El Rancho de las Golondrinas

El Rancho de las Golondrinas El Rancho de las Golondrinas is a 200-acre living history museum, representing various time periods in New Mexico
Bienvenidos! Thank you for following the El Rancho de las Golondrinas page. This page is designed to keep you up-to-date on all fun and informative events and programs of our organization. While we encourage open dialogue amongst our followers, please be respectful of the page and your fellow page users. Posts that use profanity, insults, threatening language or anything deemed inappropriate will be deleted. We will work hard to get questions and messages answered within 24 hours. Again, thank you for following us and enjoy your adventure! Click here to join our mailing list! ----> http://bit.ly/hTnEGX
(543)

"The right of citizens of the US to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the US or by any state on account of sex.” -...
02/21/2020

"The right of citizens of the US to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the US or by any state on account of sex.” - 19th Amendment, ratified by the NM Legislature 100 years ago today, Feb. 21, 1920! It’s #FactFriday! Did you know that women first organized for suffrage in 1848, but weren’t granted the right until 1920?! Suffragists convened a meeting of over 300 people in Seneca Falls, NY, beginning the crusade toward equality. In the following decades women marched, protested, lobbied, went to jail, even sustained being force-fed through tubes. Was it “suffer”age or suffrage? All in an effort to pressure Congress to vote on an amendment that would recognize their voice & vital input in American society. Here in NM women made headway in the cause with the help of educator, activist & politician, Nina Otero-Warren, who lead New Mexican women into the political mainstream. Encouraged by her, bilingual flyers & speeches at public rallies brought support among Hispanic communities. Otero-Warren enjoyed such a loyal following that she was chosen by Alice Paul, another women’s right’s advocate, to lead the state Congressional Union in 1917. Her mission was to win the support of the NM congressional delegation in the battle to pass the amendment. With her help it passed through Congress & went to the states for ratification. At least 36 states needed to vote in favor of it to become law. On February 21, 1920, NM voted to ratify it. By August of 1920, 35 other states joined in, ensuring that the right to vote could not be denied based on sex. Women voted with enthusiasm in NM, with participation rates of exceeding that of Anglo women or men. Nevertheless, the 19th Amendment did not guarantee citizenship or the vote for the state's large Indigenous population. That wouldn’t happen until 1948! But that’s a story for another day. That’s what we love about history, so many stories to share, but today was about “herstory.” Happy weekend, everyone! 📷: unknown NM suffragists, NM State Archives Sources: Office of the State Historian & NPS #19thamendment #votesforwomen #elranchodelasgolondrinas #lasgolondrinas #golondrinas #alivinghistorymuseum

We’re working hard towards another amazing season. Hold tight, June 6 is right around the corner!!! #elranchodelasgolond...
02/20/2020

We’re working hard towards another amazing season. Hold tight, June 6 is right around the corner!!! #elranchodelasgolondrinas #lasgolondrinas #alivinghistorymuseum #santafecounty #SantaFeNM #santafe #TheCityDifferent #santafetourism #howtosantafe #simplysantafe #newmexicotrue #nmtrue #landofenchantment #purenewmexico #purenm #nmlife #iamnewmexico #historylovers #wandernewmexico #travelnewmexico #explorenm #nmoutside #newmexicanliving #mynmlife

Join us next Tuesday, February 25th at 6:00 pm for our second of three "Speaking of Traditions" presentations. All lectu...
02/18/2020

Join us next Tuesday, February 25th at 6:00 pm for our second of three "Speaking of Traditions" presentations. All lectures take place in the Saint Francis Auditorium at the New Mexico Museum of Art. Admission is free for Las Golondrinas and Museum of New Mexico members, $10 for guests. See you there!

BE OUR VALENTINE!It’s that time again!!!Be our valentine and VOTE for us for the Best of Santa Fe 2020. With your help, ...
02/13/2020

BE OUR VALENTINE!

It’s that time again!!!

Be our valentine and VOTE for us for the Best of Santa Fe 2020.
With your help, we got 2nd place for BEST MUSEUM and 3rd place for BEST NONPROFIT last year and we think we can get 1st place for both this year. So don’t forget to NOMINATE us today and then VOTE for us starting May!

Also, please nominate us for:
Best Market/Festival
Best Lecture Series
Best Nonprofit for Youth
Best Gift Store

Have a great Valentines Day and don’t forget to show us some LOVE at www.sfreporter.com/bosf

Howdy Facebook peeps! This artifact Monday comes from a little gem I found while rooting through my very dorky childhood...
02/03/2020

Howdy Facebook peeps! This artifact Monday comes from a little gem I found while rooting through my very dorky childhood coin collection. As opposed to my very dorky adult collections of dorky things. Nothing has changed really.

The steel penny of 1943:

In the midst of WWII the United States was doing everything to preserve metals used in wartime materials and that included the precious copper used mainly for ammunition. So the copper coated penny, did what it could for the war effort and became for a year, steel.

The steel penny had the same Lincoln front, wheat back that its copper cousin had just this time in a cool cold silver. The steel penny was minted in Denver, San Francisco and Philadelphia and whole lot of them were made.

After minting problems immediately began springing up. A very prominent one being that they sure look an awful lot like a dime, and people would confuse the tw all the time.

Vending machines also had trouble recognizing them since the metal content of different coins is part of how they operate. Another issue with the vending machines is that these are the only coins ever minted by the United States mint that have a magnetic attraction, which also confused the heck out of the vending machines.

The edges of the coins were not galvanized make them rust very quickly and easily when they came into contact with salty human sweat. After people complained about this problem they did change the process and the coins were then much less likely to make a giant mess in your hands and pockets.

By 1944 people had had enough and the coins reverted to their previous copper coated state, but we were left with these super cool looking steel pennies. Although they did circulate well into the fifties the mint found and destroyed most of these coins.

My grandfather gave me this one he had saved since the war when I was about 7, and apparently thought it cool enough to keep it! And I must say it is pretty cool looking. What a neat bit of wartime history and a cool family keepsake, thought it fun to share with you guys. Hope you enjoyed and happiest Monday!

#elranchodelasgolondrinas #lasgolondrinas #alivinghistorymuseum #santafecounty #SantaFeNM #santafe #TheCityDifferent #santafetourism #howtosantafe #simplysantafe #newmexicotrue #nmtrue #landofenchantment #purenewmexico #purenm #nmlife #iamnewmexico #historylovers #wandernewmexico #travelnewmexico #explorenm #nmoutside #newmexicanliving #mynmlife #coin #coincollecting #coincollection #wheatpenny #penny #WWII

It’s #FactFriday! In honor of Super Bowl Sunday let’s talk about one of our state’s most famous football mascots, the UN...
02/01/2020

It’s #FactFriday! In honor of Super Bowl Sunday let’s talk about one of our state’s most famous football mascots, the UNM Lobo. After “lobo” was adopted as the school's nickname in 1920, it was not long thereafter that a real Lobo became the mascot. Bruno Dieckmann, class of 1902, & by 1920 a successful Abq insurance & real estate agent, acquired the first Lobo at his own expense. At the time he was treasurer of the Athletic Association & "one of the most admired men in town.” Elsie Ruth Chant, class of 1923, recalled, "All of the girls on campus wanted to be seen with him. He was an accomplished concert violinist as well as being a successful businessman, & he was rich. He drove a Stutz Bearcat convertible around town & all of the girls would compete to get rides with him. Sometimes he had five or six girls in the car, & when he finally got married, he left broken hearts all over campus. Anyway, he either caught it himself or he paid to have a wolf captured in the Mount Taylor area. The wolf was brought into the school & a student by the name of Bowman would take it on a leash to the football practice area." Apparently, a government trapper named Jim Young caught a wolf pup on the Floyd Lee Ranch near Mount Taylor. The pup became the responsibility of the cheerleaders & it appeared in harness at every football game. However, in the late 20s, a child teased the wolf & was bitten. UNM officials were forced to dispose of the wolf, as one historian put it, for fear other ill-bred brats might become tempted to play with the wolf & bring a damage suit." A live wolf has never been a part of the athletics scene since. In the early 1960s a human mascot named "Lobo Louie" was created & a second mascot, "Lobo Lucy" was created in the early 1980s. Both are now members of the school's cheerleading squad. How things have changed, & thank goodness! PETA & animal lovers would certainly have not been pleased. Now we get to enjoy the amusement of athletic individuals with acrobatic talent every time we cheer on the team! have a safe & happy weekend! Source: umm.edu/welcome/traditions/mascot.html #🐺🏈

It’s #FactFriday! Tomorrow is the 68th anniversary of the end of the NM Empire Zinc Mining Strike. In 1950, in Hanover, ...
01/24/2020

It’s #FactFriday! Tomorrow is the 68th anniversary of the end of the NM Empire Zinc Mining Strike. In 1950, in Hanover, NM, miners finished their shifts, formed a picket line, & began a 15-month strike after attempts at union negotiation reached an impasse. Miner demands included: equal pay, paid holidays & equal housing, among other requests against discrimination, like separate pay lines, unequal access to sanitation, electricity & paved streets around company sponsored housing. By 1951, the strike had stopped production for 8 months & Empire Zinc obtained an injunction against any further picketing. Worried about jail time & fines, yet not wanting to stand down, miners needed a new tactic. So female activists in Mine-Mill Ladies Auxiliary 209 continued the strike in place of the all-male labor force. Since they were not legally striking workers, they, the wives of strikers, as well as women & children in the community, took over the picket line. For the next 7 months, they held the line, facing violence, arrest & opposition from some of their own husbands. Excerpt, Silver City News: “[The women’s picket was carefully organized, militant, & successful. Not only did wives of Empire strikers walk the line, women from other towns joined. When the County Sheriff ordered 53 women arrested another 300 took their place! They were jailed, but their protests drew national attention, & they were released. The strike gained broad support among New Mexicans. This helped steady the hand of Governor Mechem who refrained from using state police to reopen the mine.]” The inclusion of women was vital to the success of the movement, bringing media attention because it was unusual for women & the whole mining community to be involved. The presence of women evoked empathy from law enforcement, & also garnered support from women in other communities. They displayed forward thinking, flexibility & solidarity, which proved powerful tactics. In January 1952, strikers returned to work with a new contract improving wages & benefits. Several weeks later Empire Zinc installed hot water plumbing in workers’ houses–a major issue pushed by the women, & by then, the men too. #mininghistory

Join us next Tuesday, January 28th at 6:00 pm for our first of three "Speaking of Traditions" presentations. All lecture...
01/24/2020

Join us next Tuesday, January 28th at 6:00 pm for our first of three "Speaking of Traditions" presentations. All lectures take place in the Saint Francis Auditorium at the New Mexico Museum of Art. Admission is free for Las Golondrinas and Museum of New Mexico members, $10 for guests. See you there!

It’s #FactFriday! How are you all enjoying this lovely snowy day we are having? We got several inches here at the ranch ...
01/17/2020

It’s #FactFriday! How are you all enjoying this lovely snowy day we are having? We got several inches here at the ranch yesterday, & while it’s no longer snowing, it remains a foggy winter wonderland! But not to worry, our resident Churro Sheep are well fed & nice & warm, thanks mostly to their fleece. Sheep have their own natural source of insulation. Their wool keeps their body heat in & the cold out. That is why you will see sheep with snow piled on their backs. Their body heat does not reach the outer layers of their fleece to melt the snow. The lanolin in their wool also prevents moisture from getting to their skin. No wonder wool’s a top choice in winter wear for us fleeceless humans. Stay safe & warm everyone! #sheep #fleece #lanolin #elranchodelasgolondrinas #lasgolondrinas #golondrinas #alivinghistorymuseum #howtosantafe #simplysantafe #newmexicotrue #nmtrue #landofenchantment #purenewmexico #purenm #nmlife #iamnewmexico #santafecounty #santafe #historylovers #historylove #wandernewmexico #santafetourism #explorenm #travelnewmexico #nmoutside #SantaFeNM #TheCityDifferent #newmexicanliving
#mynmlife

¡Somos El Rancho de las Golondrinas! #elranchodelasgolondrinas #lasgolondrinas #alivinghistorymuseum #santafecounty #San...
01/15/2020

¡Somos El Rancho de las Golondrinas!
#elranchodelasgolondrinas #lasgolondrinas #alivinghistorymuseum #santafecounty #SantaFeNM #santafe #TheCityDifferent #santafetourism #howtosantafe #simplysantafe #newmexicotrue #nmtrue #landofenchantment #purenewmexico #purenm #nmlife #iamnewmexico #historylovers #wandernewmexico #travelnewmexico #explorenm #nmoutside #newmexicanliving #mynmlife

Happiest artifact Monday Facebook pals! This week I take my inspiration from a cool skull I saw last night at a dinner p...
01/13/2020

Happiest artifact Monday Facebook pals! This week I take my inspiration from a cool skull I saw last night at a dinner party and upon asking my super smart animal bone specialist archaeology friend what the heck it was I got an interesting answer:

A baby Oryx.

So what in the heck is a Kalahari desert loving African animal skull doing in a living room in Santa Fe New Mexico you may ask…… well prepare to fall down the rabbit hole. Or the Oryx hole as it may be.

In the 1960’s the New Mexico department of game and fish decided there just weren’t enough large game hunting opportunities in New Mexico. So they decided to introduce exotic game, including the African Barbary Sheep, the Ibex, the Kudu (which apparently was super susceptible to disease and was never actually released) and the Oryx.

Other than the Kudu well established populations of these species all still remain here in New Mexico. This includes the Oryx, which were released on to White Sand Missile range in the late sixties through the early seventies.

Now let introduce you to the Oryx or Gemsbok or in fancy science speak Oryx gazelle. The first thing you will notice about this creature is its size. These things are like really really big. Weighing in at about 450 pounds they are as tall as a car, intimidating to say the least. They have beautiful and distinct black white and tan markings and both sexes sport large impressive black horns.

They are native to Africa’s Kalahari Desert, which is very much the reason they have managed to thrive out here in desert southwest. Super drought tolerant and not picky when it comes to what they will eat, their are now thousands of Oryx roaming the desert near White Sands Missile range and National Monument. Back in the Kalahari they Oryx had to contend with lions, but here they are lacking in natural predators, as our mountain lions and coyotes are just too small (and smarter than to even try) to take on such a big animal.

In recent years the White Sands National Monument has installed fencing in hopes of keeping the Oryx out the park due to concerns about native flora and fauna being impacted by this very non-native species.

Now as to how this skull ended up in a living room in New Mexico we may never fully know. But it can be assumed that someone found it out in the hot dry deserts of Southern New Mexico, dragged it up north, then it wound up at a garage sale years later where my pal bought it and now displays it in the living room.

Told ya it was rabbit/Oryx hole!

#oryx #elranchodelasgolondrinas #lasgolondrinas #golondrinas #alivinghistorymuseum #newmexicotrue #nmtrue #landofenchantment #purenewmexico #purenm #nmlife #iamnewmexico #historylovers #historylove #wandernewmexico #explorenm #travelnewmexico #nmoutside #newmexicanliving

It’s #FactFriday! Recognize this building? If you’re like most guests, El Molino Grande, or The Big Mill, is probably on...
01/10/2020

It’s #FactFriday! Recognize this building? If you’re like most guests, El Molino Grande, or The Big Mill, is probably one of your favorite buildings on site; but did you know that this structure, though historic, is not native to the site? Founder of La Golondrinas, Y.A. Paloheimo purchased & relocated this local treasure in the late 1960’s from Sapello, New Mexico, a little village north of Las Vegas. This mill ground wheat for both the U.S. Army, who’s main depot was Fort Union, located just a few miles away, & the civilian population of the surrounding communities during the late 19th & early 20th centuries. Crop failure & difficult economic conditions during The Great Depression forced it’s closure in the 1930’s. By then, advancing transportation methods made it easier & more cost effective for folks to travel for commercial flour, rather than having the miller ground sacks of their own crop. When Y.A. acquired the mill in 1968 all of the milling equipment & metal components for the wheel were removed & working replicas were installed. A new pine water wheel was also added. Over the years a few repairs & replacements have been made to ensure it remains in safe & working order for our guests to enjoy! The mill can be seen in operation during all of our weekend festivals during the season. Make sure to keep up with us to see what’s in store for our first season of the decade. 📷Our Miller, Gordon Mark @gomark65 , who found these gems while “milling” around the archives. #milling #molinogrande #elranchodelasgolondrinas #lasgolondrinas #golondrinas #alivinghistorymuseum #newmexicotrue #nmtrue #landofenchantment #purenewmexico #purenm #nmlife #iamnewmexico #historylovers #historylove #wandernewmexico #explorenm #travelnewmexico #nmoutside #newmexicanliving

If you grew up on a ranch you’re fully aware that maintaining it is a full time job…and then some🤪 When you have a 200+ ...
01/07/2020

If you grew up on a ranch you’re fully aware that maintaining it is a full time job…and then some🤪 When you have a 200+ year old ranch the work is never done. Luckily, we have a great maintenance team to keep the ranch going long into the future. Thank you David and Cesar for keeping the “living” alive in our great living history museum all year long!#keepinghistoryalive #elranchodelasgolondrinas #lasgolondrinas #alivinghistorymuseum #santafecounty #SantaFeNM #santafe #TheCityDifferent #santafetourism #howtosantafe #simplysantafe #newmexicotrue #nmtrue #landofenchantment #purenewmexico #purenm #nmlife #iamnewmexico #historylovers #wandernewmexico #travelnewmexico #explorenm #nmoutside #newmexicanliving #mynmlife @ El Rancho de las Golondrinas

Address

334 Los Pinos Rd
Santa Fe, NM
87507

General information

2018 Schedule of events now online! www.golondrinas.org Follow us on Twitter: @SFGolondrinas

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when El Rancho de las Golondrinas posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Contact The Museum

Send a message to El Rancho de las Golondrinas:

Videos

Category


Comments

A couple pictures from tonight at the Spirits of New Mexico's Past event. This was fun. The events, performances, stories and food were all great.
We love visiting El Rancho de las Golondrinas! We have come to all the events since joining.
Path through the trees at El Rancho de las Golondrinas (The Ranch of the Swallows) near Santa Fe, NM. facebook.com/treyflyntphotography
An In-depth look at the early lives of living on the Range of a new frontier and weathering all the storms through it and thriving in an area, very much enriched with different ethnic races coming together to carve out their piece future !
Thank you for receiving us so warmly yesterday to take photos and please tell Amy she is about the friendliest person I've ever met :)
Betty Sherred’s obituary appears in today’s Albuquerque Journal.
Our kiddos loved last weekends Harvest Fest!
Okay, did you know about this place Gilbert?????? Lol
We’re delighted to inform you that El Rancho de las Golondrinas has been selected as one of the best Pumpkin Picking Spots in New Mexico by Best of AmericanTowns, a property of AmericanTowns Media! For over 15 years, AmericanTowns Media has been the leader in highlighting the incredible work of great local organizations and initiatives. Best of AmericanTowns brings the most interesting and unique places in America right to the fingertips of the user with the opportunity to browse the best places to eat, live, and visit. We are happy to spotlight the excellence you’ve achieved in your work and hope you’ll share this with your followers on Facebook and tag us @bestofamericantowns!
One of my favorite things at the Faire was making fairy houses! My whole family loved it!!! 🧚🏻‍♀️ 💜
Magic!!!! Thank you Serendipity!
I also invite all of you to visit and like my page, "Molly Brown: History Entertained". A bit later era, but the love of history knows no boundaries.