El Rancho de las Golondrinas

El Rancho de las Golondrinas El Rancho de las Golondrinas is a 200-acre living history museum, representing various time periods in New Mexico
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06/02/2019

Las Golondrinas is open for scheduled tours only, June 5th-7th. Call now to book your tour at the special rate of $4 per person! 505.471.2261

The museum will be closed June 10th -14th for a private event but be sure to join us for the Herb and Lavender Festival June 15th and 16th.

Regular self-guided hours begin June 19th, Wednesday-Sunday, 10am-4pm.

El Rancho de las Golondrinas
06/01/2019

El Rancho de las Golondrinas

It’s opening day! See you soon at the Spring & Fiber Festival this weekend from 10am-4pm. Start your adventure at golo...
06/01/2019

It’s opening day! See you soon at the Spring & Fiber Festival this weekend from 10am-4pm. Start your adventure at golondrinas.org Photo: Richard Gonzales #elranchodelasgolondrinas #lasgolondrinas #alivinghistorymuseum #santafeartscommission #santafecounty #newmexicoarts #SantaFeNM #santafe #TheCityDifferent #santafetourism #howtosantafe #simplysantafe #newmexicotrue #nmtrue #landofenchantment #purenewmexico #purenm #nmlife #iamnewmexico #historylovers #wandernewmexico #travelnewmexico #explorenm #nmoutside #newmexicanliving #mynmlife

It’s opening day! See you soon at the Spring & Fiber Festival this weekend from 10am-4pm. Start your adventure at golo...
06/01/2019

It’s opening day! See you soon at the Spring & Fiber Festival this weekend from 10am-4pm. Start your adventure at golondrinas.org #elranchodelasgolondrinas #lasgolondrinas #alivinghistorymuseum #santafeartscommission #santafecounty #newmexicoarts #SantaFeNM #santafe #TheCityDifferent #santafetourism #howtosantafe #simplysantafe #newmexicotrue #nmtrue #landofenchantment #purenewmexico #purenm #nmlife #iamnewmexico #historylovers #wandernewmexico #travelnewmexico #explorenm #nmoutside #newmexicanliving #mynmlife

It’s #FactFriday! Hey Everyone! Sorry this is so late, but we’ve been running around outside getting things ready fo...
06/01/2019

It’s #FactFriday! Hey Everyone! Sorry this is so late, but we’ve been running around outside getting things ready for our event tomorrow! Do you know what cochineal is & what t’s used for? It’s an insect that spends its entire life on the pads of prickly pear cacti. Cochineal insects produce a chemical called carminic acid, which helps them repel predators, & is the source of the dark red color used to make cochineal dye. This is what we use at Las Golondrinas to dye our Churro Sheep wool. The traditional method of obtaining the dye is to remove the insects from the cactus pads by hand, then dry them in the sun before crushing them into a powder. It takes about 70,000 cochineal insects to produce 1lb of powder! The insects are then processed by immersion in hot water. The production of cochineal was well established in Mexico when the Spanish first arrived in the 16th century & was even used as currency! Impressed with the vividness of the dye, they soon began exporting cochineal to Spain & became a prized commodity. From there, cochineal production eventually expanded. During the colonial period, with the introduction of sheep to the Americas, the use of cochineal increased, as it provided the most intense color & set more firmly on woolen garments than on clothes made of materials such as cotton or agave and yucca fibers. In general, cochineal is more successful on protein-based animal fibers than plant-based material. You can see this whole process, from the shearing of the churro sheep, to the dye shed, to the lovely woven textiles this weekend at our Spring & Fiber Fest! Sat. & Sun. 10-4.www.golondrinas.org. See you there! #cochineal #springfest #lasgolondrinas #elranchodelasgolondrinas

ONLY ONE DAY LEFT of the @sfreporter ”Best of Santa Fe”!!! Don’t forget to vote for us in the following categories...
05/30/2019

ONLY ONE DAY LEFT of the @sfreporter ”Best of Santa Fe”!!! Don’t forget to vote for us in the following categories; "Best Museum”, “Best Non-Profit”
“Best Playground”

Let's make history together and make the museum the best in Santa Fe. Thank you for all your support. PLEASE VOTE FOR US!!! BEST MUSEUM
https://www.sfreporter.com/bosf/#/gallery/?group=307081

BEST NON-PROFIT
https://www.sfreporter.com/bosf/#/gallery/?group=30707

BEST PLAYGROUND
https://www.sfreporter.com/bosf/#/gallery?group=307078

#BOSF2019 #elranchodelasgolondrinas #lasgolondrinas #alivinghistorymuseum #santafecounty #SantaFeNM #santafe #TheCityDifferent #santafetourism #howtosantafe #simplysantafe #newmexicotrue #nmtrue #landofenchantment #purenewmexico #purenm #nmlife #iamnewmexico #historylovers #wandernewmexico #travelnewmexico #explorenm #nmoutside #newmexicanliving #mynmlife

ONLY ONE DAY LEFT of the @sfreporter ”Best of Santa Fe”!!! Don’t forget to vote for us in the following categories...
05/30/2019

ONLY ONE DAY LEFT of the @sfreporter ”Best of Santa Fe”!!! Don’t forget to vote for us in the following categories; "Best Museum”, “Best Non-Profit”
“Best Playground”

Let's make history together and make the museum the best in Santa Fe. Thank you for all your support. PLEASE VOTE FOR US!!! BEST MUSEUM
https://www.sfreporter.com/bosf/#/gallery/?group=307081

BEST NON-PROFIT
https://www.sfreporter.com/bosf/#/gallery/?group=30707

BEST PLAYGROUND
https://www.sfreporter.com/bosf/#/gallery?group=307078

#BOSF2019 #elranchodelasgolondrinas #lasgolondrinas #alivinghistorymuseum #santafecounty #SantaFeNM #santafe #TheCityDifferent #santafetourism #howtosantafe #simplysantafe #newmexicotrue #nmtrue #landofenchantment #purenewmexico #purenm #nmlife #iamnewmexico #historylovers #wandernewmexico #travelnewmexico #explorenm #nmoutside #newmexicanliving #mynmlife

It’s #FactFriday! Did you know that “colcha” means bedcover in Spanish? Colcha embroidery is a folk art, character...
05/24/2019

It’s #FactFriday! Did you know that “colcha” means bedcover in Spanish?
Colcha embroidery is a folk art, characteristic of Northern New Mexico history & traditions & is a form of cultural expression. It has not been documented sufficiently, & in many ways is a mysterious technique, even here where the art form originated.
During the Spanish Colonial era, wool shorn from the hardy churro sheep was spun into yarn & woven into a utilitarian base cloth called sabanilla. Remaining embroidery yarn was dyed with local plants, such as Cota, Chamisa, Escobillana, Lemita & Ground Lichen, all native to the high desert, as well as Mexico-native cochineal (made of bugs!) & indigo powder, imported from the Spanish Empire.
Many colcha artists follow these ancestral traditions while others interpret & apply the technique in a contemporary way.
Colcha embroidery has been practiced in private homes, small circles throughout Northern New Mexico, in the San Luis Valley of Southern Colorado & luckily, here at Las Golondrinas! Our talented Colcha artists keep this beautiful art form alive & will be here to share it with you next weekend for "Spring & Fiber Fest: Tierra, Agua y Vida", the event that officially opens our 2019 season! Colcha artists & weavers from Española Valley Fiber Arts Center & New Mexico Farm & Ranch Museum will also be here so you don’t want to miss it! For more information on this event & our season please visit www.golondrinas.org. Source: EVFAC Press Release for “Colcha Circle: A Stitch in Northern New Mexico Culture,” a documentary which will be shown during the festival! Photos: Art by LG volunteers & colcha artists, Julia Gomez & Annette Gutierrez Turk. #colcha #weaving #folkart #seasonopening #fiberart #elranchodelasgolondrinas #lasgolondrinas #golondrinas #alivinghistorymuseum #howtosantafe #simplysantafe #newmexicotrue #nmtrue

Don’t forget, there’s still a couple of days left to vote for us in the following categories; "Best Museum”, “Be...
05/23/2019

Don’t forget, there’s still a couple of days left to vote for us in the following categories; "Best Museum”, “Best Non-Profit”
“Best Playground”

Let's make history together and make the museum the best in Santa Fe. PLEASE VOTE FOR US!!! BEST MUSEUM
https://www.sfreporter.com/bosf/#/gallery/?group=307081

BEST NON-PROFIT
https://www.sfreporter.com/bosf/#/gallery/?group=30707

BEST PLAYGROUND
https://www.sfreporter.com/bosf/#/gallery?group=307078

#BOSF2019 #elranchodelasgolondrinas #lasgolondrinas #alivinghistorymuseum #santafecounty #SantaFeNM #santafe #TheCityDifferent #santafetourism #howtosantafe #simplysantafe #newmexicotrue #nmtrue #landofenchantment #purenewmexico #purenm #nmlife #iamnewmexico #historylovers #wandernewmexico #travelnewmexico #explorenm #nmoutside #newmexicanliving #mynmlife

It’s #FactFriday! On this day in 1954 the U.S. Supreme Court made a decision in Brown v. Board of Education, ruling th...
05/17/2019

It’s #FactFriday! On this day in 1954 the U.S. Supreme Court made a decision in Brown v. Board of Education, ruling that racial segregation in public schools was unconstitutional. This major civil rights victory brought an end to federal tolerance of racial segregation after Linda Brown, a young African American girl was denied admission to her local elementary school in Topeka because of the color of her skin. This decision served to greatly motivate the Civil Rights Movement & ultimately led to the abolishment of racial segregation in all public facilities. Did you know that NM, despite having a long history of racial assimilation & itself being a place where African Americans relocated during & after the Civil War, also established segregation laws? Following statehood in 1912, NM now had to abide by federal law & established segregated schools during the 1920’s, mostly in southern & southeastern communities, as they had the highest population of African American residents. Alamogordo, Artesia, Carlsbad, Las Cruces, Hobbs, Clovis, Tucumcari & Vado all had either segregated classrooms or buildings, some now on the National Historic Register. According to sources of the time, state law allowed segregated classrooms as long as rooms were "as good & as well kept" as those where “Anglos were taught”, & as long as teaching was "as efficient.” Though this was not always the case, NM was among the first states to desegregate. Less than a week after the Supreme Court's decision, the Hobbs school board decided to integrate its two junior highs & lone high school by the next fall. Some districts elsewhere in the state had already integrated. In contrast, most southern states did not desegregate their schools until 1970.
Sources: Las Cruces Bulletin & The Albuquerque Journal #education #brownvsboardofeducation #elranchodelasgolondrinas #lasgolondrinas

Know I am down with? Especially on a Monday to chase those workaday blues away? CARBS! So what is this thing you’re lo...
05/13/2019

Know I am down with? Especially on a Monday to chase those workaday blues away? CARBS!

So what is this thing you’re looking at you may wonder. Cart of a thousand tiny cuts? Medieval torture device? World’s meanest sled? Well it’s kind of the last one. It’s a threshing sled!

So you take this bad boy, throw some wheat on a threshing floor, then drug it behind a mule or horse separating the wheat from the hay using the hundreds if not thousands (a large threshing sled takes about 3,000 pieces of stone) of sharp bits of flint or obsidian. This was the first process in getting the actual seed of the wheat, the delicious part that is, and getting the rest of the not so tasty stuff off of it. There are other stages, but man they sound hard and boring so I won’t go into it for our purposes.

The threshing sled has been with us since, well; pretty much we decided wheat was a good thing, that is to say about 8,000 years ago. And to the shock and awe of no one they showed up where wheat showed up, that is to say the Middle East at first and then spread around the rest of the fine planet as wheat arrived from place to place.

And people were into to talking about the threshing sled! It shows up quite a few times in the bible and in Roman and Greek literature as well. Cato talked about it, Pliny talked about it, it was a popular item to talk about apparently.

One of the major and arguably THE major center for making these suckers was in Cantalejo in Spain starting around the 11th century. Anyone who was anyone, and you know, needed wheat threshed after the 11th century in Europe, had a threshing sled from Cantalejo. This industry continued to sustain Cantalejo well into the 21st century. This specialization was so entrenched in Cantalejo that the threshing sled makers, called Briqueros, developed their own secret language called Gaceria by which they could discuss business and all things threshing sled with the prying ears of customers or passerby’s.

The threshing sled you see here in certainly in the Spanish style, but was more then likely manufactured here using local materials including the wood and the gazillions’ of pieces of flint. I have not seen this sucker in action, but as terrifying as it maybe I surely would love to!

Although the practice of using threshing sled has long since fallen out of practice amongst more industrialized places, this technology is still used in many places throughout the world to this day. Hey if it ain’t broke for the last 8,000 years don’t fix it am I right?

#Spain #thresing #antiquetools #antiquetool #agriculture #wheat #Spanisharchaeology #flint #flintnapping
#southwesternarchaeology #elranchodelasgolondrinas #lasgolondrinas #golondrinas#alivinghistorymuseum #howtosantafe #simplysantafe#newmexicotrue #nmtrue #landofenchantment #purenewmexico#purenm #nmlife #iamnewmexico #santafecounty #santafe#historylovers #historylove #wandernewmexico #santafetourism#explorenm #travelnewmexico #nmoutside #SantaFeNM#TheCityDifferent #newmexicanliving
#mynmlife

It’s #FactFriday! Did you know that today is the 150th anniversary of the “Wedding of the Rails," or completion of t...
05/10/2019

It’s #FactFriday! Did you know that today is the 150th anniversary of the “Wedding of the Rails," or completion of the first Transcontinental Railroad? President Lincoln signed the Pacific Railroad Act into law in 1862, which gave two companies, the Union Pacific Railroad & the Central Pacific Railroad, responsibility for completing the project, authorizing land grants & 30-year government bonds to finance it. The UP was to lay track westward & the CP was to build eastward. They agreed to join at Promontory Summit/Point, Utah. When the final iron spike was nailed in, telegraphs sent "Done" across the country in one of the first national media events in America. Iron Horse fever broke over New Mexico in 1878 when SP (Southern Pacific) interests attempted to use Territorial Legislature to exclude other railroads from the territory. Both the AT&SF (Atchison, Tokepa & Santa Fe) & the D&RG (Denver & Rio Grande) began planning a rapid railroad construction campaign. The impact on NM was dramatic. By the time the AT&SF & the SP met at Deming in early 1881, profound changes had taken root. Boom towns popped up, becoming hubs of culture & commerce, & industry expanded at an almost incomprehensible pace. Hundreds of carloads of coal were shipped each week from NM mines. The number of cattle in the territory increased from 347,000 in 1880 to 1,630,000 by 1890. The number of banks grew from only 2 before the railroad to over 50 after, signaling the end of mercantile capitalism of the Santa Fe Trail days, of which Las Golondrinas was part of. The railroad ushered in American culture & modernity, fueling a new prosperity in the Territory, but also causing upheaval, as clashing cultures struggled to find their place. An influx of people moved into the area & soon many of the old ways faded & the face of NM changed forever. Here at Las Golondrinas we strive to keep the traditions of pre-industrial NM alive. Visit us for Spring & Fiber Fest: Agua, Tierra y Vida as we celebrate the opening of our season with traditional arts, activities & demonstrations of all sorts! June 1-2, 10 am to 4 pm. Kids 12 & under, FREE! #railroad #spring&fiber #elranchodelasgolondrinas

It’s #FactFriday! Did you know that Acequias are the oldest water management institutions in the United States? These ...
05/03/2019

It’s #FactFriday! Did you know that Acequias are the oldest water management institutions in the United States? These irrigation ditches, brought by the Spanish colonies, once supplied water to a large portion of the Southwestern United States. Today, around 700 acequias continue to feed the fields of Northern New Mexico! Each acequia has a mayordomo (ditch boss) & a commission, which oversee the delivery of water, settle disputes, & maintain the ditch. These ditches also help to restore aquifers & riparian areas, like here in La Cienga. One of the few commons existing in the United States today, acequias are an essential part of identity & survival, as much of a cultural system as it is ecological. The phrase, "Water is the lifeblood of the community", is often echoed throughout the high desert villages & towns in Northern New Mexico. Acequias are, in short, the living history of New Mexican heritage & agriculture. Come out this season & learn about our acequia here at El Rancho, porque El Agua Es Vida! #acequias #acequiaculture #aguaesvida #elranchodelasgolondrinas #lasgolondrinas #golondrinas #alivinghistorymuseum #howtosantafe #simplysantafe #newmexicotrue #nmtrue #landofenchantment #purenewmexico #purenm #nmlife

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334 Los Pinos Rd
Santa Fe, NM
87507

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2018 Schedule of events now online! www.golondrinas.org Follow us on Twitter: @SFGolondrinas

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