New Mexico Historic Sites

New Mexico Historic Sites Visiting a New Mexico Historic Site promises to grant you a deeper understanding of those who have gone before us and helped make us who we are today.
(45)

04/01/2020
Magdalena slideshow

Jemez Historic Site's Instructional Coordinator Magdalena is working on a lesson plan about Musical Instruments. It will be posted on April 6th on nmhistoricsites.org/virtual-classroom Stay tuned.

STAFF HIGHLIGHT!Nathan WilsonLincoln Historic Site is the most visited site in our system and while we might be closed t...
03/31/2020

STAFF HIGHLIGHT!

Nathan Wilson

Lincoln Historic Site is the most visited site in our system and while we might be closed to the public...our work goes on. Facilities team member Nathan Wilson has been working on a number of projects over the last few weeks including upgrading the museum's security infrastructure and replacing our water fountains with bottle filling stations to reduce our dependence on single-use plastic bottles.

Hello Everyone!Today's virtual history lesson is entitled “Los Luceros: The Family Behind the Name” which comes to you f...
03/30/2020
Los Luceros: The Family Behind the Name

Hello Everyone!

Today's virtual history lesson is entitled “Los Luceros: The Family Behind the Name” which comes to you from the team at Los Luceros Historic Site.

In this lesson students will explore how our State's newest Historic Site became known as Los Luceros through printable activity packets and an interactive presentation.

Get the full free lesson plan:
http://nmhistoricsites.org/virtual-classroom/los-luceros-virtual-classroom/los-luceros-the-family-behind-the-name

Los Luceros Historic Site

PRE-LESSON ACTIVITY: Design Your Own Coat of Arms (and post in the comments!)What is a coat of arms? A coat of arms is a...
03/29/2020

PRE-LESSON ACTIVITY: Design Your Own Coat of Arms (and post in the comments!)

What is a coat of arms? A coat of arms is a unique visual representation that includes symbols and colors on a shield with a name or motto associated with it. In the past, one person had a coat of arms that was typically granted by a royal as an honor for skill in battle or for standing out in their field. These could be passed down to the eldest son. Thus, a whole branch of a family could be associated with one emblem! This is how it came to also be referred to as a "family crest." There is some debate as to which term should be used today.

Tomorrow our lesson goes live on the Lucero Family and answers the question: Who is the Lucero Family, and why is a historic site named after them? We will also learn more about family crests and have activities for different ages.

Check out all of our lessons so far:
http://nmhistoricsites.org/virtual-classroom

03/27/2020
Behind the Scenes: The San Juan Church

The historic San Juan Church in Lincoln, NM is one of the most recognizable structures preserved by New Mexico Historic Sites.

Take a behind-the-scenes journey with us as we explore the building and even take a trip up into the bell tower where the original bell still hangs. The bell weighs 800 pounds and cost $160 to build. It was delivered to Lincoln, from the foundry in Saint Louis, on March 31, 1885. James J. Dolan paid the $40 freight charge out of his pocket and the town elected to name the bell “Maria Juana” in honor of Mrs. Saturnino Baca.

Be like the Historic Sites Bear!  While we are working hard for when we can all be back together in person, New Mexico H...
03/27/2020

Be like the Historic Sites Bear!

While we are working hard for when we can all be back together in person, New Mexico Historic Sites encourages YOU to stay at home and, if you must go out, be bear-aware and practice social distancing!

Please, help keep New Mexico as safe as possible for health workers, service providers, and essential personnel.

Together we can flatten the curve!

03/27/2020
How to Check Out the Navajo Long Walk on the Internet Archive

Happy Friday!

Today's lesson plan comes from Instructional Coordinator Rhonda Gutierrez at Fort Sumner Historic Site/Bosque Redondo Memorial.

In this lesson, students will learn about the lifeways and culture of the Navajo and Mescalero Apache people and about their experiences at the Bosque Redondo Reservation. Students will also learn how to get a virtual library card for the Internet Archive.

Get the full lesson plan and activities at

www.nmhistoricsites.org/virtual-classroom

www.youtube.com/embed/E8ykA2h6npA

This video takes a student through signing up for Internet Archive to check out the book "Navajo Long Walk" by Joseph Bruchac. This book is for the lessons t...

The Historic Sites team continues to move our mission forward in many ways while our sites are closed to the public and ...
03/26/2020

The Historic Sites team continues to move our mission forward in many ways while our sites are closed to the public and we would like to highlight some of our awesome team members and the projects they are working on. One special group of people is our facilities staff, most of whom are still on the ground protecting and maintaining the cultural resources we are stewards of.

Ron Gauna is our Plant & Systems Operator at Fort Sumner Historic Site/Bosque Redondo Memorial. Among many other things, he is currently looking after our flock of Churro Sheep as well as continuing to work on the new permanent exhibit which will be opening in the near future. Thank you Ron for what you do!!

A Testament to Healingby Rebekha C. CrockettPrevious articles have discussed the many hardships faced by the Navajo (Din...
03/26/2020

A Testament to Healing
by Rebekha C. Crockett

Previous articles have discussed the many hardships faced by the Navajo (Dine) and Mescalero Apache (N’de) at the Bosque Redondo Reservation and one of the most prevalent and devastating issues was the spread of illness. Many individuals, including the Native Americans themselves, remarked on this issue and made recommendations to improve the situations, two examples of which we share today.

During a Testimony of Captives in June 1865, Herrero Delgadito (Navajo Chief) was asked about the health and well being of his people. Delgadito’s response (interpreted by Epiphano Vigil) was in part:
“there are remedies to cure the disease, but they cannot get them here; they have no confidence in the medicines given them at the hospital; think it would do them no good; most of the old men know how to cure the disease; they use the root of wild weeds that do not grow here; some of the people are dying here of the disease; some were taken to the hospital, but were not cured; when they find out a person has that disease they report it to the hospital; this they have done for some time; but all that have reported there have died; the custom of the tribe is never to enter a house where a person has died, but abandon it; that is the reason they don’t want to go to the hospital; they would prefer a tent out by their camps for a hospital…”

In July 1866, Colonel A. Baldwin Norton, the new Superintendent of Indian Affairs was tasked with making a thorough inspection of Bosque Redondo and submitting his recommendation. He recommended that Fort Sumner and the Bosque Redondo Reservation be abandoned and that a new Reservation be arranged in the Navajo homeland, Dinetah. His report included the following observations regarding the health of the Navajo captives: “The water is black and brackish, scarcely bearable to the taste and said by the Indians to be unhealthy, because one-fourth of their population has been swept off by disease… Do you expect an Indian to be satisfied and content deprived of the common comforts of life, without which a white man would not be contented anywhere? Would any sensible man select a spot for a reservation for 8,000 Indians where the water is scarcely bearable, where the soil is poor and cold, and where the muskite [sic. mesquite] roots 12 miles distant are the only wood for the Indians to use?... If they remain on this reservation they must always be held there by force and not from choice. O! let them go back, or take them where they can have good clean water to drink, wood plenty to keep them from freezing to death, and where the soil will produce something for them to eat”

Many factors contribute to the spread of illness at Bosque Redondo, exposure and lack of food weakened immune systems and combined with contaminated food and water to cause a variety of diseases. Moreover, the reservation was overcrowded with approximately 10,000 people. The soldiers brought with them diseases common throughout the U.S. but uncommon among the Native Americans they interacted with daily. These new illnesses spread quickly through the crowded reservation with devastating effects. The Native American medicine men lacked the herbs they used to heal their people and the military medical staff proved mostly ineffective at treating their patients. Leaders such as Chief Delgadito and Superintendent Norton suggested the best remedy to the many outbreaks of disease that plagued the Reservation was to relocate to a place such as Dinetah where there was clean water, good food and soil and plenty of wood. Dark though this chapter of history is, it is also a testament to the strength and endurance of the people who survived, overcame adversity, and returned to their homeland. It is a testament to healing that will continue to inspire all people for generations to come.

Photo: Common medicinal plants used by the Dine and other tribes, put together by DCA staff

The Historic Sites "Brady Bunch" is working hard from our respective offsite and onsite locations! Historic Sites leader...
03/25/2020

The Historic Sites "Brady Bunch" is working hard from our respective offsite and onsite locations! Historic Sites leadership, our regional managers, and instructional coordinators from across the state are moving forward with a number of exciting projects that we will be releasing virtually in the immediate future and some surprises in store for visitors when we reopen to the public.

Stay tuned for more info!!

03/25/2020
Making Soap Using the Soaptree Yucca

Good morning!

We are excited for today's virtual classroom lesson, presented by Instructional Coordinator Alexandra McKinney from Fort Selden Historic Site. Learn how you can make your very own soap using the soaptree yucca plant indigenous to Southern New Mexico! You can find the full lesson plan and activities at our website:

http://www.nmhistoricsites.org/virtual-classroom

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aqv-WIrZieI

The use of soap has a long history and it is easy to imagine how it was discovered (and made) if you know what materials make up soap. Long before European C...

Did you know that the sprawling mountain range to the north west of Fort Selden Historic Site is called Sierra de las Uv...
03/23/2020

Did you know that the sprawling mountain range to the north west of Fort Selden Historic Site is called Sierra de las Uvas, Range of the Grapes? Contrary to the range's name, there are no grapes to be found in the Sierra de las Uvas. According to "Place Names of New Mexico," there are two possible explanations for this name. The first states that a grape thicket once graced the range. The second explanation states that the "grapes" that dot the range are actually spherical-shaped, purplish basaltic andesite.

Coronado Historic Site
03/21/2020

Coronado Historic Site

While Coronado Historic Site is temporarily closed to the public, our staff will be doing necessary restoration work on Kiva 3, also known as the Painted Kiva.

The Painted Kiva was uncovered in 1934 during the archaeological dig at Kuaua Pueblo overseen by Dr. Edgar Lee Hewett. To preserve the original painted murals, the walls were removed in their entirety to a lab in Albuquerque. Each of the 17 layers of murals was carefully removed and placed on a new backing.

The original Painted Kiva was reburied and a reconstruction erected, complete with hand-painted copies of the murals, for the education of the public.

Today, visitors to Coronado Historic Site may still experience the interior of the Painted Kiva and view a small selection of the original 300 to 700-year-old murals on display in the Mural Room.

03/20/2020

Join Ranger John Schultz to discuss life as a soldier at Fort Stanton in the 1850s!

Why Did They Stay?: A Prison Without Wallsby Rebekha C. CrockettThis week we share a request for more cavalry made on Ma...
03/19/2020

Why Did They Stay?: A Prison Without Walls

by Rebekha C. Crockett

This week we share a request for more cavalry made on March 23, 1864 by the commander at Fort Sumner, Major Henry Davies Wallen, who wrote the following excerpt to General Carleton. The request reveals the poor planning in regard to feeding and guarding the thousands of captives held at Bosque Redondo. It begs the question of how the military was able to force them to stay with no walls and few guards. Major Wallen wrote:

“I would most earnestly beg that at least one other effective mounted company be sent immediately to this Post, as I can not properly guard the large number of Indians now here with the force under my command. And should the Indians, or any portion of them, endeavor to leave the post, I would be utterly powerless to prevent them from doing so, with the little force of 30 mounted men I now possess…. In my judgment a large Cavalry force is imperatively needed at this Post as Patrols should be sent out day & night. This is only an experiment which is being tried here with these Indians, & from their well-known character, it is prudent to take all possible precautions against their caprice or treachery—in particular at this time, when the reduction of their rations may, & probably will, cause considerable discontent…. The Calvary Companies are imperatively needed to keep constant supervision on the Indians”

Previous articles have discussed at length some of the hardships faced by those N’de (Mescalero Apache) and Dine (Navajo) held captive at the Bosque Redondo Reservation, such as hunger, exposure, hard labor, and disease to name a few. Earlier in March of 1864, as alluded to by Major Wallen, General James H. Carleton had cut rations by half to one pound of food per person per day. More and more Navajo were being forced on the 400 mile march from their homeland each day and by the end of the month the population had reached approximately 5000 people. The number of soldiers stationed at Fort Sumner was about 200, only 30 of them cavalry, the remainder being infantry. It surprises some visitors to learn there were no walls keeping people from leaving. Many visitors ask, if the Dine outnumbered the soldiers 25 to 1 and the cavalry 166 to 1, and there were no walls, why did they not escape like the N’de did in November 1865?

The context of their interment reveals the answer to this question. Coronel Kit Carson, who was in charge of the military campaign against the Dine, used scorched-earth warfare. He burned crops, leveled homes, slaughtered livestock, destroyed belongings left behind by those who fled, cut down fruit trees, and even threw dead animals in water sources to make the water undrinkable. When the Dine surrendered, most had little more than their summer clothes on their backs. Soldiers still roamed their homeland and other parts of New Mexico. Orders were to shoot any men from either tribe on sight, and often women and children were caught in the crossfire. Any large escape on the part of the Dine would have simply meant a return to the warfare that had caused them to surrender in the first place, and their homes and resources had been mostly destroyed, leaving them little to return to. This fact, and the fear the brutality of the soldiers caused, kept the majority of captives from leaving. It is worth noting, however, that many did escape (some multiple times) and other Dine families were never brought into Bosque Redondo at all, and instead remained in hiding in the depths of their homeland. Regardless, survival was a daily struggle for all Dine during this time.

Photo: Navajo Indian captives under guard Fort Sumner, New Mexico, 1864 - 1868? From the United States Army Signal Corps. Courtesy of the Palace of the Governor Negative #028534

03/18/2020

🚧 Behind the scenes with Ranger John Schultz and Deputy Director Tim Roberts at the filming 🎥 of our upcoming virtual tour education series 🚧

All Department of Cultural Affairs museums and historic sites, including Coronado Historic Site, Jemez Historic Site, Lo...
03/16/2020

All Department of Cultural Affairs museums and historic sites, including Coronado Historic Site, Jemez Historic Site, Los Luceros Historic Site, Fort Stanton Historic Site, Lincoln Historic Site, Fort Selden Historic Site, Fort Sumner Historic Site/Bosque Redondo Memorial, and Taylor-Mesilla Historic Property, are temporarily closed to the public as a public health precaution due to the COVID-19 (coronavirus).

These closures are part of the larger effort by state government to minimize public exposure. Please continue to visit our website at www.nmhistoricsites.org for updates and to explore online resources and collections. #COVID19

While we may be closed to the public, our staff is still working hard (and safely) for future exhibits and programming, ...
03/16/2020

While we may be closed to the public, our staff is still working hard (and safely) for future exhibits and programming, including some that our friends and followers can explore virtually! Stay tuned!!

Special thanks to Boy Scout Troop 122 from Los Alamos last weekend for their hard work in helping prepare our new river ...
03/15/2020

Special thanks to Boy Scout Troop 122 from Los Alamos last weekend for their hard work in helping prepare our new river trail at Los Luceros Historic Site. The animals are already loving it and we know our visitors will too! Can you help us identify these tracks?

03/14/2020
Coronado Historic Site is open to the public and it's a great time to do some wildlife spotting! Today we were visited b...
03/14/2020

Coronado Historic Site is open to the public and it's a great time to do some wildlife spotting! Today we were visited by our friendly neighborhood tiger salamander.

Tiger salamanders are the largest terrestrial salamander in North America. They can grow up to 14 inches long and live up to 15 years. They live in deep burrows near a water source and emerge at night to hunt for worms, insects, frogs, and even other salamanders.

Address

725 Camino Lejo
Santa Fe, NM
87505

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when New Mexico Historic Sites posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Videos

Category

New Mexico Historic Sites

New Mexico Historic Sites are eight storied places to experience history where it happened. They invite you to hit the road and explore New Mexico. Follow in the footsteps of indigenous people, Spanish conquistadors, Civil War soldiers, outlaws, and lawmen. How often do you see a Native American kiva next to a 16th century Spanish colonial church, get a glimpse of military fort life, or walk through an historic town little changed from the 1800s? New Mexico Historic Sites offer exactly such unique experiences, and allow the visitor to discover the diverse history and prehistory of the state—all within a few hours drive by car.

Visiting a New Mexico historic site promises to grant you a deeper understanding of those who have gone before us and helped make us who we are today. Each site tells a unique story, important to the understanding of New Mexico history. So enjoy a day of discovery and Travel Back in Time. . . to each of the New Mexico Historic Sites.

Nearby museums


Comments

POST FB FEW YEARS BACK SO WHAT IS TOWN NAME
Www.waitforwhat.com I tried to call but fast busy. Please message me. We will be a great addition to all of your celebrations
The last magical night of lights at Jemez Historic Site this decade!
I love all the beautiful photos people are sharing of our wonderous state. Thank you.
CORADO MONUMENT visit each time is beautiful even more when you take an wonderful friend out of state like JIM FERGUSON, for his first visit or earlier time with JOHN LACAZE
It's long history, it's peoples, and colorful paste
Lived in Albuquerque 1976-77 Kirtland AFB Would love to come back and visit...
Greetings New Mexico history buffs. I have a question to ask... what is the name of the historian of the wild west, cowboys, bad guys etc who often appears on the History Channel (?) and a host of others as an expert. He has white/grey hair and I think has taught at the university of NM or Arizona. Anyone know the name of the gentleman I'm referring to?
I would not normally post a video game here, but this is part of New Mexico's more recent history and the game in question is on Old West video game from many years ago.
Thank you for the invitation.
Good morning folks Enjoy happy Sunday