Georgia O'Keeffe Museum

Georgia O'Keeffe Museum A Great American Artist. A Great American Story. Explore the remarkable career of Georgia O’Keeffe.

The Georgia O'Keeffe Museum in Santa Fe, New Mexico, opened to the public in July 1997, eleven years after the death of the artist from whom it takes its name. Welcoming visitors from all over the world, it is the only museum in the United States dedicated to an internationally-known woman artist.

"The meaning of a word to me is not as exact as the meaning of a color. Colors and shapes make a more definite statement...
02/12/2020

"The meaning of a word to me is not as exact as the meaning of a color. Colors and shapes make a more definite statement than words." – Georgia O’Keeffe, 1976

What statement are these colors and shapes making? Let us know in the comments! 💙

#GeorgiaOKeeffe #ColorandShape

Georgia O'Keeffe. Untitled (Abstraction Blue Shapes), 1970s. Watercolor on paper, 22 3/8 x 30 1/4 inches. Georgia O'Keeffe Museum. Gift of The Georgia O'Keeffe Foundation. © Georgia O'Keeffe Museum. [2006.5.537]

We are thrilled to announce the newest addition to the O'Keeffe's collection! This unique and beautiful work on paper by...
02/11/2020

We are thrilled to announce the newest addition to the O'Keeffe's collection! This unique and beautiful work on paper by Ken Price (1935-2012) was gifted to the Museum by the Ken Price Estate after the end of our Contemporary Voices exhibit this past fall.

Price is best known for his small-scale ceramic sculptures which resembled biomorphic blobs and sliced geodes. Derived from Mexican-folk pottery, geology, erotic objects, and southern California surf culture, Price’s influences were imaginative and eclectic.

Price was one of the foremost American sculptors artists of his day, as well as an accomplished graphic artist. Throughout the later part of his career, Price maintained a painting and printmaking practice which was similar yet different to his sculptural one. Similar to O'Keeffe, Price's works on paper often depicted small narrative scenes rooted in the forms, shapes, and colors of northern New Mexico.

Are you a working contemporary artist? Share with us in the comments how place has played a role in your creative practice! 💙

Ken Price. Outdoor Art Object, 2006. Acrylic, ink and colored pencil on paper, 8 x 11in. Georgia O’Keeffe Museum. Gift of the Ken Price Estate. @ Ken Price, Inc. [2019.12.1]

#OKeeffe #KenPrice

02/11/2020

Due to snow, all O’Keeffe locations will be closed today, including Santa Fe galleries and offices, and all Abiquiu sites.

In 1940, Georgia O'Keeffe bought her home at Ghost Ranch and installed large plate-glass windows to its adobe walls so t...
02/09/2020

In 1940, Georgia O'Keeffe bought her home at Ghost Ranch and installed large plate-glass windows to its adobe walls so that she could enjoy views of the parched red landscape from her bed. In the distance she could see the Cerro Pedernal Mountain, a flat-topped mesa almost 9,865ft high. As Mont Sainte-Victoire was to Cezanne, so Pedernal was to O’Keeffe, who painted it, obsessively, almost 30 times.

Locally known as just Pedernal, the word is Spaniah for 'flint hill,' in reference to the flaking stone collected and mined from the area. To Indigenous peoples of nothern New Mexico, it is known as Tsiping due to its proximity to the historic Tsi'pinouinge Pueblo at the base of the mountain. The village site is not open to the public unless a permit is granted.

The Pedernal mesa lies on the north flank of the Jemez Mountains, south of Abiquiú, in the Coyote Ranger District of the Santa Fe National Forest and is one of the most recognized landmarks of north-central New Mexico.

After O'Keeffe's death in March 1986, her ashes were spread on the mountain.

#GeorgiaOKeeffe #NewMexico

By the 1930s, Georgia O’Keeffe was already becoming the iconic celebrity we are so familiar with. Her fame flowered beca...
02/07/2020

By the 1930s, Georgia O’Keeffe was already becoming the iconic celebrity we are so familiar with. Her fame flowered because of her independence, because of the way she engineered her life, and because she was a role model for the counterculture lifestyle of the time.

The Museum’s collection of over 2,000 of portraits of O’Keeffe chronicle not only the rise of an icon, but the the rise of the American Modernist movement. Our photographs form a valuable record of the many ways in which O’Keeffe presented herself to the camera in formal portraits and provides invaluable insight into her life in art, the evolution of her larger than life persona, and her creative development throughout the 20th century.

Photographers including O’Keeffe’s husband, Alfred Stieglitz, the artist’s friends, Todd Webb, Tony Vaccaro, and Ansel Adams, as well and iconic fashion and media photographers like Irving Penn, Philippe Halsman, and John Leongard, are responsible for helping document Georgia O’Keeffe’s long life, allowing a new generation to be inspired.

Have photographs of O’Keeffe inspired you? Tell us about it in the comments!

Alfred Stieglitz. Georgia O'Keeffe, 1930. copy print, 9 3/4 x 7 13/16. Georgia O'Keeffe Museum. Gift of The Georgia O'Keeffe Foundation. [2006.6.932]

#GeorgiaOKeeffe #PortraitPhotography

"When I knew I was going to stay in New York, I sent for things I had left in Texas. They came in a barrel and among the...
02/06/2020

"When I knew I was going to stay in New York, I sent for things I had left in Texas. They came in a barrel and among them were all my old drawings and paintings. I put them in with the wastepaper trash to throw away and that night when Stieglitz and I came home after dark the paintings and drawings were blowing all over the street. We left them there and went in." - Georgia O'Keeffe

O'Keeffe was known to destroy new work as well as old if it failed to satisfy her own high standards. There are approximately 125 surviving objects that date from the summer of 1916, when O'Keeffe moved to Canyon, Texas, until the summer of 1918, when she moved to New York City, including this work and others from the Nude Series, 1917.

Imagine coming across an original O'Keeffe artwork in the streets of New York City at night! 💙

Georgia O'Keeffe. Nude Series, 1917. Watercolor on paper, 12 x 8 15/16 inches. Georgia O'Keeffe Museum. Gift of The Burnett Foundation and The Georgia O'Keeffe Foundation. © Georgia O'Keeffe Museum. [1997.4.13]

#GeorgiaOKeeffe #OKeeffe

Due to winter conditions, the Museum will be following Santa Fe Public Schools’ decision to delay opening tomorrow, Febr...
02/05/2020

Due to winter conditions, the Museum will be following Santa Fe Public Schools’ decision to delay opening tomorrow, February 5, for our Santa Fe offices and Museum galleries.

Santa Fe administrative offices will be on a 2-hour delay, opening at 10:00 AM

The Santa Fe Museum galleries will open to the public on a 30 minute delay, at 10:30 AM.

Abiquiu facilities will open on a normal schedule.

** Our Wednesday morning public program, Breakfast with O'Keeffe will run on its regular schedule, beginning at 8:30 AM.

Please call or email if you have questions! 505.946.1000, [email protected]

Though smaller than a piece of paper, in Black Iris, 1926 O'Keeffe has enlarged the petals far beyond lifesize proportio...
02/04/2020

Though smaller than a piece of paper, in Black Iris, 1926 O'Keeffe has enlarged the petals far beyond lifesize proportions, forcing the viewer to observe the small details that might otherwise be overlooked. The strong connection that O'Keeffe felt for her subject further enhances the intimacy and power of her compositions.

O'Keeffe said, "A flower is relatively small. Everyone has many associations with a flower--the idea of flowers. You put out your hand to touch the flower--lean forward to smell it--maybe touch it with your lips almost without thinking--or give it to someone to please them. Still--in a way--nobody sees a flower--really--it is so small--we haven't time--and to see takes time like to have a friend takes time.

If I could paint the flower exactly as I see it no one would see what I see because I would paint it small like the flower is small. So I said to myself--I'll paint what I see--what the flower is to me but I'll paint it big and they will be surprised into taking time to look at it."

What kinds of emotions does this painting evoke? Let us know in the comments! 💙

Georgia O'Keeffe. The Black Iris, 1926. Oil on canvas, 9 x 7 inches
Georgia O'Keeffe Museum. Gift of The Burnett Foundation 2007.1.19

#GeorgiaOKeeffe #OKeeffeInspired

Spring into Conservation! Learn more about the O'Keeffe's Bank of America’s Art Conservation Project Grant. The award wi...
02/04/2020

Spring into Conservation! Learn more about the O'Keeffe's Bank of America’s Art Conservation Project Grant. The award will support conservation of the pivotal Georgia O’Keeffe painting, Spring, 1948!

Over the course of her career, Georgia O’Keeffe made a very limited number of portraits. Beauford Delaney (1901-1979) wa...
02/01/2020

Over the course of her career, Georgia O’Keeffe made a very limited number of portraits. Beauford Delaney (1901-1979) was her most frequent sitter. She made five portraits of the artist—three charcoal drawings, and two pastels.

O’Keeffe and Delaney had a connection through Alfred Stieglitz. Delaney first entered the rarified circle of the foremost American Modernists in New York during the 1930s. Spending time at Stieglitz’s gallery, An American Place, Delaney participated in critical discourse with other artists, including Arthur Dove, John Marin and Georgia O’Keeffe.

The Knoxville, Tennessee born artist lived in Boston before heading to New York in 1929. The Harlem Renaissance was in full swing and the Depression was beginning to take hold. An active figure uptown and downtown, after more than two decades in the city, Delaney moved to Paris in 1953. There he became close with James Baldwin, a regular subject of his portraits.

Settling in the Left Bank neighborhood of Montparnasse, an artists’ enclave, Delaney, like Baldwin, relished a sense of freedom as a gay black man that he did not have in the United States.

Delaney was particularly impressed by O’Keeffe’s work, which he described as ‘alive and quite amazing.’ O’Keeffe, in turn, deeply respected Delaney’s painting and wrote a tribute to him in the catalogue for his 1973 solo exhibition at Darthea Speyer’s gallery in Paris.

Georgia O'Keeffe. Untitled (Beauford Delaney), 1943. Pastel on medium thick, gray, rough wove paper mounted to gray cardboard, pastel board. The Georgia O'Keeffe Foundation.

#GeorgiaOKeeffe #BeaufordDelaney #Blackhistorymonth

Georgia O'Keeffe moved to New York in June 1918. Soon after her arrival, she began working primarily in oil. Between 191...
01/31/2020

Georgia O'Keeffe moved to New York in June 1918. Soon after her arrival, she began working primarily in oil. Between 1918 and 1923, she produced some of the most remarkable abstractions of her career. The Series paintings of 1918-1920 show O'Keeffe experimenting with almost completely abstract, though organic, form. The Series paintings form one of the most provocative and least known aspects of her work and they reveal her as one of America's earliest and most formidable abstractionists. This stunning work is on view today at the Milwaukee Art Museum!

#GeorgiaOKeeffe

Georgia O'Keeffe. Series I No. 2, 1918. Oil on board. Milwaukee Art Museum, Gift of Jane and Lloyd Pettit Foundation and The Georgia O'Keeffe Foundation, 1997. © Milwaukee Art Museum (M1997.191)

"Such things as I have seen out this window I have never dreamed – tho it is more like my dreams than anything I have ev...
01/30/2020

"Such things as I have seen out this window I have never dreamed – tho it is more like my dreams than anything I have ever seen – a great river system of green and grey seeming to run up hill to a most dream like lake of bluish and pinkish grey all in the softest most chiffon like colors."

Blue Black and Grey is part of a major series of works Georgia O'Keeffe created in the 1960s. This artwork, among others in the Museum's collection was inspired by the earth and river forms as seen from the air throughout O'Keeffe travels around the world. Read more: http://ow.ly/pKKJ30qdDtI

What is the most amazing thing you've seen from above? Whether the top of a skyscraper, a mountain, or plane? Let us know in the comments!

Georgia O'Keeffe. Blue Black and Grey, 1960. Oil on canvas, 40 x 30 inches. Georgia O'Keeffe Museum. Gift of The Burnett Foundation. © Georgia O'Keeffe Museum. [2007.1.29]

#GeorgiaOKeeffe

Early in 1939, Georgia O’Keeffe, at the time most famous for depicting the arid Southwest, suddenly decided to paint a d...
01/28/2020

Early in 1939, Georgia O’Keeffe, at the time most famous for depicting the arid Southwest, suddenly decided to paint a diametrically opposite landscape — the lush tropical valleys of Hawaii. In an era when advertisers often hired fine artists to add a touch of class to their campaigns, the “least commercial artist in the U.S.” (as Time Magazine described her) was persuaded by the Dole pineapple company to visit the remote Pacific archipelago and produce two canvases.

Despite initial reservations about the project, her many letters back home show that her experience of Hawaii was a revelation. O’Keeffe ended up spending 9 weeks on different islands. She was by far the most productive while on Maui, where she was given complete freedom to explore and paint. There, she was able to seek out an unfiltered view of nature, and went directly to the most remote, wild and verdant corner of the island: the port of Hana.

She reported back to Stieglitz about Hana’s dark rain forests, exuberant flora, black sand beaches and lava washed into “sharp and fantastic shapes.”

O’Keeffe took many coastal hikes, and used her experience of the unspoiled land as inspiration for for her work. O’Keeffe painted two lava bridges — natural arches formed over the crashing waves of the ocean below. Here you see an example of one of the works inspired by O'Keeffe's 1939 adventure!

Georgia O'Keeffe. Black Lava Bridge, Hana Coast – No. 2, 1939. Oil on canvas. Honolulu Academy of Arts, Gift of The Georgia O'Keeffe Foundation, 1994 (7893.1)

Thank you to the @honolulumuseum for letting us share this stunning work from their collection! Though this work is not currently on view, you can check out all the wonderful and unique things the Honolulu Museum of Art has to offer! honolulumuseum.org 💙

Text: @newyorktimes, Footsteps: O'Keeffe's Hawaii (2012)

#GeorgiaOKeeffe

The Rio Chama is a major tributary of the Rio Grande in Northern New Mexico. The river flows through a multi-colored san...
01/24/2020

The Rio Chama is a major tributary of the Rio Grande in Northern New Mexico. The river flows through a multi-colored sandstone canyon whose walls rise to over 1,500 feet above the river. The Rio Chama has been used by humans for nearly 10,000 years, dating from the time when camels and wooly mammoths roamed the southwestern United States.

This multifaceted river canyon runs through areas designated wilderness or wilderness study areas and includes towering cliffs, heavily wooded side canyons, and historical sites. This unspoiled area offers some of the most picturesque landscapes available in the southwest and is home to a wide variety of wildlife including cougars, black bears, elk, mule deer, badgers, bobcats, coyotes, beavers, raccoons, ducks, turkey, golden eagles, bald eagles, falcons, hawks, owls, vultures, rainbow trout, flathead minnows, and other iconic American flora and fauna.

In 1988, the 24.6-mile (39.6 km) section known as Chama Canyon was designated as a National Wild and Scenic River by the U.S. Congress.

This stunning work is in the New Mexico Museum of Art collections, though it's not currently on view. This artwork that stands as one of many examples of the ways in which Georgia O'Keeffe expressed her deep appreciation and love for the beautiful landscapes of New Mexico. The best part is, you can experience this view today in much the same way O'Keeffe did over 80 years ago!

Do you have plans to travel to New Mexico in spring or summer 2020? What are you most looking forward to seeing? Let us know in the comments!

Georgia O'Keeffe. Chama River, Ghost Ranch, 1937. Oil on canvas. Museum of Fine Arts, Museum of New Mexico, Santa Fe, Gift of the Estate of Georgia O'Keeffe, 1988. © Museum of Fine Arts, Museum of New Mexico. (88.312.1)

Image 2: Rio Chama, 2017. © Georgia O'Keeffe Museum

#GeorgiaOKeeffe

O’Keeffe loved the stuff of artmaking. She loved the ritual and was a consummate craftsperson. Some of her most interest...
01/24/2020

O’Keeffe loved the stuff of artmaking. She loved the ritual and was a consummate craftsperson. Some of her most interesting works include compositions comprised of elemental shapes like this one.

This simple watercolor painting, with its organic movement reminds us of a Rorschach test. We see storm clouds, or perhaps the creative space between known and unknown.

What do you see? Let us know in the comments! 💙

Georgia O'Keeffe. Untitled (Abstraction Black Lines), 1970s. Watercolor on paper, 22 3/8 x 30 1/4 inches. Georgia O'Keeffe Museum. Gift of The Georgia O'Keeffe Foundation. © Georgia O'Keeffe Museum. [2006.5.522]

#GeorgiaOKeeffe

Irving Penn was one of the 20th century's great photographers, known for his arresting images and masterful printmaking....
01/22/2020

Irving Penn was one of the 20th century's great photographers, known for his arresting images and masterful printmaking.

He was celebrated as one of Vogue magazine's top photographers for more than sixty years, and pursued his work with quiet and relentless dedication. At a time when photography was primarily understood as a means of communication, he approached it with an artist's eye and expanded the creative potential of the medium, both in his professional and personal work.

Among the highlights of Penn's portraits made for Vogue are the photographs of celebrities he took in his studio in the late 1940s. Having constructed a temporary corner out of movable walls, he directed his sitters to inhabit the space in whatever manner they chose. This confinement heightened the psychological intensity of the portraits. Georgia O'Keeffe, dressed in her iconic black, seems to retreat into the corner, her figure dwarfed by the converging panels.

What is O'Keeffe thinking in this moment? Let us know in the comments! 💙

See more stunningly beautiful photographs from @irvingpenn

Irving Penn. Georgia O'Keeffe, New York, 1948. Gelatin silver print, 9 1/4 x 6 1/2 inches. Georgia O'Keeffe Museum. Museum Purchase. © The Irving Penn Foundation. [2014.3.54]

#GeorgiaOKeeffe

One of Georgia O'Keeffe's most minimal and beautiful abstractions is this 1916 watercolor entitled 'Black Lines'. O'Keef...
01/21/2020

One of Georgia O'Keeffe's most minimal and beautiful abstractions is this 1916 watercolor entitled 'Black Lines'. O'Keeffe created several radical watercolor paintings and drawings using just a few lines, which led her stylistic development into total abstraction.

It was at this time that O'Keeffe broke free from traditional art forms of the time. Instead, she began to explore the sensuous, organic shapes in ways that transformed her personal style into one that established her as one of the pioneers of American modernism.

"I decided to start anew, to strip away what I had been taught." - Georgia O'Keeffe

What do you see in this minimalist O'Keeffe artwork? Let us know in the comments!

Georgia O'Keeffe. Black Lines, 1916. Watercolor on paper, 24 1/2 x 18 1/2 inches. Georgia O'Keeffe Museum. Gift of The Burnett Foundation. © Georgia O'Keeffe Museum. [2007.1.1]

#GeorgiaOKeeffe

Address

217 Johnson St
Santa Fe, NM
87501

From the New Mexico Rail Runner Express station at the Santa Fe Railyard, take the Santa Fe Pick-Up shuttle to the plaza. The Georgia O'Keeffe Museum is a short walk northwest of the plaza. (To walk directly from the railyard, go north on Guadalupe, then east on Johnson.) www.nmrailrunner.com Also, the Museum is located just two blocks of the Santa Fe Trails public transit's downtown transit center. www.santafenm.gov, then click Public Transportation and Parking

Opening Hours

Monday 10:00 - 17:00
Tuesday 10:00 - 17:00
Wednesday 10:00 - 17:00
Thursday 10:00 - 17:00
Friday 10:00 - 17:00
Saturday 10:00 - 17:00
Sunday 10:00 - 17:00

Telephone

(505) 946-1000

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Our Story

The Georgia O’Keeffe Museum, in Santa Fe, New Mexico, opened to the public in July 1997, eleven years after the death of our namesake artist. A visit to the O’Keeffe Museum offers insight not only into the artist’s paintings, but also her creative process and the light and landscape that inspired her. In addition to the main Museum campus in Santa Fe, the O’Keeffe Museum maintains O’Keeffe’s two homes and studios in northern New Mexico, a research center and library, and a variety of collections relating to O’Keeffe and modern art.

One of the most significant artists of the 20th century, Georgia O’Keeffe (1887-1986) was devoted to creating imagery that expressed what she called “the wideness and wonder of the world as I live in it.” O’Keeffe’s images—instantly recognizable as her own —include abstractions, large-scale depictions of flowers, leaves, rocks, shells, bones and other natural forms, New York cityscapes and paintings of the unusual shapes and colors of architectural and landscape forms of northern New Mexico.

The Museum’s collections of over 3,000 works comprises 140 O’Keeffe oil paintings, nearly 700 drawings, and hundreds of additional works dating from 1901 to 1984, the year failing eyesight forced O’Keeffe into retirement. Throughout the year, visitors can see a changing selection of these works. In addition, the Museum presents exhibitions that are either devoted entirely to O’Keeffe’s work or combine examples of her art with works by her American modernist contemporaries.

In 2006, the Museum took responsibility for the care and preservation of O’Keeffe’s home and studio along the Chama River in Abiquiu, New Mexico, about an hour north of Santa Fe. A national historic landmark and one of the most important artistic sites in the United States, the home where the artist lived and worked is open for tours by appointment. O’Keeffe’s first home in New Mexico, about 30 minutes northwest of Abiquiu at the Ghost Ranch is also cared for by the Museum though it is not currently open to the public.

The Georgia O’Keeffe Museum Research Center opened in July 2001 to house offices for staff and fellows, and The Michael S. Engl Family Foundation Research Center Library. The Research Center serves as the intellectual hub of the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum by promoting and sponsoring research and conversation about Georgia O’Keeffe, Alfred Stieglitz, the Stieglitz Circle, and their contemporaries. It also promotes research into issues of Modernist art, architecture, design photography, literature, and music from the 1890s to the present. The Georgia O’Keeffe Museum’s unique library and archive collections in the Research Center Library are open to the public by appointment.

Educational programs at the Museum serve more than 7,100 students and adults per year with a robust slate of workshops, lectures, conversations, and classroom activities.


Comments

Thought you all would want to know if you didn't before..
Having just finished Britta Benke's 2018 book "O'Keeffe", I was curious to learn more about the artist's time in southern Virginia, specifically when she attended Chatham Episcopal Institute. It turns out this school is still very much in business, and quite proud of its O'Keeffe connection.
Just Bought another O’Keeffe book yesterday - just can’t get enough!
This is one of the best museum pages I've seen. It does honor to both Georgia O'Keeffe and your museum. There is very little clutter. Examples of your collection are ample. The most impressive aspect of your page is the artwork and its relation to the landscape. For someone in New Jersey, this relationship is important to understanding her art.
Well my feed glitches out, but "In the Patio" that you posted today was from the San Diego Museum of Art.
A freelance journalist from Denver fills BBC readers in on the "Bisti Badlands".
Its lovely... do stop n check it out.
https://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/4257168 **Anne Frank Remembrance Day with Deborah Lipstadt, Sunday August 4, 2019 3 pm** The Santa Fe Distinguished Lecture Series and the Santa Fe Jewish Film Festival are sponsoring this Anne Frank Remembrance Day on Sunday, August 4, the 75 anniversary of the arrest and deportation of Anne Frank and her family. In a special event for New Mexico, Deborah Lipstadt will speak on Antisemitism: Here and Now on August 4 in Santa Fe at the James A. Little Theater at 3 pm. There will be a VIP reception for her after the talk. Her new book on Antisemitism, published earlier this year, sold out immediately and went into a second printing on the second week after its release. In addition to the American edition, it is now being published in England, Germany, the Czech Republic, and Israel. Lipstadt came to national attention in 2016 with the movie Denial in which she was played by Rachel Weisz, a movie about her international court case with David Irving, a Holocaust denier in England. Lipstadt had long fought Holocaust deniers, and in this court case she was able to prove the falsehoods of those who denied it happened. After a successful in in theaters, Denial can now be seen on Amazon Prime Video, YouTube, and other streaming services. Her TED talk abut the trial has received 1.2 million views. Prof. Deborah Lipstadt has held the Presidential appointment to the United States Holocaust Memorial Council and represented President George W. Bush at the 60th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz. She is the Dorot Professor of Modern Jewish History and Holocaust Studies at Emory University. Her books include The Eichmann Trial, Denial: Holocaust History on Trial (a National Jewish Book Award-winner), Denying the Holocaust: The Growing Assault on Truth and Memory, and Beyond Belief: The American Press and the Coming of the Holocaust, 1933-1945. Public officials will help us in this program "United Against Antisemitism", an initiative of the Jewish Federation of New Mexico.