Lick Observatory

Lick Observatory Lick Observatory is a Bay Area icon. We have been at the forefront of astronomical research since 1888. Visit us: ucolick.org/main UC Observatories (UCO) is a Multi-campus Research Unit of the University of California, providing UC astronomers with a state-of-the-art astronomical research facility.
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Lick Observatory, part of UCO, are located on the summit of 4200' Mount Hamilton in the Diablo Range, overlooking the San Francisco Bay. It's administrative headquarters, instrument and optics laboratories are based at the University of California, Santa Cruz.

Operating as usual

Lick's latest instrumentation will be explained in this virtual event today, see details on how to join below.
01/13/2021

Lick's latest instrumentation will be explained in this virtual event today, see details on how to join below.

•••Join us TODAY January 13 at 4pm•••
Use this link https://ucsc.zoom.us/j/9893231749
Dr. Emily Martin, NSF Postdoctoral Fellow and UC Chancellors Fellow at UC Santa Cruz, is working on several UCO instrument projects and will give her UCO Living Room Lecture via Zoom at 4pm (PT) today. We also plan to share the live stream via UCO's page.
Emily will be talking primarily about PEAS [Planet as Exoplanet Analog Spectrograph], UCO’s most recently installed instrument at Lick Observatory. Learn more about this exciting new instrument, including purpose and future plans. If you like learning about exoplanet research, this is the event for you!

Join this virtual talk next week to find out more about our newest instrument at Lick. Details are below.
01/07/2021

Join this virtual talk next week to find out more about our newest instrument at Lick. Details are below.

Save the Date! New Virtual Event!
•••Join us Wednesday, January 13 at 4pm•••
Dr. Emily Martin, NSF Postdoctoral Fellow and UC Chancellors Fellow at UC Santa Cruz, is working on several UCO instrument projects and will give her UCO Living Room Lecture via Zoom at 4pm (PT) next Wednesday. We also plan to share the live stream via UCO's page.

Emily will be talking primarily about PEAS [Planet as Exoplanet Analog Spectrograph], UCO’s most recently installed instrument at Lick Observatory. Learn more about this exciting new instrument, including purpose and future plans. If you like learning about exoplanet research, this is the event for you!

Use this link to join us next Wednesday https://ucsc.zoom.us/j/9893231749

The Friends of Lick Observatory are helping us with getting SCU Lightning Complex Fire infrastructure and other damage r...
01/06/2021
Friends of Lick Observatory helps fund wildfire recovery efforts

The Friends of Lick Observatory are helping us with getting SCU Lightning Complex Fire infrastructure and other damage repaired. While the most essential infrastructure, water supply and electricity, was restored to Lick Observatory within the first month after the fire, a great deal of work remains to be done.
https://news.ucsc.edu/2021/01/wildfire-relief-fund.html

The group has designated $75,000 for the emergency support of wildfire relief efforts at Lick Observatory, where telescopes were saved but infrastructure was damaged.

Jupiter and Saturn conjunction over San Jose shortly after sunset this evening.  This is the closest conjunction of thes...
12/22/2020

Jupiter and Saturn conjunction over San Jose shortly after sunset this evening. This is the closest conjunction of these planets since 1623, and the next conjunction that will be similarly close will be in 2080. Happy Solstice! Photo courtesy of staff astronomer Elinor Gates.

The next conjunction will be in 2080, and then not again until after 2400, so be sure to see it this year.
12/09/2020

The next conjunction will be in 2080, and then not again until after 2400, so be sure to see it this year.

Take a look at the west/southwest sky about 0.5-1 hour after sunset the next few weeks: Jupiter (the brightest object) will pass Saturn (fainter, currently to Jupiter's upper left) in the sky, resulting in a "conjunction" (close approach) on December 21 (the winter solstice, coincidentally). [See the photo taken two days ago, Dec. 6.] They will appear as a "double planet" separated by only 1/5 of the Moon's diameter! No telescope is needed.

This particular conjunction is the closest since 1623. The last easily visible very close conjunction was in the year 1226 (800 hundred years ago, during the Middle Ages!) The next close one will be in 2080, and then not again until after 2400, so be sure to see it this year.

Lick Observatory continues to be closed to the public due to COVID precautions and SCU fire recovery work.  We miss havi...
12/07/2020
Lick Observatory Virtual Tour

Lick Observatory continues to be closed to the public due to COVID precautions and SCU fire recovery work. We miss having our fans visit, but our science continues despite the natural disasters this year. The resident astronomers have put together this 30 minute virtual tour to share the current science, telescopes, and history of Lick Observatory with you until we can have you visit us in person again. https://youtu.be/7I7wuhzVBz0

A virtual tour of Lick Observatory produced by the resident staff astronomers highlighting the current science, telescopes, and history of the observatory. F...

Friends of Lick Observatory (FoLO) Gift Shop Special Offer! For a short time only FoLO members will receive an additiona...
12/04/2020

Friends of Lick Observatory (FoLO) Gift Shop Special Offer! For a short time only FoLO members will receive an additional discount at the online gift shop - 🎁 just in time for the holidays! Make a gift of $50 to our wildfire relief efforts to receive a complimentary FoLO membership and take advantage of this special opportunity. #giftshop #observatory #membership https://secure.ucsc.edu/s/1069/bp18/interior.aspx?sid=1069&gid=1001&pgid=1306&cid=2595

Emily Martin (UCSC) and her team got first light spectra of Mars with the PEAS (Planet as Exoplanet Analog Spectrograph)...
11/30/2020

Emily Martin (UCSC) and her team got first light spectra of Mars with the PEAS (Planet as Exoplanet Analog Spectrograph) telescope and spectrograph right before Thanksgiving (on a cold and windy night). Congratulations on the successful deployment of the newest telescope and instrument at Lick Observatory. Photos courtesy of X. Prochaska.

First snow of the season at Lick Observatory on Mount Hamilton was this afternoon, changing the black and brown charred ...
11/08/2020

First snow of the season at Lick Observatory on Mount Hamilton was this afternoon, changing the black and brown charred landscape from the SCU Lightning Complex Fire and turning it white. While the snow will probably prevent us from opening the domes and doing science tonight, we hope that the moisture will cement the ash and soot to the ground so it won't blow around onto our telescope mirrors and allow seeds to germinate and bring new life to the landscape. Photo courtesy of staff astronomer Elinor Gates.

We love PEAS, new instrumentation is arriving soon at Lick!
11/06/2020

We love PEAS, new instrumentation is arriving soon at Lick!

PEAS is assembled and ready for its final alignment after spending several months in the UCO shops getting put together. We're very excited to be taking it up to Lick Observatory later this month so we can start observing Solar System planets as if they are exoplanets. Emily Martin, PI of PEAS

Comet 17P/Holmes has a long history, discovered Nov 6, 1892 and observed a few days later by E. E. Barnard at Lick Obser...
11/02/2020
Comet of the Week: 17P/Holmes

Comet 17P/Holmes has a long history, discovered Nov 6, 1892 and observed a few days later by E. E. Barnard at Lick Observatory. The featured photograph in the article of the Andromeda Galaxy and the comet was taken November 10, 1892 by Barnard with the Great Lick Refractor. https://www.rocketstem.org/2020/11/01/ice-and-stone-comet-of-week-45/

Perihelion: 2007 May 4.50, q = 2.053 AU With the light pollution that is endemic to large metropolitan areas, it would seem difficult to believe that any significant astronomical observational activities could be conducted from cities like London these days. But things were different during the late...

UC Observatories
10/23/2020
UC Observatories

UC Observatories

The Friends of Lick Observatory are holding their 2nd virtual event for members on Nov 1st at 6pm. To become a member (your support goes to our Lick Fire recovery fund) and enjoy this exclusive live event, email [email protected] for more information. You can sign up here for membership https://connect.ucsc.edu/folo

Join us TODAY at 4pm -  https://ucsc.zoom.us/j/98932317498
10/20/2020

Join us TODAY at 4pm - https://ucsc.zoom.us/j/98932317498

Our next virtual event is Tuesday Oct 20th at 4pm.
Other Worlds: How we will study them - What we hope to find.
Planets around other stars are not just the domain of science fiction anymore. Over the past quarter century astronomers have gone from no knowledge of planets around other stars to being able to say how common or rare they are (spoiler: they’re common). Are any of these planets habitable? To learn this we need to develop improved telescopes and instrumentation. I will describe how a specialized technique called adaptive optics will enable us to study planets and speculate what we might find. Zoom link: https://ucsc.zoom.us/j/98932317498

Photo showing the washing of the 40-inch Nickel dome.
10/17/2020

Photo showing the washing of the 40-inch Nickel dome.

Lick Observatory Update: This week has seen a red flag event for the Bay Area. How does that affect Mt Hamilton? Power was lost during one of the windy nights. Kostas Chloros Lick superintendent reported “I stepped outside with my flashlight on and, without exaggeration, it was "snowing" ash.”
It was a huge effort to get all the telescopes optics and domes cleaned and prepared for operations, we need to be careful with all the ash that gets kicked around by even the lightest winds. Additional cleanup efforts are needed on a regular basis. The main priority is to protect the telescopes and avoid damaged optics. Until the rains come this will continue to be a problem for operation. You can help us with our recovery here at connect.ucsc.edu/ucodirectorfund Attached is a photo showing the washing of the 40-inch Nickel dome.

Phil Hinz is working on building new foundational equipment at the UCO Adaptive Optics Lab. The plan is to make custom s...
10/15/2020

Phil Hinz is working on building new foundational equipment at the UCO Adaptive Optics Lab. The plan is to make custom shells for the Automated Planet Finder (APF) and the Shane Telescope at Lick Observatory where we will test this new adaptive optics technology. See below for more info in the next UCO Virtual event.

Our next virtual event is Tuesday Oct 20th at 4pm.
Other Worlds: How we will study them - What we hope to find.
Planets around other stars are not just the domain of science fiction anymore. Over the past quarter century astronomers have gone from no knowledge of planets around other stars to being able to say how common or rare they are (spoiler: they’re common). Are any of these planets habitable? To learn this we need to develop improved telescopes and instrumentation. I will describe how a specialized technique called adaptive optics will enable us to study planets and speculate what we might find. Zoom link: https://ucsc.zoom.us/j/98932317498

UC Observatories
10/15/2020
UC Observatories

UC Observatories

We’re really sorry to have lost such a great supporter of Lick Observatory. Hal Hyde served first as a staff member at UCSC and then later in life supporting us philanthropically, we will truly miss this great man.

It's good to be back to producing some science at Lick!
10/14/2020

It's good to be back to producing some science at Lick!

We are excited to report that last night was the first night back on sky for the Shane Telescope at Lick Observatory since the fire. UCSC Postdoc Tiara Hung took this spectrum of the tidal disruption event plotted below while using our remote observing platform from her home last night. The object was observed at the center of the galaxy NGC 6297.

UC Observatories
10/08/2020
UC Observatories

UC Observatories

The University of California built remote observing rooms on its far-flung campuses so researchers didn’t need to travel to Lick and other telescopes. Since the arrival of COVID-19, the scheme has been extended to home laptops—“pajama observing,” Max calls it. “The days of flying to Hawaii to observe are numbered,” she says.

UC Observatories
10/07/2020
UC Observatories

UC Observatories

Free, illustrated, non-technical talk:
"The Hunt for Dark Matter in the Universe: New Experiments”
Wednesday, Oct. 14, 2020 7:00 p.m.
Dr. Tom Shutt, Kavli Institute at Stanford University
Co-sponsored by the University of California Observatories (including Lick Observatory)

UC Observatories
10/05/2020
UC Observatories

UC Observatories

Claire Max Director, UC Observatories:
As we work on getting back to operational status at Lick following the SCU fire, we want to share with you a video about one of our recent vegetation reduction projects. Even though the August 2020 SCU fire caused some damage to a few of Lick's residences and some infrastructure, the firefighters specifically remarked how the fire would have been far more destructive if the vegetation reduction project hadn't taken place.

If you want to help in Lick's recovery from the fire, a gift to the UCO Director’s Discretionary Fund will go towards the recovery projects under way at Lick. https://connect.ucsc.edu/ucodirectorfund

Additional donations can be made until noon today if you missed the opportunity to give yesterday. Please help by suppor...
10/01/2020
$15K MATCH: Lick Observatory Wildfire Relief

Additional donations can be made until noon today if you missed the opportunity to give yesterday. Please help by supporting Lick Observatory's recovery from the recent wildfires.

Matching funds available for this program! On August 18th, the nearly 130-year-old historic Observatory was saved from a wildfire. Join our efforts to restore scientific research and public outreach efforts on Mt. Hamilton!

Additional donations can be made until noon today if you missed the opportunity to give yesterday. Generous supporters h...
09/30/2020
$10K MATCH: Lab for Adaptive Optics, University of California Observatories

Additional donations can be made until noon today if you missed the opportunity to give yesterday. Generous supporters have provided an additional $10,000 in matching funds for the Adaptive Optics Kiln! Help us reach our goal to buy a new kiln supporting cutting-edge scientific techniques.

Matching funds available for this program! Adaptive optics lets us look farther into a clearer sky using ground-based telescopes. Join us in the greatest discoveries of the future!

The group with the most unique donors between 3 P.M. and 4 P.M. will win an additional $1,000!Generous supporters have p...
09/30/2020
$15K MATCH: Lick Observatory Wildfire Relief

The group with the most unique donors between 3 P.M. and 4 P.M. will win an additional $1,000!
Generous supporters have provided an additional $25,000 in matching funds! Challenges, like the one beginning at noon, can also win us additional funds. $15,000 Matching Funds to support our ongoing urgent recovery efforts following last month's wildfires:

No matter how you choose to support our efforts today, thank you in advance! If you have any questions or need help making your gift, please contact Natasha Pedroza at [email protected] (and yes, she will be responding until midnight!)

Matching funds available for this program! On August 18th, the nearly 130-year-old historic Observatory was saved from a wildfire. Join our efforts to restore scientific research and public outreach efforts on Mt. Hamilton!

09/22/2020
UC Observatories

We're still closed to the public. Please note the important information below.

Lick Update Sept 22 - Our staff are still fully engaged in recovery efforts due to the SCU Lightning Complex Fire.
Lick Observatory remains CLOSED to the public. For at least the next four weeks CalTrans will be busy working on Mount Hamilton Road with heavy equipment removing fire damaged trees, brush, and restoring the damaged road.
It’s really important that we keep the roads clear. PLEASE DO NOT try to enter the area whilst fire recovery efforts are in progress. As soon as it’s safe we will post to our social networks. We look forward to inviting you back at that time. You can donate to our recovery effort here. connect.ucsc.edu/ucodirectorfund - Thanks for all your support.

The scientist, the teacher, the legend: Special interview UCO Virtual Living Room with Alex Filippenko.   https://ucsc.z...
09/22/2020

The scientist, the teacher, the legend: Special interview UCO Virtual Living Room with Alex Filippenko. https://ucsc.zoom.us/j/98932317498 - Today at 4pm. Or watch on https://www.facebook.com/ucobservatories

UPDATE: FINAL CHANGE OF DATE FOR UPCOMING VIRTUAL EVENT Tuesday, SEPTEMBER 22 - 4pm.
The scientist, the teacher, the legend: Alex Filippenko. Get a special look at the teacher behind the scientist during this special interview edition of UCO's Living Room Lecture.
Zoom link: https://ucsc.zoom.us/j/98932317498
We appreciate your patience with us during what has been a very difficult time. We look forward to seeing you on September 22!

UPDATE: FINAL CHANGE OF DATE FOR UPCOMING VIRTUAL EVENT Tuesday, SEPTEMBER 22 - 4pm.  The scientist, the teacher, the le...
09/15/2020

UPDATE: FINAL CHANGE OF DATE FOR UPCOMING VIRTUAL EVENT Tuesday, SEPTEMBER 22 - 4pm.
The scientist, the teacher, the legend: Alex Filippenko. Get a special look at the teacher behind the scientist during this special interview edition of UCO's Living Room Lecture.
Zoom link: https://ucsc.zoom.us/j/98932317498
We appreciate your patience with us during what has been a very difficult time. We look forward to seeing you on September 22!

Address

7281 Mount Hamilton Rd
San Jose, CA
95140

Opening Hours

Thursday 12:00 - 17:00
Friday 12:00 - 17:00
Saturday 12:00 - 17:00
Sunday 12:00 - 17:00

Telephone

(408) 274-5061

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Comments

I continue to forget you get snow at Lick Observatory... Beautiful
HNY Lick Observatory!
This evening.
Brief History of the Alfred Noble Cases in Physics Case 01: History of Alfred Nobel Prize in Physics 1929: Expanding Universe: Astronomer Edwin P. Hubble- using the telescope, Astronomer Edwin P. Hubble first observed the distribution of galaxies in space. Scientists discovered that the universe is expanding and lawfully, Nobel foundation gave Nobel Prize to the scientist in 1929. See at: https://shahidurrahmansikder.wordpress.com/2010/01/18/edwin-p-hubble/ Hence, Edwin P. Hubble said- the universe is expanding. I am saying expended velocity of the universe is going forward towards the critical radius. Consequently lawful- The Universe is not Expanding: see into- most important the thesis at: https://lnkd.in/fCTyXV3 in order of merit- found realism- Who was the rightly one for as per expanding! Next Nobel Cases - 2006, 2017, 2019 and 2020 (Coming soon) _________________________ Little Examples: Case-05 Andrea Ghez (USA) Nobel Prize in Physics 2020, the prize was awarded for contributions for the pioneering research super massive black hole on the Milky Way’s. "Own mind and location is the present past for all” In this way I finding- information of Andrea Ghez (USA) she was not right about the super massive black hole & I am say that- First Stars are the super massive black holes after the Big Bang and age of the super massive black holes are above 10 billion years & this case or information only from our present time and location. Super massive black holes with hers all family’s member’s move and orbiting around into the Origins- Transcendent or the Primordial black hole or the Infinite/Allah/God/ Creator/Nature. See at: https://shahidurrahmansikder.wordpress.com/2010/02/06/newborn-stars/ See into information: “In naked eyes or through telescope is the evolution/variable from our angle of vision” In this way- We can’t find out the present pictures of any place of space or structure of sketch of the universe. In or under the circumstances- I can take the resolution that- Results of the observatory with my theoretical thesis the assessment of value of finally found- Real History of Present Eventful Universe. Consequently- It’s most important- Studies or Lesson for the World-wide Observatory Scientists. At: bit.ly/35EHgvZ in thesis files found- Exploring the Universe at the Highest Energies Science & Space. __________________________ The following the thesis reward for the Mankind: A New World & Universe to Explore Alone You are aware that in the research activities of space science and creation mystery there is no need for an academic or university higher degree. In this regard in the past history the names of philosophers are recorded who have contributed something new for mankind of the world but they did not attain academic education of their own. Yet! Alfred Nobel says that- Present time needs Higher Education for Nobel Prize in Physics. See into following below link page: History of famous scientists Galileo, Einstein, Hawking, Darwin and Hubble & James Peebles- in PDF URLs version: In order of merit found realism- Who is the rightly one for World frontier & Higher Degrees of World fore-knowledge of philosophy of faculty of sciences, astronomy, astrophysics & Cosmology with Infinite and Infinitesimal! https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/new-universe-explore-alone-shahidur-rahman-sikder/?published=t World-wide I am seeking who can give me strictly the right note on the thesis? Can give Support for world frontier & Higher Education Degrees with Support My Goals!
Did the observatory loose power today? The feed has stopped.
Lucky shot at my living room window.
Today is the anniversary of the birth, in Muskegon, Michigan on 27 Jun 1872, of the American astronomer Heber Doust Curtis. A graduate of the University of Virginia, he joined Lick Observatory (pictured here in 1900) after completing his Ph.D. in 1902 and remained there until 1920. His early work at Lick included measuring radial velocities of the brighter stars, following which he continued the survey of nebulae initiated by James Edward Keeler. In 1920 Curtis was appointed director of the Allegheny Observatory (pictured) of the University of Pittsburgh, and in April of the same year participated in the Great Debate with Harlow Shapley on the size of the universe and the nature of nebulae and galaxies. Speaking for ‘island universes’, he advocated the existence of other galaxies apart from the Milky Way, his views shown to be correct a few years later when the results of research carried out by Edwin Powell Hubble were announced. The 2.9 km diameter lunar crater Curtis, located to the east of the crater Picard in the western regions of Mare Crisium, is named in his honour.
Rocky Francisco repairing the large access doors of the 36. I took this opportunity to snap some photos because you never see this much light flooding in.
I have these to patches from Lick Observatory. Does anyone have any others?
Hello, does anyone know if the gate is open for cyclist and if there is access to the bathrooms and water on the weekends right now? I'm assuming the whole place is gated and off limits to pedestrians and cyclists alike, but thought I would ask.
My city of San Jose California.
Lick Observatory - Fall 1974. From my personal image collection.