Museum of Indian Arts and Culture

Museum of Indian Arts and Culture The mission of the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture/Laboratory of Anthropology is to inspire appreciation for and knowledge of the diverse native arts, histories, languages, and cultures of the Greater Southwest.
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Visit us at http://miaclab.org A visit to the Museum of Indian Arts & Culture is an excellent introduction to the complexity and diversity of the Native American cultures of the region. Here, you can listen to the stories and songs that tell of origins and the long history of the Native people of the Southwest, witness the development of new forms of art, or learn about the contemporary lives and lifeways of the Southwest's indigenous populations. HOURS
Open Daily 10am-5pm from May through October
Tuesday-Sunday 10am-5pm from November through April. Closed Thanksgiving Day, December 25th, January 1st, and Easter Sunday

Operating as usual

This #TalentedTuesday, check out the latest iteration of our artist and scholar dialogue series https://youtu.be/p3Kav8a...
05/11/2021

This #TalentedTuesday, check out the latest iteration of our artist and scholar dialogue series https://youtu.be/p3Kav8ax710

This week, MIAC assistant curator Lillia McEnaney chats with Dominique Toya, a potter from Jemez Pueblo. Dominique is known for her unique swirl pots, as well as her use of micaceous slips. In this interview, she talks about her family lineage, recent collaborations with Nancy Youngblood (Santa Clara Pueblo) and her mother, Maxine Toya (Jemez Pueblo), and gives viewers a glimpse into her Facebook Live pottery demonstrations.

@NewMexicoCulture

This #TalentedTuesday, check out the latest iteration of our artist and scholar dialogue series https://youtu.be/p3Kav8ax710

This week, MIAC assistant curator Lillia McEnaney chats with Dominique Toya, a potter from Jemez Pueblo. Dominique is known for her unique swirl pots, as well as her use of micaceous slips. In this interview, she talks about her family lineage, recent collaborations with Nancy Youngblood (Santa Clara Pueblo) and her mother, Maxine Toya (Jemez Pueblo), and gives viewers a glimpse into her Facebook Live pottery demonstrations.

@NewMexicoCulture

Happening Wednesday! Register for this month’s Native Pottery Demonstration Series, hosted by the Museum of Indian Arts ...
05/10/2021

Happening Wednesday! Register for this month’s Native Pottery Demonstration Series, hosted by the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture and featuring Kathleen Wall (Jemez Pueblo).

Register here: https://nmculture-org.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_ZhgxGfRiTlaohcDDUQAcKQ

Wall was raised in a family of potters. Over the years, she has become known for transforming familiar storyteller figures into expressive, individualized sculptures. Her lighthearted and lovable koshare figures bring joy and humor, and for many, provide an entry point into her work. Grounded in Jemez Pueblo, Wall’s work is a reflection of her home. Her mountainous, high desert surroundings are constant sources of light and creativity, while the inspiration gained from her community is always present. Transcending boundaries, Wall uses her ever-evolving art to honor her family, friends, landscape, and culture.
Kathleen is MIAC's 2020--2021 Living Treasure, and her exhibition, A Place in Clay, will open at the museum in May 2021.

For more information, visit our event page https://fb.me/e/6ClSWXj2N
New Mexico Culture

Happening Wednesday! Register for this month’s Native Pottery Demonstration Series, hosted by the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture and featuring Kathleen Wall (Jemez Pueblo).

Register here: https://nmculture-org.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_ZhgxGfRiTlaohcDDUQAcKQ

Wall was raised in a family of potters. Over the years, she has become known for transforming familiar storyteller figures into expressive, individualized sculptures. Her lighthearted and lovable koshare figures bring joy and humor, and for many, provide an entry point into her work. Grounded in Jemez Pueblo, Wall’s work is a reflection of her home. Her mountainous, high desert surroundings are constant sources of light and creativity, while the inspiration gained from her community is always present. Transcending boundaries, Wall uses her ever-evolving art to honor her family, friends, landscape, and culture.
Kathleen is MIAC's 2020--2021 Living Treasure, and her exhibition, A Place in Clay, will open at the museum in May 2021.

For more information, visit our event page https://fb.me/e/6ClSWXj2N
New Mexico Culture

Join us Wednesday, May 19th for this month's Let's Take a Look!Register here:  https://nmculture-org.zoom.us/meeting/reg...
05/09/2021

Join us Wednesday, May 19th for this month's Let's Take a Look!

Register here: https://nmculture-org.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJcud-CtrD0oH9Uf7Frq0wsVOgBOKphyBy2D

MIAC staff are returning to the museum’s virtual lobby to look at your treasures. Bring a weaving, ceramic pot, piece of jewelry (or something else!) to our Zoom meeting, and curator of ethnology Tony Chavarria (Santa Clara Pueblo), curator of archaeological research collections Julia Clifton, other staff members will attempt to identify and explain the item. Curators are experts in items from the Southwest, but are willing to take a look at anything that is “brought in.” Previous attendees have often found that the experience of chatting with a group of curators is often just as, or perhaps even more, informative and enjoyable than the identification of the object.

Please note that federal and state policies prohibit curators from appraising an item; the museum neither appraises or authenticates works of art.

Visit our Facebook event page for more information: https://fb.me/e/2dPVu0t6L
New Mexico Culture

Join us Wednesday, May 19th for this month's Let's Take a Look!

Register here: https://nmculture-org.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJcud-CtrD0oH9Uf7Frq0wsVOgBOKphyBy2D

MIAC staff are returning to the museum’s virtual lobby to look at your treasures. Bring a weaving, ceramic pot, piece of jewelry (or something else!) to our Zoom meeting, and curator of ethnology Tony Chavarria (Santa Clara Pueblo), curator of archaeological research collections Julia Clifton, other staff members will attempt to identify and explain the item. Curators are experts in items from the Southwest, but are willing to take a look at anything that is “brought in.” Previous attendees have often found that the experience of chatting with a group of curators is often just as, or perhaps even more, informative and enjoyable than the identification of the object.

Please note that federal and state policies prohibit curators from appraising an item; the museum neither appraises or authenticates works of art.

Visit our Facebook event page for more information: https://fb.me/e/2dPVu0t6L
New Mexico Culture

Staff and crew are finalizing floor work in preparation for next weekend's opening. Here's a preview of what you will se...
05/08/2021

Staff and crew are finalizing floor work in preparation for next weekend's opening. Here's a preview of what you will see for our re-opening. Clearly Indigenous opens May 16th!

Join us Tuesday, May 18th for the continuation of our Contemporary Native Issues Series- Indigenizing Archaeological Tho...
05/07/2021

Join us Tuesday, May 18th for the continuation of our Contemporary Native Issues Series- Indigenizing Archaeological Thought and Practice.

Register here:
https://nmculture-org.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_aV8cKyLbSomQy3BtNf-qnQ

A new generation of Indigenous scholars are challenging the colonial frameworks that continue to deeply influence institutions of knowledge and power. The burgeoning field of Indigenous Archaeology offers broad critiques of Western and colonial archaeological thought and practice, while fostering archaeologies that are respectful of Indigenous people’s experiences and beliefs.

Join us as archaeologists demonstrate how, through their unique lived experiences as Indigenous people, the field of Indigenous archaeology operates as a broad spectrum of approaches that promotes and prioritizes Indigenous cultures and values.

Participants:
-Wade Campbell (Diné), Ph.D. Candidate, Harvard University
-Tim Wilcox (Diné), Ph.D. Candidate, Stanford University
-Nick Laluk (White Mountain Apache), Assistant Professor of Anthropology, Northern Arizona University
-Kurly Tlapyoyawa, (Chicano/Nawa/Mazewalli), Founder, Chimalli Institute of Mesoamerican Arts
Program organized and moderated by Dr. Joseph (Woody) Aguilar (San Ildefonso Pueblo).

This series would not be possible without the support of the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture.
New Mexico Culture

Join us Tuesday, May 18th for the continuation of our Contemporary Native Issues Series- Indigenizing Archaeological Thought and Practice.

Register here:
https://nmculture-org.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_aV8cKyLbSomQy3BtNf-qnQ

A new generation of Indigenous scholars are challenging the colonial frameworks that continue to deeply influence institutions of knowledge and power. The burgeoning field of Indigenous Archaeology offers broad critiques of Western and colonial archaeological thought and practice, while fostering archaeologies that are respectful of Indigenous people’s experiences and beliefs.

Join us as archaeologists demonstrate how, through their unique lived experiences as Indigenous people, the field of Indigenous archaeology operates as a broad spectrum of approaches that promotes and prioritizes Indigenous cultures and values.

Participants:
-Wade Campbell (Diné), Ph.D. Candidate, Harvard University
-Tim Wilcox (Diné), Ph.D. Candidate, Stanford University
-Nick Laluk (White Mountain Apache), Assistant Professor of Anthropology, Northern Arizona University
-Kurly Tlapyoyawa, (Chicano/Nawa/Mazewalli), Founder, Chimalli Institute of Mesoamerican Arts
Program organized and moderated by Dr. Joseph (Woody) Aguilar (San Ildefonso Pueblo).

This series would not be possible without the support of the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture.
New Mexico Culture

Did you miss our latest Contemporary Native Issues discussion on Protecting Chi'chil Bildagoteel (Oak Flat)? If so, you ...
05/07/2021

Did you miss our latest Contemporary Native Issues discussion on Protecting Chi'chil Bildagoteel (Oak Flat)? If so, you are now able to view it on our YouTube page: https://youtu.be/tTD6-3mKmOE

Join us as we continue our Contemporary Native Issues speaker series. Organized by Dr. Woody Aguilar (San Ildefonso Pueblo) and funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities, these lectures explore topics such as collaborative museum practices, Indigenous archaeology, tribal historic preservation, and other topics important to Native communities.

In this discussion, we speak with Vanessa Nosie (San Carlos Apache Tribe), San Carlos Apache Tribe Historic Preservation and Archaeology Department, Naelyn Pike (Chiricahua Apache), Indigenous rights and environmental leader and activist, Apache Stronghold, and Stephanie Barclay, Associate Professor of Law, Notre Dame Law School, and Attorney for Apache Stronghold as they discuss their efforts in the protection of Chi'chil Bildagoteel also known as Oak Flat.

Chi'chil Bildagoteel, as it is known to the Western Apache Tribes, is located in the Tonto National Forest in central Arizona. Commonly known as Oak Flat, the place is sacred land to many Indigenous peoples, including the San Carlos Apache Tribe. For time immemorial, Chi'chil Bildagoteel has held a fundamental place in Apache culture but, has recently faced threats by a proposed massive copper mine. Join a panel discussion about the efforts by Indigenous people and their allies to prevent the destructive efforts at Chi'chil Bildagoteel, and the urgent need for Native peoples to be proactive in their efforts to protect sacred landscapes.
@newmexicanculture

Did you miss our latest Contemporary Native Issues discussion on Protecting Chi'chil Bildagoteel (Oak Flat)? If so, you are now able to view it on our YouTube page: https://youtu.be/tTD6-3mKmOE

Join us as we continue our Contemporary Native Issues speaker series. Organized by Dr. Woody Aguilar (San Ildefonso Pueblo) and funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities, these lectures explore topics such as collaborative museum practices, Indigenous archaeology, tribal historic preservation, and other topics important to Native communities.

In this discussion, we speak with Vanessa Nosie (San Carlos Apache Tribe), San Carlos Apache Tribe Historic Preservation and Archaeology Department, Naelyn Pike (Chiricahua Apache), Indigenous rights and environmental leader and activist, Apache Stronghold, and Stephanie Barclay, Associate Professor of Law, Notre Dame Law School, and Attorney for Apache Stronghold as they discuss their efforts in the protection of Chi'chil Bildagoteel also known as Oak Flat.

Chi'chil Bildagoteel, as it is known to the Western Apache Tribes, is located in the Tonto National Forest in central Arizona. Commonly known as Oak Flat, the place is sacred land to many Indigenous peoples, including the San Carlos Apache Tribe. For time immemorial, Chi'chil Bildagoteel has held a fundamental place in Apache culture but, has recently faced threats by a proposed massive copper mine. Join a panel discussion about the efforts by Indigenous people and their allies to prevent the destructive efforts at Chi'chil Bildagoteel, and the urgent need for Native peoples to be proactive in their efforts to protect sacred landscapes.
@newmexicanculture

We are excited to share a recording of the April 20th Friends of Indian Art Event with Darryl, Robert, and Rebecca Begay...
05/06/2021

We are excited to share a recording of the April 20th Friends of Indian Art Event with Darryl, Robert, and Rebecca Begay.

https://youtu.be/TDBM8d-TeKI

If you tuned in live, you will remember we experienced some technical difficulties, so if you missed Darryl's demonstration or the opening video clip, you can watch it here, glitch free!

Revisit our studio visit with Darryl, Rebecca, and Robert Begay.

Darryl and Rebecca Begay are award-winning Navajo jewelers who have been creating their work for over 22 years. In 2009, they won Best of Show at the Southwestern Association for Indian Arts’ Santa Fe Indian Market.

Their seventeen-year-old son, Robert Whitehair Begay, is a gifted young artist and the recipient of MIAC’s 2021 Goodman Aspiring Artist Fellowship.

Meet this talented family in their Gallup, New Mexico studio for a sneak preview of some works in progress. They will talk about the techniques used to create their distinctive jewelry and the meanings behind their designs. They will also share how they inspire one another and how the pandemic environment is influencing their work and impacting their artistic practice.
New Mexico Culture

We are excited to share a recording of the April 20th Friends of Indian Art Event with Darryl, Robert, and Rebecca Begay.

https://youtu.be/TDBM8d-TeKI

If you tuned in live, you will remember we experienced some technical difficulties, so if you missed Darryl's demonstration or the opening video clip, you can watch it here, glitch free!

Revisit our studio visit with Darryl, Rebecca, and Robert Begay.

Darryl and Rebecca Begay are award-winning Navajo jewelers who have been creating their work for over 22 years. In 2009, they won Best of Show at the Southwestern Association for Indian Arts’ Santa Fe Indian Market.

Their seventeen-year-old son, Robert Whitehair Begay, is a gifted young artist and the recipient of MIAC’s 2021 Goodman Aspiring Artist Fellowship.

Meet this talented family in their Gallup, New Mexico studio for a sneak preview of some works in progress. They will talk about the techniques used to create their distinctive jewelry and the meanings behind their designs. They will also share how they inspire one another and how the pandemic environment is influencing their work and impacting their artistic practice.
New Mexico Culture

Don’t forget to register for this month’s Native Pottery Demonstration Series, held on May 12th, hosted by the Museum of...
05/05/2021

Don’t forget to register for this month’s Native Pottery Demonstration Series, held on May 12th, hosted by the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture and featuring Kathleen Wall (Jemez Pueblo).

Register here: https://nmculture-org.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_ZhgxGfRiTlaohcDDUQAcKQ

Raised in a family of potters, Wall has become known for transforming familiar storyteller figures into expressive, individualized sculptures. Her lighthearted and lovable koshare figures bring joy and humor, and for many, provide an entry point into her work.

Grounded in Jemez Pueblo, Wall’s work is a reflection of her home. Her mountainous, high desert surroundings are constant sources of light and creativity, while the inspiration gained from her community is always present. Transcending boundaries, Wall uses her ever-evolving art to honor her family, friends, landscape, and culture.

Kathleen is MIAC's 2020--2021 Living Treasure, and her exhibition, A Place in Clay, will open at the museum on May 16th!

To information on this event, visit our event page https://fb.me/e/6ClSWXj2N
New Mexico Culture

Don’t forget to register for this month’s Native Pottery Demonstration Series, held on May 12th, hosted by the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture and featuring Kathleen Wall (Jemez Pueblo).

Register here: https://nmculture-org.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_ZhgxGfRiTlaohcDDUQAcKQ

Raised in a family of potters, Wall has become known for transforming familiar storyteller figures into expressive, individualized sculptures. Her lighthearted and lovable koshare figures bring joy and humor, and for many, provide an entry point into her work.

Grounded in Jemez Pueblo, Wall’s work is a reflection of her home. Her mountainous, high desert surroundings are constant sources of light and creativity, while the inspiration gained from her community is always present. Transcending boundaries, Wall uses her ever-evolving art to honor her family, friends, landscape, and culture.

Kathleen is MIAC's 2020--2021 Living Treasure, and her exhibition, A Place in Clay, will open at the museum on May 16th!

To information on this event, visit our event page https://fb.me/e/6ClSWXj2N
New Mexico Culture

This #TalentTuesday we are taking a look at Deborah Jojola (Isleta Pueblo/Jemez Pueblo) in our latest iteration of MIAC'...
05/04/2021

This #TalentTuesday we are taking a look at Deborah Jojola (Isleta Pueblo/Jemez Pueblo) in our latest iteration of MIAC's artist and scholar dialogue series. https://youtu.be/8NEafn3QhTo

This time, assistant curator Lillia McEnaney chats with multidisciplinary Deborah who is known for her frescos, painting, printmaking, ceramics, and installation work. In this conversation, Lillia and Deborah talk about her artistic trajectory, creative process, and specifically chat in-depth about the process of creating frescos.

New Mexico Culture

This #TalentTuesday we are taking a look at Deborah Jojola (Isleta Pueblo/Jemez Pueblo) in our latest iteration of MIAC's artist and scholar dialogue series. https://youtu.be/8NEafn3QhTo

This time, assistant curator Lillia McEnaney chats with multidisciplinary Deborah who is known for her frescos, painting, printmaking, ceramics, and installation work. In this conversation, Lillia and Deborah talk about her artistic trajectory, creative process, and specifically chat in-depth about the process of creating frescos.

New Mexico Culture

Address

710 Camino Lejo
Santa Fe, NM
87505-7511

Ride the Santa Fe Trails 'M' line from the plaza to Museum Hill, or take the shuttle up from the downtown Railrunner stop.

General information

The Museum of Indian Arts & Culture is located on beautiful Museum Hill at 710 Camino Lejo off Old Santa Fe Trail in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The museum is open Daily from 10:00 am to 5:00 pm. May through October, and open Tuesdays through Sundays 10:00am to 5:00pm. November through April, Our admission prices are listed here http://www.indianartsandculture.org/hours . We are always free for youth and children 16 and under. Free for NM residents on Sundays and Free for NM seniors on Wednesday. Free Parking on Museum Hill. If you are looking for more information about the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, please visit http://www.indianartsandculture.org/.

Opening Hours

Tuesday 10:00 - 17:00
Wednesday 10:00 - 17:00
Thursday 10:00 - 17:00
Friday 10:00 - 17:00
Saturday 10:00 - 17:00
Sunday 10:00 - 17:00

Telephone

(505) 476-1269

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Comments

Is the virtual speaker series continuing today with Arigon Starr?
Just wanted to share my prized possession I have in my great room.
This was a really excellent discussion. Dr. Reese is a great resource for Native writing... everyone can learn from this discussion of reviewing materials and Native American representation in books today.
Has the storyteller started ye
Our Beautiful Museum Hill Cafe on Milner Plaza. Delicious food & friendly staff. Highly recommended. #museumhill #museumhillcafe #indian #museum 
I understand there was a showing of painter Leslie JaKakobovits? Would like to know about this please & Thank you.
"Joe Garcia's Soldiers" from San Juan Pueblo
Ojibway artist IceBear just completed the restoration of a composite material sculpture originally installed in 2001. It is located on the harbour front in Victoria, BC, and titled Four Winds. Photos and videos of the restoration process is on his page, IceBear Studios. It is placed with its back to the prevailing winds from the ocean. The north wind blows her ice breath into the world, and Nanabush’s huge claws are warning of much destruction across the lands if humans continue their careless ways. Since this pieces was created, much of what it forecast has come to pass. On the other side, out of view, is a frog...to speak for the amphibians who are vanishing at a rapid rate all over the world. And Thunderbird has his face to the sky, ready to carry messages, and offering hope to those who will listen and act. Overhead, an amorphous cloud hovers, what shape it will take is up to us. North Wind, here also representing Mother Earth, originally had a completely clear breath. Over the years, it has yellowed, and despite best efforts by the artist, could not be returned to its original brilliance. Much like the air and water we breath.
Sold! at Native Treasures, thank you! Final step Varnish. Oil on canvas. Osage Artist Dante Biss-Grayson: 2020 Virtual Indian Market participant! August 1-31 at swaia.org #art MoMA The Museum of Modern Art #santafeart #swaia http://dantebissgrayson.faso.com/
Did you record the lecture on Chaco and Cahokia Mounds (Wed @noon?). Over 300 people were interested and the event was shut off at 100. I tried to check in between 11:55 and 12:10 was told the event was full. If you did record it, where can we find it?
I hope that the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture can invite Native scholars, especially Pueblo scholars, to discuss Chaco Canyon in the future! It would be wonderful to have perspectives from within the culture.
I hope you are recording this!