New Mexico Historic Sites

New Mexico Historic Sites Visiting a New Mexico Historic Site promises to grant you a deeper understanding of those who have gone before us and helped make us who we are today.
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Operating as usual

02/24/2021

During the summer of 2020, NM Historic Sites staff, colleagues from the New Mexico Historic Preservation Division, and adobe preservation specialists worked to redesign and repair the roof of the "Painted" Kiva at Coronado Historic Site.

The work focused on addressing critical drainage issues threatening both the structure and the murals held within. The preservation project took full advantage of the site's public closure and its success ensures this irreplaceable cultural resource will be protected for years to come.

Mattie the Cattie wandered into the Tunstall Store at Lincoln Historic Site today inquiring if we sell tuna.  Her owner ...
02/22/2021

Mattie the Cattie wandered into the Tunstall Store at Lincoln Historic Site today inquiring if we sell tuna. Her owner was quite embarrassed and apologized profusely, but I told him that once upon a time...the Tunstall Store had a resident mouser! Can you find the kitty in this historic Tunstall photo?
#tunstallstore #johntunstall #johnhenrytunstall #nmhistoricsites #nmhs #newmexicohistoricsites #lincolnhistoricsite #lincolnnm #lincolnnewmexico #lincolncountynewmexico #lincolncountywar #nmhistory #newmexicohistory #historicsites #billythekid #historicpreservation #historicphotos #photoarchives #archivesofinstagram

02/22/2021
"Living History: Lincoln" ~ The Murder of John Henry Tunstall

February 18th marked the 143rd anniversary of the murder of John Henry Tunstall, the spark that ignited the Lincoln County War. In this episode of "Living History", Ranger Javier Trost takes you to the remote canyon where John Tunstall met his fate.

02/21/2021
Rebecca's Recipe Room: Sourdough Bread

Sourdough has certainly seen a rise in popularity the past year but it has a long and vast history going back 4000 years! Join Ranger Rebecca as she shares a brief history of sourdough and afterward you can gather ingredients to bake two loaves alongside her. Beginner bakers are welcome as well as anyone who wants to learn new tips and tricks from an experienced baker!

02/21/2021
Rebecca's Recipe Room: Sourdough Bread

Sourdough has certainly seen a rise in popularity the past year but it has a long and vast history going back 4000 years! Join Ranger Rebecca as she shares a brief history of sourdough and afterward you can gather ingredients to bake two loaves alongside her. Beginner bakers are welcome as well as anyone who wants to learn new tips and tricks from an experienced baker!

Stabilization and preservation of the old church and village has been an ongoing endeavor for staff at Jemez Historic Si...
02/20/2021

Stabilization and preservation of the old church and village has been an ongoing endeavor for staff at Jemez Historic Site (known as Jemez State Monument when these pics were taken). Here are a few images from the 90s of a crew hard at work.
Photos courtesy of NM Historic Sites
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#JemezHistoricSite #NewMexicoHistoricSites #NMHistoricSites #preservation #Jemez #JemezPueblo #JemezSprings #SanJosedelosJemez #Gisewa #Guisewa

Fort Sumner Historic Site/Bosque Redondo: Memorial Earlier this Week Vs. TodayThe weather is finally warming up, making ...
02/19/2021

Fort Sumner Historic Site/Bosque Redondo: Memorial Earlier this Week Vs. Today

The weather is finally warming up, making it a good time to visit our site and take a guided audio tour of the grounds and nature trail. The audio tour includes historical photographs, virtual exhibits, and more. The Staff at Fort Sumner Historic Site wishes our visitors a warm welcome back and we hope to see you soon!
#newmexicohistoricsites #nmhistoricsites #nmhs #fortsumnerhistoricsite #bosqueredondomemorial #winter #snow

Fort Selden, circa 1867. From the Palace of the Governors Photo Archives. Photographer: Nicholas Brown. Negative Number ...
02/18/2021

Fort Selden, circa 1867. From the Palace of the Governors Photo Archives. Photographer: Nicholas Brown. Negative Number 001742. This picture was probably taken from the post trader’s store, also known as the Fort Selden Hotel.

Meanwhile, at Fort Stanton......
02/16/2021

Meanwhile, at Fort Stanton......

Raise your hand if you love ducks! 🦆 Here is another favorite picture from Instructional Coordinator Alexandra, who spie...
02/16/2021

Raise your hand if you love ducks! 🦆 Here is another favorite picture from Instructional Coordinator Alexandra, who spied a gaggle of ducks in the acequia behind the Taylor-Mesilla Historic Property. Every day is an adventure at New Mexico Historic Sites!

Meanwhile, at Fort Stanton....
02/16/2021

Meanwhile, at Fort Stanton....

Lincoln, New Mexico,.... "the Most Dangerous......Coldest Street in America."
02/15/2021

Lincoln, New Mexico,.... "the Most Dangerous......Coldest Street in America."

Happy Valentine's Day from the snowy Los Luceros Historic Site. If you come visit Los Luceros today, if you cold please ...
02/14/2021

Happy Valentine's Day from the snowy Los Luceros Historic Site. If you come visit Los Luceros today, if you cold please make sure you brrrrrring your layers for snow, ice, wind, and low temperatures exist. Check our website for directions so you don't get frost!

Icy you soon!

Due to increasingly hazardous road and weather conditions, Coronado, Jemez, Fort Sumner, Lincoln, Fort Selden, and Fort ...
02/14/2021

Due to increasingly hazardous road and weather conditions, Coronado, Jemez, Fort Sumner, Lincoln, Fort Selden, and Fort Stanton Historic Sites will be closed Sunday, February 14. We apologize for the inconvenience. Los Luceros will remain open.

New Mexico Historic Sites are now OPEN to the public!Open sites include: Coronado, Fort Selden, Fort Stanton, Fort Sumne...
02/13/2021

New Mexico Historic Sites are now OPEN to the public!

Open sites include: Coronado, Fort Selden, Fort Stanton, Fort Sumner/Bosque Redondo Memorial, Jemez, Lincoln, and Los Luceros. The Taylor-Mesilla Historic Property will remain closed to visitation.

Please see the Department of Cultural Affairs' press release or visit each site's page for revised operating days and hours!

https://media.nmculture.org/release/1246/new-mexico-historic-

New Mexico Historic Sites are now OPEN!Open sites include: Coronado, Fort Selden, Fort Stanton, Fort Sumner/Bosque Redon...
02/13/2021

New Mexico Historic Sites are now OPEN!

Open sites include: Coronado, Fort Selden, Fort Stanton, Fort Sumner/Bosque Redondo Memorial, Jemez, Lincoln, and Los Luceros. The Taylor-Mesilla Historic Property will remain closed to visitation.

Please see the Department of Cultural Affairs' press release or visit each site's page for revised operating days and hours!

https://media.nmculture.org/release/1246/new-mexico-historic-

02/13/2021
Artist in their Residence - Boderra Joe Part II

Boderra Joe is a poet, journalist and photographer from Bááhazł'ah (Twin Lakes), New Mexico, on the Navajo Nation. She is Diné of the Folded Arms, born for the Water’s Edge clan. She holds a BFA and MFA from the Institute of American Indian Arts. Her work has appeared in Tribal College Journal, Yellow Medicine Review, Indigenous Goddess Gang, and Keshmish Knitting from the Rez (an eBook series).
She previously worked as a journalist for the Rio Grande Sun and Gallup Sun newspaper, where she received an award from the New Mexico Press Association. In-between, she worked at New Mexico School for the Arts, in the admissions/community engagement department where she traveled and presented to schools across the state.
Boderra continues to channel her existence with words and photography: a combination of which that challenges, heals and inspires her. When it comes to her work, she views them as layers or different worlds—all of which are beats coming into being.
“With existence, are stories. Stories in which I acknowledge because along with stories are people; a place; an idea. Acknowledging those, I am acknowledging everything else.”

Artists in Their Residence is a program at Fort Sumner Historic Site/Bosque Redondo Memorial that highlights the art and scholarly work of local Native Americans. During their residency, each artist or scholar will create a video of themselves demonstrating their craft, which will premiere on the New Mexico Historic Site's page. Viewers will have an opportunity to engage with and ask questions directly to the artist during the premiere!

We are opening!!We look forward to welcoming the public back on Saturday, February 13th at 10:00am! Please check our soc...
02/13/2021

We are opening!!

We look forward to welcoming the public back on Saturday, February 13th at 10:00am! Please check our social media or our website (nmhistoricsites.org) often for more information regarding our reopening plans, and to continue exploring our online programs. We are working diligently to ensure the safety of our visitors and staff by preparing our facilities!

Kill All You Canby Rebekha C. CrockettThis week we share a glimpse into the volatile interactions between soldiers and t...
02/12/2021

Kill All You Can
by Rebekha C. Crockett

This week we share a glimpse into the volatile interactions between soldiers and the Navajo (Dine) and Mescalero Apache (N’de) during the 1860s. At this time, a campaign of scorched earth warfare was launched against both tribes by the U.S. Military. Belongings were destroyed, crops and homes burned, livestock slaughtered, water sources contaminated, and men of the tribes were shot on sight with women and children often being killed in the crossfire. As they surrendered to forts near their homelands, in the case of the Dine some such forts were Fort Defiance and Fort Wingate, they were gathered and then forced to march hundreds of miles to a desolate reservation called Bosque Redondo on the Pecos River. At the various forts where they were held, they were often forced to preform manual labor, with rations used as leverage. The reports below show the fear and uncertainty experienced the needless brutality as the military followed orders, and the bravery and resilience of native peoples in the face of such an impossible situation.

On February 13th, 1865, Major Ethan W. Eaton at Fort Wingate wrote to headquarters: “…during most of the winter there has been about 50 Navajoe Indians encpd about one mile from this Post. These Indians were in the habit of coming to the Post daily, brining wood, carrying water, and doing small jobs generally. After receiving notice from the Dptmt. Commander that they could be sent to the reservation and that runners should be sent to those yet back, I notified these here that they could now get rations and would be sent to the reservation as soon as possible, that they might be there in time to plant the coming season. Two of these Indians were sent with the interpreters to notify the balance. On the 11th inst. I noticed that there were no Navajoes about the Post, and sent the interpreter to see the reason. He returned at about 5-1/2 o’clock in the afternoon, reporting that they had all left, probably the day before about noon. This showed bad faith on their part and I at once ordered Capt. Montoya with 25 enlisted men (on foot) to pursue and overtake them if possible… I directed Capt. Montoya to inform them that they must return and go to the reservation, that if they returned, they would be fed and cared for. If they refused to return and resisted, to bring them by force and if they fought, to kill all he could—Women & children to be spared as much as possible…The Indians had about 30 hours head start.

In his report, made on the same day, Captain Donaciano Montoya wrote: “…I stared from this Post on the 10th inst. at 7 o’clock at night in pursuit of a party of Navajo Indians that had left this post the night before. My command consisted of 2 noncommissioned officers, 23 men, …and citizen Jose Morales as guide and interpreter. My guide having seen the trail of the Indians in the daytime, I lost no time in finding it at night, and I followed it all night until daylight, having traveled about 35 miles among rocky cañons and steep mountains. When it was perfectly clear I stopped to give the men time to get breakfast and to rest a little from the fatigues of the night’s march. I rested there until 9 o’clock A.M. and at that hour renewed my march, but not on the whole trail which I followed in the night, for the Indians had divided themselves into little parties and went in different directions. The ground being frozen I could discover no more than the tracks of one Indian, 2 squaws and one child. I followed this trail all day and overtook the party at sundown, but they saw my command when it was about 400 yards from their ranchos and they immediately fled. All my men being on foot it would have been impossible to overtake the, and they would have escaped, had it not been that I mounted the interpreter on my own horse with instructions to overtake the Indians and tell them to return; that I did not want to do them any harm, that the commandant wanted them to go to the Post where they would receive rations until means of taking them to the Bosque Redondo should be obtained. The interpreter told them this but they resisted saying that they did not want to return, that they were going to their native country. The interpreter then, as he had orders to fire upon them if they would not return, began to fire at them with a pistol and the warrior who was with the squaws began to defend his family, fighting valiantly until one of the soldiers arrived at the place where the interpreter was, when he fled; but the interpreter acted promptly and putting the soldier up behind him, the 2 mounted on one horse, again overtook the Indian and killed him. During the fight the interpreter received an arrow wound in one leg but it is not serious. After the Indian was killed and the squaws captured, I asked one of the latter, through the interpreter, why they had left the fort, and she replied, because the men wanted to hide their families in the mountains, and then join in a campaign to go and rob at Abiquiu […]This indicated that the robberies which were committed on the Rio Grande were committed by those thieves who yet remain in their native country and not by those who are at the reservation at the Bosque Redondo as some citizens think. After receiving this information from the squaw, and after having burnt all they had in their ranchos, I returned to the post. It would have been impossible to catch more Indians, because they had by this time gone into the rocky places in the mountains where loaded mules could not go….”

In forwarding Captain Montoya’s report, Major Eaton notes that, after questioning the women himself, they left in large part because of report that they were all to be killed at the Bosque Redondo. While conditions at Bosque Redondo were notoriously horrendous and many died, there is no evidence that the Military ever planned an outright massacre; nevertheless, this was understandably a common belief. Many were never brought to Bosque Redondo, but rather spent those years in their homeland, constantly threatened by soldiers and struggling just as much to survive.

02/11/2021
Artist in their Residence - Boderra Joe Part II

Boderra Joe is a poet, journalist and photographer from Bááhazł'ah (Twin Lakes), New Mexico, on the Navajo Nation. She is Diné of the Folded Arms, born for the Water’s Edge clan. She holds a BFA and MFA from the Institute of American Indian Arts. Her work has appeared in Tribal College Journal, Yellow Medicine Review, Indigenous Goddess Gang, and Keshmish Knitting from the Rez (an eBook series).

She previously worked as a journalist for the Rio Grande Sun and Gallup Sun newspaper, where she received an award from the New Mexico Press Association. In-between, she worked at New Mexico School for the Arts, in the admissions/community engagement department where she traveled and presented to schools across the state.

Boderra continues to channel her existence with words and photography: a combination of which that challenges, heals and inspires her. When it comes to her work, she views them as layers or different worlds—all of which are beats coming into being.
“With existence, are stories. Stories in which I acknowledge because along with stories are people; a place; an idea. Acknowledging those, I am acknowledging everything else.”

Artists in Their Residence is a program at Fort Sumner Historic Site/Bosque Redondo Memorial that highlights the art and scholarly work of local Native Americans. During their residency, each artist or scholar will create a video of themselves demonstrating their craft, which will premiere on the New Mexico Historic Site's page. Viewers will have an opportunity to engage with and ask questions directly to the artist during the premiere!

Buffalo Soldiers were stationed at Fort Selden on and off during the 1800s. Sergeant Richard Anderson was one of them. A...
02/11/2021

Buffalo Soldiers were stationed at Fort Selden on and off during the 1800s. Sergeant Richard Anderson was one of them. An African American noncommissioned officer in the regular U.S. Army, he served as the Quartermaster Sergeant at Fort Selden in 1886 and 1887 under the command of Captain Arthur MacArthur. While there, he was the only African American at the post.

Quartermaster Sergeants had a lot of responsibility including being in charge of post finances, supplies, construction and maintenance, record keeping, and mail.

Anderson was born in Missouri. He enlisted with the 2nd Regiment of Missouri Colored Infantry in 1863. After the war he re-enlisted in the regular army and was promoted to sergeant in the 9th Cavalry. Most African American noncommissioned officers during this time came from Northern states so his background from a former slave state was uncommon.

While we don’t have a photo of the sergeant, the bronze sculpture "The Sentinel"--located at Fort Selden--stands in honor of the African-American soldiers who served in New Mexico and commemorates their contributions, dedication, and sacrifices on the Western Frontier during the late 19th century.

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New Mexico Historic Sites

New Mexico Historic Sites are eight storied places to experience history where it happened. They invite you to hit the road and explore New Mexico. Follow in the footsteps of indigenous people, Spanish conquistadors, Civil War soldiers, outlaws, and lawmen. How often do you see a Native American kiva next to a 16th century Spanish colonial church, get a glimpse of military fort life, or walk through an historic town little changed from the 1800s? New Mexico Historic Sites offer exactly such unique experiences, and allow the visitor to discover the diverse history and prehistory of the state—all within a few hours drive by car.

Visiting a New Mexico historic site promises to grant you a deeper understanding of those who have gone before us and helped make us who we are today. Each site tells a unique story, important to the understanding of New Mexico history. So enjoy a day of discovery and Travel Back in Time. . . to each of the New Mexico Historic Sites.

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