de Saisset Museum

de Saisset Museum The de Saisset is the South Bay's FREE museum of art and history. The de Saisset Museum at Santa Clara University is the South Bay’s free Museum of art and history.

The museum was founded adjacent to Mission Santa Clara de Asís on SCU's campus in 1955. It is currently one of three museums in the South Bay to hold accreditation from the American Alliance of Museums. Operated and supported by Santa Clara University, the de Saisset Museum also is privately funded and member-supported. The de Saisset Museum collects, preserves, exhibits, and interprets objects of

The museum was founded adjacent to Mission Santa Clara de Asís on SCU's campus in 1955. It is currently one of three museums in the South Bay to hold accreditation from the American Alliance of Museums. Operated and supported by Santa Clara University, the de Saisset Museum also is privately funded and member-supported. The de Saisset Museum collects, preserves, exhibits, and interprets objects of

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Student-curated exhibition "Loneliness Barefaced" seeks to connect art to loneliness and therefore the pandemic.Below is...
06/04/2021

Student-curated exhibition "Loneliness Barefaced" seeks to connect art to loneliness and therefore the pandemic.

Below is an excerpt from one of their object labels. You can view (and read) their entire virtual exhibition on our website: https://www.scu.edu/desaisset/exhibitions/arth140/lonelinessbarefaced/

"Erosion contains many different elements throughout the photograph. The main theme that we see here is...that the photograph evokes loneliness. For example, many of the trees in the landscape lack leaves and the black and white medium of the photograph gives it a desolate feeling. The black and white texture initially makes us feel desolate, and then goes on to make the viewer feel more alienated after looking at it longer.

There is also an overturned chair next to the small cabin in the bottom right of the image, which gives the impression that no one has been around for some time. An alternative idea is that the person who was there may have left abruptly for some particular reason. We do not know why, but can interpret or imagine what may have happened. The sole presence of the chair furthered the idea of both isolation and loneliness, but perhaps at the same time also gives a sense of hope or possible return. There is a chair there so there must have been a person there at some point too. Will they be coming back? Or are they running or hiding from something?"

Pictured: Unknown artist, Erosion destroyed hillside, 1/1/1938, 1938, black and white photograph, de Saisset Museum permanent collection, Santa Clara University, Purchased from Library of Congress, Washington, DC, USA, NDA.6.682

#exhibitions #universitymuseum #photography

Student-curated exhibition "Loneliness Barefaced" seeks to connect art to loneliness and therefore the pandemic.

Below is an excerpt from one of their object labels. You can view (and read) their entire virtual exhibition on our website: https://www.scu.edu/desaisset/exhibitions/arth140/lonelinessbarefaced/

"Erosion contains many different elements throughout the photograph. The main theme that we see here is...that the photograph evokes loneliness. For example, many of the trees in the landscape lack leaves and the black and white medium of the photograph gives it a desolate feeling. The black and white texture initially makes us feel desolate, and then goes on to make the viewer feel more alienated after looking at it longer.

There is also an overturned chair next to the small cabin in the bottom right of the image, which gives the impression that no one has been around for some time. An alternative idea is that the person who was there may have left abruptly for some particular reason. We do not know why, but can interpret or imagine what may have happened. The sole presence of the chair furthered the idea of both isolation and loneliness, but perhaps at the same time also gives a sense of hope or possible return. There is a chair there so there must have been a person there at some point too. Will they be coming back? Or are they running or hiding from something?"

Pictured: Unknown artist, Erosion destroyed hillside, 1/1/1938, 1938, black and white photograph, de Saisset Museum permanent collection, Santa Clara University, Purchased from Library of Congress, Washington, DC, USA, NDA.6.682

#exhibitions #universitymuseum #photography

06/04/2021

We are excited to participate in the ongoing #JesuitMuseums campaign with Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities and to share the work of Santa Clara University students with our permanent collection. Thank you for the feature on the #JesuitEducated blog!

Student-curated exhibition "Indentity in the Landscape" invites viewers to contemplate the various types of relationship...
06/02/2021

Student-curated exhibition "Indentity in the Landscape" invites viewers to contemplate the various types of relationships between people and the landscape through .

Below is an excerpt from one of their object labels. You can view (and read) their entire virtual exhibition on our website: https://www.scu.edu/desaisset/exhibitions/arth140/identityinthelandscape/

"Navaho Sacred Mountain of the East by Laura Gilpin is an expansive landscape photograph focused on the snow-covered mountains in the background as well as the desert land in the foreground. There is an unaltered, winding river that cuts through the frame which portrays a common theme in Gilpin’s photographs of the wild landscape. The viewer takes on an elevated view of the Earth in order to absorb the complete scene. The mountains and valley are equally appreciated in the frame as the viewer’s eye travels from the river below to the mountains above.

Navaho Sacred Mountain of the East replaces a traditional, colonial map and attempts to redefine what belongs to the Navajo people through the photography of an expansive landscape. During the 20th century, the Navajo people were being displaced and had to negotiate what land belonged to them. Photographing the sacred mountains and valley below reclaimed the sovereignty of the land which belonged to the Navajo people.

Gilpin was one of the first woman to photograph the natural landscape and received praise from her male counterparts such as Ansel Adams. The main goal of her photography was to capture Southwest Native culture and show the connection between Native people and the land. This differs significantly from male photographers at the time who excluded Native people from their photography. Gilpin spent time with the Navajo people and came to have a deep appreciation for their traditions and their connection with the land. She attempts to show this connection through her photos of the natural, untouched landscapes in which the Navajo people lived."

Pictured: Laura Gilpin, Navaho Sacred Mountain of the East, 1953, gelatin silver print, de Saisset Museum permanent collection, Santa Clara University, Focus Gallery Collection, Helen Johnson Bequest, 6.33.1989
Note: Gilpin's original title for this photograph utilizes the spelling "Navaho."

#exhibitions #universitymuseum #photography

Student-curated exhibition "Indentity in the Landscape" invites viewers to contemplate the various types of relationships between people and the landscape through .

Below is an excerpt from one of their object labels. You can view (and read) their entire virtual exhibition on our website: https://www.scu.edu/desaisset/exhibitions/arth140/identityinthelandscape/

"Navaho Sacred Mountain of the East by Laura Gilpin is an expansive landscape photograph focused on the snow-covered mountains in the background as well as the desert land in the foreground. There is an unaltered, winding river that cuts through the frame which portrays a common theme in Gilpin’s photographs of the wild landscape. The viewer takes on an elevated view of the Earth in order to absorb the complete scene. The mountains and valley are equally appreciated in the frame as the viewer’s eye travels from the river below to the mountains above.

Navaho Sacred Mountain of the East replaces a traditional, colonial map and attempts to redefine what belongs to the Navajo people through the photography of an expansive landscape. During the 20th century, the Navajo people were being displaced and had to negotiate what land belonged to them. Photographing the sacred mountains and valley below reclaimed the sovereignty of the land which belonged to the Navajo people.

Gilpin was one of the first woman to photograph the natural landscape and received praise from her male counterparts such as Ansel Adams. The main goal of her photography was to capture Southwest Native culture and show the connection between Native people and the land. This differs significantly from male photographers at the time who excluded Native people from their photography. Gilpin spent time with the Navajo people and came to have a deep appreciation for their traditions and their connection with the land. She attempts to show this connection through her photos of the natural, untouched landscapes in which the Navajo people lived."

Pictured: Laura Gilpin, Navaho Sacred Mountain of the East, 1953, gelatin silver print, de Saisset Museum permanent collection, Santa Clara University, Focus Gallery Collection, Helen Johnson Bequest, 6.33.1989
Note: Gilpin's original title for this photograph utilizes the spelling "Navaho."

#exhibitions #universitymuseum #photography

Student-curated exhibition "Manifest Destiny" delves into the impact and legacy of the 19th cultural doctrine Manifest D...
06/01/2021

Student-curated exhibition "Manifest Destiny" delves into the impact and legacy of the 19th cultural doctrine Manifest Destiny through an examination of photographs from the de Saisset Museum's permanent collection.

Below is an excerpt from one of their object labels. You can view (and read) their entire virtual exhibition on our website: https://www.scu.edu/desaisset/exhibitions/arth140/manifestdestiny/

"Inspired by his Rephotographic Survey Project from the 1970s where he revisited sites photographed during the nineteenth-century surveys of the American West, artist Mark Klett started his Revealing Territory series. This project was intended to present an updated survey of the west that showcased the legacy of Manifest Destiny. This photograph, and the others from this project, are intended to reference both the style and subject matter of the earlier survey images. During the nineteenth-century survey photographers such as Timothy O’Sullivan and William Henry Jackson took images of the landscape that embody the ideals of Manifest Destiny. Most of their images do not include humans but are suggestive of humans' dominance over the land. In opposition to this, Klett purposely includes humans' presence in the landscape to directly reference human exploitation of American landscapes and call attention to the legacy of Manifest Destiny. Taken during a trip to Lake Powell, Klett utilizes his camp setup to alert the viewer to humans' presence and effect on the landscape. Lake Powell is one of the largest man-made reservoirs in the United States. It was created as a result of the construction of the Glen Canyon Dam in the Arizona portion of the Colorado River in 1963. When a dam is constructed, the builders “tame” the wild landscape and force it to follow their will. This embodies the idea that the American landscape is to be dominated by man and used for their benefit, which is promoted by Manifest Destiny. This image, and the others in the series, make apparent the lasting impact and legacy of Manifest Destiny in the western portion of the United States."

Pictured: Mark Klett, Camp 3 at Lake Powell, 1984, gelatin silver print, de Saisset Museum permanent collection, Santa Clara University, Gift of David B. Devine, 1991.2.6

#exhibitions #universitymuseum #photography

Student-curated exhibition "Manifest Destiny" delves into the impact and legacy of the 19th cultural doctrine Manifest Destiny through an examination of photographs from the de Saisset Museum's permanent collection.

Below is an excerpt from one of their object labels. You can view (and read) their entire virtual exhibition on our website: https://www.scu.edu/desaisset/exhibitions/arth140/manifestdestiny/

"Inspired by his Rephotographic Survey Project from the 1970s where he revisited sites photographed during the nineteenth-century surveys of the American West, artist Mark Klett started his Revealing Territory series. This project was intended to present an updated survey of the west that showcased the legacy of Manifest Destiny. This photograph, and the others from this project, are intended to reference both the style and subject matter of the earlier survey images. During the nineteenth-century survey photographers such as Timothy O’Sullivan and William Henry Jackson took images of the landscape that embody the ideals of Manifest Destiny. Most of their images do not include humans but are suggestive of humans' dominance over the land. In opposition to this, Klett purposely includes humans' presence in the landscape to directly reference human exploitation of American landscapes and call attention to the legacy of Manifest Destiny. Taken during a trip to Lake Powell, Klett utilizes his camp setup to alert the viewer to humans' presence and effect on the landscape. Lake Powell is one of the largest man-made reservoirs in the United States. It was created as a result of the construction of the Glen Canyon Dam in the Arizona portion of the Colorado River in 1963. When a dam is constructed, the builders “tame” the wild landscape and force it to follow their will. This embodies the idea that the American landscape is to be dominated by man and used for their benefit, which is promoted by Manifest Destiny. This image, and the others in the series, make apparent the lasting impact and legacy of Manifest Destiny in the western portion of the United States."

Pictured: Mark Klett, Camp 3 at Lake Powell, 1984, gelatin silver print, de Saisset Museum permanent collection, Santa Clara University, Gift of David B. Devine, 1991.2.6

#exhibitions #universitymuseum #photography

Student-curated exhibition "Representations of Women in Portrait Photography" aims to emphasize the role, representation...
05/29/2021

Student-curated exhibition "Representations of Women in Portrait Photography" aims to emphasize the role, representation, and problems endured by women in American photographic history.

Below is an excerpt from one of their object labels. You can view (and read) their entire virtual exhibition on our website: https://www.scu.edu/desaisset/exhibitions/arth140/representationsofwomen/

"This piece highlights the topic of domesticity and the role of women in the late 30’s. It is not a traditional portrait since she is facing away from the camera, however, this further emphasizes the purpose and meaning behind the photo: a woman hard at work is the subject of the photo, but a face and individuality are not the main focus. Wolcott hid of the subject’s face in the photo making this picture more universal as well. A faceless woman at work gives room for seeing any and all women in that position, rather than tying this work to one individual and face."

Pictured: Marion Post Wolcott, Making Biscuits on Corn-husking Day, 1939, photograph, de Saisset Museum permanent collection, Santa Clara University, Gift of David B. Devine, 6.348.1986

#exhibitions #universitymuseum #photography #marionpostwolcott

Student-curated exhibition "Representations of Women in Portrait Photography" aims to emphasize the role, representation, and problems endured by women in American photographic history.

Below is an excerpt from one of their object labels. You can view (and read) their entire virtual exhibition on our website: https://www.scu.edu/desaisset/exhibitions/arth140/representationsofwomen/

"This piece highlights the topic of domesticity and the role of women in the late 30’s. It is not a traditional portrait since she is facing away from the camera, however, this further emphasizes the purpose and meaning behind the photo: a woman hard at work is the subject of the photo, but a face and individuality are not the main focus. Wolcott hid of the subject’s face in the photo making this picture more universal as well. A faceless woman at work gives room for seeing any and all women in that position, rather than tying this work to one individual and face."

Pictured: Marion Post Wolcott, Making Biscuits on Corn-husking Day, 1939, photograph, de Saisset Museum permanent collection, Santa Clara University, Gift of David B. Devine, 6.348.1986

#exhibitions #universitymuseum #photography #marionpostwolcott

Student-curated exhibition "Depictions of Feminine" contends with varying levels of objectification and sexualization of...
05/28/2021

Student-curated exhibition "Depictions of Feminine" contends with varying levels of objectification and sexualization of subjects in the photographic medium.

Below is an excerpt from one of their object labels. You can view (and read) their entire virtual exhibition on our website https://www.scu.edu/desaisset/exhibitions/arth140/feminine/

"Born in 1879 in Luxembourg, Edward Steichen spent most of his youth in Milwaukee, Wisconsin where he was introduced to the German- Scandinavian-Socialist movement. Much of his early work on landscape photography reflected this influence as he contrasted the simplicity of nature and rural living with the difficulty and suffering of modern capitalist societies. During a two-year stay in Paris from 1900 to 1902 Steichen first engaged with figural photography, but retained his anti-capitalist stance, writing in his biography, A Life in Photography, “I did a number of n**e figures in Paris...in none of these is the face visible. For many years everyone had prejudices against posing in the n**e and even professional models usually insisted, when they posed for n**e pictures, that their faces not be shown”. Torso reveals the plight of the female n**e model by conserving her anonymous identity and shielding her private features yet still inviting the viewer to gaze at her."

Pictured: Edward Steichen, Torso, Part of Portfolio Early Years 1920-1927, 1902 (photograph), 1981 (print), photogravure, de Saisset Museum permanent collection, Santa Clara University, Focus Gallery Collection, Helen Johnston Bequest, 6.75.1989.4

#exhibitions #universitymuseum #figurativephotography #photography

Student-curated exhibition "Depictions of Feminine" contends with varying levels of objectification and sexualization of subjects in the photographic medium.

Below is an excerpt from one of their object labels. You can view (and read) their entire virtual exhibition on our website https://www.scu.edu/desaisset/exhibitions/arth140/feminine/

"Born in 1879 in Luxembourg, Edward Steichen spent most of his youth in Milwaukee, Wisconsin where he was introduced to the German- Scandinavian-Socialist movement. Much of his early work on landscape photography reflected this influence as he contrasted the simplicity of nature and rural living with the difficulty and suffering of modern capitalist societies. During a two-year stay in Paris from 1900 to 1902 Steichen first engaged with figural photography, but retained his anti-capitalist stance, writing in his biography, A Life in Photography, “I did a number of n**e figures in Paris...in none of these is the face visible. For many years everyone had prejudices against posing in the n**e and even professional models usually insisted, when they posed for n**e pictures, that their faces not be shown”. Torso reveals the plight of the female n**e model by conserving her anonymous identity and shielding her private features yet still inviting the viewer to gaze at her."

Pictured: Edward Steichen, Torso, Part of Portfolio Early Years 1920-1927, 1902 (photograph), 1981 (print), photogravure, de Saisset Museum permanent collection, Santa Clara University, Focus Gallery Collection, Helen Johnston Bequest, 6.75.1989.4

#exhibitions #universitymuseum #figurativephotography #photography

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Thursday 11am - 4pm
Friday 11am - 4pm

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The de Saisset Museum at Santa Clara University is the South Bay’s free Museum of art and history. The museum was founded adjacent to Mission Santa Clara de Asís on SCU's campus in 1955. It is currently one of three museums in the South Bay to hold accreditation from the American Alliance of Museums. Operated and supported by Santa Clara University, the de Saisset Museum also is privately funded and member-supported. The de Saisset Museum collects, preserves, exhibits, and interprets objects of art and history for the educational and cultural enrichment of all people. The museum achieves its mission through an active program of exhibitions, collections, education programs, and publications. As an important resource for SCU, the de Saisset actively collaborates with the larger University community in order to foster the integration of diverse forms of learning. The de Saisset presents 6 to 10 temporary exhibitions every year. Exhibitions highlight the diversity of our community, address issues of contemporary society, showcase the work of under-recognized or under-appreciated artists, and emphasize the strengths of the permanent collection. The museum also serves as the caretaker of the University's California History Collection, which is on permanent view. Since its founding, the de Saisset's permanent collection has expanded to include more than 12,000 objects collected in six main areas: California history, Mission-era liturgical vestments, decorative arts, works on paper, painting & sculpture, and new media. The collection includes prints from the Renaissance, Baroque, Rococo, 19th century, and Modernist periods. The museum has an extensive collection of contemporary works on paper, with a special emphasis on artists from the San Francisco Bay Area. The de Saisset Museum offers a variety of educational programs including lectures, symposia, workshops, and family days. In addition, the de Saisset provides free docent tours of the California History Collection and Mission Santa Clara.

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