New Mexico History Museum

New Mexico History Museum The stories that made America's West come alive in New Mexico's newest museum.
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The stories that made America's West come alive in New Mexico's newest museum. HOURS Open Daily 10am-5pm from May through October Tuesday-Sunday 10am-5pm from November through April. Closed Thanksgiving Day, December 25th, January 1st, and Easter Sunday

Are These the Same Hat?The first hat is a Stetson. It was worn by Elliott Barker (1886-1988) a conservationist and outdo...
07/17/2020

Are These the Same Hat?
The first hat is a Stetson. It was worn by Elliott Barker (1886-1988) a conservationist and outdoorsman in New Mexico who served as a Director of the New Mexico Department of Game & Fish. The second hat is also the Stetson brand in the Open style. This hat is from the Romero Mercantile Co., Las Vegas, New Mexico, which opened in 1880 and closed around 1940.
Felt hats were shaped into a plethora of different styles. Today, hat companies give these styles specific names, such as a Cattleman or Quarterhorse. The styling consisted of the angle of the curve of the brim and the roll of the brim and the type of creasing and indentations on the crown. An unmodified hat is called an Open style. Thus, the first hat started its life in an Open style and was transformed through shaping.
NMHM/DCA 10138.45 and 3358.45

Today in historyJuly 16, 1945: 75 years ago scientists detonate the world’s first atomic bomb at Trinity Site in south-c...
07/16/2020

Today in history

July 16, 1945: 75 years ago scientists detonate the world’s first atomic bomb at Trinity Site in south-central New Mexico, after secretly developing the technology through the Manhattan Project in Los Alamos.

Image:
Trinity Site monument marking where first nuclear device was detonated in New Mexico
From the Santa Fe New Mexican collection, Palace of the Governors Photo Archives # HP.2014.14.100

#nmsharedhistories #newmexicoculture

Today in historyJuly 15, 1751: Don Tomas Velez Cachupin, governor of New Mexico, approves the Las Trampas land grant, re...
07/15/2020

Today in history

July 15, 1751: Don Tomas Velez Cachupin, governor of New Mexico, approves the Las Trampas land grant, requested by 12 genízaro families from Santa Fe's Barrio de Analco.

Image:
Horse and buggy near Trampas, New Mexico, ca. 1912?
Photographer: Jesse Nusbaum
Palace of the Governors Photo Archives # 036466

On display in the History Museum’s main exhibit, Telling New Mexico: Stories from Then and Now.Gambling was an everyday ...
07/15/2020

On display in the History Museum’s main exhibit, Telling New Mexico: Stories from Then and Now.

Gambling was an everyday diversion among traders, trappers, and many other New Mexicans. Plenty of fur trappers gambled away their profits. This gaming table was owned by Kit Carson.
History Collection NMHM, DCA, 11664/45 Gift of Mr. Tom Doran

Photo by Blair Clark, New Mexico Department of Cultural Affairs

Today in historyAudience in the Lensic Theater for a free three-day cooking school (which was also a promotion for Chamb...
07/14/2020

Today in history

Audience in the Lensic Theater for a free three-day cooking school (which was also a promotion for Chamber's Gas Ranges), Santa Fe, New Mexico

Date: July 14, 1936
Photographer: T. Harmon Parkhurst
Palace of the Governors Photo Archives # 069256

Lensic Performing Arts Center

#nmsharedhistories #newmexicoculture

A Super Deluxe Blue Max Can black light from c. 1973 made by IMS Corp. Albuquerque, NM.The black light, so well-known fo...
07/13/2020

A Super Deluxe Blue Max Can black light from c. 1973 made by IMS Corp. Albuquerque, NM.
The black light, so well-known for its use in the late 1960s, started its life much earlier with the invention of the Wood’s glass in 1903. Wood’s glass was a bulb that had an optical filter that allowed ultraviolet and infrared light to pass through while blocking most visible light. This is basically how the black light operates today. Originally the black light was mainly used by the military. Later, black lights had a number of uses from detecting refrigerant leaks, checking for counterfeit bills, rock hunting and my favorite, the hobby of scorpion spotting. However, it is with the invention of fluorescent ink that the black light really found its niche. Fluorescent ink was developed in 1932, but it took the fluorescent poster craze of the late 1960s to put the black light on the map.
NMHM/DCA 2015.39.1

Navajo woman taking photograph, New MexicoCreator: New Mexico Tourism BureauDate: 1945?Collection: New Mexico Magazine C...
07/13/2020

Navajo woman taking photograph, New Mexico

Creator: New Mexico Tourism Bureau
Date: 1945?
Collection: New Mexico Magazine Collection
Negative Number: HP.2007.20.707
Palace of the Governors Photo Archives

Market and Cathedral, Zacatecas, Mexico, ca. 1883Palace of the Governors Photo Archives # 128056
07/12/2020

Market and Cathedral, Zacatecas, Mexico, ca. 1883

Palace of the Governors Photo Archives # 128056

Santa Rosa de Lima, Peru, 18th century, oil on canvas. Santa Rosa de Lima (April 30, 1586 - August 24, 1617) was a Domin...
07/10/2020

Santa Rosa de Lima, Peru, 18th century, oil on canvas.
Santa Rosa de Lima (April 30, 1586 - August 24, 1617) was a Dominican Tertiary from Lima, Peru. An example of piety and penance, Santa Rosa tended to the sick and is considered the founder of social service in Peru. In this portrait, she is shown atop a rose, holding the Christ Child, and wearing a crown of roses. During her life, Santa Rosa wore a painful, spiked silver crown to emulate the Crown of Thorns worn by Christ in the days leading up to the Crucifixion. In 1671 she became the first American-born saint to be canonized and is recognized as Patron of the Americas. She had early reach here in New Mexico as well. La Capilla de Santa Rosa de Lima de Abiquiú was built in the 1740s near the present village of Abiquiú in her honor. Her feast day is celebrated in New Mexico on August 23 and in Lima on August 30. This painting is currently on exhibit in "Looking Back: Reflecting on Collections" in the New Mexico History Museum's Herzstein Gallery.
Gift of the International Institute of Iberian Colonial Art NMHM/DCA 2005.027.043

Today in historyJuly 9, 1868: A telegraph connection is established between Santa Fe and Denver. Image: Palace of the Go...
07/09/2020

Today in history

July 9, 1868: A telegraph connection is established between Santa Fe and Denver.

Image:
Palace of the Governors, Santa Fe, New Mexico, 1868
Photographer: Nicholas Brown
Palace of the Governors Photo Archives # 045819

#nmsharedhistories #newmexicoculture

07/08/2020
1st Wednesday Lecture - Andy Otto & William Henry Mee: Santa Fe River in New Mexico History

Drawing on extensive research and stories collected over the years on life along the Santa Fe River from early Spanish days to the present, Andy Otto, together with William Mee, will share their thoughts on the importance of the Santa Fe River in New Mexico history and the preservation of the Watershed in today's climate-change impacted environment.

Andy Otto has been the Executive Director of the Santa Fe Watershed Association since 2014 - https://www.santafewatershed.org/ - He holds a degree in watershed management from the University of Arizona. His experience working collaboratively with diverse stakeholders—from city and county governments to tribes to individual property owners—has served him well in meeting the challenges to improve the health of the Santa Fe Watershed.

William Mee is a long-time resident of the Santa Fe Watershed. Over the years, he has collected many stories of life along the Santa Fe River and its importance in New Mexico history.

View, to the northwest, of Laguna PuebloPhotographer: Carlos Vierra or Jesse NusbaumDate: 1912-1915?Negative Number 0421...
07/07/2020

View, to the northwest, of Laguna Pueblo

Photographer: Carlos Vierra or Jesse Nusbaum
Date: 1912-1915?
Negative Number 042121

via Palace of the Governors Photo Archives

Early 20th century Victor Talking Machine with a “Morning Glory” horn found in an abandoned house near the Navajo Dam fl...
07/06/2020

Early 20th century Victor Talking Machine with a “Morning Glory” horn found in an abandoned house near the Navajo Dam flood pool area of Northeastern New Mexico. We have a few phonographs similar to this one, complete with their horns, tonearms, and soundboxes. The Victor Talking Machine Co. produced approximately 125,000 of this particular model. What good is a phonograph without records? Well, we also have a sizable collection of 78s that would’ve been played on a similar machine, but we’d need a special turntable with 33, 45, and 78 playing capabilities in order to listen to them now. While our staff is hard at work developing future exhibitions and programming, we’re listening to everything from podcasts to Lizzo and from Mon Laferte to Nina Simone. What are you listening to?
NMHM/DCA 00249.45a-c

Fourth of July parade in downtown Santa Fe, New Mexico, 1978From The Santa Fe New Mexican Collection, Palace of the Gove...
07/04/2020

Fourth of July parade in downtown Santa Fe, New Mexico, 1978

From The Santa Fe New Mexican Collection, Palace of the Governors Photo Archives # HP.2014.14.1086

American Flag with 47 stars ca. 1912.Few examples of American flags with 47 stars exist. An official version of the flag...
07/03/2020

American Flag with 47 stars
ca. 1912.

Few examples of American flags with 47 stars exist. An official version of the flag was not made by United States manufacturers. New Mexico became the 47th state on January 6th 1912, and one month later, Arizona became the 48th state changing the number of stars again before a new flag was adopted. The United States adopted new flags only on the 4th of July. Therefore, the addition of Arizona negated the production of flags with 47 stars. This flag may be one of the very few made and used in celebrations of New Mexico’s statehood.
History Collection NMHM/DCA 10118.45

“This grand show is eternal. It is always sunrise somewhere; the dew is never all dried at once; a shower is forever fal...
07/03/2020

“This grand show is eternal. It is always sunrise somewhere; the dew is never all dried at once; a shower is forever falling; vapor is ever rising. Eternal sunrise, eternal sunset, eternal dawn and gloaming, on sea and continents and islands, each in its turn, as the round earth rolls.”―John Muir, "John of the Mountains: The Unpublished Journals of John Muir"

Horses on hillside at sunset, New Mexico, 1945-1950 (?). Palace of the Governors Photo Archives HP.2007.20.615 .

Filigree jewelry maker Adolfo (Slim) Ortiz in his shop on Don Gaspar Street, Santa Fe, New Mexico, ca. 1960?Palace of th...
07/02/2020

Filigree jewelry maker Adolfo (Slim) Ortiz in his shop on Don Gaspar Street, Santa Fe, New Mexico, ca. 1960?

Palace of the Governors Photo Archives # 030206

Tune in tonight to see the PBS documentary, The Vote, and stay for the discussion that centers on NM following the scree...
07/01/2020
American Experience The Vote Screening and Discussion

Tune in tonight to see the PBS documentary, The Vote, and stay for the discussion that centers on NM following the screening. Register for a free ticket here:

Watch “American Experience: The Vote” program, and then Megan Kamerick will lead a conversation about the women’s suffrage history in NM.

"One of the nicest things we do in the summer in the short period when it has grown warm and dry on the ground, and befo...
07/01/2020

"One of the nicest things we do in the summer in the short period when it has grown warm and dry on the ground, and before the cold weather comes at the end of August, is to go up to Blue Lake for a night and a day and we leave early in the morning when there is a dew sparkling on everything and cobwebs stretching all in one direction across the grasses and trees. ... The mountainsides are covered with patches of mauve-blue columbine and the `little scarlet rain' and all the other flowers. The forests are deep in vivid green moss and dozens of varieties of birds sing on all sides. The vividness of all this growing life is startling when one leaves furniture and curtains, silk and cloth and made things behind." —Mabel Dodge Luhan, from “Winter in Taos” (1935)

1934 image of (left to right) Angelino, Mabel Dodge Luhan, Freida Lawrence, Dorothy Brett, Myron Brinig and Kathleen Kiker. Palace of the Governors Photo Archives 159391.

Sad to hear about the passing of Rudolfo Anaya.Here's a previous feature by New Mexico Magazine.
06/30/2020
The Godfather

Sad to hear about the passing of Rudolfo Anaya.

Here's a previous feature by New Mexico Magazine.

Author Rudolfo Anaya talks about "Bless Me, Ultima" and new stories to come.

100 years agoA court case summarized in the Albuquerque Morning Journal, June 30, 1920, involves a man letting a woman w...
06/30/2020

100 years ago

A court case summarized in the Albuquerque Morning Journal, June 30, 1920, involves a man letting a woman who is not his wife use her train pass and stay in a hotel room with him.

Source:
Chronicling America

06/29/2020
Conversation with the Curators: Reflections on Voices of Counterculture in the Southwest

Voices of Counterculture in the Southwest

Voices of Counterculture in the Southwest was an exhibition in the Herzstein Gallery at the New Mexico History Museum from May 14, 2017 through February 11, 2018, and lives on today in a virtual format captured by 3D photography. This virtual version of the exhibition highlights the counterculture movement of the 1960s and 70s in the American Southwest.

By 1967, and the “Summer of Love,” New Mexico was experiencing its own counterculture movement. Issues of social and political justice, national identity and social norms triggered activism and a search for alternative living situations across the country. Counterculture may be best described by Gary Snyder who speaks of the movement as the “discovering of another choice, another path away from capitalism other than European Marxist enlightenment ideas.” Through archival footage, oral histories, photography, and artifacts, Voices of Counterculture in the Southwest examines this era of social, cultural, political, and environmental activism.

We invite you to join us for a revival of this important history here through conversations with the curators Meredith Schweitzer and Jack Loeffler:

Voices of Counterculture in the Southwest was on view at the New Mexico History Museum May 2017 through February 2018. The exhibition showcased the lives of young…

Today in historyJune 28, 1954: The Atomic Energy Commission votes 4 to 1 to strip J. Robert Oppenheimer of his security ...
06/28/2020

Today in history

June 28, 1954: The Atomic Energy Commission votes 4 to 1 to strip J. Robert Oppenheimer of his security clearance.

Image:
Oppenheimer's wartime security badge, ca. 1943. Los Alamos National Laboratory

Pride ignites in New Mexico The Stonewall riots began in Greenwich Village after 1 am on June 28, 1969, and they continu...
06/27/2020

Pride ignites in New Mexico

The Stonewall riots began in Greenwich Village after 1 am on June 28, 1969, and they continued with varied levels of intensity through July 3rd.

For those who witnessed or heard about the events, the rebellion sparked a sense of urgency for change. Stonewall's aftermath inspired new organizations and new tactics, in New York City and across the country.

This pressing desire for action resonated in New Mexico too; organizers in Albuquerque attempted to form a chapter of the Gay Liberation Front at UNM in 1970.

By 1975, activist energy in Albuquerque coalesced around two organizations, a local group called Juniper and the Metropolitan Community Church, both of which focused on community, support, and self-acceptance in the face of mainstream prejudice.

In 1976, these organizations co-hosted the first Pride march in Albuquerque with about 25 participants, no permit, and no media attention.

100+ marchers again celebrated “Christopher Street Resistance” in 1977, chanting “Out of the closets, into the streets.” The featured speaker that year was Mattachine Society founder (and New Mexico resident) Harry Hay, who called for a “coalition among all scapegoat minorities—Indians, Chicanos, Blacks, women in the women’s movement, and gays.”

The marchers' cars were egged, they were booed and heckled (but also cheered), and a local church passed out “Gay No More” pamphlets. Undaunted, one woman told a reporter for the alternative newspaper Seers Rio Grande Weekly that “The homophobes and hatemongers will just have to look out ‘cause we’re coming out and we’re not going back.”

By 1981, when this Lesbian & Gay Pride Week program was created, Pride was organized by the Gay Co-op. Around that time, 1980 or 1981, one woman marched with a paper bag over her head, a compromise since she wanted to be a part of the public demonstration but was worried that being out could cause her to lose her job or her son.

These early parades might have been the first time that Albuquerque locals could see how many gay people, often talked about in the abstract or singly, were members of the community: neighbors, friends, family, coworkers, and teachers. But, it's important to note, these celebrations and demonstrations weren't for the straights, they were for the gay community and for liberation.

Albuquerque Pride gave us permission to post their copy of this 1981 program, signed by the artist, Ray Sandoval.

Happy Pride! May we roller disco again soon!

PS - Let Palace of the Governors Photo Archives know if you have a photograph of any 1970s parade or other LGBTQ event in New Mexico.

#nmsharedhistories #newmexicoculture

This entertainment console from 1949 consists of a television, radio and phonograph made by Philco Television. The New M...
06/26/2020

This entertainment console from 1949 consists of a television, radio and phonograph made by Philco Television. The New Mexico History Museum collects objects related to New Mexico from the earliest history to the modern period. A predominant part of the collection comes from before the 21st century. Each generation of museum professionals has a different view on what is appropriate to collect. Recently, the collections team has begun to focus on objects from the 20th and 21st centuries. To date, this is the only TV in the collection. It sits in storage among other furniture like the chair and spittoon in this photo.
NMHM/DCA 2014.28.1

Truck farm vegetable garden near Albuquerque, New MexicoDate: 1910?Negative Number: 005153Palace of the Governors Photo ...
06/25/2020

Truck farm vegetable garden near Albuquerque, New Mexico

Date: 1910?
Negative Number: 005153
Palace of the Governors Photo Archives

Rider above Lake Katherine in Sangre de Cristo Mountains, New MexicoCreator: New Mexico Tourism BureauFrom the New Mexic...
06/24/2020

Rider above Lake Katherine in Sangre de Cristo Mountains, New Mexico

Creator: New Mexico Tourism Bureau
From the New Mexico Magazine Collection
Date: 1950?
Negative Number: HP.2007.20.638
Palace of the Governors Photo Archives

Now I see the secret of the making of the best persons, It is to grow in the open air and to eat and sleep with the eart...
06/23/2020

Now I see the secret of the making of the best persons,
It is to grow in the open air and to eat and sleep with the earth.
Here a great personal deed has room

—Walt Whitman, “Song of the Open Road,” from “Leaves of Grass,” 1856

Image:
Rio Grande and Sandia Mountains near Albuquerque, New Mexico
Photographer: T. Harmon Parkhurst
Date: ca. 1935?
Palace of the Governors Photo Archives 005573

A stuffed elephant from circa 1920 to 1930. Not much is known about the origins of this particular stuffed animal except...
06/23/2020

A stuffed elephant from circa 1920 to 1930. Not much is known about the origins of this particular stuffed animal except that it appears to have been played with often.
Stuffed toys have been handmade for centuries, often of socks, sacking or other cloth and stuffed with a variety of materials such as corn husks, beans, straw or scraps of left-over material. The Steiff company of Germany was the first to commercially produce a stuffed animal in 1880. This earliest animal was in fact a stuffed elephant pin cushion that children loved to play with. In 1892, an American company created the Ithaca Kitty. In 1903 the Teddy Bear hit the toy world and has been going strong ever since.
This stuffed elephant is one of only a handful of stuffed animals in the history museum’s collection. Perhaps there are just not enough people willing to part with these comforting toys.
NMHM/DCA 10965.45

Tintype of dog and burroNegative Number: 156668Palace of the Governors Photo Archives
06/22/2020

Tintype of dog and burro

Negative Number: 156668
Palace of the Governors Photo Archives

Address

113 Lincoln Ave
Santa Fe, NM
87501

General information

A 96,000-square-foot addition to the venerable Palace of the Governors (the nation's oldest continuously occupied government building), the New Mexico History Museum sweeps across five centuries of stories that made the American West -- from early Native inhabitants to Spanish colonists, Santa Fe Trail riders, outlaws, the railroad, artists, scientists, hippies and more. Vibrant lectures, hands-on workshops and performances complement the museum experience. Films, computer interactives, artifacts, photos, maps, paintings and more tell the New Mexico story and provide a jumping-off point for your New Mexico adventures.

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Need 1 historic cemetery in New Mexico in need of help to clean and repair stones for FREE! 48 workshops in 48 states ..... ... Open to the Public and all will be Free ......................... ..... Each event will briefly discuss historic preservation with a focus on masonry, cemeteries and gravestones.......Then visually survey some of the most historic and in need of repair monuments, at each location........followed by safe and effective cleaning of gravestones.......... Everyone is welcome to watch and or help with hands on work. Veterans stones will be cleaned at each event.....Followed by other assorted repairs that will be performed varying on location........ including joining fractured tablets, raising and or leveling badly leaning, sunken or fallen stones, resetting and joining of multiple piece monuments, if possible a lifting tripod will be employed at each location..........We have about 40 locations and need one cemetery in NM ............. All that is required is approval from those who run the cemetery, sometimes a sexton, board of directors, superintendent, town, etc Please share and try to help find folks interested all over the USA.......... please text of phone me anytime 860-558-2785 or email [email protected]. Thanks and have a great day! Be well, Jon
Need 1 historic cemetery in NEW MEXICO in need of help to clean and repair stones for FREE! 48 workshops in 48 states ..... ... Open to the Public and all will be Free ......................... ..... Each event will briefly discuss historic preservation with a focus on masonry, cemeteries and gravestones.......Then visually survey some of the most historic and in need of repair monuments, at each location........followed by safe and effective cleaning of gravestones.......... Everyone is welcome to watch and or help with hands on work. Veterans stones will be cleaned at each event.....Followed by other assorted repairs that will be performed varying on location........ including joining fractured tablets, raising and or leveling badly leaning, sunken or fallen stones, resetting and joining of multiple piece monuments, if possible a lifting tripod will be employed at each location..........We have about 40 locations and need one cemetery in New Mexico ............. All that is required is approval from those who run the cemetery, sometimes a sexton, board of directors, superintendent, town, etc Please share and try to help find folks interested all over the USA.......... please text of phone me anytime 860-558-2785 or email [email protected]. Thanks and have a great day! Be well, Jon
This page is so great I know that you have several social media outlets but I would love if you also had an Instagram account. I am a middle school history teacher and so many young Mew Mexicans use this platform it would be a great way to bring history to them.
https://eagle.rrps.net/UserFiles/Servers/Server_133377/File/NM7_Chapter_05.pdf
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lF4UNPQMV7I The Buffalo Soldiers served all over New Mexico.....this 3 minute song honors their exploits.
https://ref.kickex.com/79395197e56150ca2b774394f53395ae Hello i hope everyone Is doing well at home along with their family,friends and loved ones. If anyone is intereses un making some very good income and some serious cash PLEASE SUBSCRIBE AND SHARE! Its one of of those opportunities that very rarely come by. Good afternoon to all and stay safe and social free to help the world ve a better placer. Jorge Huerta Hola espero y este bien al igual que toda su familia ya que siempre son mis mejores deseos. Si gustas ganar muy buenos ingresos PORFAVOR INSCRIBETE Y COMPARTE! Es unas de las oportunidades que poca veces llegan. Buenas tardes a todos, mantenganse aislados sin eventos sociales para un mundo mejor. Jorge Huerta
It has to be!!
I hope this is okay to post here if not please delete and accept my apologies... I am unable to visit your museum as I live in Alaska but my cousin and I are working on our genealogy and trying to find information, personal stories and photos of our grandfather Frank Albert Forni and his parents. Thelma Brodie and her family. Here is what we know about them: Fred Forni born Ferdinando Forni In Italy came to Dawson New Mexico 12 days after marrying in Italy. He sail to American in April 29th 1905. He came to meet his cousin Luigi and work in the mines to save money to bring over his new bride. We know that he was robbed twice before having enough to send for her. His wife Born Elisa Deangeli went my Elisabeth Forni on all US documents we've found. She sailed to America on Oct. 20th, 1906 meeting her husband in Raton, New Mexico near Van Houten. Sometime after her arrival they bought land ( We've been told from another Italian man who told him the land would be great for growing grapes for wine but upon arrive he found this to be untrue) Never the less they settled and farmed in Carlsbad where I believe the family farm remains. Frank Albert Forni made a name for himself in Carlsbad. Frank was married to Thelma Brodie and they had 2 sons Jerry Forni who died and age 2 1/2 from Whooping Cough and Robert Forni born Sept. 28th 1939 (my dad) Thelma had lots of family in the area as well ( her parents Aron Brodie and Tennie Wilkie her siblings Anne, Clyde and Bonnie Brodie. Frank went to war. He was held as a POW by the Japanese, he survived the Bataan Death March and returned to New Mexico. He and Thelma divorced and she moved to California. Frank remained in New Mexico starting a new family with his 2nd wife Patsy. I'm told he was in constant poor health after the war until he passed in 1960 ( prior to my birth) Any help is greatly appreciated :)
: :+CC ID: 2015623/kcm.org.aus
I'm making a pork pot roast tomorrow can somebody told me what seasonings to use I don't want it spicy just a regular pot roast
Carey's Hardware Store, Raton. No date but I guess early 1900s. My gt.gt aunts and their husbands worked in the store. After Mr & Mrs Carey died Mr Arkell continued to run the store until his death in 1934. My gt,gt aunts returned to England for a visit in 1933 and posed for this photo with my father. I have other early street views of Raton if you are interested.
War in the Pacific: ‘Jive’ band playing for sunbathing crew members on the quarterdeck of the US Navy battleship USS ‘New Mexico’ (BB-40). 1944 / Source USN photo