerstown-Washington County Convention & Visitors Bureau for the share!!!

The Hagerstown Model Railroad Museum will have model train layouts on display Sundays throughout the month of January at the historic Antietam Station from 1-5pm. Learn about the ongoing restoration and maintenance of the station and see new museum displays. Donations are welcomed. http://ow.ly/vM9N30nfKm0

Now that is how you unload a car!
01/04/2019

Now that is how you unload a car!

It’s Throwback Thursday! This 1949 photograph shows Central of Georgia freight car No. 40106, loaded with grain, being picked up and dumped by a Link-Belt Car Unloader at the Port of Houston. A large steel hopper caught the grain as it spilled through the door. A “new concept for mechanically unloading grain and other bulk materials from boxcars,” the unloader handled as many as ten cars an hour. Seventy years ago, this image appeared in several publications, including Central of Georgia Magazine and Popular Mechanics.

Then and now, innovation is at the forefront of the rail industry. Behind every Norfolk Southern train is an extensive network of track and terminals, a fleet of sophisticated locomotives and freight cars, and a team of dedicated employees who work around the clock to provide safe and reliable rail #transportation. #tbt

Now that is a way to travel!
12/28/2018

Now that is a way to travel!

Are you traveling for the holidays? This traveling party explored Norfolk & Western’s Ohio Extension in 1891 and stopped for a photograph. Some people are carrying umbrellas, and there are picnic baskets along for the trip. While not everyone in the photograph is identified, the image includes sisters Rachel and Helen Hutchison, Phillip Goodwill (general manager of the Goodwill Coal and Coke Company), Col. J. S. Browning, and Judge Benjamin Keller and his wife, Mercy.

On September 23, 1892, the Ohio Extension between Kenova and Elkhorn was joined at Rawl, West Virginia. The project involved 5,000 workers and took two years to complete. Once the extension was finished, the Norfolk & Western Railway was connected to the Pocahontas coal fields.

Here’s to safe holiday travels for all. With nearly two centuries of service, safety at Norfolk Southern remains our highest priority. NS trains transport the nation’s goods to businesses and communities across our 19,500-mile rail network, passing through small towns, big cities, and everywhere in between. No matter where we travel, NS works around the clock to deliver a better and safer future. #TBT #ThrowbackThursday
Norfolk & Western Historical Society

Check it out!
12/26/2018

Check it out!

If you’re planning on visiting the National Christmas Tree between now and New Year’s Day... keep watch for the Norfolk Southern engine leading the consist around the tree.

Since 1994, the volunteers of the National Christmas Tree Railroad group have constructed and operated a large scale model train display around the base of the National Christmas Tree. The current display is comprised of over a thousand feet of track and features trains, trolleys, and villages.

The National Christmas Tree is located on the Ellipse, just south of the White House. For 2018, the trains will run daily during park hours following the tree lighting ceremony on November 28th through New Year's Day. Operations may be suspended in the event of severe weather. Thank you to the volunteers who keep this train rolling.

How clever!
12/20/2018

How clever!

It’s Throwback Thursday! This jolly snowman was built at Southern Railway’s Inman Yard in #Atlanta in December 1952. The snow traveled to Georgia on #Pennsylvania Railroad cars, seen here behind conductor John R. Hanie. The Southern workers who constructed the snowman made sure he was properly outfitted with a cap, a scarf, and a railroad lantern.

Today, more than 75 freight trains move through Norfolk Southern’s Inman Yard—a major southeastern rail hub—each day, hauling commodities vital to the lives of Georgia residents. Behind every NS train is an extensive network of track and terminals, a fleet of sophisticated locomotives and freight cars, and a team of dedicated employees who work around the clock to provide safe and reliable rail #transportation. #tbt

Another great place to visit and see trains!
12/15/2018

Another great place to visit and see trains!

Weekends (especially rainy ones) are the perfect time to experience the Trains of Christmas at the Hagerstown Roundhouse Museum! Enjoy the 3-rail "O" scale layout featuring your favorite steam & diesel trains operating on 4 levels of winter wonderland, as well as regular year-round displays. Open Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays from 1-5pm. http://ow.ly/AEM630mZHFO

Can't believe it was two weeks ago already! Thanks to everyone who came out in the wet weather to visit our Model Train ...
12/09/2018

Can't believe it was two weeks ago already! Thanks to everyone who came out in the wet weather to visit our Model Train Sale in November. And a special thank you to our wonderful vendors who make it a great event! If you missed the last show, or did not get to see everything, the next sale will be Saturday, February 9, 2019.

Learned something here!
12/02/2018

Learned something here!

At one minute after midnight on December 1, 1959, the Norfolk & Western and Virginian Railways merged. “From now on,” an article in the Norfolk and Western Magazine assured its readers, “the people of the merged railroads will work together as one of the strongest, most efficient, and capable railway teams in America.”

One hour and ten minutes after midnight, a 200-car coal train moved from the former Virginian Railway onto the rails of the Norfolk & Western at Abilene, Virginia, in Charlotte County. Later that morning, N&W assistant general counsel Robert B. Claytor filed the articles of merger with the Virginia State Corporation Commission in Richmond. N&W president Stuart Saunders praised the employees of both railroads as “people who take pride in good performance and better service” who would usher in “a new era for a new system.”

Behind the scenes at Princeton, West Virginia, painters applied N&W stenciling to Virginian hopper cars. This photograph is one in a series taken 59 years ago today.

Hundreds of railroad companies were built, merged, reorganized, and consolidated into what eventually became Norfolk Southern. NS has served the freight transportation needs of America for nearly two centuries, connecting businesses and communities to the marketplaces of the world—creating jobs, supporting economies, and transporting goods on safe, environmentally friendly rail. #Virginian
Norfolk & Western Historical Society

12/02/2018
Norfolk Southern Corp

Awesome!

The Capital Region Toys for Tots Train is on the move and headed to Bainbridge. #herewego #NYToysforTots

That's a looooong train!
11/15/2018

That's a looooong train!

It’s Throwback Thursday! On November 15, 1967, the Norfolk & Western Railway operated the world's longest and heaviest freight train between Iaeger, W.Va., and Portsmouth, Ohio. The train was four miles long with 500 coal cars pulled by six 3,600 horsepower diesel engines. The train weighed 48,170 tons and covered a distance of 159 miles. It averaged 26 miles per hour.

Earlier in the fall, Norfolk & Western had moved long trains (including a 450-car coal train between Iaeger and Williamson, W.Va., on October 25, 1967) as practice for operating maximum-tonnage trains. The 1967 N&W annual report noted simply that “experiments in operating longer and heavier trains were undertaken with satisfactory results.”

Today’s photograph shows Pocahontas Division superintendent W. O. Tracy, Jr., shaking hands with Scioto Division superintendent C. H. Hale and turning over responsibility for the train at Williamson. With them, left to right, are Q. A. Goff, Jr., Pocahontas Division road foreman of engines; Pocahontas Division engineer R. E. Bailey; Pocahontas Division conductor E. T. Hagy; Scioto Division brakeman R. G. Sutherland, engineer J. W. Marcum, and fireman D. W. Clark.

The Norfolk and Western Magazine reported that “teamwork and cooperation made the run a success.” Hardworking and dedicated railroad employees—then and now—make things happen. #safety
Norfolk & Western Historical Society

Address

17230 Shepherdstown Pike
Sharpsburg, MD
21782

General information

After the Battle of Antietam in 1862,people who wanted to look for survivors or claim the bodies of loved ones had to travel by train to Hagerstown or Keedysville and then by horse and buggy to Sharpsburg. Thus began a constant stream of visitors that has not even stopped today. Veterans and families of casualties seem especially drawn to the area and began to gather every year at the end of May on decoration day to reminisce and decorate the graves of soldiers. In 1868 decoration day was celebrated with a parade in Sharpsburg which continues to this day every memorial day weekend. In 1877, the veterans cemetery came under ownership of the federal Government, becoming one of the first National cemeteries to honor our nation's war dead. The Shenandoah Valley Railroad was just coming through on its way to Hagerstown and a small frame site was built near the site of the present station. Shortly afterward, slate curbing and wide walkways were built along along either side of what is now called Sheperdstown Pike or Maryland route 34 from the Station, through Sharpsburg, to the cemetery. Norway maples were planted along both sides of the road to shade the veterans as they walked, and some of those trees still stand today. The railroad was a boom to the local economy. Not only did it allow travel directly to and from Sharpsburg, it allowed farmers to send produce and livestock more easily by rail, and it delivered mail and goods to local storekeepers. The station stood until 1910 when it was destroyed by fire. The Norfolk and Western railroad, which had earlier acquired the Shenandoah Valley railroad, then built the more commodious current station in 1911to accommodate the extra visitors to the area, just in time for the 50th anniversary of the Battle of Antietam. One can easily picture the station full of activity as each train pulled up. Men unloading freight, rolling barrels over to waiting wagons, people kissing goodbye, and many survivors from the battle meeting and embracing other survivors as they make there way down to the sacred battleground and to later pay respects to there fallen comrades at the National Commentary. Veterans continued to return for reunions into the 1930's. There was a huge 75th anniversary celebration and reenactment in 1937 attended by President Roosevelt, and certainly many attendees arrived by train. Unfortunately our country's love of cars caused the decline of passenger rail use by the 50's. By 1962 when thousands journey to the area to observe the centennial, the station had been sold to a private individual. In 1992 the station was saved from demolition due to the efforts of 'Save the Historic Antietam Foundation of Washington County, the MHT, and various entities. It was turned over to the town of Sharpsburg in 1997 who leased it long term to the Hagerstown Model Railroad Museum.

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