New Mexico Historic Sites

New Mexico Historic Sites Visiting a New Mexico Historic Site promises to grant you a deeper understanding of those who have gone before us and helped make us who we are today.
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Temporarily closed

11/14/2020
Sam Slater - Artist in Their Residence Program

As a Diné moccasin maker, Sam Slater has attempted to use his art as a form of researching and sharing Diné history. The initial symbolism of Diné moccasins represents the history of our Emergence into this world and later meanings have been layered on as the art has evolved. In his own family history, they identify the Long Walk as the moment in which their current style of moccasin making--using cowhide and our contemporary pattern--was thoroughly developed. Additionally, the transitions between different materials and styles tell a story of colonization and fierce resistance to external forces. These are the histories that Sam will be sharing by discussing his art and its evolution over the past millennium of Diné migration and survival.

"My signature moccasin style is the typical Navajo low-cut kélchí with fabric piping stitched into the seem between the upper and lower portions. This is an attempt to draw attention to the hidden stitching, which represents lighting, as a way of illuminating the full significance of the moccasin."

Artists in Their Residence is a program at Bosque Redondo Memorial that highlights the art and scholarly work of local Native Americans.
During their residency, each artist or scholar will create a video of themselves demonstrating their craft, which will premiere on the New Mexico Historic Site's page. Viewers will have an opportunity to engage with and ask questions directly to the artist during the premiere!

11/13/2020
"It is Revenge, Not Justice Seeking Satisfaction"

“It Is Revenge, Not Justice Seeking Satisfaction”
by Rebekha C. Crockett

On November 12th, 1862, Judge Joseph Gillette Knapp, who was firmly opposed to slavery, wrote the following to Commissioner of Indian Affairs, William P. Dole regarding a newspaper publication on the Navajo Campaign:
“… I desire to call your attention to the ‘leader’ [of the Santa Fe Gazette] […] particularly to that portion relating to the employment of Utahs against the Navijoes. I found a band of the Utahs here, in possession of 6 Navajo captives, women & children, whom they sold as slaves, and who said that they should start on another expedition for the purpose of procuring more captives. Proof of these facts can be easily had here. Now sir, are the laws of God and the U.S. to be thus outraged? And is it the policy of your department to encourage countenance, and promote Indian wars, of one tribe with another? This course if pursued will eventually bring on a general war of the Indians against whites.”

Frustrated, he again wrote Commissioner Dole on December 5th after reading a publication by Acting Governor William Arny where he praised the start of the Navajo campaign and the likelihood of obtaining gold from Navajo land. In this lengthy letter he presents a powerfully eloquent argument against the Navajo Campaign which requires no further explanation on my part:

“… It seems the military of this department have entered into the arrangement of a campaign, not only against the Navijoes, but against the Mescalero Apaches […] In its execution no distinction is to be made between the innocent and the guilty. The blow of the military arm is to fall on all alike. Those who have desired to remain in quiet and peace, who have opposed with all their power the commission of depredations for a year and a half, are to be treated with the same rigor as the depredators themselves […] The only way of avoiding this injustice, as these Indians are told, is at once to gather all their people and effects together, leave their homes and country, cease communication with their own people; surrender themselves as prisoners of war, and enter into a military post, entirely under the authority of the commandant of that post. There they must be dependent upon rations furnished them […] Will these Indians distinguish between their condition, and that of those who flee before our army? […] And for what is this war to be prosecuted? Some from among the tribes, so the rumor goes, have stolen horses and mules, have killed cows, oxen, sheep, goats and asses and eaten them up. They have also killed a few pastors, and driven off the flocks they were tending. Concede all this, and then is a war against the whole tribe, an armed invasion of the nation, collisions with the innocent […] Let the arm of justice fall with unerring certainty upon the head of the offenders against the law. He who offends its majesty should feel the penalty. The innocent never…. In every view I can take of this Indian warfare as it has been arranged, whether it be in pursuit of the mountains of gold, or because of the depredations complained of, it does seem to be that it had better be postponed for the present. Offenders should be pursued and made to answer for their offences […] When these humane remedies fail, and not before, is the resort to arms justified […] [An Indian Superintendent] with such judicious men as the department can appoint could undoubtedly form such a treaty with all the Indians of New Mexico as would meet the approval of the government, and put an end to hostilities which have existed between them and the whites, since the day when the first Spanish adventurer crossed the El Passo, and entered New Mexico—a hostility which will exist so long as Indian captives are bought and sold, …The transgressor should be punished according to his sin, and he who commits a crime should pay the penalty of the law according to the law; but to exterminate whole peoples for the sins of a lawless few is a greater evil than any loss of any amount of property can be […] It is revenge, not justice seeking satisfaction. In these views I am aware that I disagree with every officer of the government, if not with every man in New Mexico. . . Still I have the firmest conviction of their eternal truth […] The importance of this subject, the happiness and prosperity of the people of New Mexico, with the love I owe to my country, and a desire to see its laws obeyed or enforced, are all the excuses I can render for this long letter.”

Photo: Knapp, Judge Joseph Gillette; 1805-1888. “Through White Men’s Eyes: A Contribution to Navajo History” Vol.3 pp.249 Author J. Lee Correl.

Photo: Dole, William P.; n.d. “Through White Men’s Eyes: A Contribution to Navajo History” Vol.3 pp.235 Author J. Lee Correl

Photo: Oath of Office of Joseph Gillet Knapp; 1861; From the William G. Ritch Papers concerning History of New Mexico, 1539-1885, from microfilm. Courtesy of the Palace of the Governors.

Come visit us at beautiful Jemez Historic Site!
11/12/2020

Come visit us at beautiful Jemez Historic Site!

11/09/2020

As a Diné moccasin maker, Sam Slater has attempted to use his art as a form of researching and sharing Diné history. The initial symbolism of Diné moccasins represents the history of our Emergence into this world and later meanings have been layered on as the art has evolved. In his own family history, they identify the Long Walk as the moment in which their current style of moccasin making--using cowhide and our contemporary pattern--was thoroughly developed. Additionally, the transitions between different materials and styles tell a story of colonization and fierce resistance to external forces. These are the histories that Sam will be sharing by discussing his art and its evolution over the past millennium of Diné migration and survival.

"My signature moccasin style is the typical Navajo low-cut kélchí with fabric piping stitched into the seem between the upper and lower portions. This is an attempt to draw attention to the hidden stitching, which represents lighting, as a way of illuminating the full significance of the moccasin."

Artists in Their Residence is a program at Bosque Redondo Memorial that highlights the art and scholarly work of local Native Americans. During their residency, each artist or scholar will create a video of themselves demonstrating their craft, which will premiere on the New Mexico Historic Site's page. Viewers will have an opportunity to engage with and ask questions directly to the artist during the premiere!

11/08/2020
11/08/2020
11/06/2020
Lincoln Celebrates Day of the Dead Traditions!

Lincoln, New Mexico bursts with color and music in autumn with the celebration of Dia de los Muertos! Organized by Lincoln's merchants and supported by Lincoln Historic Site, the event reflects the traditions of the Day of the Dead with altars, food, music, educational presentations, and activities for all ages. Enjoy these memories of past DDLM celebrations and we'll see you next year at Lincoln Historic Site!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AmovHj-qpo0

Lincoln, New Mexico bursts with color and music in autumn with the celebration of Dia de los Muertos! Organized by Lincoln's merchants and supported by Linco...

News from the Frontier: November 2020 (Lincoln & Fort Stanton Historic Sites)
11/03/2020
News from the Frontier: November 2020 (Lincoln & Fort Stanton Historic Sites)

News from the Frontier: November 2020 (Lincoln & Fort Stanton Historic Sites)

Throughout the summer, contractors worked on replacing the aging roof of the historic 1932 power plant building at Fort Stanton Historic Site. In addition, plans are being made for contractors to begin installing new access gates and fencing along Hwy 220 (Fort Stanton's entrance) to ensure securit...

Click to view a 360-degree interactive photo! Monday, November 2nd is Dia de los Muertos (Day of the Dead). The Day of t...
11/01/2020
Los Luceros Historic Site's 2020 Día de los Muertos Altar from Rio Arriba County, NM, USA

Click to view a 360-degree interactive photo!

Monday, November 2nd is Dia de los Muertos (Day of the Dead). The Day of the Dead is a celebration of loved ones who have passed and is an important part of Mexican culture. In honor of this holiday that is celebrated throughout Mexico and the Southwestern US, we have put together an altar to honor some of the important women who lived and worked at Los Luceros. To explore the altar we created and learn about the different elements that are included on our altar, click the link to explore the 360-degree photo!

*Please note that there are fake skulls on the 360-degree altar.

Take a look at the Dia de Los Muertos set up in the Grand Sala of the Hacienda at Los Luceros. Learn about the women represented on the altar in addition to the elements included on the altar.

This circa 1887 photograph features three children from a prominent early New Mexico family. (From left) Epimenia, Marga...
11/01/2020

This circa 1887 photograph features three children from a prominent early New Mexico family. (From left) Epimenia, Margarita, and Valeria were the daughters of Trinidad Romero, a Territorial Delegate to Congress, a U.S. Marshall, and a businessman from Las Vegas, New Mexico. The Romero family line can be traced back to the Spanish settlement of New Mexico in 1598. Descendants can be found throughout the state. Margarita, the youngest child, became the mother of New Mexico State Legislator and educator J. Paul Taylor, who we have to thank for the Taylor-Mesilla Historic Property in southern NM.
Photographer: James N. Furlong
Date: circa 1887 (Epimenia b. 1872, Valeria b. 1878, Margarita b. 1881)
Palace of the Governors Photo Archives Negative #099612

11/01/2020
Ghost Hunter Q & A Reduz

Immediately following the premiere of "Proof of Afterlife," Fort Stanton Historic Site's debut on A&E, staff were joined for a LIVE question and answer session with Ghost Hunters team members Brandon Alvis and Mustafa Gatollari. If you missed this session, tune in on Saturday as we re-air our time spent discussing their findings at Fort Stanton. #ghosthunters #newmexico #haunted

11/01/2020
10/31/2020

Immediately following the premiere of "Proof of Afterlife," Fort Stanton Historic Site's debut on A&E, staff were joined for a LIVE question and answer session with Ghost Hunters team members Brandon Alvis and Mustafa Gatollari. If you missed this session, tune in on Saturday as we re-air our time spent discussing their findings at Fort Stanton. #ghosthunters #newmexico #haunted

CRIKEY! A wild masked Dilophosaurus has been seen running around Los Luceros Jurassic Site!Happy Halloween! There are ma...
10/31/2020

CRIKEY! A wild masked Dilophosaurus has been seen running around Los Luceros Jurassic Site!

Happy Halloween! There are many safe activities to do tonight: carve pumpkins, decorate your living space, have a virtual Halloween costume contest, dress up and have a fun photo session at your home, bake Halloween treats, or have a movie night with the people you live with.

Did you know that the Dilophosaurus was actually a LOT bigger than portrayed in the movie and there is no evidence of a neck frill? It did have crests, however. The first specimen was found by a Diné (Navajo) man named Jesse Williams in Arizona.

In New Mexico, the Coelophysis, another two-legged dino, was discovered at Ghost Ranch near Abiquiu and is much closer in size to the Dilphosaurus depicted in Jurassic Park. The Coelophysis is the state fossil of New Mexico and it is estimated that about a thousand complete skeletons exist at Ghost Ranch.

#happyhalloween #wearamask #halloween2020 #dilophosaurus #losluceroshistoricsite

10/30/2020

Even though we are temporarily closed to the public, the wildlife are free to visit the Sites 🐺🐻🐰🦊🦝🐸🦎🐁🐇🐈🦌🦣🐿️🦫🦨🦇🐦🦅🦃🦆
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#JemezHistoricSite #Jemez #JemezMountains #NMHistoricSites #Muledeer #wildlife #NM #NewMexico #deer #NMTRUE #LandofEnchantment #PureNM

Pumpkins and Turnipsby Rebekha C. CrockettThis week, we share an exchange between General James H. Carleton, and then co...
10/29/2020

Pumpkins and Turnips
by Rebekha C. Crockett

This week, we share an exchange between General James H. Carleton, and then commander of Fort Sumner, General Marcellus Crocker regarding pumpkins going towards the subsistence of the Dine (Navajo) captives.

On October 21st, 1864, General James Carleton instructed General Marcellus Crocker: “Mr. LaRue, sutler at Fort Sumner, has, I understand, several thousand pounds of pumpkins which he desires to sell. If these pumpkins were raised by Indians they should not have gone into his possession, as it is forbidden, positively, for anyone to buy a single article of food, animate or inanimate, from Indians belonging to the Reservation. If not raised by Indians, these pumpkins may be bought at what you consider a fair price per pound, and issued in lieu of other food. Did not the Indians themselves raise many pumpkins and turnips? If so, these articles must be consumed by them, and the breadstuff issues be diminished while these vegetables last. The money for the fodder should be used toward defraying the expenses of subsistence of Indians. Pray take this matter under consideration, and have it so arranged that all the fruit of the labor of the Indians on their farms will be sure to go toward feeding them, except a sufficient sum to buy them tobacco […]see that every man and woman able to work be kept employed in preparing fields for cultivation from now until the next season for planting has passed by […] Are any of the Navajo Horses fit for light cavalry service: If so, how many can be bought of this quality, and at what price per head? Some of them might do well for men in Colonel Carson’s regiment, particularly for light Mexicans”

On October 28th, after receiving a report from Captain William P. Calloway that the amount of vegetables the Navajo had were “but very few, principally Beets and Turnips, but in such small quantities that they cannot be considered anything towards their support”, General Crocker reported back to Carleton that the pumpkins for sale to the Government by Mr. LaRue were not procured from the Navajo, but from a garden cultivated by Captain Calloway, and that the purchase of them had not been authorized because the price asked by LaRue was too high. General Crocker added that “..They [the Navajo] decline selling any of their horses at any price…”

A recent article discussed the hardships of food scarcity during the fall and winter of 1864 due to a combination of extremely poor planning and unexpected crop failures. After which, General Carleton slashed rations to 20 ounces per person per day, causing wide spread hunger and starvation. At the same time, we see here that he increased the labor demands on the men and women held captive despite the drastic decrease in food, the lack of winter clothing (supplies would not arrive until December), and the increasingly cold weather, further worsening the already miserable conditions at Bosque Redondo. Adding insult to injury, even under these dire circumstances, the sutler insisted on charging too much for the pumpkins which could have gone a small way towards alleviating the food shortage. Sadly, these conditions and actions were the norm on the Bosque Redondo Reservation.

Billy is holding down the fort today! Winter Storm Billy that is...😉
10/27/2020

Billy is holding down the fort today! Winter Storm Billy that is...😉

Winter Storm Billy! How appropriate for the “Most Dangerous Street in America!”
10/27/2020

Winter Storm Billy! How appropriate for the “Most Dangerous Street in America!”

What if the Lincoln County War were conducted via Zoom? Would it have been known as the "Most Dangerous Website in Ameri...
10/23/2020

What if the Lincoln County War were conducted via Zoom? Would it have been known as the "Most Dangerous Website in America?"

In accordance with revised public health directives, the New Mexico Department of Cultural Affairs (DCA) has closed its ...
10/23/2020

In accordance with revised public health directives, the New Mexico Department of Cultural Affairs (DCA) has closed its museums and historic sites to the public until further notice.

The safety and well-being of our employees and visitors is the DCA’s foremost concern.

We appreciate your ongoing support and understanding. Please visit our website or keep an eye on this page for virtual visits, programs, and educational opportunities at http://nmhistoricsites.org.

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725 Camino Lejo
Santa Fe, NM
87505

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New Mexico Historic Sites

New Mexico Historic Sites are eight storied places to experience history where it happened. They invite you to hit the road and explore New Mexico. Follow in the footsteps of indigenous people, Spanish conquistadors, Civil War soldiers, outlaws, and lawmen. How often do you see a Native American kiva next to a 16th century Spanish colonial church, get a glimpse of military fort life, or walk through an historic town little changed from the 1800s? New Mexico Historic Sites offer exactly such unique experiences, and allow the visitor to discover the diverse history and prehistory of the state—all within a few hours drive by car.

Visiting a New Mexico historic site promises to grant you a deeper understanding of those who have gone before us and helped make us who we are today. Each site tells a unique story, important to the understanding of New Mexico history. So enjoy a day of discovery and Travel Back in Time. . . to each of the New Mexico Historic Sites.

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Comments

POST FB FEW YEARS BACK SO WHAT IS TOWN NAME
Www.waitforwhat.com I tried to call but fast busy. Please message me. We will be a great addition to all of your celebrations
The last magical night of lights at Jemez Historic Site this decade!
I love all the beautiful photos people are sharing of our wonderous state. Thank you.
CORADO MONUMENT visit each time is beautiful even more when you take an wonderful friend out of state like JIM FERGUSON, for his first visit or earlier time with JOHN LACAZE
It's long history, it's peoples, and colorful paste
Lived in Albuquerque 1976-77 Kirtland AFB Would love to come back and visit...
Greetings New Mexico history buffs. I have a question to ask... what is the name of the historian of the wild west, cowboys, bad guys etc who often appears on the History Channel (?) and a host of others as an expert. He has white/grey hair and I think has taught at the university of NM or Arizona. Anyone know the name of the gentleman I'm referring to?
I would not normally post a video game here, but this is part of New Mexico's more recent history and the game in question is on Old West video game from many years ago.
Thank you for the invitation.