Scappoose Historical Society Watts House

Scappoose Historical Society Watts House Founded in 1974, the Scappoose Historical Society is a private, Non-profit organization dedicated to the collection and preservation of the history of Scappoose, Oregon, and the surrounding areas.
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For many years the Society has been working to restore the Watts House Pioneer Museum and bring community awareness and involvement to the Society's efforts. There have been many projects, some of which have become annual events. This includes decorating all the Museum rooms and hosting tours for the Christmas holidays season, and the Spring Tea which is catered by the Society members and don't forget the annual Summer Daze antique car show, which draws 100 cars every year. For more information on how to become involved and see when their events are, visit there website at Scappoosehistoricalsociety.org

It is time for our Spring Teas!
04/04/2019

It is time for our Spring Teas!

12/03/2018

Come visit us at the Watts House and enjoy the decorations! We are open Friday, Saturday and Sunday evenings in December from 4pm to 8pm!

12/03/2018
12/02/2018

The house is beautifully decorated again! Come visit tomorrow evening! Its free and we have goodies!

Come and visit the Watts House this holiday season!
11/27/2018

Come and visit the Watts House this holiday season!

11/27/2018
Santa arrived!  Look at these little cuties waiting in line to see him!
11/27/2018

Santa arrived! Look at these little cuties waiting in line to see him!

11/23/2018
11/23/2018
Remember to get your tickets!  We have two date this year, so join us enjoy good food and good company!
04/27/2018

Remember to get your tickets! We have two date this year, so join us enjoy good food and good company!

11/18/2017
Christmas Wine Tasting!
11/17/2017

Christmas Wine Tasting!

Very interesting!
06/18/2017
NPR

Very interesting!

On this day in 1928, Amelia Earhart began the flight that made her the first woman to successfully fly across the Atlantic Ocean. From our archives, we revisit when archaeologists seemingly uncovered a new lead in the mystery of Earhart's disappearance.

Can anyone imagine sending your child somewhere by mail???
06/14/2017
Smithsonian Magazine

Can anyone imagine sending your child somewhere by mail???

On this day in 1920, the U.S. Postal Service said that children could no longer be sent through the mail.

Some of these pioneers ended up here in Scappoose!
05/22/2017
Alison

Some of these pioneers ended up here in Scappoose!

Oregon Trail traveling started today - 1843 (Mine arrived 1850)

Don't forget our Wine Tasting on Sunday from 3-6pm!  Helvetia Winery will be serving!
05/01/2017

Don't forget our Wine Tasting on Sunday from 3-6pm! Helvetia Winery will be serving!

Today's the Day!
04/30/2017

Today's the Day!

Don't Forget!
04/30/2017

Don't Forget!

Don't forget our Wine Tasting tomorrow between 3 and 6pm! Come enjoy the beautiful grounds then head inside and enjoy th...
04/30/2017

Don't forget our Wine Tasting tomorrow between 3 and 6pm! Come enjoy the beautiful grounds then head inside and enjoy the wines from Helvetia Winery as well as sandwiches and goodies! Cost is only $15!

Timeline Photos
04/24/2017

Timeline Photos

Smithsonian Magazine
03/20/2017
Smithsonian Magazine

Smithsonian Magazine

The year 2017 marks the 50th anniversary of the home microwave oven.

Smithsonian Magazine
03/17/2017
Smithsonian Magazine

Smithsonian Magazine

Located on Canada’s Prince Edward Island, the house belonged to Montgomery’s cousins, and it served as the backdrop to her novel about a plucky little orphan with fiery red hair.

Smithsonian Magazine
03/13/2017
Smithsonian Magazine

Smithsonian Magazine

On this day in 1877, this young man from Farmington, Maine, patented his simple invention: earmuffs.

National Geographic
03/10/2017
National Geographic

National Geographic

Update: What was first believed to be a depiction of Pharaoh Ramses II is now more likely thought to be King Psammetich I.

Archaeologists from Egypt and Germany have discovered the remains of an ancient Egyptian statue they believe could depict one of history's most famous rulers.

Smithsonian Magazine
02/24/2017
Smithsonian Magazine

Smithsonian Magazine

Discover the women’s stories from the early days of NASA that had been lost to history.

02/22/2017

Our General Monthly Meeting is this Saturday, February 25 at 10:00am at the Watts House! Hope you will come and join us!

Smithsonian Magazine
02/21/2017
Smithsonian Magazine

Smithsonian Magazine

The Founding Father spent his post-presidency years presiding over a booming alcohol business.

Smithsonian Magazine
02/21/2017
Smithsonian Magazine

Smithsonian Magazine

Before he became the 16th president of the United States, Lincoln, who had a long fascination with how things worked, invented a flotation system for lifting riverboats stuck on sandbars.

NPR
02/19/2017
NPR

NPR

On this day 75 years ago, President Roosevelt signed an executive order which led all Japanese-Americans on the West Coast to be forced from their homes and businesses during World War II.

Smithsonian Magazine
02/13/2017
Smithsonian Magazine

Smithsonian Magazine

The mold impacts at least 5,000 of the museum's 16,000 objects, including first editions of Twain’s books, furniture, metal, glass and leather items.

Smithsonian Magazine
02/11/2017
Smithsonian Magazine

Smithsonian Magazine

Each hidden distillery needed to use runners—drivers in understated or otherwise ordinary-looking cars who could smuggle moonshine from the stills to thirsty customers across the region.

Smithsonian Magazine
02/07/2017
Smithsonian Magazine

Smithsonian Magazine

"Little House on the Prairie" author, Laura Ingalls Wilder was born on this day 150 years ago.

Smithsonian Magazine
02/03/2017
Smithsonian Magazine

Smithsonian Magazine

On this day in 1795, the French army offered 12,000 francs to anyone who could successfully solve the problem of safely storing food.

Address

52432 SE 1st St
Scappoose, OR
97056

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Andrea Harrison November 5 at 5:18 PM · What's on my mind? Family history of course. This weeks hint - Adventure. Elizabeth Jacoby – April 4, 1777 (or July 4, 1777) – February 14, 1847 Life is just an adventure, but when that “adventure” includes a wilderness home where the Indians roam, or a Revolutionary War to begin a new nation, you just might wish you could maybe move or just live in a different century, anything, right? Elizabeth was born in the middle of the Revolutionary War and lived just a plantation away from her Jacoby grandparents near Culpepper, Virginia. In 1765, In the Culpeper Courthouse, on Oct. 21, 1765, sixteen of the 20 members of the County Court of Culpeper, holding commissions as Justices of the Peace from King George III, resigned and relinquished their commissions in protest of the Stamp Act. Nine years later, in 1774, the citizens of Culpeper held a mass meeting, fiercely condemned the British Parliament, and pledged themselves to defend their rights with their “lives and fortunes.” Culpeper militia men were among the first to be called, “Minute Men,” and participated in the first battle fought on Virginia soil during the Revolution, called the Battle of Great Bridge. There is also a record of her father, John Francis Lucas Jacoby furnishing beef to the Continental Army. Her family was definitely in it for the long haul, this was their land and neither Indians nor Red Coats were going to move them from it. However, when Elizabeth was six years old, in 1783, just after the cessation of the war, the family moved to Kentucky along with their friends and neighbors the Starks. The Starks eventually became known for their apples and orchards, so it is possible they all moved to Kentucky for better land for their hoped for orchards. In our day, this move sounds simple, like moving from San Diego to Arizona, maybe 300+ miles, few hours in the car, and set up shop in a new home. That would have been nice. They were moving from a relatively settled area to the frontier, as in Daniel Boone-type frontier. In fact they moved right between two stations frequently attacked by Indians with Warriors Path to the east and Wilderness Road, Boone’s Station and Boonesborough to the south. But, hey, what do kids know – it’s just life and you go with the flow. Elizabeth and her siblings loved running up and down the enclosed stairways getting to know their new home. There were long longs that ran the length of the home with the obligatory rifle holes cut into them. For the kids, I’m sure they were convenient and fun peep holes. Nevertheless, Indian attacks were frequent in her early life, but they were well-prepared and no one was lost to Indian attack. There is no definitive record of how or when her future husband, John Watts moved to Kentucky. Supposedly, he was born in Culpeper, Virginia as well, but that is unproven. John was born in 1766, and shows up on a petition to establish a new town in Bourbon, Hopewell, Kentucky in 1789. The families may have even moved together from Virginia. Whatever the reason or timing, Elizabeth and John found each other and were married on January 8, 1795, when Elizabeth was 18. He built her a fine home and a daughter and three sons were born to them before they moved to live with her mother, Frederica in the two-story log home of her childhood. Again, the process of moving was arduous as each adult, child and slave had a part to perform from packing furniture, linens, clothes and food, then unpacking same at the new home or stops along the way. They continued to live in Fredericka’s house for 14 years, and five more children were added to the family, making the total 11 in all. As if her previous years of Revolutionary War, Indian uprisings and 11 children were not enough, in 1816, she and John moved their family to Pike County, Missouri, to begin all over. Elizabeth was known in the region as an accomplished nurse, frequently coming to the aid of family, friends and servants. She and John remained in Pike County until their deaths, his in 1839 and hers on February 14, 1847. They both were buried in the family cemetery and the grave stone is still visible today. True examples of the pioneer backbone that built America. Photo is Watts Family Cemetery in Pike County Missouri and grave site of John and Elizabeth
Andrea Harrison 14 hrs · August 1, 2019 52 Ancestors - Namesake Sarah Strieby – 1814- January 12, 1852 My father’s side of the family has a history of naming their children after well-known men or women they admire. So for me to write about a namesake, more often than not I would have to write a story about a president or two, a judge, military leaders or even a famous woman missionary to China. I have no idea who the original Sarah was named after, but Sarah Annie Watts was named after her maternal great-grandmother Sarah, who, as you will see, was worthy of the traditional family admiration evidenced by naming one of their children in her honor. So this “namesake” story will be about Sarah Strieby. Religious persecution in Germany, civil oppression and confusion, and the gratuitous offer of land in Pennsylvania by William Penn, led to the emigration of a large number of Palatines (immigrants of German descent) to America in the 1800s. Included in this migration was the Hans Michael Strieby family (father of John Strieby). These first immigrants were for the most part destitute, however they had a reputation for morality, industry, and thrift. In the course of time they began to accumulate property, and acquire a .reputation for honesty and integrity. With this came respect, influence, and general prosperity. Above all they were ardent supporters of the German Reformed Church. John seems to have fallen into this category as he owned several pieces of property in Tuscarawas County and even deeded property to Lawrence Township for the purpose of building a church. Into this atmosphere was born Sarah Strieby in 1814, however I have not yet found a record of her birth to confirm this fact. Family historians say she was born in Tuscarawas County, Ohio to John Strieby and Anna Maria Rishel. They both died and were buried in Lawrence Township, Tuscarawas County, Ohio, so it is possible that Sarah was born in that township. Further evidence suggested by Beers' "History of Tuscarawas County, Ohio", published in 1884, p. 566 "Peter Himes and John Streaby emigrated from Pennsylvania about 1812,” and Sarah is not indicated as a child with them at that time. This would be a good indication that she was born in 1814 not 1811 as some histories suggest. Additionally, her tombstone states 1814-1852. Church was the center of life for the Striebys and, consequently, Sarah’s life as well and was ideally suited to the frontier as it provided a “well-anchored religious life.” There was a saying prevalent in the early 1800 America that stated, "A German is like a willow tree; stick it anywhere and it will take." Sarah grew up to be a fine, upstanding young woman adding credence to this saying. She met Timothy Lamberson, Jr., recently widowed and grieving for his wife of only a few years. I can imagine Sarah with her firm conviction of Jesus Christ and the resurrection was a balm for his soul. At the rather young age of 17 (going with the 1814 birth date), Sarah married Timothy on Jan 20, 1831. There was little time for honeymoon as their first child, Samuel was born later that year with young Timothy following four years later. It would be interesting to talk to Sarah and find out if she knew that her husband, Timothy, was an inveterate wanderer and seeker of all things new and different. Before their third child was born the family headed off to Iowa where their third child was possibly born. Maybe the land wasn’t to his liking or the call of the west rung in Timothy’s ears or he heard of a wagon train being formed in Missouri that was headed to the Oregon Territory and open land. It is entirely possible that Sarah was pregnant with their son Henry when the journey to Missouri began, as he was born there. In 1845, the wagon train consisting of 38 wagons and approximately 1,000 head of cattle, headed out from Independence under the guidance of John Henry Brown. At this time Sarah and Timothy had six children in tow with the youngest being Elizabeth (my great grandmother) age three and the oldest being Samuel age thirteen. That they all arrived safely in Oregon is a testament to Sarah’s strength both physically and mentally – you just try to keep six kids corralled, fed and healthy in a one day car trip let alone a six-month journey across the continent in a 10 X 3.5 foot wagon that was also loaded down with all your earthly possessions most of which were necessary for your survival on the trip. Shortly after their arrival in Oregon, settling on the Scappoose Plains and setting themselves up on a donation land claim, Timothy took off for California to learn about some new agricultural method and cattle raising in 1846, and Sarah was on her own again to take care of seven kids now. Timothy returned in late 1847 or early 1848 and put his newfound knowledge to use, and the family prospered. Gold was discovered in 1849 and Timothy was off again either shortly before or after their last child, James, was born. In 1850, Timothy returned setting up a saw mill, and the family was once again together. Unfortunately for Sarah, the hard life of a pioneer eventually took its toll causing her to die at the young age of 38. She was buried in the Lamberson Family Cemetery. Interestingly, this cemetery is made up of only 3 known plots on what was the Timothy Lamberson Land Donation Claim near Scappoose, Columbia County, Oregon. The three plots are Sarah and two of her sons, James and Davis (both died shortly after their births); Timothy having taken off for Sonora, Mexico after her death eventually helping to establish the town of Walnut Grove in Arizona where he died. The Lamberson Family Cemetery was situated on a corner of the Lamberson donation land claim and is currently owned by a development company. The graves are protected by the either the Historical Society or the Cemetery Society or both. While her husband Timothy wandered Sarah remained a steadfast beacon for her family and the family prospered. First photo - Sarah's gravestone. 2nd photo - Lamberson Family Cemetery. 3rd photo - Oregon Biographical Index Card for Sarah. 4th photo - Timothy Lamberson donation land claim. See her page for pictures and other articles. Susan LeBlanc