IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts

IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts NOTE: We are temporarily closed to the public due to COVID-19. IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts‘ mission is to advance contemporary Native art through exhibitions, collections, public programs, and scholarship.
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IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts (MoCNA) is dedicated to increasing public understanding and appreciation of contemporary Native art, history and culture through presentation, collection and acquisition, preservation, and interpretation. MoCNA is recognized as the preeminent organizer of exhibitions devoted exclusively to the display of dynamic and diverse arts practices representative of Native North America. Did you know that MoCNA Provides Tours? MoCNA offers group tours for educational, travel, and corporate groups. Group tours must be arranged at least two weeks prior to arrival. Please email [email protected] or call (505) 428-5904 for more information. Walk – In Tours with our Docents: The IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts provides current exhibition highlight tours every week on Mondays and Saturdays at 10:30 am led by our Docents. With cost of admission, these walk-in tours are free to our guests and offer insight into contemporary Native American art and experience.

“I’ve been navigating through some big questions: Why is survival of historical traumas met with alcoholism or violence ...
06/17/2020

“I’ve been navigating through some big questions: Why is survival of historical traumas met with alcoholism or violence or abuse? Would my family’s narrative have turned out differently if there was no removal from our ancestral land? What influences changed the role of the father? ⁣
The building of the Kinzu Dam in 1965 and the closing of the Thomas Indian School in 1957 are still part of our community’s recent history, so what does survival mean by adding a new generation to the family in the face of the continued effects of colonialism? How does humor play a part in the healing? This work has become part of my answer to those big questions.” ⁣

-Luanne Redeye (Seneca Nation/Hawk Clan) ⁣



Shown: If We Forgive Our Fathers What is Left, 2017. Frame: fabric, seed beads, paper, thread; Study: gel photo transfer, gouache, and acrylic on watercolor paper.

My Frame Series focuses on weaving together personal narratives and family relationships to explore larger themes that a...
06/16/2020

My Frame Series focuses on weaving together personal narratives and family relationships to explore larger themes that affect Native communities. When I became a first-time mom over four years ago, I thought about the relationships I have with my family—how my relatives impacted who I am and what events have shaped who we are as a family. ⁣


Luanne Redeye’s work is a part of the new summer exhibition, FRAMED, featuring work by Tamara Ann Burgh (Inupiat-Kawarek/Swede) and Luanne Redeye (Seneca Nation/Hawk Clan). The museum is still closed, but a virtual exhibition will be available next month! So stay tuned. ⁣



Luanne Redeye (Seneca Nation/Hawk Clan) was born in Jamestown, NY and grew up on the Allegany Indian Reservation in Western New York. Redeye studied at the University of New Mexico and received her MFA in 2011. She has exhibited in solo and group exhibitions in museums and galleries throughout the US and abroad. ⁣

Shown: My Survival Led to Him/ “I wont Hurt You, I will Protect You”, 2016. Frame: recycled screen print on paper, fabric, seed beads, thread; Study: gel photo transfer, gouache, and acrylic on watercolor paper. ⁣

06/09/2020
Artist Talk: Jeffrey Veregge

Join artist Jeffrey Veregge (Port Gamble S'Klallam) and MoCNA Senior Manager of Museum Education, Winoka Yepa (Diné) for a discussion of Veregge's artistic journey from growing up on the rez, his artistic process, and current works in progress. This artist talk is based on MoCNA's exhibition, Indigenous Futurisms: Transcending Past/Present/Future.

MoCNA Stands in Solidarity: A Message by Director, Patsy PhillipsDear Members and Friends,The IAIA Museum of Contemporar...
06/05/2020

MoCNA Stands in Solidarity: A Message by Director, Patsy Phillips

Dear Members and Friends,

The IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts (MoCNA) stands in solidarity with Black Lives Matter against the killing of George Floyd, Ahmaud Arbery, Breonna Taylor, and countless others who have been victims of police brutality and racial inequality. We grieve for the injustice and mistreatment of all people of color and we acknowledge the pain. Indigenous People too have been murdered by police at inordinate numbers without accountability. The missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls’ crisis has existed for decades without serious examination and investigation by the police. Today we join together to challenge the present by seeking justice and equality.

MoCNA is not neutral. We tell the truth about contemporary Indigenous Peoples. Art has the power to tell the truth and heal. Truth telling, reconciliation and transformation are the seeds of healing. Art is an important weapon against hate and prejudice. We are committed to supporting Indigenous artists who create work that addresses the issues of race, inequity and violence against people of color thus changing lives. In our collection is an installation created in 1994 by IAIA Academic Dean Charlene Teters (Spokane) titled It Was Only An Indian that resonates today.

In response to her work created 26 years ago, Teter says, “The impact of racism and hate is real. The tragic murder of George Floyd is an example of the real impact of dehumanization, hate and racism. When you dehumanize a people and it is done so publicly, we are vulnerable to acts of hate and violence, that we face every day somewhere in America. Like the violence directed at our Native women who are murdered and missing and somehow, that is not seen as a national tragedy… because, It was only a non-human.” This installation articulates the issues Indigenous Peoples have experienced since colonization. The dehumanization of Indigenous Peoples parallels that of other people of color.

Dr. Robert Martin (Cherokee), President of the Institute of American Indian Arts, urges the community to join the struggle against racism, hatred, and violence. He asks that we provide positive and constructive contributions to the national conversation about race and poverty in this country. As a fine arts college president, he encourages us to use our creative talents to fashion innovative statements about what is happening. He encourages the IAIA community to not stand quietly by while these injustices continue to damage the health and moral fiber of our peoples.

With renewed determination, the IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts will continue addressing issues of injustice, racism and inequity.

Sincerely,

Patsy Phillips (Cherokee), Director
IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts

Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA)
06/04/2020

Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA)

The following is a message from Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA) President Dr. Robert Martin (Cherokee Nation), regarding the tragic death of George Floyd in Minneapolis that has sparked this past week's Black Lives Matter protests.

You may also view the statement at www.iaia.edu/statement-from-dr-martin-about-black-lives-matter/

Check out the virtual exhibition of the IAIA 2020 Spring Senior Graduating Exhibition, Memory Unearthed. Memory Unearthe...
06/03/2020

Check out the virtual exhibition of the IAIA 2020 Spring Senior Graduating Exhibition, Memory Unearthed.

Memory Unearthed is a culmination of the students’ final semester, where they worked closely with advisors, faculty, staff, and colleagues to create and articulate their conceptually-driven body of work. This exhibition represents a capstone to their course of study, as well as their academic experience.

Visit the following link to view the exhibition: https://iaia.edu/memoryunearthed/

Today marks the beginning of 🏳️‍🌈 Pride Month. ⁣⁣⁣⁣A bit of history on Pride Month:⁣⁣Pride started with protest. In June...
06/01/2020

Today marks the beginning of 🏳️‍🌈 Pride Month. ⁣⁣
⁣⁣
A bit of history on Pride Month:⁣⁣

Pride started with protest.

In June of 1969, patrons and supporters of the Stonewall Inn staged an uprising to resist the police brutality and persecution to which LGBTQ people were commonly subjected to. These protests marked the beginning of a movement to outlaw discriminatory laws and practices against LGBTQ people. ⁣⁣(Courtesy of the Anti-Violence Project)
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“Push back against a culture [a society] that tells us we are less than, that our lives don’t matter!” -Alphonso David

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⁣Shown: Kent Monkman (Cree), Fisher River Band⁣
History is Painted by the Victors, 2013. Acrylic on canvas. A part of the “Art for a New Understanding: Native Perspectives, 1950s to Now“ exhibition that was at MoCNA from January 25,2019 to July 19, 2019. ⁣
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“Cannon’s literacy, philosophical, and social concerns had a strong influence upon his art. His prints produced at the I...
05/28/2020

“Cannon’s literacy, philosophical, and social concerns had a strong influence upon his art. His prints produced at the Institute reflect the emerging young artist, looking back into his childhood while looking forward into his projected new life…” Seymour Tubis, 1980⁣

T.C. Cannon (Caddo/Kiowa)⁣
Attended IAIA—1964-1966⁣

Sometime Ago, AP, n.d.⁣
Drypoint on paper⁣
Gift of Nina Tubis Wooderson Trust⁣
IAIA Art Collection: CD:38⁣

For more on T.C. Cannon and the origins of the IAIA Printmaking studio, visit Experimental exPRESSion: Printmaking @IAIA, 1963-1980 at the IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts.

05/28/2020

A Letter From The Director:

Dear Members and Friends,

As we enter a new month of COVID-19, I want to let you know, how and what we’re doing at the IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts (MoCNA). I’m happy to report that all of our staff are healthy, cautious and protecting themselves from this serious virus. Beginning on March 18th, our staff worked from home and were extremely productive. On May 18th, some employees returned to work in the museum and a few continue to work from home. In the office, we are using all the recommended precautions. We aren’t sure yet, when the museum will reopen to the public, but rest assured when we do, all precautionary measures will be in place for the public and you will be among the first to know.

In early March we received word from the American Alliance of Museums (AAM) that MoCNA received accreditation—the highest national recognition afforded to the nation's museums. Accreditation signifies excellence to the museum community, to governments, funders, outside agencies, and to the museum-going public. AAM Accreditation brings national recognition to MoCNA for its commitment to distinction, accountability, high professional standards and continued institutional improvement. Less than 10% of museums nationwide have received accreditation from AAM. Of the nation's estimated 33,000 museums, only 1,070 are currently accredited.

Until we open to the public, we have exhibitions and programs happening virtually. We invite you to visit:

1. The exhibition Indigenous Futurisms: Transcending Past/Present/Future will stay on view in the museum until January 3, 2021. The traveling show we planned to install in its place this summer, When I Remember I See Red from the Crocker Museum, was unfortunately cancelled due to COVID-19. Since not many of our visitors were able to see Indigenous Futurisms after it opened in February, we decided to keep this exceptional exhibition on view. The catalog was just released and is now available in the museum store at: https://iaia.edu/store/ Until you can see the show in person, we invite you to visit the exhibition virtually: https://www.artsteps.com/view/5e6bb844c131b94e2168ad2b

2. Resistance Through Existence is co-curated by the Institute of American Indian Arts’s museum studies student Faithlyn Seawright (Chickasaw) and MoCNA’s chief curator, Dr. Manuela Well-Off-Man and features 12 graduating IAIA seniors. The exhibition tackles a wide variety of topics ranging from the revitalization of tribal regalia and mask making to healing from traumatic events that happened as a result of European colonization. Inspired by their ancestors and culture, many of the artists examine what it means to be Indigenous and part of a living culture. Resistance closes May 29, 2020, but can be viewed virtually: https://iaia.edu/vr-experience-resistance-through-existence/

3. Way of Sorrows, an installation by Charlene Teters (Spokane), addresses current issues such as forced migrations and the US-Mexico border crises, while asking questions about responsibility and identifying new myths. This exhibition closes May 29, 2020, but can be viewed virtually: https://iaia.edu/event/charlene-teters-way-of-sorrows/

Two new exhibitions will be installed June 4. Staff may also turn these shows into virtual exhibitions, but hopefully you’ll be able to see them live and in person later this year.

4. Tom Jones: Strong Unrelenting Spirits, June 4 - March 28, 2021. Strong Unrelenting Spirits features new works from Tom Jones' series of portraits that are rooted in his Ho-Chunk identity. The works extend the boundaries of photography by incorporating beadwork directly onto the photographs.

5. Tamara Ann Burgh & Luanne Redeye: FRAMED, June 4 - January 24, 2021. The exhibition FRAMED investigates issues of self-representation and identity and examines the "American Experience" from a Native perspective through mixed media works by Tamara Ann Burgh (Iñupiat-Kawerak/Swede) and Luanne Redeye (Seneca Nation of Indians/Hawk Clan). Both artists often include family and found portrait photos in their artworks, which they alter through overpainting. Presented in seemingly nostalgic, decorative frames, which evoke American folk art and Victorian-era Iroquois beadwork, these works invite viewers to contemplate alternate histories, intergenerational trauma and authenticity.

In addition to our exhibitions, we welcome you to engage with contemporary Native art through our array of online virtual educational resources. Through artmaking, curriculum guides, and other fun activities, visitors of all ages can learn more about various works of art in MoCNA's exhibitions and collections. The following resources can be found at: https://iaia.edu/mocna/mocna-education/

1. The MoCNA Education Program has created a series of educational workbooks for each of the artists featured in the Indigenous Futurism exhibition. These workbooks explore topics related to the artwork and interests of each artist. The first workbook, "Storytelling Through Comics," is inspired by the work of Jeffrey Veregge (Port Gamble S'Klallam). Learn how to create your own comic book through storytelling and learn about the Indigenous world of superheroes.

2. Enjoy coloring pages depicting a work of art from MoCNA’s collection or exhibitions created by IAIA alum, Daniel McCoy Jr. (Muscogee Creek/Citizen Band Potawatomi). Simply download, print, and color away. Share your creations with us on Instagram by tagging @iaiamocna. We can't wait to see your creations!

When we have a date to re-open safely, I will send another letter with details regarding our plan to protect our members and visitors from COVID-19. We hope everyone is staying safe, and we look forward to seeing you in-person when we can all meet again.

Sincerely,


Patsy Phillips (Cherokee)
Director

05/22/2020

The newest MoCNA publication is fresh off the press, Indigenous Futurisms, is now available to purchase!!

IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts (MoCNA) recently announced the release of the exhibition catalogue for Indigenous Futurisms: Transcending Past/Present/Future. The catalogue investigates a major trend in Contemporary Native Art -- the rise of futuristic or science-fiction inspired Native American art. The essays and artworks present the future from a Native perspective and illustrate the use of Indigenous cosmology and science as part of tribal oral history and ways of life. Several of the artists use sci-fi related themes to emphasize the importance of Futurism in Native cultures, to pass on tribal oral history and to revive their Native language. However, Indigenous Futurism also offers a way to heal from the traumas of the past and present-the post-apocalyptic narratives depicted in some of the artworks are often reality for Indigenous communities worldwide.

⁣Among the authors of Indigenous Futurisms are MoCNA chief curator Dr. Manuela Well-Off-Man, Dr. David Begay (Navajo), Andrea Carlson (Ojibwe), Dr. Suzanne Newman Fricke, and Chelsea Herr (Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma).

To purchase the catalogue click: https://iaia.edu/product/indigenous-futurisms-transcending-past-present-future/

📸 by: Jason S. Ordaz, IAIA, 2020

“Well Mr. Tubis taught us the basics of art theory and talked about contrast, the color wheel, and complimentary and com...
05/21/2020

“Well Mr. Tubis taught us the basics of art theory and talked about contrast, the color wheel, and complimentary and composition elements. Perspective to some extent…he was very formulistic in the way he taught us. He wanted us to absorb in a certain discipline about our work and really learn the rules for composition before we ran off and did our own thing.” ⁣
-Susan Sheoships, Oral History, 2018⁣

For more on Susan Sheoships and the origins of the IAIA Printmaking studio, visit Experimental exPRESSion: Printmaking @IAIA, 1963-1980 at the IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts.⁣

Artist: Susan Sheoships (Cayuse)⁣
Attended IAIA—1969-1970, 1972-1973⁣

Shown: Water Walker, ed. 1/6, n.d.⁣
Etching on paper⁣
Gift of the Nina Tubis Wooderson Trust⁣
IAIA Art Collection: CSE-13

#printmakingthursdays

Congratulations to our IAIA graduates and to all graduates, near and far!  In the words of Congresswoman Deb Haaland, “Y...
05/19/2020

Congratulations to our IAIA graduates and to all graduates, near and far! In the words of Congresswoman Deb Haaland, “You are the dream that our ancestors had.” ⁣



Shown: Brian Walker (King Island Inupiat/Deg Hit’an Athabascan), Prayer for the Individual (Salmon), 2019.

Photograph by Jason S. Ordaz, IAIA, 2020

"My artwork stems from my love of movies, comics, pop culture, and my family. The reference used for this piece is an ac...
05/13/2020

"My artwork stems from my love of movies, comics, pop culture, and my family. The reference used for this piece is an actual photo of my great grandfather sans space suit. And after researching different war propaganda posters, 1960s comic book covers, and Golden Age movie posters, I felt that the best way to capture the look of a comic printed during the Silver Age of comics (1956-1975) was by
exposing my image on a photopolymer plate.

Space Indians was an idea I had one day while sitting in class. In a different reality, what would happen if the government took away all of our land? With the planet dying, what would we do and where would we go? My answer, space! This would be the first in a series, pulling new inspirations from pulp magazines as well as comics showcasing our journey through the stars. From the dusty forgotten landscape of the moon to the ice volcanoes of Titan. And hopefully one day, we will find another uncorrupted world to call our home." -James McCloud

Shown: JAMES MCCLOUD (PAIUTE), Space Indians, 2013
Lithograph, edition 3 of 5, 19 ½ x 16 ¾ inches (framed). Collection of August Walker

Address

108 Cathedral Pl
Santa Fe, NM
87501

Santa Fe Trails bus schedule, visit http://www.santafenm.gov/route_maps_and_schedules

General information

The IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts (MoCNA) is pleased to welcome visitors Monday, and Wednesday through Saturday, from 10 am until 5 pm and on Sunday from Noon until 5 pm. We are closed on Tuesdays and on the following holidays: New Years Day Easter Sunday Thanksgiving Day Christmas Day Admission: $10 for adults; half-price for seniors (62+), students with a valid ID, and NM residents; and free for members, Native people, veterans and their families, youth (16 & under), and NM residents visiting on Sunday. Admission rates are subject to change. Call (505) 983-8900 for more information. With your admission, you will receive an in-depth printed gallery guide. Use it as a narrative for your self-guided tour. Individual tours of most exhibits are available on request and based on availability of tour guides. Please inquire at the admissions desk. MoCNA offers group tours for educational, travel, and corporate groups. Group tours must be arranged at least three weeks prior to arrival. Please contact: [email protected] Walk – In Tours with our Docents: The IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts provides current exhibition highlight tours every week on Mondays and Saturdays at 11:00 am led by our Docents. With cost of admission, these walk – in tours are free to our guests and offer insight into contemporary Native American art and experience. In some cases, we might not have a docent available, so please call 505-428.5907 during museum hours to confirm the walk-in tours are offered on a particular day or ask the museum admission desk.

Opening Hours

Monday 10:00 - 17:00
Wednesday 10:00 - 17:00
Thursday 10:00 - 17:00
Friday 10:00 - 17:00
Saturday 10:00 - 17:00
Sunday 12:00 - 17:00

Telephone

(505) 983-8900

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We are temporarily closed due to COVID-19. The IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts (MoCNA) is the country’s only museum for exhibiting, collecting and interpreting the most progressive work of contemporary Native artists.

MoCNA is dedicated solely to advancing the scholarship, discourse and interpretation of contemporary Native art for regional, national and international audiences. As such, it stewards the National Collection of Contemporary Native Art, 7,500 artworks in all media created in 1962 or later. MoCNA is at the forefront of contemporary Native art presentation and strives to be flexible, foresighted and risk-taking in its exhibitions and programs. MoCNA is located in the heart of downtown Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Our Museum is free for Members, Native People, Veterans and their families and youth (16 and under) every day. On Sunday we offer free admission for all New Mexico residents.


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CALL TO ARTISTS: Request for Qualifications City of Salem Naumkeag Portrait Project The City of Salem, MA invites artists to submit qualifications for a $30,000 public art commission grant award to create a portrait of a Naumkeag leader or other prominent Indigenous community member to commemorate the Indigenous Peoples of Salem, MA. The Salem Public Art Commission, in conjunction with the City of Salem Department of Parks, Recreation, and Community Services; Mayor Kimberley Driscoll or her designee; the Massachusett-Ponkapoag Tribal Council and other Indigenous community stakeholders, will be the acting Art Jury managing the artist selection process. To be considered for this commission, submit your qualifications via email to [email protected] as well as [email protected] by 4:00 p.m., May 15, 2020. Details below. The Naumkeag Portrait Project was proposed by Mayor Kimberley Driscoll to the Public Art Commission in May 2019, with the purpose of recognizing and highlighting the contributions and sacrifices of the Indigenous Peoples of this land. The Naumkeag band of the Massachusett, among other Indigenous communities, lived on and moved through this land long before the Town of Salem was established. The City’s goal is to acknowledge the past and historic contributions of these communities, while honoring and celebrating the presences of these rich cultures and their Peoples today. From the Request for Qualifications (RFQ), three or four finalists will be selected by the Art Jury to participate in an “in-person” interview process, to the extent we are able to do so, with the Art Jury. One artist will be selected by the Art Jury for this commission, based on the finalists’ presentations and pending final formal approval by the Mayor. The selected artist will be required to meet or confer regularly with the Massachusett-Ponkapoag Tribal Council and other members of the Indigenous community to identify the subject of the portrait and ensure that the completed product accurately and satisfactorily represents the Indigenous community in a way that feels appropriate to them. The City intends to unveil the newly completed portrait as part of a public celebration in October 2020. The City is seeking qualifications from artists with demonstrated portraiture painting experience. Ideally, this artists would also have some experience with or expertise in the art of Indigenous cultures. The $30,000 grant commission must cover all services from subject/content development through final completion and framing, including but not limited to artist fee, travel, community meetings, research, subject sketches, materials, portrait creation, transportation, framing, and coordination with consultants, the Massachusett-Ponkapoag Tribal Council, and City staff and volunteers. PORTRAIT PARAMETERS:  Subject matter to be informed by conversations with Indigenous community to ensure reflection of and connection to the deep history of Indigenous Peoples here in Salem.  Proposed subject matter must be reviewed and approved by members of the Art Jury  Preferred medium is oil paint, style can be classic or modern/contemporary  Frame should be made of a simple dark natural wood  Finished product is preferred to be Round or Oval in shape, to reflect the importance of the circle in Indigenous cultures  Finished framed work should be approximately 36'' x 28" in size, to be in keeping with the size of other portraiture in City Hall THE SITE: It has been proposed to the City Council that this new commissioned portrait be placed in the location where the existing portrait of Andrew Jackson now hangs in Council Chambers at Salem City Hall. If approved, the portrait of Andrew Jackson would be relocated to the Council anteroom or some other prominent location in City Hall. If this is not approved by Council, the newly commissioned portrait will be hung on display in another publicly viewable and prominent location of honor within Salem City Hall. THE ARTIST SELECTION PROCESS: 1. Artists submit qualifications via email to [email protected] as well as Purchasing Agent Tom Watkins at [email protected]. Requested qualifications are: • No more than 10 .jpg image examples of relevant previous work • A formal CV or Resume • Brief biographical information • Statement of interest for this specific commission 2. The Art Jury reviews all submissions and selects finalists. 3. Finalists interviews/presentations. 4. Art Jury will select one artist to be awarded the commission grant. PORTRAIT CREATION PROCESS: 1. The selected artist will be paid one-third of the total commission for supplies and research time amount upon signing of City contract. 2. Contracted artist will begin work by meeting, to the fullest extent possible via virtual means, with members of the Indigenous communities in and around Salem, MA to help identify the subject, content, and style of the portrait. 3. Artist will review identified subject matter with Art Jury. 4. Once the subject is identified and agreed upon by all parties, including the artist, the artist will begin work on the creation of the piece. 5. Artist holds a mid-point check in with Senior Planner for Arts & Culture and/or full Art Jury 6. Artists delivers finished and framed work to the City of Salem. Remaining two-thirds balance of contact paid upon delivered of completed work that meets City’s satisfaction and standards. 7. The new work is unveiled at a public celebration in October 2020.* *Note: If the artist would like to give a talk about their process at this event, that would be welcome, but is not required. TIMELINE: May 14, 2020 4pm Deadline for submissions of qualifications May 19, 2020 Finalists selected May 25-29, 2020 Selected finalists’ interviews May 4, 2020 Public announcement of selected artist May – September 2020 Work Created July 1, 2020 Project Mid-point Check-in October 1, 2020 Finished & Framed work delivered to City of Salem October 12, 2020 Unveiling Celebration & possible Artist’s Talk ELIGIBILITY:  Must have demonstrated Portraiture experience.  Preference will be given to artists with experience/expertise in the art of Indigenous cultures.  Salem is committed to providing equal opportunities for ALL. Artists of all gender, race, ethnicity, national origin, age, sexual orientation/ identity, religion/beliefs, education and physical ability are encouraged to apply.  Salem residency not required. HOW TO SUBMIT YOUR QUALIFICATIONS:  Artists submit qualifications via email to [email protected] and [email protected].  Requested qualifications are: • No more than 10 .jpg image examples of relevant previous work • A formal CV or Resume • Brief biographical information • Statement of interest for this specific commission  Deadline for submissions of qualifications is Thursday, May 14, 2020 by 4:00pm DISCLOSURE STATEMENT: The City of Salem is not liable for any costs incurred by the proposer in submitting this proposal. The City reserves the right to reject any or all proposals and to award the agreement in its best interest. The City reserves the right to make multiple awards. Any municipal permit fees required will be waived by the City, however, the awarded artist may still be required to pull the permits. MGL c. 30B, §2 defines “Grant agreement'', [as] “an agreement between a governmental body and an individual or nonprofit entity the purpose of which is to carry out a public purpose of support or stimulation instead of procuring supplies or services for the benefit or use of the governmental body. Therefore, this Contract is exempt from the rules and regulations of MGL 30B S. 5 or 6. The City of Salem does not and shall not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, gender, gender expression, age, national origin, disability, marital status, sexual orientation, or military status, in any of its activities or operations. Attached is the City of Salem contract with insurance requirements which will be executed. A Certificate of Insurance will be required at the time of contract execution. QUESTIONS: For more information please contact: Julie Barry, Senior Planner of Arts & Culture at [email protected] or 978-619-5681.
Tribute to T.C. Cannon-Native American artist and Vietnam Vet. Cannon’s art illustrated the complexities of contemporary Native American life as well as his ambivalence toward war. The song “Red, White and Blue” was inspired by the exhibit of Cannon’s work, titled “At the Edge of America"
I am Anna Sheffield's mother and enjoyed an amazing tour of your Museum about a year ago. Keep up the great work with our Native Americans.
Johnnie Diacon (Mvskoke ) Where No Indian Has Gone Before, 2019 Acrylic on stretched canvas 28" x 22" IAIA Alumni Class of 1999.
I love Santa Fé. Santa Fé is so neat. Everytime I go to Santa Fé I want to be an artist from Santa Fé.
Museum of Contemporary Native Arts was named a Most Astounding University Museum by EDsmart!
can't resist sharing this news about an IAIA graduate and artist Jimi LaPointe
Re-Move Free Tattoo/Tattoo Removal Clinic - Performance Art by Nicholas Galanin and Merritt Johnson at IAIA MoCNA - happening right now!
Performance art Re-Move by Merritt Johnson and Nicholas Galanin at IAIA MoCNA happening NOW