IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts

IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts NOTE: We are temporarily closed to the public due to COVID-19. IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts‘ mission is to advance contemporary Native art through exhibitions, collections, public programs, and scholarship.
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IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts (MoCNA) is dedicated to increasing public understanding and appreciation of contemporary Native art, history and culture through presentation, collection and acquisition, preservation, and interpretation. MoCNA is recognized as the preeminent organizer of exhibitions devoted exclusively to the display of dynamic and diverse arts practices representative of Native North America. Did you know that MoCNA Provides Tours? MoCNA offers group tours for educational, travel, and corporate groups. Group tours must be arranged at least two weeks prior to arrival. Please email [email protected] or call (505) 428-5904 for more information. Walk – In Tours with our Docents: The IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts provides current exhibition highlight tours every week on Mondays and Saturdays at 10:30 am led by our Docents. With cost of admission, these walk-in tours are free to our guests and offer insight into contemporary Native American art and experience.

"In this painting, the scene is reminiscent of Star Wars: The Force Awakens, featuring a fallen Star Destroyer Imperial ...
04/27/2020

"In this painting, the scene is reminiscent of Star Wars: The Force Awakens, featuring a fallen Star Destroyer Imperial battleship in sand dunes of Jakku. This image also reminds me of being a kid wandering around and exploring sand dunes around Tuba City, Arizona, on the Navajo
Reservation. The fallen spaceship contrasts with the elderly Navajo woman herding sheep through the desert. The ship can also symbolize waste eroding in the desert, uranium fallout from mines or other environmental issues facing Indigenous peoples." - Ryan Singer (Diné)

Until we're ready to open again, please check out our virtual exhibition of Indigenous Futurisms on the artsteps platform.
https://www.artsteps.com/view/5e6bb844c131b94e2168ad2b

Shown: Ryan Singer (Diné), Fallen Star Destroyer, acrylic on canvas, collection of Eric Laurence.

“I asked Seymour one day, ‘how did the Japanese do their prints?’ and he said ‘well, use water based inks and make sure ...
04/24/2020

“I asked Seymour one day, ‘how did the Japanese do their prints?’ and he said ‘well, use water based inks and make sure you mix them with glycerin to retard the drying time on it and then you paint your block.’ We had to wet the paper and let it dry out a little bit and get it where it was slightly damp. Then lay that down over the print and rub the back of it then the ink was transferred onto the paper.”

-Benjamin Harjo, Jr. Oral History, 2018

For more on Ben Harjo and the origins of the IAIA Printmaking studio, visit the Seymour Tubis Papers at the IAIA Archives and, once we re-open, please visit Experimental exPRESSion: Printmaking @IAIA, 1963-1980.

Shown: Po-She, Artist Proof, ca. 1965, woodcut on paper, gift of the Nina Tubis Wooderson Trust, Museum Collection: SE-87

"Resistance Through Existence: IAIA 2020 BFA Exhibition" has gone virtual!Created by our Senior Manager of Museum Educat...
04/21/2020

"Resistance Through Existence: IAIA 2020 BFA Exhibition" has gone virtual!

Created by our Senior Manager of Museum Education, Winoka Yepa, and using the same virtual platform as our "Indigenous Futurisms" virtual experience, the virtual tour of "Resistance Through Existence" is a digital re-interpretation of the student curated exhibition that features the work of twelve IAIA graduating seniors and curated by museum studies student, Faithlyn Seawright (Chickasaw/Choctaw) and co-curated by MoCNA chief curator Manuela Well-Off-Man.

Visit and tour the virtual exhibition by click on the following link:

https://www.artsteps.com/view/5e7a50ece604461814e199f2

or for a more immersive experience, download the artsteps mobile application via the Apple app store or Google Play Store.

Introducing #NMtwinning An invitation to reinterpret art held by New Mexico collections5 randomly selected $200 prizes e...
04/20/2020

Introducing #NMtwinning

An invitation to reinterpret art held by New Mexico collections

5 randomly selected $200 prizes each week throughout May

3 top submissions will each receive $300

Details below and at www.vitalspaces.org

TO PARTICIPATE, INDIVIDUALS NEED TO:

1. Pick a work of art from one of the online collections of our partners:

Georgia O’Keeffe Museum: https://collections.okeeffemuseum.org/
Ralph T. Coe Center for the Arts: https://www.coeartscenter.org/coe-collection/
IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts: https://iaia.edu/mocna/mocna-collection/
Museum of International Folk Art: http://collection.internationalfolkart.org/collections
New Mexico Museum of Art: http://sam.nmartmuseum.org/collections

2. Reinterpret the work of art in your home—this can mean reproducing the artwork with your body or everyday objects or creating a new painting, drawing, poem, song, or scene inspired by an existing work. Please create reinterpretations that honor and respect the source material. Culturally insensitive posts will not be included in the randomized drawings for the prizes.

3. Post the reinterpretation and the labeled original on here, on Instagram, or on Twitter.

4. Make sure to follow Vital Spaces and include the hashtag #NMtwinning and where you live to be considered for a prize. If you are a middle or high school student, include that as well. One prize a week will be designated for a teenager.

5. Tag the collection the work is from and Vital Spaces so that we can repost our favorites!

6. Look out for a DM letting you know if you’ve been selected as one of the prize winners. While anyone is welcome to participate, you must live in New Mexico to be eligible to win a prize. The winner of each prize will have the choice to receive the money personally or to donate it to the All Together New Mexico Fund.

7. Repeat steps 1–6 each week if you want!

Works of art:
Ram's Head, Blue Morning Glory, Georgia O’Keeffe, 1938, Georgia O’Keeffe Museum
Untitled, Anita Field, 1973, IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Art
Demon is out, Happiness is In, sake cup, Japanese, 1868-1912, Museum of International Folk Art
Lady With the Earrings, Gerald Cassidy, n.d., New Mexico Museum of Art
Wolf Picture, Doris Beck, 1990, Ralph T. Coe Center for the Arts

Indigenous Futurisms is a part of The Social Distancing Festival! The Social Distancing Festival is a site for celebrati...
04/18/2020
Indigenous Futurisms: Transcending Past/Present/Future — The Social Distancing Festival

Indigenous Futurisms is a part of The Social Distancing Festival!

The Social Distancing Festival is a site for celebrating art from all over the world, showcasing amazing talent, and coming together as a community during a time when we need it more than ever.

Click on the link below to learn more!

Indigenous Futurisms: Transcending Past/Present/Future Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA - This incredible and unique exhibit was sent to us by graphic designer Sallie Wesaw Sloan on behalf of the IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts. All pieces explore the future from a Native perspective and they are j...

Check out the virtual gallery of “Indigenous Futurisms: Transcending Past/Present/Future” by visiting the following link...
04/17/2020
Tomorrow people today: "Indigenous Futurisms: Transcending Past/Present/Future"

Check out the virtual gallery of “Indigenous Futurisms: Transcending Past/Present/Future” by visiting the following link: https://iaia.edu/new-virtual-reality-vr-exhibition/

Indigenous Futurisms: Transcending Past/Present/Future highlights the major themes of a growing contemporary art movement that projects Native peoples into imagined futures and finds, therein, parallels with past histories, not least

Seymour Tubis (1919-1993) began teaching graphic arts and printmaking at IAIA in 1963. Originally from Philadelphia, Tub...
04/16/2020

Seymour Tubis (1919-1993) began teaching graphic arts and printmaking at IAIA in 1963. Originally from Philadelphia, Tubis studied at the Philadelphia Museum School of Art and the Arts Students League of New York in the 1940s. In 1949-1950, he exhibited his work in Europe while furthering his studies and returned to New York around 1951. Tubis soon began to supplement his income by teaching art and moved to Santa Fe in 1962. Seymour Tubis was a key IAIA Arts Faculty member until his retirement in 1981.

Tubis’s experimentation with printmaking in New York and Paris in the 1940s and 1950s coincided with a boom in original printmaking in the U.S. Artists across the continent were exploring new images, ideas, and methods through relief, intaglio, and experimental techniques. Artists began printing their own plates, rather than handing them to a master printer, which was the method taught by Tubis in the IAIA studio: IAIA students were artist-printmakers.

For more on Seymour Tubis and the origins of the IAIA Printmaking studio, visit the Seymour Tubis Papers at https://iaia.edu/academics/library/archives/

Once we re-open, please visit Experimental exPRESSion: Printmaking @IAIA, 1963-1980, the exhibition will be up until July 2021.

“I use numerous elements of design to bring my art to life. I grew up living a Navajo traditional lifestyle. I’ve always...
04/14/2020

“I use numerous elements of design to bring my art to life. I grew up living a Navajo traditional lifestyle. I’ve always had an interest in art. The most influential artistic person in my life has been my nálí asdzáá (paternal grandmother). She’s an herb healer, who carved kachinas, created exquisite silversmith jewelry, and to this day weaves the finest rugs. She’s an amazing artist in numerous media. I strive to be like her.⁣ My concentrations are painting, serigraphy, beading, ledger art and performing as a Southern Cloth dancer. In August 2019, I was featured in the Vogue Magazine article “Tradition and Innovation Collide.” This has been a major influence and encouraged me to set my goals higher and to eventually pursue clothing design—traditional and contemporary with a fashion aspect. After all, the heart of my concentration is the beauty of my traditional and contemporary lifestyle. I create what I live and love.”⁣

–Natasha Ashley Brokeshoulder⁣ (Diné)


The virtual gallery of the IAIA 2020 BFA Exhibition: Resistance Through Existence, will be launching this week via artsteps.


Shown: Natasha Brokeshoulder (Diné), Best Man’s Ride, 2019. Two-tone screen print on 1952 vintage ledger paper. ⁣

Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA)
04/11/2020

Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA)

The Board of Trustees, faculty, and staff of the Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA) and the IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts (MoCNA) offer our heartfelt condolences to the family and friends of Charmay Allred. Her legacy will live on in the countless Indigenous students and IAIA alumni she influenced with her kindness, generosity, and mentoring. For all her support and contributions to Indigenous arts and cultures, we honor her with a poem by Joy Harjo, IAIA alumna and twenty-third Poet Laureate of the United States 2019:

Eagle Poem

To pray you open your whole self
To sky, to earth, to sun, to moon
To one whole voice that is you.
And know there is more
That you can’t see, can’t hear;
Can’t know except in moments
Steadily growing, and in languages
That aren’t always sound but other
Circles of motion.
Like eagle that Sunday morning
Over Salt River. Circled in blue sky
In wind, swept our hearts clean
With sacred wings.
We see you, see ourselves and know
That we must take the utmost care
And kindness in all things.
Breathe in, knowing we are made of
All this, and breathe, knowing
We are truly blessed because we
Were born, and die soon within a
True circle of motion,
Like eagle rounding out the morning
Inside us.
We pray that it will be done
In beauty.
In beauty.

—Joy Harjo (Mvskoke Nation) ’68

Experimental exPRESSion: Printmaking @IAIA, 1963-1980 is on display until July, 2021 in the Kieve Family Gallery at the ...
04/09/2020

Experimental exPRESSion: Printmaking @IAIA, 1963-1980 is on display until July, 2021 in the Kieve Family Gallery at the IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts. Experimental exPRESSion features fifty-one recently-acquired works on paper from the Tubis Print Collection. Notable artists in the exhibition include Peggy Deam (Suquamish), Mary Gay Osceola (Seminole), and Sandy Fife (Muskogee Creek), among other IAIA Alumni.


“Printmaking today contains so many variables, so many possibilities exist in the uses of materials. It is unlikely that any contemporary printmaker has not experimented or thought of experimenting with the same materials and processes.”
- Seymour Tubis, 1966


“This exhibition celebrates the experimentation of IAIA students during the first two decades of the Contemporary Native Art Movement. The variety of works on paper on exhibit is a testament to the progressive arts education program in graphic arts,” stated IAIA archivist and exhibit co-curator Ryan S. Flahive.

Photographs by Jason S. Ordaz, IAIA, 2020

“My works are a reflection of a lifetime love affair with comic books, toys, TV, and film. Taking my passions, I blend t...
04/08/2020

“My works are a reflection of a lifetime love affair with comic books, toys, TV, and film. Taking my passions, I blend them with my Native perspective, artistic background, and the desire to simply be me. I’m doing the same thing that my ancestors did: I’m telling the stories that I care about, that I love, and that are relevant to me.” ⁣
- Jeffrey Veregge (Port Gamble S’klallam) ⁣

While the museum is closed, please check out our virtual exhibition on artsteps! ⁣ https://bit.ly/2JTF0Is



Shown: “She’s Got It Where It Counts” 2016/2020 ⁣
Digital print, Collection of the artist ⁣

Image courtesy of the artist

Hi everyone! ⁣⁣It’s Winoka, I’m the MoCNA education curator. Just sending a brief note to let you know that during the m...
04/07/2020

Hi everyone! ⁣

It’s Winoka, I’m the MoCNA education curator. Just sending a brief note to let you know that during the museum’s temporary closure, we will be offering an array of online resources via our MoCNA webpage, see link here: https://iaia.edu/mocna/mocna-education/

Currently, we welcome you to enjoy some coloring pages created by artist Daniel McCoy Jr. (Muskogee Creek/Citizen Band Potawatomi).

Simply download, print, and color away!! ⁣

Also, we would love to see your creations! So definitely tag us on Instagram @iaiamocna or here on Facebook. We look forward to seeing all the awesome coloring you do! Thank you!

Stay safe, and stay healthy!

-Winoka

“For the last two decades, I have been developing a screenplay titled Revolt 1680/2180. It is not just a story of persec...
04/06/2020

“For the last two decades, I have been developing a screenplay titled Revolt 1680/2180. It is not just a story of persecution and revolt, but also a story of resilience — one that seems to be more critical than ever in today’s political and cultural climate.” ⁣

-Virgil Ortiz (Cochiti Pueblo) ⁣@virgilortiz

Shown: Venetian Soldiers, 2020; installation, two mixed media outfits, collection of the artist ⁣

Image by: Jason Ordaz

“Our Oceti Sakowin women have done everything to hang onto what our ancestors created for us through our own dystopia, o...
04/03/2020

“Our Oceti Sakowin women have done everything to hang onto what our ancestors created for us through our own dystopia, our genocide. Our women have hung onto so much of the way we were, despite everything we had to go through and are still going through. We need projects like this to remind ourselves that there is still good in the world, no matter how many times we have been told the world is ending, we are still here” ⁣

—Jaida Grey Eagle (Oglala Lakota) @jaida.l.greyeagle ⁣

Stay tuned for a virtual tour of the IAIA 2020 BFA Exhibition, “Resistance Through Existence.” ⁣



Image courtesy of the artist⁣
Shown: “We Take Care of Us”, 2019, Photography, 15 x 22.

04/02/2020

In 1967, the Institute of American Indian Arts had about 200 students and fewer than 20 art faculty members. As a multi-tribal institution, then located on the campus of the Santa Fe Indian School, IAIA developed creative recruitment strategies to attract students coast-to-coast, including this 16mm film narrated by actor and IAIA supporter Vincent Price.


This film clip is part of "Experimental exPRESSion: Printmaking @IAIA, 1963-1980" on display at the Museum until June 2021.

Shown: IAIA Recruitment Film, 1967, Directed by Ollie Miller; Narrated by Vincent Price; Edited by Nathaniel Fuentes, IAIA Student. Courtesy of the IAIA Archives.

The Museum's Virtual Reality Tour of "Indigenous Futurisms: Transcending Past/Present/Future" is featured in this week's...
04/01/2020
Santa Fe Museums Adapt to Stay-at-Home Order

The Museum's Virtual Reality Tour of "Indigenous Futurisms: Transcending Past/Present/Future" is featured in this week's Santa Fe Reporter!

To read more about it, please click on the link:

A trio of local museums turn to online engagement in the age of COVID-19.

Today we are joining with other museums to send our gratitude to the doctors, nurses, and other medical personnel on the...
04/01/2020

Today we are joining with other museums to send our gratitude to the doctors, nurses, and other medical personnel on the front lines of fighting COVID-19. While these professionals are always in the business of saving lives, it is rare that doing so puts their own lives, and the lives of their families, in danger.⁠


Today, to all our medical personnel -- we thank you. #MuseumsThankHealthHeroes⁠


Shown: Detail of Triptych Herb Wall by Camilla Trujilo, from last year's exhibition "Reconciliation." This detail from the series is titled "Night Sky Over Espanola” and was made of native New Mexican food crops, as well as traditional medicinal herbs and roots.

03/31/2020
IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts

As Women's History Month comes to a close, let's take a look back to last year's Indian Market and Joy Harjo's visit to the the Museum.

An alumna of the Institute of American Indian Arts, Joy Harjo is an internationally renowned performer and writer of the Muscogee (Creek) Nation.

She was named the 23rd Poet Laureate of the United States in 2019, the first Native American to receive the honor.

Please enjoy Harjo's words.

If you couldn’t attend our Joy Harjo reading, you may view it below!

Shared from Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA):The #IAIATogetherApart website is now live! It was created to give ...
03/30/2020
Submit | #IAIATogetherApart

Shared from Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA):

The #IAIATogetherApart website is now live! It was created to give voice to the Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA) Community—a voice to help cope with the 2020 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic and its effects on a community who largely relies on day-to-day physical interaction for learning, mentoring, and communicating. All IAIA Community members are eligible to submit their stories to the #IAIATogetherApart website, which includes staff, faculty, students, alumni, board members, parents and family members, other Tribal Colleges and Universities, AIHEC, and AICF. See togetherapart.iaia.edu/submit for criteria and guidelines.

Stories can be just that, a story, or perhaps a poem, a letter—from one word to 512 words. During this pandemic, the IAIA campus is absent of your voice in its classrooms, hallways, walking paths, dorms, office spaces, buildings, and Café, but don’t let that stop you from vocalizing—share your voice, submit a story to #IAIATogetherApart.

After you submit a story, head over to Instagram and post photographs and videos using your story and the #IAIATogetherApart hashtag for a chance to be featured on IAIA’s social media.

#IAIATogetherApart was conceived and created by IAIA’s offices of Institutional Research (Dr. Bill Sayre, Anita Gavin, Jesse Morris) and Marketing and Communications (Jason S. Ordaz, Nicole Lawe). The website launched on Monday, March 30, 2020. For inquires, please contact [email protected].

COVID-19 stories from the Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA) community.

Address

108 Cathedral Pl
Santa Fe, NM
87501

Santa Fe Trails bus schedule, visit http://www.santafenm.gov/route_maps_and_schedules

General information

The IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts (MoCNA) is pleased to welcome visitors Monday, and Wednesday through Saturday, from 10 am until 5 pm and on Sunday from Noon until 5 pm. We are closed on Tuesdays and on the following holidays: New Years Day Easter Sunday Thanksgiving Day Christmas Day Admission: $10 for adults; half-price for seniors (62+), students with a valid ID, and NM residents; and free for members, Native people, veterans and their families, youth (16 & under), and NM residents visiting on Sunday. Admission rates are subject to change. Call (505) 983-8900 for more information. With your admission, you will receive an in-depth printed gallery guide. Use it as a narrative for your self-guided tour. Individual tours of most exhibits are available on request and based on availability of tour guides. Please inquire at the admissions desk. MoCNA offers group tours for educational, travel, and corporate groups. Group tours must be arranged at least three weeks prior to arrival. Please contact: [email protected]ia.edu Walk – In Tours with our Docents: The IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts provides current exhibition highlight tours every week on Mondays and Saturdays at 11:00 am led by our Docents. With cost of admission, these walk – in tours are free to our guests and offer insight into contemporary Native American art and experience. In some cases, we might not have a docent available, so please call 505-428.5907 during museum hours to confirm the walk-in tours are offered on a particular day or ask the museum admission desk.

Opening Hours

Monday 10:00 - 17:00
Wednesday 10:00 - 17:00
Thursday 10:00 - 17:00
Friday 10:00 - 17:00
Saturday 10:00 - 17:00
Sunday 12:00 - 17:00

Telephone

(505) 983-8900

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Our Story

We are temporarily closed due to COVID-19. The IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts (MoCNA) is the country’s only museum for exhibiting, collecting and interpreting the most progressive work of contemporary Native artists.

MoCNA is dedicated solely to advancing the scholarship, discourse and interpretation of contemporary Native art for regional, national and international audiences. As such, it stewards the National Collection of Contemporary Native Art, 7,500 artworks in all media created in 1962 or later. MoCNA is at the forefront of contemporary Native art presentation and strives to be flexible, foresighted and risk-taking in its exhibitions and programs. MoCNA is located in the heart of downtown Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Our Museum is free for Members, Native People, Veterans and their families and youth (16 and under) every day. On Sunday we offer free admission for all New Mexico residents.


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CALL TO ARTISTS: Request for Qualifications City of Salem Naumkeag Portrait Project The City of Salem, MA invites artists to submit qualifications for a $30,000 public art commission grant award to create a portrait of a Naumkeag leader or other prominent Indigenous community member to commemorate the Indigenous Peoples of Salem, MA. The Salem Public Art Commission, in conjunction with the City of Salem Department of Parks, Recreation, and Community Services; Mayor Kimberley Driscoll or her designee; the Massachusett-Ponkapoag Tribal Council and other Indigenous community stakeholders, will be the acting Art Jury managing the artist selection process. To be considered for this commission, submit your qualifications via email to [email protected] as well as [email protected] by 4:00 p.m., May 15, 2020. Details below. The Naumkeag Portrait Project was proposed by Mayor Kimberley Driscoll to the Public Art Commission in May 2019, with the purpose of recognizing and highlighting the contributions and sacrifices of the Indigenous Peoples of this land. The Naumkeag band of the Massachusett, among other Indigenous communities, lived on and moved through this land long before the Town of Salem was established. The City’s goal is to acknowledge the past and historic contributions of these communities, while honoring and celebrating the presences of these rich cultures and their Peoples today. From the Request for Qualifications (RFQ), three or four finalists will be selected by the Art Jury to participate in an “in-person” interview process, to the extent we are able to do so, with the Art Jury. One artist will be selected by the Art Jury for this commission, based on the finalists’ presentations and pending final formal approval by the Mayor. The selected artist will be required to meet or confer regularly with the Massachusett-Ponkapoag Tribal Council and other members of the Indigenous community to identify the subject of the portrait and ensure that the completed product accurately and satisfactorily represents the Indigenous community in a way that feels appropriate to them. The City intends to unveil the newly completed portrait as part of a public celebration in October 2020. The City is seeking qualifications from artists with demonstrated portraiture painting experience. Ideally, this artists would also have some experience with or expertise in the art of Indigenous cultures. The $30,000 grant commission must cover all services from subject/content development through final completion and framing, including but not limited to artist fee, travel, community meetings, research, subject sketches, materials, portrait creation, transportation, framing, and coordination with consultants, the Massachusett-Ponkapoag Tribal Council, and City staff and volunteers. PORTRAIT PARAMETERS:  Subject matter to be informed by conversations with Indigenous community to ensure reflection of and connection to the deep history of Indigenous Peoples here in Salem.  Proposed subject matter must be reviewed and approved by members of the Art Jury  Preferred medium is oil paint, style can be classic or modern/contemporary  Frame should be made of a simple dark natural wood  Finished product is preferred to be Round or Oval in shape, to reflect the importance of the circle in Indigenous cultures  Finished framed work should be approximately 36'' x 28" in size, to be in keeping with the size of other portraiture in City Hall THE SITE: It has been proposed to the City Council that this new commissioned portrait be placed in the location where the existing portrait of Andrew Jackson now hangs in Council Chambers at Salem City Hall. If approved, the portrait of Andrew Jackson would be relocated to the Council anteroom or some other prominent location in City Hall. If this is not approved by Council, the newly commissioned portrait will be hung on display in another publicly viewable and prominent location of honor within Salem City Hall. THE ARTIST SELECTION PROCESS: 1. Artists submit qualifications via email to [email protected] as well as Purchasing Agent Tom Watkins at [email protected]. Requested qualifications are: • No more than 10 .jpg image examples of relevant previous work • A formal CV or Resume • Brief biographical information • Statement of interest for this specific commission 2. The Art Jury reviews all submissions and selects finalists. 3. Finalists interviews/presentations. 4. Art Jury will select one artist to be awarded the commission grant. PORTRAIT CREATION PROCESS: 1. The selected artist will be paid one-third of the total commission for supplies and research time amount upon signing of City contract. 2. Contracted artist will begin work by meeting, to the fullest extent possible via virtual means, with members of the Indigenous communities in and around Salem, MA to help identify the subject, content, and style of the portrait. 3. Artist will review identified subject matter with Art Jury. 4. Once the subject is identified and agreed upon by all parties, including the artist, the artist will begin work on the creation of the piece. 5. Artist holds a mid-point check in with Senior Planner for Arts & Culture and/or full Art Jury 6. Artists delivers finished and framed work to the City of Salem. Remaining two-thirds balance of contact paid upon delivered of completed work that meets City’s satisfaction and standards. 7. The new work is unveiled at a public celebration in October 2020.* *Note: If the artist would like to give a talk about their process at this event, that would be welcome, but is not required. TIMELINE: May 14, 2020 4pm Deadline for submissions of qualifications May 19, 2020 Finalists selected May 25-29, 2020 Selected finalists’ interviews May 4, 2020 Public announcement of selected artist May – September 2020 Work Created July 1, 2020 Project Mid-point Check-in October 1, 2020 Finished & Framed work delivered to City of Salem October 12, 2020 Unveiling Celebration & possible Artist’s Talk ELIGIBILITY:  Must have demonstrated Portraiture experience.  Preference will be given to artists with experience/expertise in the art of Indigenous cultures.  Salem is committed to providing equal opportunities for ALL. Artists of all gender, race, ethnicity, national origin, age, sexual orientation/ identity, religion/beliefs, education and physical ability are encouraged to apply.  Salem residency not required. HOW TO SUBMIT YOUR QUALIFICATIONS:  Artists submit qualifications via email to [email protected] and [email protected].  Requested qualifications are: • No more than 10 .jpg image examples of relevant previous work • A formal CV or Resume • Brief biographical information • Statement of interest for this specific commission  Deadline for submissions of qualifications is Thursday, May 14, 2020 by 4:00pm DISCLOSURE STATEMENT: The City of Salem is not liable for any costs incurred by the proposer in submitting this proposal. The City reserves the right to reject any or all proposals and to award the agreement in its best interest. The City reserves the right to make multiple awards. Any municipal permit fees required will be waived by the City, however, the awarded artist may still be required to pull the permits. MGL c. 30B, §2 defines “Grant agreement'', [as] “an agreement between a governmental body and an individual or nonprofit entity the purpose of which is to carry out a public purpose of support or stimulation instead of procuring supplies or services for the benefit or use of the governmental body. Therefore, this Contract is exempt from the rules and regulations of MGL 30B S. 5 or 6. The City of Salem does not and shall not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, gender, gender expression, age, national origin, disability, marital status, sexual orientation, or military status, in any of its activities or operations. Attached is the City of Salem contract with insurance requirements which will be executed. A Certificate of Insurance will be required at the time of contract execution. QUESTIONS: For more information please contact: Julie Barry, Senior Planner of Arts & Culture at [email protected] or 978-619-5681.
Tribute to T.C. Cannon-Native American artist and Vietnam Vet. Cannon’s art illustrated the complexities of contemporary Native American life as well as his ambivalence toward war. The song “Red, White and Blue” was inspired by the exhibit of Cannon’s work, titled “At the Edge of America"
I am Anna Sheffield's mother and enjoyed an amazing tour of your Museum about a year ago. Keep up the great work with our Native Americans.
Johnnie Diacon (Mvskoke ) Where No Indian Has Gone Before, 2019 Acrylic on stretched canvas 28" x 22" IAIA Alumni Class of 1999.
I love Santa Fé. Santa Fé is so neat. Everytime I go to Santa Fé I want to be an artist from Santa Fé.
Museum of Contemporary Native Arts was named a Most Astounding University Museum by EDsmart!
can't resist sharing this news about an IAIA graduate and artist Jimi LaPointe
Re-Move Free Tattoo/Tattoo Removal Clinic - Performance Art by Nicholas Galanin and Merritt Johnson at IAIA MoCNA - happening right now!
Performance art Re-Move by Merritt Johnson and Nicholas Galanin at IAIA MoCNA happening NOW