Museum of Indian Arts and Culture

Museum of Indian Arts and Culture The mission of the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture/Laboratory of Anthropology is to inspire appreciation for and knowledge of the diverse native arts, histories, languages, and cultures of the Greater Southwest.
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Visit us at http://miaclab.org A visit to the Museum of Indian Arts & Culture is an excellent introduction to the complexity and diversity of the Native American cultures of the region. Here, you can listen to the stories and songs that tell of origins and the long history of the Native people of the Southwest, witness the development of new forms of art, or learn about the contemporary lives and lifeways of the Southwest's indigenous populations. HOURS Open Daily 10am-5pm from May through October Tuesday-Sunday 10am-5pm from November through April. Closed Thanksgiving Day, December 25th, January 1st, and Easter Sunday

Temporarily closed

Poeh Cultural Center
11/23/2020

Poeh Cultural Center

NM Native Artists! Please apply for our Round II of emergency relief grants of $100. We want to help in a small way this holiday season. Help us spread the word.

#share #nativeNMartist

Earlier this month, we launched MIAC’s November speaker series, “Indigenous Storytelling in Art and Literature,” co-host...
11/19/2020

Earlier this month, we launched MIAC’s November speaker series, “Indigenous Storytelling in Art and Literature,” co-hosted by Deputy Director Dr. Matthew Martinez (Ohkay Owingeh) and Curatorial Assistant Lillia McEnaney. To watch our latest installment in the series, click on the link below.

According to Dr. Reese, (Nambé Owingeh), less than 1% of children’s books published in the United States include American Indian characters or authors. These conversations are an extension of MIAC’s ongoing work with local schools and educators, and is meant to serve as a resource for New Mexicans to learn about Indigenous communities throughout the Southwest.

Our third speaker is Daniel W. Vandever (Navajo). From Haystack, New Mexico, Vandever, is the Communications Director of Navajo Technical University, where he also serves as an adjunct instructor. Vandever obtained his undergraduate degree in Strategic Communication from the University of Missouri and his graduate degree in Community and Regional Planning from the University of New Mexico. Vandever volunteers for the Crownpoint Navajo Rug Auction, providing technical support and helping local weavers sell their rugs. Vandever comes from a long line of educators and is the grandson of Navajo Code Talker Joe Vandever Sr. He is the author of “Fall in Line, Holden!” (2017), which follows a young Navajo Boy through his day at a boarding school. Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cfUNCl9djZI

Located on the ancestral lands of Pueblo, Navajo, and Apache peoples, the School for Advanced Research (SAR) and Museum ...
11/17/2020
MIAC and SAR Announce Virtual Program to Explore Ongoing National Dialogues Concerning Historical Markers, Monuments, and Memory Making :: Department of Cultural Affairs Media Center :: Press Releases

Located on the ancestral lands of Pueblo, Navajo, and Apache peoples, the School for Advanced Research (SAR) and Museum of Indian Arts & Culture (MIAC) have joined forces to present “Messages + Monuments: Perspectives on Collective Memories,” a virtual program aimed at addressing the ongoing removal of historical markers and monuments, and what these removals – or attempts to remove – mean within the context of collective memories.

This free online event will take place at 10:30 a.m. MST on December 10, 2020.

Here’s a link to the news release, which can also be found on the New Mexico Department of Cultural Affairs Media Center.

https://media.newmexicoculture.org/release/1219/miac-and-sar-announc

SANTA FE – Located on the ancestral lands of Pueblo, Navajo, and Apache peoples, the School for Advanced Research (SAR) and Museum of Indian Arts & Culture (MIAC) have joined forces to present “Messages + Monuments: Perspectives on Collective Memories,” a virtual program aimed at addr...

Job Alert! Director of Leadership Giving for the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture. Please share with qualified candidat...
11/14/2020
Employment - MNMF

Job Alert! Director of Leadership Giving for the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture. Please share with qualified candidates who have development experience. Come work with us! See posting below.

https://www.museumfoundation.org/employment/

Employment The Museum of New Mexico Foundation offers a stimulating, creative and fulfilling work environment for a range of cultural professionals. As one of the largest arts organizations in New Mexico, we work hand in hand with the Museum of New Mexico, one of the oldest and most diverse public m...

11/12/2020
Indigenous Storytelling in Art and Literature: Laurel Goodluck, Mandan/Hidatsa/Tsimshian

Earlier this month, we launched MIAC’s November speaker series, “Indigenous Storytelling in Art and Literature,” co-hosted by Deputy Director Dr. Matthew Martinez (Ohkay Owingeh) and Curatorial Assistant Lillia McEnaney. Today we are featuring the second installment of this series that you can watch at the link below.

According to Dr. Reese, (Nambé Owingeh), less than 1% of children’s books published in the United States include American Indian characters or authors. These conversations are an extension of MIAC’s ongoing work with local schools and educators, and is meant to serve as a resource for New Mexicans to learn about Indigenous communities throughout the Southwest.

Today we invite you to listen to our second speaker in this series, Laurel Goodluck. Laurel Goodluck writes picture books with modern Native themes that reflect Native children’s cultural experiences and everyday life, showing Native children that they have a perspective that is unique and powerful. Raised in the San Francisco Bay Area, Laurel comes from an intertribal background of Mandan and Hidatsa from the prairies of North Dakota, and Tsimshian from a rainforest in Alaska. Laurel received both a B.A. in Psychology and an M.A. in Community Counseling and Family Studies from the University of New Mexico.

She began writing by crafting a curriculum for community advocacy involving Native teen leadership and later for children newly diagnosed with mental health challenges. Laurel lives with her Navajo husband in Albuquerque, where they raised two children also bent on storytelling in journalism and filmmaking. She was a recipient of the 2019 We Need Diverse Books Picture Book Mentorship and was paired with award-winner author Traci Sorell. She also received a competitive funding grant from New Mexico Writers to support new works in progress.

You can listen to Laurel Goodluck's talk at this link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fA0KKZ4NwDw&t=6s

Earlier this month, we launched MIAC’s November speaker series, “Indigenous Storytelling in Art and Literature,” co-hosted by Deputy Director Dr. Matthew Mar...

View a virtual program from our partners at the National Museum of the American   Indian honoring the service and sacrif...
11/11/2020

View a virtual program from our partners at the National Museum of the American Indian honoring the service and sacrifice of Native veterans and their families and marking the completion of the National Native American Veterans Memorial. This program includes tributes to Native veterans and a virtual tour of the memorial. Thank you for your service!

“The National Native American Veterans Memorial will serve as a reminder to the nation and the world of the service and sacrifice of Native American, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian veterans. Native Americans have always answered the call to serve, and this memorial is a fitting tribute to their patriotism and deep commitment to this country.” —Kevin Gover (Pawnee), director of the National Museum of the American Indian

Join us Wednesday, November 11, online at AmericanIndian.si.edu for the opening of the National Native American Veterans Memorial. The moment will be marked with a short virtual message to honor the service and sacrifice of Native veterans and their families.

The memorial, which sits on the grounds of the museum, was commissioned by Congress to give “all Americans the opportunity to learn of the proud and courageous tradition of service of Native Americans in the Armed Forces of the United States.” Native Americans have served in every major military conflict in the U.S. since the Revolutionary War. The memorial is the first national landmark in Washington, D.C., to honor the contributions of American Indians, Alaska Natives, and Native Hawaiians who have served in the military.

The design by Harvey Pratt (Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes of Oklahoma) features an elevated stainless steel circle resting on a carved stone drum. It also incorporates water for sacred ceremonies, benches for gatherings, and four lances where veterans, family members, tribal leaders and others can tie cloths for prayers and healing.

The museum planned to host a dedication ceremony and veterans’ procession to mark the memorial’s completion but postponed those events due to current health and safety guidelines. The museum will reschedule both events when it is safe to do so.

Major support for the National Native American Veterans Memorial has been provided by the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes; Chickasaw Nation; Margaret A. Cargill Philanthropies; Poarch Band of Creek Indians; San Manuel Band of Mission Indians; and Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community. The memorial has also been widely supported by tribal governments and tribal veterans organizations. More than 85 tribes, individuals, corporations and other organizations have contributed to the memorial.
#NationalNativeAmericanVeteransMemorial #NNAVM

If you missed our panel hosted by MIAC’s Archeological Research Collections celebrating International Archeology Day you...
11/09/2020

If you missed our panel hosted by MIAC’s Archeological Research Collections celebrating International Archeology Day you can now watch it on our YouTube channel at this link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xu5V9ggXHnI

This panel brings together several knowledgeable scholars and weavers to discuss their current work with the Cedar Mesa Perishables Project, as well as their own experimental work with Southwest perishables. Invited panelists include Laurie Webster (Southwest Archaeologist and Southwest Perishable Expert), Mary Weahkee (Santa Clara/Comanche - Office of Archaeological Studies Archaeologist), Christopher Lewis (Zuni Basket Weaver), Louie Garcia (Tiwa/Piro Textile Weaver), and Chuck LaRue (Wildlife Biologist). This panel is brought to you by the Archaeological Research Collections (ARC) at MIAC.

Did you know? Senator and Vice-President of the US (1929-33) Charles Curtis was an enrolled Kaw, his mother was Ellen Pa...
11/07/2020

Did you know?

Senator and Vice-President of the US (1929-33) Charles Curtis was an enrolled Kaw, his mother was Ellen Pappan, and they were Kaw, Osage, and Potawatomi. With his mother dead and his father away in the Civil War, he lived with his grandparents on the Kaw reservation. Later, he took an allotment in Oklahoma. He remains the highest ranking American Indian to serve in the government.

Following is a list of suggested books for more reading about American Indians serving in public office and leadership. Who else can you add to the list?

Today we are launching MIAC’s November speaker series, “Indigenous Storytelling in Literature and Arts,” co-hosted by De...
11/05/2020

Today we are launching MIAC’s November speaker series, “Indigenous Storytelling in Literature and Arts,” co-hosted by Deputy Director Dr. Matthew Martinez (Ohkay Owingeh) and Curatorial Assistant Lillia McEnaney. See link below to watch.

According to Dr. Reese, (Nambé Owingeh), less than 1% of children’s books published in the United States include American Indian characters or authors. These conversations are an extension of MIAC’s ongoing work with local schools and educators, and is meant to serve as a resource for New Mexicans to learn about Indigenous communities throughout the Southwest.

Our first speaker is Dr. Debbie Reese (Nambé Owingeh). Enrolled at Nambé Owingeh, Dr. Reese's research on Native peoples in children's literature is taught in English, Library Science, and Education classrooms in the United States and Canada. Dr. Reese's education started at the day school at Nambé. Her blog, American Indians in Children's Literature, is widely recognized as a leading resource for teachers, librarians, parents, writers, and professors. She is a co-adaptor of An Indigenous Peoples' History of the United States, for Young People, which won an Honor Award from the American Indian Library Association and was on numerous "Best Of" book lists in 2019.

Watch our first installment with Dr. Debbie Reese here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PNOkaeAVIDw&t=1s

You can follow Dr. Reese on her blog (https://americanindiansinchildrensliterature.blogspot.com) and on Twitter @debreese.

TODAY! Indigenous Storytelling in Literature and ArtsDr. Debbie Reese (Nambé Owingeh)When: Thursday, November 5, 2020, 1...
11/05/2020

TODAY! Indigenous Storytelling in Literature and Arts

Dr. Debbie Reese (Nambé Owingeh)
When: Thursday, November 5, 2020, 1 p.m. MST
About the speaker: Enrolled at Nambé Owingeh, Dr. Reese’s research on Native peoples in children’s literature is taught in English, Library Science, and Education classrooms in the United States and Canada. Dr. Reese’s education started at the day school at Nambé. She became a teacher and taught at Albuquerque Public Schools, Pojoaque Elementary School, and Santa Fe Indian School. She has a B.S. in Education from the University of New Mexico, an M.A. in Education from the University of Oklahoma, a Ph.D. in Education from the University of Illinois, and an MLIS from San Jose State University. Her blog, “American Indians in Children’s Literature,” is widely recognized as a leading resource for teachers, librarians, parents, writers, and professors. She is a co-adaptor of “An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States for Young People,” which won an Honor Award from the American Indian Library Association and was on numerous "Best of" book lists in 2019.

Please continue to check MIAC's Facebook on Thursdays at 1:00pm MST for the weekly link

MUSEUM OF INDIAN ARTS AND CULTUREMIAC Announces Indigenous Storytelling Speaker SeriesFOR IMMEDIATE RELEASENovember 04, ...
11/04/2020
MIAC Announces Indigenous Storytelling Speaker Series :: Department of Cultural Affairs Media Center :: Press Releases

MUSEUM OF INDIAN ARTS AND CULTURE
MIAC Announces Indigenous Storytelling Speaker Series
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
November 04, 2020
MEDIA CONTACT
Cisco Tapia
505-795-1908
[email protected]
The Museum of Indian Arts & Culture (MIAC) is excited to announce a new virtual speaker series called "Indigenous Storytelling in Literature and Arts." The first of these weekly presentations will begin at 1 p.m. MST on Thursday, November 5, 2020.
According to Dr. Debbie Reese (Nambé Owingeh), “Children are inundated with stereotyped and biased images of Native people in the fiction, non-fiction, and textbooks they read. As a result, Native children’s’ self-esteem is harmed and non-Native children are miseducated. Recent years have shown a small but steady increase in books by Native writers that counter harmful imagery, though there is still significant work to be done.”
These conversations are an extension of MIAC’s ongoing work with local schools and educators and are meant to serve as a resource for New Mexicans to learn about Indigenous communities throughout the Southwest. Their critical work is expanding the knowledge and understandings of Indigenous voices in literature and the arts.
“We are enthusiastic to host such an accomplished group of speakers,” said MIAC Executive Director Della Warrior (Otoe-Missouria). “This series is timely for MIAC as we continue to develop programs focused on showcasing the diversity of Indigenous educators and artists.”
Please check MIAC’s page on Thursdays at 1 p.m. MST for the weekly link.
Below is a schedule of speakers:

Who: Dr. Debbie Reese (Nambé Owingeh)
When: Thursday, November 5, 2020, 1 p.m. MST
About the speaker: Enrolled at Nambé Owingeh, Dr. Reese’s research on Native peoples in children’s literature is taught in English, Library Science, and Education classrooms in the United States and Canada. Dr. Reese’s education started at the day school at Nambé. She became a teacher and taught at Albuquerque Public Schools, Pojoaque Elementary School, and Santa Fe Indian School. She has a B.S. in Education from the University of New Mexico, an M.A. in Education from the University of Oklahoma, a Ph.D. in Education from the University of Illinois, and an MLIS from San Jose State University. Her blog, “American Indians in Children’s Literature,” is widely recognized as a leading resource for teachers, librarians, parents, writers, and professors. She is a co-adaptor of “An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States for Young People,” which won an Honor Award from the American Indian Library Association and was on numerous "Best of" book lists in 2019.

Who: Laurel Goodluck (Mandan and Hidatsa & Tsimshian)
When: Thursday, November 12, 2020, 1 p.m. MST
About the speaker: Laurel Goodluck writes picture books with modern Native themes that reflect Native children’s cultural experiences and everyday life, showing Native children that they have a perspective that is unique and powerful. Raised in the San Francisco Bay Area, Laurel comes from an intertribal background of Mandan and Hidatsa from the prairies of North Dakota, and Tsimshian from a rainforest in Alaska. Laurel received both a B.A. in Psychology and an M.A. in Community Counseling and Family Studies from the University of New Mexico. She began writing by crafting a curriculum for community advocacy involving Native teen leadership and later for children newly diagnosed with mental health challenges. Laurel lives with her Navajo husband in Albuquerque, where they raised two children also bent on storytelling in journalism and filmmaking. She was a recipient of the 2019 We Need Diverse Books Picture Book Mentorship and was paired with award-winner author Traci Sorell. She also received a competitive funding grant from New Mexico Writers to support new works in progress.

Who: Daniel W. Vandever (Navajo)
When: Thursday, November 19, 2020, 1 p.m. MST
About the speaker: From Haystack, New Mexico, Daniel W. Vandever,(Navajo) is the Communications Director of Navajo Technical University, where he also serves as an adjunct instructor. Vandever obtained his undergraduate degree in Strategic Communication from the University of Missouri and his graduate degree in Community and Regional Planning from the University of New Mexico. Vandever volunteers for the Crownpoint Navajo Rug Auction, providing technical support and helping local weavers sell their rugs. Vandever comes from a long line of educators and is the grandson of Navajo Code Talker Joe Vandever Sr. He is the author of “Fall in Line, Holden!” (2017), which follows a young Navajo Boy through his day at a boarding school.

Who: Melissa Henry (Navajo)
When: Thursday, December 3, 2020, 1 p.m. MST
About the speaker: Filmmaker Melissa Henry spent her childhood herding sheep, caring for livestock, and playing in the forest. Today, she makes innovative Navajo-language films that appeal to people of all ages and cultural backgrounds. Often featuring her pets and animals on her family’s land on the Navajo reservation, Henry’s films employ voiceovers to animate the thoughts and meanderings of the animals through the reservation landscape. Her short animated film, “This is a Hogan,” was produced for MIAC as part of the upcoming renovated “Here, Now and Always” exhibit. Henry has received a National Geographic All Roads Seed Grant and a Sundance Institute Fellowship, and has won the People’s Choice award in the PBS Online Film Festival.

Who: Arigon Starr (Kickapoo)
When: Thursday, December 10, 2020, 1 p.m. MST
About the speaker: Arigon Starr is a Kickapoo singer, actor, playwright, and comic book writer known for her one-woman shows. She has won numerous awards for her music, art, and plays, including the Native American Music Awards for Best Independent Recording in 1999 and Songwriter of the Year in 2007. In 2016, Starr edited the graphic novel “Tales of the Mighty Code Talkers,” which was named one of the American Library Association’s 2018 Great Graphic Novels for Teens. Starr has stated that her writings are intended to counter negative Indigenous stereotypes. She is the first Native American woman to have her own record label: "Wacky Productions" and has created four albums under this label.
This series is generously funded by the Continuous Pathways Foundation.

About the Museum of Indian Arts & Culture
The Museum of Indian Arts and Culture is a division of the Department of Cultural Affairs, under the leadership of the Board of Regents for the Museum of New Mexico. Programs and exhibits are generously supported by the Museum of New Mexico Foundation and our donors. The mission of the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture/Laboratory of Anthropology is to serve as a center of stewardship, knowledge, and understanding of the artistic, cultural, and intellectual achievements of the diverse peoples of the Native Southwest.

https://media.newmexicoculture.org/release/1214/miac-announces-indig

SANTA FE – The Museum of Indian Arts & Culture (MIAC) is excited to announce a new virtual speaker series called

Address

710 Camino Lejo
Santa Fe, NM
87505-7511

Ride the Santa Fe Trails 'M' line from the plaza to Museum Hill, or take the shuttle up from the downtown Railrunner stop.

General information

The Museum of Indian Arts & Culture is located on beautiful Museum Hill at 710 Camino Lejo off Old Santa Fe Trail in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The museum is open Daily from 10:00 am to 5:00 pm. May through October, and open Tuesdays through Sundays 10:00am to 5:00pm. November through April, Our admission prices are listed here http://www.indianartsandculture.org/hours . We are always free for youth and children 16 and under. Free for NM residents on Sundays and Free for NM seniors on Wednesday. Free Parking on Museum Hill. If you are looking for more information about the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, please visit http://www.indianartsandculture.org/.

Opening Hours

Tuesday 10:00 - 17:00
Wednesday 10:00 - 17:00
Thursday 10:00 - 17:00
Friday 10:00 - 17:00
Saturday 10:00 - 17:00
Sunday 10:00 - 17:00

Telephone

(505) 476-1269

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Comments

Just wanted to share my prized possession I have in my great room.
This was a really excellent discussion. Dr. Reese is a great resource for Native writing... everyone can learn from this discussion of reviewing materials and Native American representation in books today.
Has the storyteller started ye
Our Beautiful Museum Hill Cafe on Milner Plaza. Delicious food & friendly staff. Highly recommended. #museumhill #museumhillcafe #indian #museum 
I understand there was a showing of painter Leslie JaKakobovits? Would like to know about this please & Thank you.
"Joe Garcia's Soldiers" from San Juan Pueblo
Ojibway artist IceBear just completed the restoration of a composite material sculpture originally installed in 2001. It is located on the harbour front in Victoria, BC, and titled Four Winds. Photos and videos of the restoration process is on his page, IceBear Studios. It is placed with its back to the prevailing winds from the ocean. The north wind blows her ice breath into the world, and Nanabush’s huge claws are warning of much destruction across the lands if humans continue their careless ways. Since this pieces was created, much of what it forecast has come to pass. On the other side, out of view, is a frog...to speak for the amphibians who are vanishing at a rapid rate all over the world. And Thunderbird has his face to the sky, ready to carry messages, and offering hope to those who will listen and act. Overhead, an amorphous cloud hovers, what shape it will take is up to us. North Wind, here also representing Mother Earth, originally had a completely clear breath. Over the years, it has yellowed, and despite best efforts by the artist, could not be returned to its original brilliance. Much like the air and water we breath.
Sold! at Native Treasures, thank you! Final step Varnish. Oil on canvas. Osage Artist Dante Biss-Grayson: 2020 Virtual Indian Market participant! August 1-31 at swaia.org #art MoMA The Museum of Modern Art #santafeart #swaia http://dantebissgrayson.faso.com/
Did you record the lecture on Chaco and Cahokia Mounds (Wed @noon?). Over 300 people were interested and the event was shut off at 100. I tried to check in between 11:55 and 12:10 was told the event was full. If you did record it, where can we find it?
I hope that the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture can invite Native scholars, especially Pueblo scholars, to discuss Chaco Canyon in the future! It would be wonderful to have perspectives from within the culture.
I hope you are recording this!
Thank you