El Rancho de las Golondrinas

El Rancho de las Golondrinas El Rancho de las Golondrinas is a 200-acre living history museum, representing various time periods in New Mexico Bienvenidos! Thank you for following the El Rancho de las Golondrinas page.
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This page is designed to keep you up-to-date on all fun and informative events and programs of our organization. While we encourage open dialogue amongst our followers, please be respectful of the page and your fellow page users. Posts that use profanity, insults, threatening language or anything deemed inappropriate will be deleted. We will work hard to get questions and messages answered within 24 hours. Again, thank you for following us and enjoy your adventure! Click here to join our mailing list! ----> http://bit.ly/hTnEGX

Operating as usual

Friends this is a fake link.  Do not click it. Our content is free on sfgolondrinas page. Sorry   Someone is tr...
02/24/2021

Friends this is a fake link. Do not click it. Our content is free on sfgolondrinas page. Sorry Someone is trying to steal our content.

02/24/2021
Golondrinas Live Sessions - Acequias, Mayordomos, and Other Norteno Traditions

This fascinating lecture will explore the vernacular traditions of Northern New Mexico, particularly the culture and governance of acequias. Local author and farmer, Stanley Crawford, will draw from his own experiences and share his knowledge on small-scale farming and adobe construction within the Acequia system.

Don’t forget to join us this evening for our second installment of our 2021 Speaking of Traditions virtual Winter Lectur...
02/23/2021

Don’t forget to join us this evening for our second installment of our 2021 Speaking of Traditions virtual Winter Lecture Series, “Acequias, Mayordomos and other Norteño Traditions” with Stanley Crawford. This fascinating lecture will explore the vernacular traditions of Northern New Mexico, particularly the culture and governance of acequias. Local author and farmer, Stanley Crawford, will draw from his own experiences and share his knowledge on small-scale farming and adobe construction within the Acequia system. Co-hosted by @newmexicoartmuseum and sponsored by @humanitiesnm @santafecounty
Link to watch is in our bio.
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#acequias #mayordomos #norteño #winterlectureseries #speakingoftraditions #newmexicomuseumofart #golondrinaslivesessions #elranchodelasgolondrinas #lasgolondrinas #golondrinas #alivinghistorymuseum #howtosantafe #simplysantafe #newmexicotrue #nmtrue #landofenchantment #purenewmexico #purenm #nmlife #iamnewmexico #santafecounty #santafe #historylovers

It’s #FactFriday! Chinese New Year 2021 welcomed the year of the Ox. Ox (plural, Oxen) are any breed of cattle over 4 ye...
02/19/2021

It’s #FactFriday! Chinese New Year 2021 welcomed the year of the Ox. Ox (plural, Oxen) are any breed of cattle over 4 years old that have been castrated and trained as draft animals, usually for plowing or for transporting freight. Because females are smaller and valued for breeding and milk, ox are more often male. First harnessed ca. 4,000 BCE, cattle and other domesticated animals were introduced to the Americas by the Spanish in the 16th century. The Oñate expedition of 1598 traveled up El Camino Real to New Mexico with 80 ox carts, averaged 10 miles a day and took 6 months one-way! Extending nearly 1,800 miles from Mexico City to Santa Fe, El Camino Real was first used for trade, hunting and travel by Indigenous groups between Mesoamerica and what is now the Southwest and was the first road adopted by Europeans upon settlement. For a time, it was one of the longest roads in North America. It was an avenue for communication, commerce, exploration, settlement and military campaigns for nearly 300 years. It was also the agent for cultural and biological exchange. Santa Fe became the terminal for supplies with Las Golondrinas as a “paraje” (resting place), which continued to be advantageous once the Santa Fe Trail (1821) and Old Spanish Trail (1829) officially opened. By 1829 oxen were being used by the U.S. Army to to pull supply wagons and were so efficient at making the journey between Missouri, New Mexico and California that about half of trail wagons were drawn by oxen; some freighters even matched their teams by color or other distinguishing characteristics. The average mature weight of an ox is upward 2,000 lbs. and they are capable of pulling twice their weight, which meant they were perfect for pulling artillery, ambulance wagons, provisions and supplies. Throughout its history no doubt thousands of oxen traveled through the little paraje at Las Golondrinas! Happy trails and happy year of the ox! For more New Mexico history visit golondrinas.org, the "Las Golondrinas Channel" on YouTube & @sfgolondrinas (FB/IG)!.
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📷 1 : Vic Macias
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#YearoftheOx #spanishoxcart #elcaminoreal #elranchodelasgolondrinas #lasgolondrinas #alivinghistorymuseum #santafecounty #SantaFeNM #santafe #TheCityDifferent #santafetourism #howtosantafe #simplysantafe #newmexicotrue #nmtrue #landofenchantment #purenm #nmlife #iamnewmexico #historylovers #travelnewmexico #nmoutside #newmexicolove

Clara Belle (Drisdale) Williams was born in Plum Texas 1885 to share croppers Isaac and Carrie Drisdale. Clara was first...
02/16/2021

Clara Belle (Drisdale) Williams was born in Plum Texas 1885 to share croppers Isaac and Carrie Drisdale. Clara was first educated in a one room school house and it seemed was destined to be a good student. As a young adult Clara received a scholarship to Prairie View Normal and Independent College where she graduated valedictorian. After graduating in 1905 she headed the college’s sewing department for several years. She then moved to El Paso where she met her husband Jasper Williams, a pharmacist and they married in 1917. The couple ran a drug store in El Paso and three sons Jasper, James and Charles. In 1924 the couple and their three sons moved to Las Cruces New Mexico in order to homestead 600 plus acres of land.

Clara continued her studies taking correspondence courses at the University of Chicago and in 1928 became the first African American student of the New Mexico College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts, as we now refer to it NMSU.

As a student Williams was segregated from her classmates, and most professors would not allow her in to the lectures so she would have to stand outside taking notes. And yet she persisted, and at the age of 51 she became the first ever African American graduate of New Mexico State University, receiving her degree in English. She was not allowed participate in her own graduation. Nevertheless Williams continued her education at NMSU and did some graduate work there.

After her studies Clara worked for the segregated Las Cruces schools teaching at the Booker T. Washington School for almost 30 years. After her husband passed in 1947 and Mrs. Williams retired and moved to Chicago to join her sons, all of whom had graduated from NMSU and later became physicians. Clara helped her sons run the clinic they started together serving Chicago’s south side residents for many years. She retired as their receptionist at 91.

In the 1960’s the New Mexico State started to change it’s tune and realize just how poorly they had treated their first African American graduate. Clara was named Alum of the year, a street on campus name was changed to Williams Avenue to honor the family. She was awarded an honorary law degree from the school in the 1980’s as well as a formal apology for her treatment whilst a student at the school.
In the 2000’s the English building was re-named in her honor and a scholarship was also established in her name.

Clara died in Chicago at (I am not making this up) 108 in 1994. I think as soon as this whole thing is over I am going to head on down to Cruces to take a stroll on Williams Avenue and perhaps head on over the Clara Belle Williams building to check it out. Who wants to join me?!

#educators #teachers #BlackHistoryMonth #elranchodelasgolondrinas #lasgolondrinas #alivinghistorymuseum #santafecounty #santafeartscommission #SantaFeNM #santafe #TheCityDifferent #santafetourism #howtosantafe #simplysantafe #newmexicotrue #nmtrue #landofenchantment #purenm #nmlife #historylovers #travelnewmexico #newmexicolove

It’s #FactFriday! Did you know the history of Valentine’s Day dates back centuries, from the ancient Roman fertility fes...
02/13/2021

It’s #FactFriday! Did you know the history of Valentine’s Day dates back centuries, from the ancient Roman fertility festival of Lupercalia to Christian martyr Valentinus in the 3rd century CE? Legend has it that when Emperor Claudius II outlawed marriage (believing single men made better soldiers) Valentinus helped “love conquer all” by marrying couples in secret. Once discovered, he was imprisoned and sentenced to death. But before he lost his head, he gave his heart to the jailer’s daughter in a secret love letter signed simply, “From your Valentine.” He died February 14th and was later canonized St. Valentine. There’s another story of a man who lost his head over love, Santa Fe soldier Juan Espinoza and his fateful visit to La Casa Vieja de Analco, now known as the “The Oldest House in the U.S.” Juan fell in love with a woman who did not return his affections. Desperate to capture her heart, he paid a visit to two brujas (witches) who lived in the house offering spells and potions to paying customers. Juan paid for a potion that didn’t work, and the woman he loved married another. Broken-hearted and angry, he returned to the house, demanding a refund. When they denied him, (sword in hand) he violently lunged at them, but one of them tripped him while the other grabbed his sword and decapitated him. The moral of the story? Forget potions and stick to a tastier elixir, chocolate! Chocolate (cacao) has been a coveted Mesoamerican delicacy for centuries. “Cacahuatl” or cacao, translates to “food of the gods” and “Ixcacao”, a fertility goddess, was the deity of chocolate. Thousand-year-old pottery has been unearthed with traces of theobromine, cacao’s signature component. Though bitter, it was consumed as a liquid mixed with herbs and spices and was prized as an aphrodisiac. When the Spanish arrived, they liked it so much they walked it up to New Mexico. In 1600, Oñate himself noted in an inventory to the crown of Spain “80 small boxes of chocolate in locked jars,” indicating how valuable it was. Surely, they passed through Las Golondrinas on El Camino Real! The Spanish took chocolate back to Spain, where eventually sugar was added and the rest, as they say, is history. Today, billions are spent on sweets for Valentine’s Day with chocolate accounting for over 75% of sales! Some things are just timeless. Happy Valentine’s Day, friends! Love to you all!

02/12/2021
Golondrinas Live Sessions - Tin Valentine Hearts

Join Las Golondrinas Tinsmiths, Tom Whitson and Chad Lauritzen, who will share the history of the art of tin stamping in New Mexico, and show you the step by step process on how to craft a tin heart ornament for your special Valentine

Thanks to the folks at New Mexico True for the great story of our very own Julia Gomez. Enjoy!
02/11/2021
The Spanish Roots of Santa Fe County Colcha artist Julia Gomez interprets history

Thanks to the folks at New Mexico True for the great story of our very own Julia Gomez. Enjoy!

Teacher Julia Gomez took up a new educational mission after retirement: teaching visitors at El Rancho de Las Golondrinas about Spanish colonial lifeways. The acclaimed colcha artist picked up the Spanish style of embroidery decades ago, but didn’t master the art until she began volunteering at La...

¡Hola Amigos y Amigas! Tune in for our next Golondrinas Live Sessions live stream on Facebook, "Tin Valentine Hearts” on...
02/10/2021

¡Hola Amigos y Amigas! Tune in for our next Golondrinas Live Sessions live stream on Facebook, "Tin Valentine Hearts” on Friday, February 12 at 11:00 am! Join Las Golondrinas Tinsmiths, Tom Whitson and Chad Lauritzen, who will share the history of the art of tin stamping in New Mexico, and show you the step by step process on how to craft a tin heart ornament for your special Valentine❤️. Click on link to watch: https://www.facebook.com/sfgolondrinas/live/

Friday, February 12 at 11am
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#tinstamping #tinheart #golondrinaslivesessions #elranchodelasgolondrinas #lasgolondrinas #alivinghistorymuseum #santafecounty #santafeartscommission #SantaFeNM #santafe #TheCityDifferent #santafetourism #howtosantafe #simplysantafe #newmexicotrue #nmtrue #landofenchantment #purenm #nmlife #historylovers #travelnewmexico #newmexicolove

Today we talk about a famous old west cowboy, Nat (or alternately Nate Love) who roamed the west from Wyoming to Califor...
02/08/2021

Today we talk about a famous old west cowboy, Nat (or alternately Nate Love) who roamed the west from Wyoming to California, Tennessee to Texas, Mexico and New Mexico herding cattle, and being a rodeo super star.

Nat Love was born enslaved in Davidson County Tennessee in or around 1854. His mother ran the kitchen and his father was a foreman of the plantation of a Robert Love. As a young man loved horses, taught himself to read and write and worked on his parents tobacco farm. At the age of 16 Nat entered a horse raffle and won, allowing him to sell said horse back to the owner for $50 and head west.

He found himself in Dodge City Kansas, and then Texas where it is said he had a incredible propensity for breaking difficult horses and out smarting cattle rustlers. Eventually he moved to Texas and then Arizona where in his autobiography he claims to have met Pat Garrett and Billy the kid.

His travels took him all over the west and he gained a reputation as an incredibly gifted cowboy. In Deadwood South Dakota he entered a rodeo and won almost every category. Securing him a place in cowboy history.

He claims to have been shot 14 times, saw many friends killed, endured blizzards and bison stampedes, and after all that he decided it was time to “retire.”

After he left the cowboy life he became porter for the railroads working for the Rio Grande and Denver railroads. Eventually he fully retired and ended up in Southern California with his wife Alice. He died in the 1920’s at the age of 67.

Nat left us an autobiography that spoke to his many exploits out west called “Life and Adventures of Nat Love, Better Known in Cattle Country as Deadwood Dick.” It reads like an the most staggering adventure novel, a page turner to say the least. Nat was also depicted in graphic novels and comics. He has been represented in TV and movies and first person interpretations at the Smithsonian.

Nat was one of those people we all should know about, and sounds like he was braver then could be, brilliant and fun as could be to be around. To Nat Love, a cowboys cowboy!

#cowboys #cowboy #BlackHistoryMonth #elranchodelasgolondrinas #lasgolondrinas #alivinghistorymuseum #santafecounty #santafeartscommission #SantaFeNM #santafe #TheCityDifferent #santafetourism #howtosantafe #simplysantafe #newmexicotrue #nmtrue #landofenchantment #purenm #nmlife #historylovers #travelnewmexico #newmexicolove

02/05/2021
Golondrinas Live Sessions: Flint, Steel and Fire

Las Golondrinas Volunteer, Gordon Mark and learn about the history of flint and steel technology, from its earliest uses to its innovative expansion into the flintlock pistol and common hand-held lighter. Learn how you can safely do this at home using proven historic techniques and local materials! Please note, Fire is a dangerous substance that can cause serious injury or death. Adult supervision is highly required for any young persons interested in learning this skill and should be practiced outside, in a safe controlled place.

El Rancho de las Golondrinas's cover photo
02/05/2021

El Rancho de las Golondrinas's cover photo

¡Hola Amigos y Amigas! Tune in for our next Golondrinas Live Sessions live stream on Facebook, “Flint, Steel and Fire” o...
02/04/2021

¡Hola Amigos y Amigas! Tune in for our next Golondrinas Live Sessions live stream on Facebook, “Flint, Steel and Fire” on Friday, February 5 at 1:00 pm! Join Las Golondrinas Volunteer, Gordon Mark and learn about the history of flint and steel technology, from its earliest uses to its innovative expansion into the flintlock pistol and common hand-held lighter. Learn how you can safely do this at home using proven historic techniques and local materials! Please note, Fire is a dangerous substance that can cause serious injury or death. Adult supervision is highly required for any young persons interested in learning this skill and should be practiced outside, in a safe controlled place. See you tomorrow! Follow link to watch: https://www.facebook.com/sfgolondrinas/live/

Friday, February 5, 2021 at 1pm
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#flint #steel #fire #golondrinaslivesessions #elranchodelasgolondrinas #lasgolondrinas #alivinghistorymuseum #santafecounty #santafeartscommission #SantaFeNM #santafe #TheCityDifferent #santafetourism #howtosantafe #simplysantafe #newmexicotrue #nmtrue #landofenchantment #purenm #nmlife #historylovers #travelnewmexico #newmexicolove

02/02/2021

Got a little extra time on your hands?
Well it’s that time of the year for @sfreporter BEST OF SANTA FE 2021. Use some of that extra time and go to The Santa Fe Reporter (https://www.sfreporter.com/bosf/) and nominate us for the BEST OF SANTA FE 2021!!! Let's make history together and make El Rancho de las Golondrinas THE BEST IN SANTA FE 2021!
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BEST MUSEUM
BEST NONPROFIT
BEST LECTURE SERIES
BEST INSTAGRAM FEED
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#bestofsantafe2021 #bosf2021 #sfreporter #stayhomestaysafe #alltogethersantafe #elranchodelasgolondrinas #lasgolondrinas #alivinghistorymuseum #santafecounty #santafeartscommission #SantaFeNM #santafe #TheCityDifferent #santafetourism #howtosantafe #simplysantafe #newmexicotrue #nmtrue #landofenchantment #purenm #nmlife #iamnewmexico #historylovers #travelnewmexico #nmoutside #newmexicolove

It’s #FactFriday! Hello Friends! Hope you all enjoyed the lovely full moon yesterday. Called the Wolf Moon by Indigenous...
01/30/2021

It’s #FactFriday! Hello Friends! Hope you all enjoyed the lovely full moon yesterday. Called the Wolf Moon by Indigenous groups because the howling of wolves was often heard this time of year, it was commonly thought they howled due to hunger, and that howling signaled they were on the hunt. They were right, but they also howl to define territory, communicate with or locate pack members, and to reinforce social bonds. It can sound a bit ominous, especially against the backdrop of a full moon which, on its own, carries its share of superstitions. Many New Mexicans, if not completely superstitious, were always a little-stitious, with a number of superstitions centered around the moon, especially with respect to birth. In the past, it was a widespread belief that the moon exercised a great deal of influence on children, even while in the womb. Pregnant women were cautioned to take special care during moon phases and were discouraged to go outside during eclipses for fear that health issues was arise. It was also believed the moon’s shadow could imprint on the child causing large birthmarks, particularly on the face. As a caution, pregnant women were encouraged to wear keys tied around their waist. My own mother did this while pregnant with me at the request of her grandmother. Some still believe that if you want your hair to grow it should be cut while the moon is waxing, or that cleaning your house is best done when the moon is waning. Ever consider where the word “lunatic” comes from? Derived from the Latin “lunaticus,” it refers to madness caused by the moon. My grandfather would playfully say, “es la luna” if anyone in the family displayed a bad mood or acted unlike themselves. Can anyone relate? People of all cultures have long tied belief and superstition to the moon, and have associated changes, big and small, to its powerful energy. But all superstitions aside, New Mexico sure has some pretty moonscapes!
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📷 credit: Volunteer, Richard Gonzales
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#wolfmoon #laluna #alltogethersantafe #elranchodelasgolondrinas #lasgolondrinas #alivinghistorymuseum #santafecounty #SantaFeNM #TheCityDifferent #nmtrue #landofenchantment #santafetourism

Address

334 Los Pinos Rd
Santa Fe, NM
87507

General information

www.golondrinas.org Please donate at: https://golondrinas.org/annual-fund/

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Comments

Now that the State museums are opening, I have high hopes for the Ranch to open sometime this spring!
I’m hoping to attend the 13th annual Renaissance Faire next month. Since it may seem that with the limited number of attendees, will you be pre selling the tickets for different time slots instead of buy at the gate? Thank you Big fan and hopeful
A couple pictures from tonight at the Spirits of New Mexico's Past event. This was fun. The events, performances, stories and food were all great.
We love visiting El Rancho de las Golondrinas! We have come to all the events since joining.
Path through the trees at El Rancho de las Golondrinas (The Ranch of the Swallows) near Santa Fe, NM. facebook.com/treyflyntphotography
An In-depth look at the early lives of living on the Range of a new frontier and weathering all the storms through it and thriving in an area, very much enriched with different ethnic races coming together to carve out their piece future !
Thank you for receiving us so warmly yesterday to take photos and please tell Amy she is about the friendliest person I've ever met :)
Betty Sherred’s obituary appears in today’s Albuquerque Journal.
Our kiddos loved last weekends Harvest Fest!
Okay, did you know about this place Gilbert?????? Lol
We’re delighted to inform you that El Rancho de las Golondrinas has been selected as one of the best Pumpkin Picking Spots in New Mexico by Best of AmericanTowns, a property of AmericanTowns Media! For over 15 years, AmericanTowns Media has been the leader in highlighting the incredible work of great local organizations and initiatives. Best of AmericanTowns brings the most interesting and unique places in America right to the fingertips of the user with the opportunity to browse the best places to eat, live, and visit. We are happy to spotlight the excellence you’ve achieved in your work and hope you’ll share this with your followers on Facebook and tag us @bestofamericantowns!
One of my favorite things at the Faire was making fairy houses! My whole family loved it!!! 🧚🏻‍♀️ 💜