New Mexico Museum of Art

New Mexico Museum of Art The New Mexico Museum of Art is the oldest art museum in the state. We bring the art of New Mexico to the world and the art o the World to New Mexico!

For information about the New Mexico Museum of Art, visit nmartmuseum.org. The New Mexico Museum of Art is a catalyst and showcase for creativity and the enjoyment of art. Artists, learners and community members are empowered to think critically and see a multiplicity of meanings. We bring the art of the world to New Mexico and the art of New Mexico to the world. The New Mexico Museum of Art began in 1917 as the Art Gallery for the Museum of New Mexico that was then located in the Palace of the Governors. The building helped establish the Pueblo Spanish Revival architectural style. HOURS Open Daily 10am-5pm from May through October Tuesday-Sunday 10am-5pm from November through April. Closed Thanksgiving Day, December 25th, January 1st, and Easter Sunday

Operating as usual

"The birth, death and resurrection of Christ: from Michelangelo to Tiepolo"This print is an example of a devotional imag...
07/16/2020

"The birth, death and resurrection of Christ: from Michelangelo to Tiepolo"

This print is an example of a devotional image being turned into a luxury object. While the majority of prints in this exhibition were made on paper, this impression is reproduced on colored silk, giving the background its blue green hue. The figure of Christ, the mourners, and the skull at the base of the cross were all hand painted, likely by the artist himself, with gold highlights added. All this comes together to make an immensely precious object.

Cornelis Cort, The Crucifixion, after Giulio Clovio, 1568, hand-colored engraving with body color, heightened with gold and white, printed on blue-gray silk. © The Trustees of the British Museum.

Today’s Staff Favorite is from Collections Manager, Erica Prater 👗👒💍👜•The first time I saw “White Lady” by Faith Ringgol...
07/14/2020

Today’s Staff Favorite is from Collections Manager, Erica Prater 👗👒💍👜

The first time I saw “White Lady” by Faith Ringgold in our collection, I immediately thought “WOW! That is definitely not your typical doll!” I found her to be so intriguing with her bold, over the top, caricature-esque features. She wears a long floral dress with a matching hat. Her bosom is accentuated as well as the pearls draped around her neck. She exudes wealth with her pearl earrings and gold purse.

I found out later that the artist made these soft sculptures in the 1970s as socio-political commentary. “White Lady” is definitely a testament to the lifestyle of luxury that was afforded to the upper classes of American society which were, and remain, a white majority. While the intention of this work is a statement on American culture of the 1970s, “White Lady” tells the story in a contextual and aesthetically pleasing way. Certainly one of my favorite works in the collection!

Faith Ringgold, “White Lady,” 1976, fabric and mixed media, 12 5/8 × 5 1/2 × 5 1/16 in. Collection of the New Mexico Museum of Art. Gift of Lucy R. Lippard, 1999 (1999.15.1) © 1976 Faith Ringgold / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York, Courtesy ACA Galleries, New York.

#faithringgold #womenartists #womanartist #socialcommentary #dolls #doll #caricature #1970s #art #artmuseum #staffpick #staffpicks #newmexicomuseumofart #newmexicoculture

Judith Francisca Baca is an American artist, muralist, and community organizer. “Study for Olympic Mural of a Woman” is ...
07/10/2020

Judith Francisca Baca is an American artist, muralist, and community organizer. “Study for Olympic Mural of a Woman” is a gridded outline drawing for her 20 ×100 foot mural, “Hitting the Wall: Women in Marathon,” commissioned for the 1984 Olympic Games. Held in Los Angeles, these games were the first to include a women’s marathon. The dreamy illustration commemorates this historic moment and suggests the broader narrative of women breaking through the barrier of traditional roles, as it celebrates the ability for anyone to overcome obstacles. 💪🏽💪🏿💪🏻

Born and raised in Los Angeles, Baca’s work resonates with her Chicana identity. Her work as an artist and educator promotes equality for all, as it provides a visual narrative for stories of those who have historically been disenfranchised. In 1974, she was a founder of the Social and Public Art Resource Center in Venice, California. Baca is best known for an early large-scale project, the “Great Wall of Los Angeles,” painted with youth over the summers from 1976 –1984.

Judith Francisca Baca, “Study for Olympic Mural of a Woman,” 1980, blueline print, 31 1/2 x 67 1/8 in. Collection of the Museum of New Mexico. Gift of Lucy R. Lippard, 1999 (1999.15.345a) ©️ Judy Baca

Image 5 is the full work; images 1-4 are are details.

#JudithFBaca #JudyBaca #JudithBaca #SPARC #publicmurals #murals #chicanaartist #marthon #olympics #feminism #womeninsports #newmexicomuseumofart #newmexicoculture

"The birth, death and resurrection of Christ: from Michelangelo to Tiepolo"Michelangelo constructs his powerful composit...
07/09/2020

"The birth, death and resurrection of Christ: from Michelangelo to Tiepolo"

Michelangelo constructs his powerful composition with two triangles, one at the bottom of the drawing formed by the mourners at the foot of the cross, and the other at the top formed by the three crosses. This formula draws the eye upward to the body of Christ. It is possible that this drawing was intended as a model for a private devotional sculpture that was either never made or lost to time.

Michelangelo, The Three Crosses, 1521–24, red chalk, touches of wash. © The Trustees of the British Museum.

A tale of an incredible outdoor art gallery, courtesy of Sam Rykels, Preparator 🗿🌿🎨•I really admire people that can pull...
07/07/2020

A tale of an incredible outdoor art gallery, courtesy of Sam Rykels, Preparator 🗿🌿🎨

I really admire people that can pull off big ambitious projects. My neighbors, Nicasio and Janet Stein Romero, staged an annual sculpture and gallery show on their property for twenty years or so. The participants ranged anywhere from 40+ to nearly 100 artists. The invitations (images 4 and 5), one from 1991 and the other from 2001, show the artists they included. The opening day events — usually on Father’s Day — included music and Flamenco dancers, and the exhibition lasted nearly a month. The event became so popular that they hired a parking attendant and used a neighbor’s field for parking the large crowds. The last of “The El Ancon Outdoor Sculpture Show” (sculpture garden and gallery) was around 2009-2010. The exhibition was both an art exhibit and offered gallery sales (images 1-3, 6-7 show the installations).

Many of the pieces Nicasio created were considered permanent and still exist today. The pieces that are visible from the road are “El Torreon de El Ancon” (image 9) and a few Kivas, made of adobe and/or stone. The “Caracol,” (image 8), acircular Nautilus-shaped meditation spiral, is pictured but cannot be seem from the road. There are just a few other artworks that can be seen, mostly only by Nicasio. Some are left over from the events. (Images

When I purchased my property next door to the Romeros it was too late. I had missed the whole extravagant event. I had no idea of the size of their undertaking and its ambitious nature. I would have loved to have participated! I could have helped park cars. It must have been an impressive celebration.

All images are courtesy of Nicasio and Janet Stein Romero

#installation #sculpture #sculpturegarden #outdoorart #outdoorinstallation #outdoorgallery #artgallery #artexhibition #newmexico #newmexicomuseumofart #newmexicoculture

Summertime in the courtyard 🌿☀️🌶•••#newmexicomuseumofart #newmexicoculture #summertime #summer #sun #sunlight #courtyard...
07/06/2020

Summertime in the courtyard 🌿☀️🌶



#newmexicomuseumofart #newmexicoculture #summertime #summer #sun #sunlight #courtyard #museumsoftheworld #newmexico #santafe

"The birth, death and resurrection of Christ: from Michelangelo to Tiepolo"This tender nativity scene would be easily re...
07/02/2020

"The birth, death and resurrection of Christ: from Michelangelo to Tiepolo"

This tender nativity scene would be easily recognizable to anyone who has visited a newborn. The focus is on the tender exchange between Mary and her new baby while the angels and animals present in the stable look on adoringly. Here, the divinity of Christ is subtly represented by the light he radiates while the emotional sensitivity of the scene is very human.

Gregorio de’ Ferrari, The Nativity, 1659-1726, pen and brown ink, brown wash, heightened with white, on light brown paper. © The Trustees of the British Museum.

B. J. O. Nordfeldt (American, born Sweden, 1878 - 1955), "Antelope Dance," 1919, oil on canvas. Museum purchase with fun...
06/30/2020

B. J. O. Nordfeldt (American, born Sweden, 1878 - 1955), "Antelope Dance," 1919, oil on canvas. Museum purchase with funds from the Archaeological Society & Friends of Southwestern Art, 1920

Bro Julius Olsson (B. J. O.) Nordfeldt (American, born Sweden, 1878-1955) emigrated from Sweden with his family in 1891 to Chicago where he began his training at the Art Institute. When he was chosen to become an assistant muralist for the McCormick Harvester Company’s murals at the 1900 Paris Exhibition, he traveled to Paris and studied at the Academie Julian where he was greatly influenced by the works of Gaugin, Cezanne and the Fauvists. Following a decade of painting, printmaking, and study in Chicago and Europe, Nordfeldt visited Santa Fe at the invitation of William Penhallow Henderson, a former classmate at the Art Institute. He felt an immediate affinity for the people and landscape of New Mexico and in 1919, Nordfeldt moved to Santa Fe where he remained for the next twenty years.

Nordfeldt’s first New Mexico paintings were often Cézannesque renderings of Native American ceremonial dances as seen in Antelope Dance (oil on canvas, 41 ¼ x 50 ½ in. 1919). Nordfeldt was thought to have based this composition on Cézanne’s famous painting of bathers while also alluding to Paul Gauguin’s Tahitian imagery. With his use of repetition, bold imagery and vibrant, complementary colors, Nordfeldt conveys the movement and heightened emotion of the ceremonial dance.

What’s the first thing in the work that catches your attention?

What’s the strongest emotional human-interest spot in the painting?

How does your eye move through the painting? What choices did the artist make to make that happen?

How does the artist’s use of color, perspective and other visual elements communicate the central idea of the work?

Ruth LaNore, Head of Registration and Collections, shares one of her favorites 👩🏻‍🌾🌽🌿 •I have always had a strong affect...
06/29/2020

Ruth LaNore, Head of Registration and Collections, shares one of her favorites 👩🏻‍🌾🌽🌿

I have always had a strong affection for the rich, black and white prints of Kenneth Miller Adams, not only because I love black and white prints and photography, but because Adams’ works so clearly and effectively communicate the world inhabited by most Americans up until the mid-20th century. Adams’ people are strong, working women and men, grown from the earth, and still connected to her by bonds of blood and toil. The women in this lithograph could be of any age, any ethnicity. While Adams was depicting New Mexicans, their story is the story of people throughout the world who grow and gather the food they eat, share, trade and sell. While this way of life has largely passed in our country, other than in smaller home and community gardens, for people in many other countries this remains a constant.

Adams came to New Mexico in 1925 at the urging of Andrew Dasburg, and became one of the early members of the Taos Society of Artists. His love of the solid, everyday working people of New Mexico made his prints stand out from the more romantic artworks created by his companions. He was part of the Treasury Relief Art Project and the Public Works of Art Project, both New Deal projects which kept working artists employed. Adams’ interest in the people of New Mexico did not end with government funding. This lithograph has been dated to 1940, several years after the New Deal art programs ended.

As someone who was taught to garden, sew, cook and do for herself, when I see this piece I feel connected to my grandmother and our ancestors who were also closely tied to the earth. To what does art connect you?

Kenneth Miller Adams, “Harvest,” n.d., lithograph, 11 x 9 in. Collection of the New Mexico Museum of Art. Bequest of Vivian Sloan Fiske, 1978 (4359.23G)

#staffpicks #kennethmilleradams #blackandwhite #blackandwhiteprint #printmaking #print #newmexico #newmexicans #newdeal #newdealart #taossocietyofartists #connection #earth #newmexicomuseumofart #newmexicoculture

06/27/2020
What's Inside

The New Mexico Museum of Art presents "What’s Inside," a crowd-sourced digital exhibition curated by Merry Scully, Head of Curatorial Affairs, Curator of Contemporary Art

The images in "What’s Inside" were all selected from photographs posted to Instagram using the hashtag #NMAWhatsInside, and reveal a few responses to the recently imposed period of containment and introspection. With so many working from home and canceling summer plans, we are spending extended amounts of time within a very limited space. The reeling-in of our range of experiences brings with it shifts in perceptions and meanings. Protracted time inside allows for extended observation of our surroundings and seems to encourage more frequent (and uninterrupted) internal dialogues. Odd things are amplified, meanings are changed, and perspectives are altered. These artists reveal multiple experiences of various insides, both eerie and clever.

https://vimeo.com/432542111 #nmawhatsinside #whatsinside #virtualexhibit #virtualexhibition #museumfromhome #artmuseum #artexhibition #museumsoftheworld #newmexicomuseumofart #newmexicoculture

This is "What's Inside" by Museum of New Mexico Foundation on Vimeo, the home for high quality videos and the people who love them.

"The birth, death and resurrection of Christ: from Michelangelo to Tiepolo"This scene of the crucifixion with a tempest ...
06/25/2020

"The birth, death and resurrection of Christ: from Michelangelo to Tiepolo"

This scene of the crucifixion with a tempest of wind whipping the clothing of the mourning figures focuses on the drama and emotional impact of Christ’s death. Though the figures of Virgin Mary and St. John the Evangelist at the foot are typical witnesses to the crucifixion, the artist makes the unusual choice to include the figure of God the father, shown at the top left, descending from heaven to grieve for his suffering son.

Salvatore or Giovanni Benedetto Castiglione, The Crucifixion, 1631–70, oil paint on paper. © The Trustees of the British Museum.

Opening virtually • Saturday, June 27th at 3pm • on Instagram and Facebook • “What’s Inside” • A crowd-sourced exhibit •...
06/24/2020

Opening virtually • Saturday, June 27th at 3pm • on Instagram and Facebook • “What’s Inside” • A crowd-sourced exhibit • Curated by Merry Scully, Head of Curatorial Affairs and Curator of Contemporary Art
.......
Brad Trone, Untitled (Grocery Bags)
.......
#nmawhatsinside #whatsinside #virtualexhibit #virtualexhibition #museumfromhome #artexhibition #artmuseum #museumsoftheworld #newmexicomuseumofart #newmexicoculture

Today’s Staff Favorite comes to you from Assistant Registrar, Michael Reyes 🏞☀️🌵•With the stay-at-home orders still in p...
06/22/2020

Today’s Staff Favorite comes to you from Assistant Registrar, Michael Reyes 🏞☀️🌵

With the stay-at-home orders still in place, many citizens, including I, have had the itch to just get OUT. Thankfully, the national, state, and municipal parks have been open and everyone has been respectful of social distancing practices while visiting them. My visit to the Rio Grande Gorge area was my opportunity to get out. Upon arriving, I was lucky to be the only one on a specific trail. I do not consider myself an experienced hiker, so the thought of trekking this alone was exciting and nerve-racking at the same time. The hike offered wild flora growing amongst the towering boulders, hidden green meadows that looked like mirages, and soaring cliffs that were outlined by the clear blue sky. By the time I arrived at the overlook I was drenched in sweat, panting, and aching in places I didn’t know existed. As I reached the overlook, my breath was taken away by the vastness and beauty of what was in front of me. My immediate reaction was to take a photograph before relaxing in the shade.

Like Raymond Belcher, many individuals, photographers or not, try to capture the beauty of nature. Through various mediums they try to invoke the feelings that one experiences at that very moment. I tried doing the same, and learned that it is much harder than it looks. What I do know is that we all share the same feelings of awe and wonder. Depictions of these moments may not look the same for each of us, but they do capture our personal memories of what it was that took our breath away — just as Mr. Belcher's photo did for me.

Raymond Belcher, “Navajo Mountain”, 1979, gelatin silver print. Collection of the New Mexico Museum of Art. Gift of Gil Hitchcock, 1984 (1984.573.1)

#riogrande #riograndegorge #navajomountain #raymondbelcher #photograph #photography #photographer #desert #newmexico #flora #hiking #staffpick #newmexicoculture #newmexicomuseumofart

William Penhallow Henderson (American, 1877 - 1943), "Landscape (Cerro Gordo Before the Sangre de Cristo Mountains)," ci...
06/19/2020

William Penhallow Henderson (American, 1877 - 1943), "Landscape (Cerro Gordo Before the Sangre de Cristo Mountains)," circa 1930, oil on board, 32 x 40 in. On long term loan from the Fine Arts Program, Public Buildings Service, U.S. General Services Administration

William Penhallow Henderson first visited Santa Fe as a boy in the early 1880s when his parents took up cattle ranching. He returned thirty years later with his wife Alice Corbin, a well-known poet, to make their permanent home here in 1916. William Henderson left a lasting legacy of fine art and architecture to include six WPA murals for the U.S. Courthouse and Santa Fe and the design of the Wheelwright Museum in Santa Fe. Henderson was also one of the founders of the New Mexico Painters Society.

It’s works like this one for which he is most remembered. Henderson was able to capture the vivid color of the light and landscape of New Mexico. By incorporating sharp contrasting colors – yellow and purple – this work makes a bold, dramatic statement that draws viewers into the composition.

· How do you personally relate or connect to the painting?

· How did the artist use line, shape and color to contribute to
the mood of the painting?

· How would you describe the artwork to someone who has
never seen it?

06/18/2020
The birth, death and resurrection of Christ: from Michelangelo to Tiepolo #6

“The birth, death and resurrection of Christ: from Michelangelo to Tiepolo” traveling exhibition of more than fifty drawings and prints, organized by the British Museum from their extensive collection, tells the story of Italian art beginning with the Renaissance and ending in the mid-nineteenth century through an examination of how artists have depicted the saga of Christ.

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The New Mexico Museum of Art is a catalyst and showcase for creativity and the enjoyment of art. Artists, learners and community members are empowered to think critically and see a multiplicity of meanings. We bring the art of the world to New Mexico and the art of New Mexico to the world. The New Mexico Museum of Art began in 1917 as the Art Gallery for the Museum of New Mexico that was then located in the Palace of the Governors. The building helped establish the Pueblo Spanish Revival architectural style. HOURS All Department of Cultural Affairs museums and historic sites, including the New Mexico Museum of Art, are temporarily closed to the public as a public health precaution due to the COVID-19 (coronavirus). These closures are part of the larger effort by state government to minimize public exposure. Please continue to visit this website for updates and to explore online resources and collections.


Comments

I need advice on the best source for identifying an artist’s signature. The oil painting was purchased in Santa Fe and dated 1994. It’s a nude. I have a second painting that’s a villagescape by the same artist dated 2002. Does the Museum do this? The signature is obviously not discernible.
Do you have any job openings at the museum?
Israeli Ambassador Ron Dermer Visits New Mexico! Watch His Extraordinary Speech Below! Shalom Friends, This past week the Jewish community of New Mexico was honored with a visit by the Israeli Ambassador to the United States, His Excellency, Ron Dermer. Ambassador Dermer spoke to our community in the most passionate and intelligent terms about modern day Israel. Everyone in attendance was truly awed by his cogent and heartfelt talk in which he shared much more than a canned speech. He spoke from the heart and shared in a very candid manner, the tachlis, the essence, right now, regarding Israel. This is especially poignant in our time when there are many competing narratives about Israel, the Palestinians, the Israeli government’s positions on a variety of domestic issues and international relations. Sadly, some segments of the American Jewish community are no longer talking with each other. In addition, the BDS movement, which is nothing but a veil for antisemitism, has misled some members of the Jewish community to become witting and unwitting supporters. In this environment of fracture, Ambassador Dermer gave a compelling call for unity, and a return to the basic, historical love of Israel that has been a mainstay of Jewish consciousness from time immemorial. His message felt transcendent and timeless. Ambassador Dermer made an especially profound point: While Zionism is the belief in the right of the Jewish people to express their sovereignty in their ancestral land, being “pro-Israel” is a unique and essential attitude. Namely, when we hear accusations against Israel, if we are pro-Israel, we will not simply assume such claims are true; but, rather, we will believe in the best of Israel, and question the voracity of anti-Israel claims and not simply assume guilt. He honestly asserted that we who support Israel, must at least give Israel the benefit of the doubt. He did not claim Israel is perfect, but realistically pointed out that Israel is a work-in-progress democracy. He reminded us that Israel deserves our loyalty and generous moral support, and that we must be steadfast in nurturing Israel as the only Jewish state in the world. This was a proud and memorable moment in the history of our New Mexico Jewish community. If you would like to see Ambassador Dermer’s speech, click here -> https://youtu.be/uY6jFC15o4Q , and enjoy! And stay tuned for updates about the Jewish Federation of New Mexico’s growing engagement with Israel and our multifaceted mission to Israel now being planned for December 2020! Am Yisrael Chai! Rob Lennick Executive Director The Jewish Federation of New Mexico
Is the concert cancelled tonight?
Really enjoyed my visit to the museum today, especially the Agnes Pelton show., which was a real revelation. I was really disappointed, however, that, except for a tiny nonrepresentative print, there were no works by Gustave Baumann on any of the walls. Seems, since the gift shop devotes a large amount of space to Baumann books, calendars, cards, posters, etc. for sale. Any advice on where to see Baumann’s art while in Santa Fe this week?
Artist Harmony Hammond's survey exhibition "Harmony Hammond: Material Witness, Five Decades of Art, " at the Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum in Ridgefield, CT received a critics pick in today's New York's Time! Congratulations Harmony! Hammond, a resident of Galisteo, has artwork in the Museum of Art collection and her painting "Buffer", 2011 is currently on view at the Museum. "Duo," 1980, also from our collection, is currently traveling as part of the exhibition, "Art After Stonewall."
Do you sell postcards of some of the paintings?
Your cover photo is spectacular!
GOOD MORNING
A REALY BIG PARTY FOR PAPA GUS Celebrating the 100th Anniversary of Gustave Baumann at the New Mexico Museum of Art Watch the entire show here: https://youtu.be/V2Rq69HJ4cQ Performed live in the St. Francis Auditorium, at the New Mexico Museum of Art www.nmartmuseum.org, December 16th, 2018 Directed by Barbara Hatch The Puppeteers: Patrick Briggs, Camille Cooper, Melissa Heiman, Liam Benjamin Merkle, Susie Perkins, and Danielle Louise Reddick Video & Sound Recording, Editing and Photographs by Giuseppe Quinn, Agramzu Photography www.facebook.com/AgramzuImagery/ RedQuyn Productions, LLC www.redquyn.com
Hello, I am not a member so it will not allow me to PM you. I am doing some research on a sculpture and was wondering if you could help in identifying this foundry, it's status and perhaps the sculptor also. Now I notice it will not let me post a photo either. The info on this sculpture is as follows: "1/12 Louise" with Louise written in cursive The the foundry logo I am guessing is: "TAOS. NM La Plata" with a design on the center Finally I am assuming this to be the artists: "Lindsey" "Lindy" "Linden" "Lindsay" The sculpture is of a nude perhaps Native American woman bathing her baby in a stream.
Fabulous Gustave Baumann 100th Birthday Seminar - thank you all for making it possible!! Such a wonderful treat for those who attended. What a joyful experience!