National New Deal Preservation Association

National New Deal Preservation Association This is the official page of the NNDPA, with an emphasis on our New Mexico Chapter of the National New Deal Association. We are a non-profit organization dedicated to the education, promotion and preservation of the New Deal legacy in the United States.
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Our logo, which appears throughout the website and on our page, was created by Jim Pirkl of Albuquerque, N.M. and depicts so well the various segments of the New Deal projects that Americans worked together on between 1933-43 to save this nation. We are still reaping the benefits of their labors. Hopefully by viewing this page and viewing our website, you will be desirous of joining us in learning more about preserving those beneficial New Deal treasures and also sharing your knowledge about the New Deal accomplishments from your family stories or your career experiences. We hope to hear from you. - The NNDPA Board of Directors

Our logo, which appears throughout the website and on our page, was created by Jim Pirkl of Albuquerque, N.M. and depicts so well the various segments of the New Deal projects that Americans worked together on between 1933-43 to save this nation. We are still reaping the benefits of their labors. Hopefully by viewing this page and viewing our website, you will be desirous of joining us in learning more about preserving those beneficial New Deal treasures and also sharing your knowledge about the New Deal accomplishments from your family stories or your career experiences. We hope to hear from you. - The NNDPA Board of Directors

Mission: FDR made it possible for many of our family members to survive during the Great Depression and to create New Deal treasures all over this nation that we are still using and enjoying today. You may not know what they are. It can include such things in your town, city, county or state like schools and other public buildings, parks, roads, bridges, cemeteries, swimming pools, water and sewer systems, rural electricity, murals, paintings, sculptures, and even symphonic orchestras. Many of today's legal rights for labor were established in the New Deal era. The FDIC protects your bank account, and Social Security is possibly critical to you and your family. Join the NNDPA and learn about these treasures.

Operating as usual

Living here in the southwest, this painting struck a chord. We had to repost. #Repost @ashcan_daily with @get_repost・・・J...
12/29/2020

Living here in the southwest, this painting struck a chord. We had to repost.

#Repost @ashcan_daily with @get_repost
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Jerry Bywaters, Oil Field Girls, 1940, @blantonmuseum

Yesterday we made a post by a member of the ‘Dallas Nine’ and while researching other artists in that group we came across this wonderful piece! It reminds us of the women from Leon Kroll and Reginald Marsh’s work.

Williamson Gerald Bywaters (1906–1989) was a true Texas Renaissance man: painter, printmaker, illustrator, muralist, essayist, art critic, editor, publisher, professor, museum director and spokesman for the Texas Regionalist art movement, which he founded along with the other members of the “Dallas Nine.” Bywaters was at ease in both the literature and fine art worlds. As director of the Dallas Museum of Fine Arts from 1943–64, he was instrumental in establishing a national interest in Texas’ unique style.

In July 1927 he traveled with a friend to Europe to study art. The following February Bywaters went to Mexico to study the Mexican mural movement and met Diego Rivera. From him he learned that "art, to be significant, must be a reflection of life" In the summer of 1928 Bywaters continued his study of art at the Old Lyme Art Colony in Connecticut. In the fall Bywaters moved to New York City to attend the @aslnyc . There he studied with John Sloan, known for his paintings of urban life. But Sloan advised Bywaters to return to the Southwest, saying there were "a lot of interesting things" he could paint. Bywaters returned to Dallas.

In 1935 Bywaters began making prints, using lithography as a way to make art affordable. He hoped to sell more works to middle class people and to popularize Texas regional art. He pioneered the style later termed "Lone Star Regionalism" and he was recognized as "one of the finest of the regional print makers"

#ashcan #jerrybywaters #johnsloan #diegorivera #texas #texasart #ashcanschool #americanart #americanrealism #artdaily #artlovers #artcollectors #instagramart #artlover #ashcandaily #artcollector #art #worksprogressadministration
#artstudentsleaguenewyork

Merry Christmas!!“The future belongs to those who believe in the beauty of their dreams.” - Eleanor Roosevelt
12/25/2020

Merry Christmas!!
“The future belongs to those who believe in the beauty of their dreams.” - Eleanor Roosevelt

Our historical license plates feature the work of WPA artists from New Mexico. These collector items are a lovely gift f...
12/07/2020

Our historical license plates feature the work of WPA artists from New Mexico. These collector items are a lovely gift for the art or history buff in your life!

Every license plate helps us continue our work restoring WPA landmarks and keeping the spirit of the New Deal alive.

Tap to shop, or visit our full store at www.newdeallegacy.org/merchandise

Taken near the Mexican boarder in 1929. Four years later, on December 5, 1933, America’s Prohibition chapter came to a c...
12/05/2020

Taken near the Mexican boarder in 1929. Four years later, on December 5, 1933, America’s Prohibition chapter came to a close. The 21st Amendment to the U.S. Constitution was ratified, repealing the 18th Amendment and bringing an end to the era of prohibition in America. **Like & Share our page for more historical moments, merch and more.**

On this day in history, 1933... 🍷
12/05/2020
The Night Prohibition Ended

On this day in history, 1933... 🍷

Look back at America’s surprising reaction to the end of Prohibition.

The CCC-built administration building of the  Conchas Lake State Park contains a WPA mural by Odon Hullenkremer, a Hunga...
12/03/2020

The CCC-built administration building of the Conchas Lake State Park contains a WPA mural by Odon Hullenkremer, a Hungarian-bom artist who worked with the WPA Federal Art Project during the 1930s. This painting, six feet by twelve feet, hangs on the north wall of the Visitor Center in the administration building and is called “Commencement of Main Dam Construction.” The foreground of this painting depicts four surveyors with their instruments. The actual identities of the surveyors depicted have been verified by their descendents. In the background are depicted machines and men at work.

The second painting, "Kids on a teeter-totter," also by Hullenkremer, hangs in the Carrie Tingley Children's Hospital, and was also a WPA project.

Excerpt: "According to the New Mexico Humanities Council, over half of the roughly 425,000 people living in New Mexico i...
12/03/2020
From the Ground Up

Excerpt: "According to the New Mexico Humanities Council, over half of the roughly 425,000 people living in New Mexico in 1935 had a job with one of the New Deal agencies. Nearly a century later, over 15,000 sites nationwide—over 300 of which are in New Mexico—remain. Many still are part of our communities, including schools, government facilities, parks, and murals, and many of these sites helped those places grow economically and have become important parts of these communities."

Text and photographs by Brian K. Edwards, MFA, PhD Give a man a dole, and you save his body and destroy his spirit. Give him a job and you save both body and spirit.” —Harry Hopkins, WPA administrator The economic collapse that followed the 1929 stock market crash eventually saw one in four Amer...

12/01/2020

Who can agree that this year (home) cinema has been a saving grace?

"During the Depression, when the spirit of the people is lower than at any other time, it is a splendid thing that for just 15 cents an American can go to a movie and look at the smiling face of a baby and forget his troubles."
-President Franklin Roosevel 🎟

Americans could find hope while watching a character's success and believe that betterment was still possible. They could laugh irreverently at traditional American institutions or at forces that they could not quite define but that had altered their lives in the 1930s.

#Repost @clarkgablelives
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🎬 NO MAN OF HER OWN 1932
Carole Lambard-Clark Gable



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#CLASSICHOLLYWOOD #CLARKGABLE #JEANHARLOW #GREATDEPRESSION #OLDHOLLYWOODGLAMOUR #CLASSICMOVIES #LOVE #LEGENDARY #SWAGGER #GENTLEMAN #AESTHETIC #selfie #TBT #PHOTOGRAPHY #PORTRAIT #NATURE #KINGOFHOLLYWOOD #VINTAGE #PICOFDAY #INSTADAILY #HOLLYWOODGLAMOUR #OLDMOVIES #goldenage #glamour

A look at how a decade shaped a country, 91 years ago.
12/01/2020
Great Depression Timeline

A look at how a decade shaped a country, 91 years ago.

The Great Depression lasted from August 1929 to June 1938, but unemployment remained above 10% until 1941, when the U.S. entered World War II.

In 1939, the last Thursday of November was going to be November 30. Retailers complained to FDR that this only left twen...
11/26/2020

In 1939, the last Thursday of November was going to be November 30. Retailers complained to FDR that this only left twenty-four shopping days to Christmas and begged him to push Thanksgiving just one week earlier. It was determined that most people do their Christmas shopping after Thanksgiving and retailers hoped that with an extra week of shopping, people would buy more.

So when FDR announced his Thanksgiving Proclamation in 1939, he declared the date of Thanksgiving to be Thursday, November 23, the second-to-last Thursday of the month.

https://bit.ly/2UJaJBU

Many of us are firing up the oven and wiping down the stove in preparation for tomorrow 🦃 We know this has been a tough ...
11/25/2020
17 Great Depression Era Recipes • Insteading

Many of us are firing up the oven and wiping down the stove in preparation for tomorrow 🦃 We know this has been a tough 11 months and that some of us may be slimming down on the trimmings this year. But what how did our grandparents get by when times were tough?

Whether you want to reminisce or are looking for filling recipes on a budget, check out some of our favorite great depression era recipes to try.

Men Burning “Grapes of Wrath.” It was banned in California due to its politics and language. When Eleanor Roosevelt visi...
11/23/2020

Men Burning “Grapes of Wrath.” It was banned in California due to its politics and language.

When Eleanor Roosevelt visited California in 1940 and saw squatter camps and the model government camps and was asked by a reporter if The Grapes of Wrath was exaggerated, she answered unequivocally, “I never have thought The Grapes of Wrath was exaggerated.” Steinbeck wrote to thank her for remarks: “I have been called a liar so constantly that sometimes I wonder whether I may not have dreamed the things I saw and heard in the period of my research.”

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#steinbeck #greatdepression #historicalphotos #americanhistory

What is your favorite Steinbeck novel? When Eleanor Roosevelt visited California in 1940 and saw squatter camps and the ...
11/23/2020
The Roosevelts and John Steinbeck: 75th Anniversary of The Grapes of Wrath - Roosevelt House Public Policy Institute at Hunter College

What is your favorite Steinbeck novel?

When Eleanor Roosevelt visited California in 1940 and saw squatter camps and the model government camps and was asked by a reporter if The Grapes of Wrath was exaggerated, she answered unequivocally, “I never have thought The Grapes of Wrath was exaggerated.” Steinbeck wrote to thank her for remarks: “I have been called a liar so constantly that sometimes I wonder whether I may not have dreamed the things I saw and heard in the period of my research.”

John Steinbeck’s The Grapes of Wrath was published 75 years ago in April 1939. The bestselling book of the year, with more than 400,000 copies in print, it also won...  

1 week count down to T Day! Thanksgiving was much different during the Great Depression than it is today. In this great ...
11/19/2020

1 week count down to T Day! Thanksgiving was much different during the Great Depression than it is today. In this great narrative, we get a look inside what Turkey Day was like in the 1930s: https://bit.ly/3nCCU1v

Excerpt: The WPA (Works Progress Administration) certainly was putting men to work, albeit at "make work" projects, but men were bringing home paychecks, and for many, it would be the first time in several years that their women folk could "rub two dollars together" and might just be wearing a new dress at Thanksgiving time.

People you may not know about, but probably should
11/19/2020

People you may not know about, but probably should

When Frances Perkins was a little girl, she asked her parents why nice people could be poor. Her father told her not to worry about those things, and that poor people were poor because they were lazy and drank. Eventually, she went to Mount Holyoke College, and majored in physics. In her final semester, she took a class in American economic history and toured the mills along the Connecticut River to see working conditions. She was horrified. Eventually, instead of teaching until she married, she earned a masters degree in social work from Columbia University. In 1910, Perkins became Executive Secretary of the New York City Consumers League. She campaigned for sanitary regulations for bakeries, fire protection for factories, and legislation to limit the working hours for women and children in factories to 54 hours per week. She worked mainly in New York State’s capital, Albany. Here, she made friends with politicians, and learned how to lobby.
On March 25th, 1911, Frances was having tea with friends when they heard fire engines. They ran to see what was happening, and witnessed one of the worst workplace disasters in US history. The Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire was devastating, killing 146 people, mostly young women and girls. Frances watched as fire escapes collapsed and fireman ladders couldn’t reach the women trapped by the flames. She watched 47 workers leap to their deaths from the 8th and 9th floors.
Poignantly, just a year before these same women and girls had fought for and won the 54 hour work week and other benefits that Frances had championed. These women weren’t just tragic victims, they were heroes of the labor force. Frances at that moment resolved to make sure their deaths meant something.
A committee to study reforms in safety in factories was formed, and Perkins became the secretary. The group took on not only fire safety, but all other health issues they could think of. Perkins, by that time a respected expert witness, helped draft the most comprehensive set of laws regarding workplace health and safety in the country. Other states started copying New York’s new laws to protect workers.
Perkins continued to work in New York for decades, until she was asked by President Elect Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1933 to serve as Secretary of Labor. She told him only if he agreed with her goals: 40-hour work week, minimum wage, unemployment and worker’s compensation, abolition of child labor, federal aid to the states for unemployment, Social Security, a revitalized federal employment service, and universal health insurance. He agreed. Similar to what she had worked for in New York, her successes became the New Deal, and changed the country and its workers forever.
So while you may not know her name, you certainly know her legacy.

Murals weren't the only artwork commissioned by WPA in New Mexico during the Great Depression. Ildeberto “Eddie” Delgado...
11/15/2020

Murals weren't the only artwork commissioned by WPA in New Mexico during the Great Depression. Ildeberto “Eddie” Delgado and his father Francisco Delgado both were well known tinsmiths and both worked extensively during the WPA period. A number of examples of Eddie’s work are still in use today. They can be seen at the Albuquerque Little Theatre, and the Roswell Federal Art Center.

This incredible chandelier was created by Eddie and currently hangs at the National Park Service building in Santa Fe

Thank you for your service, Veterans. 🇺🇸 These men are both WWII Veterans that are now in their mid 90s. Frank Dávila (p...
11/11/2020

Thank you for your service, Veterans. 🇺🇸 These men are both WWII Veterans that are now in their mid 90s. Frank Dávila (pictures with his friend) and Earnest Daniel. #wwiiveteran #veterans #veteransday

Did you know that back in the 19th century, some states had standardized printing rules, but in other places voters coul...
11/03/2020
Voting Booths Were a Radical 19th-Century Reform to Stop Election Fraud

Did you know that back in the 19th century, some states had standardized printing rules, but in other places voters could write down the names of whomever they wanted to vote for. Kentucky voted by voice almost to the end of the 1800s. Below is a picture of Eleanor Roosevelt voting in 1936!

An idea imported from Australia, they helped enable the "secret" part of secret ballots.

"In some ways, 2020 feels a lot like 1935: US unemployment is high, a recession looms, and there’s a need for communitie...
11/02/2020
Artists helped lift America out of the Great Depression. Could that happen again?

"In some ways, 2020 feels a lot like 1935: US unemployment is high, a recession looms, and there’s a need for communities to pull together. And thus I became curious about how the Federal Art Project and other similar initiatives worked, what kind of restrictions and freedoms the artists had, and whether such a program might work today." (excerpt) Vox

As unemployment soars, the WPA’s emphasis on artists shows a path toward recovery.

Have a Spookracular Halloween!! ...WPA Artist Gene Kloss. Kloss received widespread recognition and awards during the 19...
10/31/2020

Have a Spookracular Halloween!!
...
WPA Artist Gene Kloss.

Kloss received widespread recognition and awards during the 1930s. From 1933 to 1944 Kloss was the sole etcher employed by the Public Works of Art Project. Her series of nine New Mexico scenes from that period were reproduced and distributed to public schools across the state. She also created watercolors and oil paintings for the WPA. In 1935, she was one of three Taos artists who represented New Mexico at a Paris exhibition called "Three Centuries of Art in the United States".

Jazz up your ride with a piece of living history. These license plates each feature a work of WPA art from New Mexico. S...
10/29/2020

Jazz up your ride with a piece of living history. These license plates each feature a work of WPA art from New Mexico. Shop www.newdeallegacy.org/merchandise

Mr. Wood wasn’t a WPA artist, but he was an important part of the artistic documentation of the times. The artists of Ce...
10/23/2020

Mr. Wood wasn’t a WPA artist, but he was an important part of the artistic documentation of the times.

The artists of Cedar Rapids, of which he belonged, believed in authentic, local-level cultivation of culture and were part of a much larger cultural trend between the world wars. Particularly through the New Deal years, both emotional and economic recovery from the Great Depression hinged upon national identity through regional achievement.

#Repost @lizgrahamartconsulting with @get_repost
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Artist From The Past You Should Know - "All the good ideas I ever had came to me while I was milking a cow." Grant Wood
Wood (1891 - 1942) was an American Regionalist painter who captured Depression Era rural America with a nostalgic honesty of expression. Psychological candor and loneliness touch Wood's work, which shows the union of modernist ideas and his Midwestern surroundings. He studied art at The Handicraft Guild in Minneapolis and the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Wood made four trips to Europe, where he studied many styles of painting, especially Impressionism and post-Impressionism. However, it was the work of the 15th-century Flemish artist Jan van Eyck that influenced him to take on the clarity of this technique and to incorporate it in his works. Wood taught painting at the University of Iowa's School of Art from 1934 to 1941. His work is found in the collections of The Art Institute of Chicago, the Cedar Rapids Museum of Art, and the Figge Art Museum in Davenport, Iowa.

#grantwood #greatdepressionart #americangothic #themidnightrideofpaulrevere #fallplowing #daughtersofrevolution #sentimentalballad #artistsfromiowa #regionalism #lizgrahamartconsulting

Address

P.O. Box 602
Santa Fe, NM
87504-0602.

General information

Our national office is in Santa Fe, N.M., and our mailing address is P.O. Box 602, Santa Fe, NM 87504-0602. We can be reached at 505-473-3985 or by cell at 505-690-5845. Our email address is [email protected]

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//🐢 Save Turtle Fountain 🐢\\

Help us save this piece of living history by donating at newdeallegacy.org/donations/

In the above photo, you can see the Turtle Fountain, a WPA New Deal sculpture created by Eugenie Shonnard in the 1930’s, as it appeared when it was once a courtyard centerpiece at Carrie Tingley Polio Hospital for Children, photo circa 1970’s.

The facility now serves as the only New Mexico State Veterans Nursing Home in Truth or Consequences, New Mexico. Sadly, now it stands broken, silent and in a state of disrepair.

This is the official page of the National New Deal Preservation Association, with an emphasis on our New Mexico Chapter of the National New Deal Association. We are a non-profit organization dedicated to the education, promotion and preservation of the New Deal legacy in the United States. Learn more, become a member, or donate to our preservation projects at www.newdeallegacy.org/member/.

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