New Mexico History Museum

New Mexico History Museum Promoting understanding of the diverse experiences of New Mexico residents, the forces that shaped our state, and our connections with the rest of the world.
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The New Mexico History Museum includes the Palace of the Governors, Fray Angelico Chavez History Library, Palace of the Governors Photo Archive, Palace Press, & Native American Artisans Portal Program.

Operating as usual

05/01/2021
Extended Summer Hours

Welcome! The Museum will be open on extended summer hours starting Saturday, May 1. Hours will be: 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Saturday - Thursday and 10 a.m. - 7 p.m. on Fridays.

The Library remains closed to research appointments at this time. Email: [email protected] with any inquiries.

05/01/2021
Introducing Extended Summer Hours

Welcome! Starting Saturday, May 1, the Museum will be open 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Saturday- Thursday and 10 a.m. - 7 p.m. on Fridays.

The first of May in days of yore: Lantern slide of a car float in a 1914 May Day Parade, Santa Fe. Palace of the Governo...
05/01/2021

The first of May in days of yore: Lantern slide of a car float in a 1914 May Day Parade, Santa Fe. Palace of the Governors Photo Archives LS.0838.

The first of May in days of yore: Lantern slide of a car float in a 1914 May Day Parade, Santa Fe. Palace of the Governors Photo Archives LS.0838.

Today in historyApril 30, 1943: While stationed in Kentucky, Private Ralph Anderson addresses a three-page letter to the...
04/30/2021

Today in history

April 30, 1943: While stationed in Kentucky, Private Ralph Anderson addresses a three-page letter to the Superintendent of the Navajo Nation, demanding that members of the Navajo Nation be able to exercise their right to vote as promised by the Indian Citizenship Act of 1924.

On behalf of the "Navajo soldier boys," he urges his chairman to "...use every power to push this through and make a revolution..."

#newmexicoculture #NMSharedHistories

Image:
Page one of the letter. From the National Archives at Denver, Record Group 75 (Records of the BIA), Decimal Files, Indian Suffrage, NAID 7863696.

Today in history

April 30, 1943: While stationed in Kentucky, Private Ralph Anderson addresses a three-page letter to the Superintendent of the Navajo Nation, demanding that members of the Navajo Nation be able to exercise their right to vote as promised by the Indian Citizenship Act of 1924.

On behalf of the "Navajo soldier boys," he urges his chairman to "...use every power to push this through and make a revolution..."

#newmexicoculture #NMSharedHistories

Image:
Page one of the letter. From the National Archives at Denver, Record Group 75 (Records of the BIA), Decimal Files, Indian Suffrage, NAID 7863696.

04/29/2021
Making History: A Poem in Your Pocket

April is National Poetry Month, and this year, April 29 is Poem in Your Pocket Day. To commemorate this day, Museum Educator, Melanie LaBorwit shows you how you can create a personalized poem container you can slip in your pocket and have with you any day of the year.

We've gathered together all of our Making History videos in a playlist so you can find more activities:
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLtegZp9FLqfYDrubS7G0wUCek1krszH7B

#newmexicoculture #NationalPoetryMonth

Henry Gier's car stuck in mud, Pecos River, New MexicoPhotographer: William H. RobertsDate: circa 1917-1920Palace of the...
04/29/2021

Henry Gier's car stuck in mud, Pecos River, New Mexico

Photographer: William H. Roberts
Date: circa 1917-1920
Palace of the Governors Photo Archives #149943

Henry Gier's car stuck in mud, Pecos River, New Mexico

Photographer: William H. Roberts
Date: circa 1917-1920
Palace of the Governors Photo Archives #149943

Paul and Felipita Trujillo with baby, Cochiti Pueblo, New MexicoPhotographer: T. Harmon ParkhurstDate: 1935?Palace of th...
04/27/2021

Paul and Felipita Trujillo with baby, Cochiti Pueblo, New Mexico

Photographer: T. Harmon Parkhurst
Date: 1935?
Palace of the Governors Photo Archives # 002333

Paul and Felipita Trujillo with baby, Cochiti Pueblo, New Mexico

Photographer: T. Harmon Parkhurst
Date: 1935?
Palace of the Governors Photo Archives # 002333

Today in historyApril 26, 1943: Code Talker John Werito enlists as a US Marinehttps://text-message.blogs.archives.gov/20...
04/26/2021

Today in history

April 26, 1943: Code Talker John Werito enlists as a US Marine

https://text-message.blogs.archives.gov/2019/01/29/john-werito-goes-to-war-a-story-of-a-wwii-dine-navajo-code-talker/

Image: Service photograph found in John Werito’s Official Military Personnel File, courtesy of the National Archives at St. Louis.

Today in history

April 26, 1943: Code Talker John Werito enlists as a US Marine

https://text-message.blogs.archives.gov/2019/01/29/john-werito-goes-to-war-a-story-of-a-wwii-dine-navajo-code-talker/

Image: Service photograph found in John Werito’s Official Military Personnel File, courtesy of the National Archives at St. Louis.

Art Bibo and Gigi Marmon drinking water from 555 foot deep well drilled by Kow-ina Foundation, Laguna Pueblo, New Mexico...
04/26/2021

Art Bibo and Gigi Marmon drinking water from 555 foot deep well drilled by Kow-ina Foundation, Laguna Pueblo, New Mexico

Photographer: Lee Marmon
Date: 1963
Palace of the Governors Photo Archives # 044766

Art Bibo and Gigi Marmon drinking water from 555 foot deep well drilled by Kow-ina Foundation, Laguna Pueblo, New Mexico

Photographer: Lee Marmon
Date: 1963
Palace of the Governors Photo Archives # 044766

Today in HistoryOn April 23, 1706, don  Francisco Cuervo y Valdez (b. June 16, 1651- d.1714)  wrote to the Spanish King ...
04/23/2021

Today in History

On April 23, 1706, don Francisco Cuervo y Valdez (b. June 16, 1651- d.1714) wrote to the Spanish King Philip:
" I founded a Villa on the margins and meadows of the Rio del Norte in a goodly place of fields, waters, pasturage, and timber, distant from this Villa of Santa Fe about twenty- two leagues, ….calling it and naming it the Villa of Alburquerque in a good site, and there are now thirty-five families settled there, comprising 252 persons..."

The original name of the settlement was Villa de Albuquerque de San Francisco Xavier del Bosque. It had been decided in 1698 during the administration of Governor Vargas to establish a city below Bernalillo. There were certainly numerous Puebloan settlements along the Rio Grande corridor, but when the site was chosen, Cuervo allegedly worked around pre-existing indigenous communities. Albuquerque is now a city of almost one million.

Photo:
Street showing Spiegelberg Brothers store, Albuquerque, New Mexico
Creator Brown, W. Calvin
Date 1885?
Palace of the Governors Photo Archives #122058

Today in History

On April 23, 1706, don Francisco Cuervo y Valdez (b. June 16, 1651- d.1714) wrote to the Spanish King Philip:
" I founded a Villa on the margins and meadows of the Rio del Norte in a goodly place of fields, waters, pasturage, and timber, distant from this Villa of Santa Fe about twenty- two leagues, ….calling it and naming it the Villa of Alburquerque in a good site, and there are now thirty-five families settled there, comprising 252 persons..."

The original name of the settlement was Villa de Albuquerque de San Francisco Xavier del Bosque. It had been decided in 1698 during the administration of Governor Vargas to establish a city below Bernalillo. There were certainly numerous Puebloan settlements along the Rio Grande corridor, but when the site was chosen, Cuervo allegedly worked around pre-existing indigenous communities. Albuquerque is now a city of almost one million.

Photo:
Street showing Spiegelberg Brothers store, Albuquerque, New Mexico
Creator Brown, W. Calvin
Date 1885?
Palace of the Governors Photo Archives #122058

Lost Lake northeast of Wheeler Peak, New MexicoPhotographer: Harold D. WalterDate: 1955?Palace of the Governors Photo Ar...
04/22/2021

Lost Lake northeast of Wheeler Peak, New Mexico

Photographer: Harold D. Walter
Date: 1955?
Palace of the Governors Photo Archives # 154278

Happy #EarthDay

Lost Lake northeast of Wheeler Peak, New Mexico

Photographer: Harold D. Walter
Date: 1955?
Palace of the Governors Photo Archives # 154278

Happy #EarthDay

Today in historyFather José Manuel Gallegos, an interesting early civic leader of New Mexico, was born in Abiquiu in 181...
04/21/2021

Today in history

Father José Manuel Gallegos, an interesting early civic leader of New Mexico, was born in Abiquiu in 1815. Ordained as a priest in 1840 after study in Durango, Mexico, Gallegos served in the San Juan parish at Ohkay Owingeh until 1845 and in Albuquerque (presumably at San Felipe) from 1845-1847. In these years when New Mexico was under the Mexican Republic, Gallegos also served in the Mexican Legislative Assembly for the Department of Nuevo Mexico from 1843-1846.

After the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo ended the US-Mexico War in 1848, and New Mexico became a US territory in 1851, Gallegos was elected to the first Territorial Council that same year. With the change in political administrations came a change in ecclesiastical leadership as well for the Catholic Church in New Mexico. Following a power struggle between local Nuevomexicano clergy and Archbishop Lamy in 1851, Gallegos devoted himself to government entirely after Lamy removed him from the Church. By 1853, Gallegos won election to serve as territorial delegate to Congress in Washington, D. C. Though Gallegos was elected to a second term, both his seat and loyalty to the US was questioned. Despite unproven voter fraud claims, Gallegos was denied the election, and he came home to New Mexico where served in the territorial government as a legislator and treasurer, among other offices, including one more stint in Congress.

José Manuel Gallegos died in Santa Fe on April 21, 1875.

Frederick Gutenkunst. Portrait of José Manuel Gallegos, 1872. Palace of the Governors Photo Archives Neg. No. 009882

Today in history

Father José Manuel Gallegos, an interesting early civic leader of New Mexico, was born in Abiquiu in 1815. Ordained as a priest in 1840 after study in Durango, Mexico, Gallegos served in the San Juan parish at Ohkay Owingeh until 1845 and in Albuquerque (presumably at San Felipe) from 1845-1847. In these years when New Mexico was under the Mexican Republic, Gallegos also served in the Mexican Legislative Assembly for the Department of Nuevo Mexico from 1843-1846.

After the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo ended the US-Mexico War in 1848, and New Mexico became a US territory in 1851, Gallegos was elected to the first Territorial Council that same year. With the change in political administrations came a change in ecclesiastical leadership as well for the Catholic Church in New Mexico. Following a power struggle between local Nuevomexicano clergy and Archbishop Lamy in 1851, Gallegos devoted himself to government entirely after Lamy removed him from the Church. By 1853, Gallegos won election to serve as territorial delegate to Congress in Washington, D. C. Though Gallegos was elected to a second term, both his seat and loyalty to the US was questioned. Despite unproven voter fraud claims, Gallegos was denied the election, and he came home to New Mexico where served in the territorial government as a legislator and treasurer, among other offices, including one more stint in Congress.

José Manuel Gallegos died in Santa Fe on April 21, 1875.

Frederick Gutenkunst. Portrait of José Manuel Gallegos, 1872. Palace of the Governors Photo Archives Neg. No. 009882

Tending the waffle gardens, Zuni Pueblo, New MexicoPhotographer: Harvey CaplinDate: 1956?Palace of the Governors Photo A...
04/20/2021

Tending the waffle gardens, Zuni Pueblo, New Mexico

Photographer: Harvey Caplin
Date: 1956?
Palace of the Governors Photo Archives Group # 090736

Tending the waffle gardens, Zuni Pueblo, New Mexico

Photographer: Harvey Caplin
Date: 1956?
Palace of the Governors Photo Archives Group # 090736

Today in historyApril 19, 1907: U.S. President Theodore Roosevelt, issued a proclamation creating Guadalupe National For...
04/19/2021

Today in history
April 19, 1907: U.S. President Theodore Roosevelt, issued a proclamation creating Guadalupe National Forest led by inaugural Supervisor, J.H. Kenny. The forest was initially based in Carlsbad however, within a year was moved to Alamogordo, New Mexico.

Photo: Theodore Roosevelt's visit, Roosevelt waving hat, Eugene A. Fiske riding in carriage. Santa Fe, New Mexico.
Date: May 1903
Collection: Dendahl
Palace of the Governors Photo Archives # 010983

Today in history
April 19, 1907: U.S. President Theodore Roosevelt, issued a proclamation creating Guadalupe National Forest led by inaugural Supervisor, J.H. Kenny. The forest was initially based in Carlsbad however, within a year was moved to Alamogordo, New Mexico.

Photo: Theodore Roosevelt's visit, Roosevelt waving hat, Eugene A. Fiske riding in carriage. Santa Fe, New Mexico.
Date: May 1903
Collection: Dendahl
Palace of the Governors Photo Archives # 010983

Today in historyApril 17, 1882: The Santa Fe Railway opens its Montezuma resort outside of Las Vegas, N.M., named becaus...
04/17/2021

Today in history

April 17, 1882: The Santa Fe Railway opens its Montezuma resort outside of Las Vegas, N.M., named because, presumably, the Aztec ruler Montezuma once bathed in the hot springs there. (Yeah, right). An 1883 railroad brochure called it “Nature’s Sanitarium.” It’s now the site of a United World College campus.

Image
“The Great Montezuma Hotel,” Las Vegas Hot Springs, New Mexico. ca. 1882?
Creator: Continental Stereoscopic Company
Palace of the Governors Photo Archives # 086964

Today in history

April 17, 1882: The Santa Fe Railway opens its Montezuma resort outside of Las Vegas, N.M., named because, presumably, the Aztec ruler Montezuma once bathed in the hot springs there. (Yeah, right). An 1883 railroad brochure called it “Nature’s Sanitarium.” It’s now the site of a United World College campus.

Image
“The Great Montezuma Hotel,” Las Vegas Hot Springs, New Mexico. ca. 1882?
Creator: Continental Stereoscopic Company
Palace of the Governors Photo Archives # 086964

Burros at Acequia Madre, Santa Fe, New MexicoPhotographer: T. Harmon ParkhurstDate: 1915?Palace of the Governors Photo A...
04/15/2021

Burros at Acequia Madre, Santa Fe, New Mexico

Photographer: T. Harmon Parkhurst
Date: 1915?
Palace of the Governors Photo Archives # 011047

This photograph is currently on view at New Mexico History Museum in "Looking Back: Reflecting on Collections"
https://www.nmhistorymuseum.org/exhibition/details/4534/looking-back

You can view the virtual exhibit here
https://my.matterport.com/show/?m=6eF6D4ZkMAn

Burros at Acequia Madre, Santa Fe, New Mexico

Photographer: T. Harmon Parkhurst
Date: 1915?
Palace of the Governors Photo Archives # 011047

This photograph is currently on view at New Mexico History Museum in "Looking Back: Reflecting on Collections"
https://www.nmhistorymuseum.org/exhibition/details/4534/looking-back

You can view the virtual exhibit here
https://my.matterport.com/show/?m=6eF6D4ZkMAn

04/14/2021
Friends of History Lecture: Hoofbeats Through History

When we think of New Mexico history we sometimes forget that the humans in the narrative have often been dependent on their equine companions. The influence of New Mexico on the history of the horse in the Americas is both fascinating and profound. From the pre-historic ancestors of the horse found here millions of years ago, the first horse breeding and racing in the Americas, the introduction of the horse to Native Americans and the subsequent development of some of the greatest horse cultures in history, New Mexico is arguably the most significant state when it comes to the history of the horse in the U.S.

A horse lover since birth, Cynthia Culbertson is proud to have served as a consultant for multiple museum exhibitions featuring horses. She served as co-curator of an exhibition at the International Museum of the Horse featuring artifacts from 27 museums around the world, including such prestigious institutions as the British Museum and the Metropolitan Museum of Art. She has also served as a consultant for the equine components of many other projects, including a UNESCO World Heritage museum. Cynthia is the author of several books on the subject of Arabian horses and is a regular contributor to international equine media. She has been a lecturer in more than ten countries and has scripted and narrated multiple educational videos, including a New York Times Vision Award recipient.

The Friends of History Lectures take place at 12pm MT on the first Wednesday of each month. For more information on the lecture series, visit our website: nmhistorymuseum.org or the Friends website: friendsofhistorynm.org/lecture-series/

Friends of History is a volunteer support group for the New Mexico History Museum in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Its mission is to raise funds and public awareness for the Museum’s exhibitions and programs. Friends of History fulfills its mission by offering high quality public history programs, including the First Wednesday Lecture Series.
For more information, or to join the Friends of History, go to friendsofhistorynm.org

Today in history April 14, 1935: The morning was clear and sunny. But late in the day, a giant haboob of biblical propor...
04/14/2021

Today in history

April 14, 1935: The morning was clear and sunny. But late in the day, a giant haboob of biblical proportions blew across the southern high plains and across northeastern New Mexico, blotting out the light of the sun, and covering the landscape in dust. The Black Sunday storm was one of the worst dust storms in US history.

Dust storms hit New Mexico hard in the 1930s. The Depression was difficult enough, but the conditions (drought, erosion, bare soil, and winds) that caused the dust bowl covered large swaths of the eastern New Mexico plains.

More information on Black Sunday:
PBS video (The Dust Bowl | Black Sunday)
https://www.pbs.org/video/dust-bowl-dust-bowl-black-sunday/
The Black Sunday Dust Storm of April 14, 1935 https://www.weather.gov/oun/events-19350414

Image:
Dorothea Lange / FSA. "Dust storm. It was conditions of this sort which forced many farmers to abandon the area. Spring 1935. New Mexico." File from The Library of Congress.

#NMSharedHistories #newmexicoculture

Today in history

April 14, 1935: The morning was clear and sunny. But late in the day, a giant haboob of biblical proportions blew across the southern high plains and across northeastern New Mexico, blotting out the light of the sun, and covering the landscape in dust. The Black Sunday storm was one of the worst dust storms in US history.

Dust storms hit New Mexico hard in the 1930s. The Depression was difficult enough, but the conditions (drought, erosion, bare soil, and winds) that caused the dust bowl covered large swaths of the eastern New Mexico plains.

More information on Black Sunday:
PBS video (The Dust Bowl | Black Sunday)
https://www.pbs.org/video/dust-bowl-dust-bowl-black-sunday/
The Black Sunday Dust Storm of April 14, 1935 https://www.weather.gov/oun/events-19350414

Image:
Dorothea Lange / FSA. "Dust storm. It was conditions of this sort which forced many farmers to abandon the area. Spring 1935. New Mexico." File from The Library of Congress.

#NMSharedHistories #newmexicoculture

Address

113 Lincoln Ave
Santa Fe, NM
87501

General information

A 96,000-square-foot addition to the venerable Palace of the Governors (the nation's oldest continuously occupied government building), the New Mexico History Museum sweeps across five centuries of stories that made the American West -- from early Native inhabitants to Spanish colonists, Santa Fe Trail riders, outlaws, the railroad, artists, scientists, hippies and more. Vibrant lectures, hands-on workshops and performances complement the museum experience. Films, computer interactives, artifacts, photos, maps, paintings and more tell the New Mexico story and provide a jumping-off point for your New Mexico adventures.

Opening Hours

Wednesday 10:00 - 16:30
Thursday 10:00 - 16:30
Friday 10:00 - 16:30
Saturday 10:00 - 16:30
Sunday 10:00 - 16:30

Telephone

(505) 476-5200

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Comments

Read About A true New Mexico Gem:
A wonderful place, I love going there
Are there any exhibits or photos of the men who joined the CCC camps during the 1940s?
An interesting project on recovering Native American history narratives: https://www.facebook.com/events/499333501460735/
St. Francis Cathedral 1955
Is it possible to help me contact Native artisan Paul Johnson (silver jeweler)?
Three Unique New Mexico Christmas Traditions! Check them my blog post! https://laradasbooks.com/2020/12/02/enjoy-three-new-mexico-christmas-traditions/ #christmas #newmexico #tamales #bisochitos #luminarias
Any Info on this Indian Head rock, I would like to know, thanks
Hello! I found and wrote about this photo that I think shows an old store in Santa Fe. I thought you might be interested or even have some additional information. Thanks for taking a look!
I have a distant relative who was one of the first Native Americans to paint landscapes in the European style, his name was Looking Elk Martinez. Is there anything in your museum about him>
Does anyone have anything on Eastview NM, it was ten miles west of Mountainair...? I can be reached at: [email protected]
👍