San Diego Air & Space Museum

San Diego Air & Space Museum We are proud to be California's official air and space museum and education center located in Balboa Park. Preserve, Inspire, Educate, Celebrate!
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Visit our website at https://sandiegoairandspace.org and follow us on social media to join the fun. We respect all views, and we prefer to keep our religious and political opinions out of air and space. We ask that you do the same, and note that any disrespectful or excessively negative comments will be deleted.

Operating as usual

Throwback to July 15, 1933, when Wiley Post took off from Floyd Bennett Field in New York on his quest to become the fir...
07/15/2021

Throwback to July 15, 1933, when Wiley Post took off from Floyd Bennett Field in New York on his quest to become the first person to fly solo around the world. Almost 8 days later, he was successful when he landed the “Winnie Mae” at Floyd Bennett.

Throwback to July 15, 1933, when Wiley Post took off from Floyd Bennett Field in New York on his quest to become the first person to fly solo around the world. Almost 8 days later, he was successful when he landed the “Winnie Mae” at Floyd Bennett.

NASA delivered our new S-3B Viking yesterday to the Annex at Gillespie Field in El Cajon, where it will be on permanent ...
07/14/2021

NASA delivered our new S-3B Viking yesterday to the Annex at Gillespie Field in El Cajon, where it will be on permanent public display. We're so grateful and honored to have this historic and venerable airplane, which was the last flight worthy of its kind in the world. We thank NASA and share in their wonderful mission of inspiring the next generations of aviation enthusiasts and engineers! #NASA

The RTV-A-2 Hiroc had its first flight on July 13, 1948 at White Sands, New Mexico. What was it and who built it? #histo...
07/13/2021

The RTV-A-2 Hiroc had its first flight on July 13, 1948 at White Sands, New Mexico. What was it and who built it? #historytoday

The RTV-A-2 Hiroc had its first flight on July 13, 1948 at White Sands, New Mexico. What was it and who built it? #historytoday

The San Diego Air & Space Museum is proud to be the one-and-only host of the official Apollo 15 50th Anniversary. Clearl...
07/12/2021
San Diego Air & Space Museum - Balboa Park, San Diego

The San Diego Air & Space Museum is proud to be the one-and-only host of the official Apollo 15 50th Anniversary. Clearly one of the Apollo program’s finest moments, the Apollo 15 50th Anniversary Celebration takes place at the Museum on Saturday, July 31. Apollo 15 Commander Colonel David R. Scott (USAF Ret.) and Flight Director Gerry Griffin will highlight an All-Star panel discussion focusing on one the most carefully planned scientific explorations in human history. Learn more here! 🚀https://sandiegoairandspace.org/calendar/event/apollo-15-50th-anniversary-celebration

The San Diego Air & Space Museum in Historical Balboa Park welcomes you to visit. The Official Air & Space Museum and Education Center of California has many attractions for the entire family.

The San Diego Air & Space Museum is receiving a rare S-3B Viking aircraft at its Gillespie Field Annex between 2 p.m. an...
07/12/2021

The San Diego Air & Space Museum is receiving a rare S-3B Viking aircraft at its Gillespie Field Annex between 2 p.m. and 4 p.m. on Tuesday, July 13. The progress of NASA Flight 601 can be tracked in real time on FlightAware at https://flightaware.com/live/ The Museum’s Gillespie Field Annex is located at 335 Kenney Street, El Cajon, CA 92020. Weather permitting, the Viking is scheduled to depart Cleveland, Ohio at 6 a.m. Pacific Time on Tuesday, July 13. The plane will stop in El Paso, Texas, where it will remain for an hour before departing for San Diego. After a scheduled flyover of North Island Naval Air Station, the aircraft will fly to Gillespie Field in El Cajon, where it will land and taxi to its new home at the San Diego Air & Space Museum’s Annex. NASA’s rare S-3B is the last flight-worthy Viking in the world. Originally designed by Lockheed Martin for the U.S. Navy as an anti-submarine warfare (ASW) aircraft, the Viking was put out of active service by the U.S. Navy in 2009. NASA’s S-3B Viking was completely reconfigured in 2006 for flight research purposes. To learn more about NASA’s Viking, visit https://www.nasa.gov/feature/glenn/2021/NASA-retires-S-3B-Viking-research-aircraft-from-its-fleet

The San Diego Air & Space Museum is receiving a rare S-3B Viking aircraft at its Gillespie Field Annex between 2 p.m. and 4 p.m. on Tuesday, July 13. The progress of NASA Flight 601 can be tracked in real time on FlightAware at https://flightaware.com/live/ The Museum’s Gillespie Field Annex is located at 335 Kenney Street, El Cajon, CA 92020. Weather permitting, the Viking is scheduled to depart Cleveland, Ohio at 6 a.m. Pacific Time on Tuesday, July 13. The plane will stop in El Paso, Texas, where it will remain for an hour before departing for San Diego. After a scheduled flyover of North Island Naval Air Station, the aircraft will fly to Gillespie Field in El Cajon, where it will land and taxi to its new home at the San Diego Air & Space Museum’s Annex. NASA’s rare S-3B is the last flight-worthy Viking in the world. Originally designed by Lockheed Martin for the U.S. Navy as an anti-submarine warfare (ASW) aircraft, the Viking was put out of active service by the U.S. Navy in 2009. NASA’s S-3B Viking was completely reconfigured in 2006 for flight research purposes. To learn more about NASA’s Viking, visit https://www.nasa.gov/feature/glenn/2021/NASA-retires-S-3B-Viking-research-aircraft-from-its-fleet

07/11/2021

NEW TIME: Watch #UNITY22 launch and livestream TODAY at 7:30 am PT | 10:30 am ET | 3:30 pm BST.

Good morning from Spaceport America in New Mexico. Overnight weather delayed the start of flight preparations, but we are on track to fly today with a newly scheduled time.

WATCH: www.virgingalactic.com

Did you know the Sun accounts for 99.86% of the mass in our solar system? It has 330,000 times the mass of Earth! ☀️
07/10/2021

Did you know the Sun accounts for 99.86% of the mass in our solar system? It has 330,000 times the mass of Earth! ☀️

Did you know the Sun accounts for 99.86% of the mass in our solar system? It has 330,000 times the mass of Earth! ☀️

Dr. Robert Hutchings Goddard received a science degree from the Worcester Polytechnic Institute in 1908 and his doctorat...
07/09/2021

Dr. Robert Hutchings Goddard received a science degree from the Worcester Polytechnic Institute in 1908 and his doctorate in physics from Clark University in 1911. He taught physics at Clark University from 1909 to 1911 and at Princeton from 1912 to 1913. At this time, Dr. Goddard began his monumental work on the development of rockets by mathematically exploring the practicability of using rocket escape velocity for space flight. In 1914, he received the first United States patent on the idea of multi-stage rockets. By 1916, when Dr. Goddard reached the limit of his own resources, the Smithsonian Institution gave him a grant that enabled him to continue his work on solid-propellant rockets and to begin development on liquid propellant vehicles. During World War I, he developed and demonstrated the basic idea of a Bazooka-type weapon to the United States Army. On March 16, 1926, after more than 15 years of research, Dr. Goddard launched the world's first liquid-fueled rocket in Auburn, Massachusetts. It traveled 184 feet in 2½ seconds, at an average speed of 70 miles per hour. This was followed by another liquid-fueled 11-foot rocket launched on July 17, 1929, which carried a payload of a small camera and barometer. Thus the new era of controlled liquid-fueled rocketry was born. From 1930 to 1932, and again from 1934 to 1942, Dr. Goddard took a leave of absence from Clark University to engage in rocket research under a Guggenheim Foundation grant. On March 28, 1935, he fired the first rocket equipped with gyroscopic controls. This rocket attained a height of 4,800 feet, a distance of 13,000 feet, and a speed of 550 miles per hour. During World War II, the United States Navy assigned Dr. Goddard to develop practical jet-assisted takeoff and liquid propellant rocket motors capable of variable thrust.

Dr. Goddard was inducted into the prestigious International Air & Space Hall of Fame at the San Diego Air & Space Museum in 1966.

Dr. Robert Hutchings Goddard received a science degree from the Worcester Polytechnic Institute in 1908 and his doctorate in physics from Clark University in 1911. He taught physics at Clark University from 1909 to 1911 and at Princeton from 1912 to 1913. At this time, Dr. Goddard began his monumental work on the development of rockets by mathematically exploring the practicability of using rocket escape velocity for space flight. In 1914, he received the first United States patent on the idea of multi-stage rockets. By 1916, when Dr. Goddard reached the limit of his own resources, the Smithsonian Institution gave him a grant that enabled him to continue his work on solid-propellant rockets and to begin development on liquid propellant vehicles. During World War I, he developed and demonstrated the basic idea of a Bazooka-type weapon to the United States Army. On March 16, 1926, after more than 15 years of research, Dr. Goddard launched the world's first liquid-fueled rocket in Auburn, Massachusetts. It traveled 184 feet in 2½ seconds, at an average speed of 70 miles per hour. This was followed by another liquid-fueled 11-foot rocket launched on July 17, 1929, which carried a payload of a small camera and barometer. Thus the new era of controlled liquid-fueled rocketry was born. From 1930 to 1932, and again from 1934 to 1942, Dr. Goddard took a leave of absence from Clark University to engage in rocket research under a Guggenheim Foundation grant. On March 28, 1935, he fired the first rocket equipped with gyroscopic controls. This rocket attained a height of 4,800 feet, a distance of 13,000 feet, and a speed of 550 miles per hour. During World War II, the United States Navy assigned Dr. Goddard to develop practical jet-assisted takeoff and liquid propellant rocket motors capable of variable thrust.

Dr. Goddard was inducted into the prestigious International Air & Space Hall of Fame at the San Diego Air & Space Museum in 1966.

Throwback to July 8, 1908, when Thérèse Peltier was a passenger with Léon Delagrange in his Voisin biplane. It is widely...
07/08/2021

Throwback to July 8, 1908, when Thérèse Peltier was a passenger with Léon Delagrange in his Voisin biplane. It is widely believed that this was the first time a woman flew in an airplane!

Throwback to July 8, 1908, when Thérèse Peltier was a passenger with Léon Delagrange in his Voisin biplane. It is widely believed that this was the first time a woman flew in an airplane!

Our Gillespie Field Annex is going to be getting a new resident!
07/08/2021
NASA retires S-3B Viking research aircraft from its fleet

Our Gillespie Field Annex is going to be getting a new resident!

When the U.S. Navy retired its fleet of S-3B Vikings from active duty in 2009, not all of them were grounded. At NASA’s Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, one S-3B was being used almost daily as a flight research aircraft.

Pan American Airways was once the largest airline in the world and during its heyday in the 1930s, offered the most luxu...
07/07/2021
San Diego Air & Space Museum - Balboa Park, San Diego

Pan American Airways was once the largest airline in the world and during its heyday in the 1930s, offered the most luxurious and comfortable air passenger service on their famous “Clipper” flying boats. Named for the square-rigged, clipper sailing ships of the 1800s, the Pan American Clippers were the first to carry air passengers around the globe. Explore the magnificent Boeing 314 Clipper in this comprehensive online exhibit: https://sandiegoairandspace.org/exhibits/online-exhibit-page/introduction-boeing-314-exhibit

The San Diego Air & Space Museum in Historical Balboa Park welcomes you to visit. The Official Air & Space Museum and Education Center of California has many attractions for the entire family.

On July 6, 1919, the Royal Air Force Airship R.34 arrived in the United States.  Why was this so significant?
07/06/2021

On July 6, 1919, the Royal Air Force Airship R.34 arrived in the United States. Why was this so significant?

On July 6, 1919, the Royal Air Force Airship R.34 arrived in the United States. Why was this so significant?

From everyone at the San Diego Air & Space Museum, have a happy and safe Fourth of July! 🇺🇸
07/04/2021

From everyone at the San Diego Air & Space Museum, have a happy and safe Fourth of July! 🇺🇸

From everyone at the San Diego Air & Space Museum, have a happy and safe Fourth of July! 🇺🇸

Stars don’t twinkle. This appearance of sparkling or flashing comes from Earth’s atmosphere. The light from a star must ...
07/03/2021

Stars don’t twinkle. This appearance of sparkling or flashing comes from Earth’s atmosphere. The light from a star must pass through many layers of atmosphere that often differ in density. This deflects the light small amounts, like a ball in a pinball machine and causes the appearance of “twinkling.”

Stars don’t twinkle. This appearance of sparkling or flashing comes from Earth’s atmosphere. The light from a star must pass through many layers of atmosphere that often differ in density. This deflects the light small amounts, like a ball in a pinball machine and causes the appearance of “twinkling.”

Please join the San Diego Air & Space Museum in wishing former NASA astronaut and moonwalker Harrison “Jack” Schmitt a h...
07/03/2021

Please join the San Diego Air & Space Museum in wishing former NASA astronaut and moonwalker Harrison “Jack” Schmitt a happy and healthy 86th birthday, today, July 3. Schmitt was the Lunar Module Pilot on Apollo 17, landing on the Moon with Commander Gene Cernan in December 1972 on board the Lunar Module (LEM) “Challenger” while Command Module Pilot Ronald Evans orbited above in the Command Module “America.” It was the final in-person visit to the Moon during the storied Apollo program, and Schmitt and Cernan were the last two men to explore the lunar surface. Schmitt later became a Senator for the state of New Mexico and served as Chairman of the Science, Technology and Space Subcommittee of the United States Senate Committee on Commerce. Happy Birthday Harrison!

Please join the San Diego Air & Space Museum in wishing former NASA astronaut and moonwalker Harrison “Jack” Schmitt a happy and healthy 86th birthday, today, July 3. Schmitt was the Lunar Module Pilot on Apollo 17, landing on the Moon with Commander Gene Cernan in December 1972 on board the Lunar Module (LEM) “Challenger” while Command Module Pilot Ronald Evans orbited above in the Command Module “America.” It was the final in-person visit to the Moon during the storied Apollo program, and Schmitt and Cernan were the last two men to explore the lunar surface. Schmitt later became a Senator for the state of New Mexico and served as Chairman of the Science, Technology and Space Subcommittee of the United States Senate Committee on Commerce. Happy Birthday Harrison!

The Blue Angels are the United States Navy's Flight Demonstration Squadron, performing air shows in the United States an...
07/02/2021

The Blue Angels are the United States Navy's Flight Demonstration Squadron, performing air shows in the United States and foreign nations. They performed their first flight demonstration in June 1946 at their home base, Naval Air Station (NAS) Jacksonville, Florida, flying the Grumman F6F Hellcat. The mission of the Blue Angels is to enhance Navy and Marine Corps recruiting efforts and to represent the naval service to the United States, its elected leadership and foreign nations. They serve as positive role models and goodwill ambassadors. Their flight demonstrations exhibit choreographed refinements of skills possessed by all naval aviators. The team illustrates the pinnacle of precision flying, performing maneuvers locked as a unit in the renowned, six-jet Delta Formation. Over the past several decades, the Blues have flown several types of aircraft, including the Grumman F11F-1 Tiger, the McDonnell Douglas F-4J Phantom II, and the A-4F Skyhawk II. On November 8, 1986, the Blue Angels completed their 40th anniversary year. During this ceremony, they unveiled their present aircraft, the new sleek F/A-18 Hornet, the first dual-role fighter/attack aircraft now serving on the nation's front lines of defense. The team is stationed at Forrest Sherman Field, Naval Air Station Pensacola, Florida, during the show season. However, the squadron spends January through March training pilots and new team members at Naval Air Facility El Centro, California. Since 1946, the Blue Angels have performed for more than 427 million fans and are certainly one of the world's most respected and watched flight teams.

The Blue Angels were inducted into the prestigious International Air & Space Hall of Fame at the San Diego Air & Space Museum in 2009.

The Blue Angels are the United States Navy's Flight Demonstration Squadron, performing air shows in the United States and foreign nations. They performed their first flight demonstration in June 1946 at their home base, Naval Air Station (NAS) Jacksonville, Florida, flying the Grumman F6F Hellcat. The mission of the Blue Angels is to enhance Navy and Marine Corps recruiting efforts and to represent the naval service to the United States, its elected leadership and foreign nations. They serve as positive role models and goodwill ambassadors. Their flight demonstrations exhibit choreographed refinements of skills possessed by all naval aviators. The team illustrates the pinnacle of precision flying, performing maneuvers locked as a unit in the renowned, six-jet Delta Formation. Over the past several decades, the Blues have flown several types of aircraft, including the Grumman F11F-1 Tiger, the McDonnell Douglas F-4J Phantom II, and the A-4F Skyhawk II. On November 8, 1986, the Blue Angels completed their 40th anniversary year. During this ceremony, they unveiled their present aircraft, the new sleek F/A-18 Hornet, the first dual-role fighter/attack aircraft now serving on the nation's front lines of defense. The team is stationed at Forrest Sherman Field, Naval Air Station Pensacola, Florida, during the show season. However, the squadron spends January through March training pilots and new team members at Naval Air Facility El Centro, California. Since 1946, the Blue Angels have performed for more than 427 million fans and are certainly one of the world's most respected and watched flight teams.

The Blue Angels were inducted into the prestigious International Air & Space Hall of Fame at the San Diego Air & Space Museum in 2009.

Address

2001 Pan American Plz
San Diego, CA
92101

SDMT Route 7, Get off at Park and Presidents Way

Opening Hours

Monday 10am - 4:30pm
Tuesday 10am - 4:30pm
Wednesday 10am - 4:30pm
Thursday 10am - 4:30pm
Friday 10am - 4:30pm
Saturday 10am - 4:30pm
Sunday 10am - 5pm

Telephone

(619) 234-8291

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https://www.facebook.com/1474473743/posts/10220113028724023/ Dick joined the U. S. Army Air Corps in 1942. He flew 180 combat missions in North Africa and Italy in the P-47 Thunderbolt earning four Distinguished Flying Crosses, fourteen Air Medals, the Legion of Merit and a Silver Star. He flew six more combat missions in the Korean conflict in the F-86 to demonstrate the benefits of a new wing design. As an Air Force test pilot after WWII, Dick flew every fighter, bomber and cargo aircraft in the Air Force inventory. In addition, he flew all the RAF aircraft of the period as well as the French Ouragon, Mystere-II, IV and IVB. He flew the first military flights of the XF-91, 93, 94, 95 and 96, and was the first to exceed Mach 1 in many other types. In 1953, Dick joined General Dynamics, Convair Division as their Chief Engineering Test Pilot, initially starting in San Diego, then to Edwards Air Force Base and, finally to Fort Worth. During his time with Convair, he was instrumental in the development and deployment of the F-102, F-106, B-58, F-111 and F-16. He piloted the first flights of the YF-102, F-106 and F-111. In 1955 Dick was one of six civilian test pilots who formed the “Testy Test Pilots Society”, which, a short time later became the Society of Experimental Test Pilots In addition to the previously mentioned military awards, Dick was awarded the Society of Experimental Test Pilots’ Iven C. Kincheloe Award, Henri de las Vaulx Award, Thompson Trophy, MacKay Trophy, Flying Tiger Trophy, Federation Aeronautique Internationale Gold Medal, Golden Plate Award of the American Academy of Achievement and the Aerospace Walk of Honor. In 1977, Dick retired from General Dynamics as Director of Flight and Quality Assurance. He died in 2002/ He andhis wife, Binkey, are interred at Arlington National Cemetery. They had three children: Richard L II, Kristie and Lisa. Dick was my uncle.
In 1953, Dick joined General Dynamics (GD), Convair as a their Chief Engineering Tesrt Pilot. During his time with GD, Dick was instrumental in the development and deployment of the F-102, F-106, B-58, F-111 and F-16. He made the first flights in the YF-102, F-106 and F-111. In 1955, Dick was one of the six founding members of the Testy Test Pilots Society, which later became the Society of Experimental Test Pilots. Dick entered the U.S. Army Air Corps in 1942 and flew 180 combat missions in the P-47 Thunderbolt. He was awarded four Distinguished Flying Crosses, fourteen Air Medals, the Legion of Merit and a Silver Star for his heroic actions in aerial combat. He also flew six combat missions in the F-86 during the Korean War, to demonstrate the benefits of a wing modification. During his time as a an Air Force test pilot after WWII, Dick flew every fighter, bomber and cargo aircraft in the Air Force inventory as well as the X-1. In addition, he few all the RAF aircraft of the period and the French Ouragon, Mystere II,IV and IVB. In addition to the military awards previously mentioned, Dick was the recipient of: Society of Experimentl Test Pilots’ Ivan C. Kincheloe Award, the Henri de la Vaulx Award, Thompson Trophy, Flying Tiger Trophy, Federation Aeronautiique Internationale Gold Medals, Golden Plate Award of the American Academy of Achievement and induction into the Aerospace WAlk of Honor in Lancaster, CA. Dick retired from GD in 1977 as their Director of Flight and Quality Assurance. He died in 2002 and is interred with his wife, Binkey, at Arlington National Cemetery. Dick and Binky had threee children: Richard L II, Kristie and Lisa. Dick is my uncle.
Just got e-mail about summer camp opening soon. I hope you do well. Way to go pushing the stem programs. good luck. god speed.🤠
I am the person who sold the Ryan STA to Mr, Ryan so it can hang in the Museum He signed my log book and we spent time in his ofice and it was the best day of my life. I am now going on 88 years old and of course do not fly anymore but at least still drive my Corvette and have my log book hanging open to Ryans signatur on my office wall I then got into the Commerative Air force and helped start the wing in Mesa and have left seated the B-17 flown in the B-29 and miss flying till the day I die. I was also a commercial hot air balloon pilot and was the first to take off from Deer Valley Airport with my Balloon. I h kept an aircraft radio in it and also got to left seat the Good Year Blimp for about an half an hour as I had a commerial and muli-engine rarting also. The high light of my life was talking to Mr. Ryan for about an hour. I have pics of our landing at Lindberg field that day. My best wishes to all of you as the Museum is just wonderful and I have been back twice. Best regards to you and all the docents that were kind to me on my other trips to the Museum. Aaron Berkowitz 1425 E. Villa Rita Dr. Phoenix az. 602 404 5707
I visited in 1991 ,I remember seeing a Spitfire there and met a great guy who flew Stearman biplanes who also worked on the Sally B Flying fortress for the film at somewhere like Chino ? Excellent.
Convair 880 hand painted Not in great shape but thought I would share
The most fabulous Paradise Island in the mid-Atlantic Ocean, is the unknown Fernando de Noronha Archipelago, on the Equator. It was used by the USAAF in WWII as a 'fixed' Aircraft carrier deck. The USA stepped into the European War theater by early 1942 and began to stream thousands of aircraft to Africa with an unprecedented ferry via air corridors. A string of airfields was constructed or extended for this purpose to create a Central Atlantic route that went from Florida into the Caribbean, on along via the Brazilian North coast. Via Belem, the aircraft came to Natal, at the NE point of that continent. From there the longest leg had to be flown over the Atlantic to Monrovia, Liberia in W. Africa, a distance over an open ocean of 3100 km/ 1900 miles. For the single-engine fighters and twin-engine aircraft of that time quite a challenge. A solution to shorten that hop was presented by this tiny island, 350 km. NE off Natal's shore. It was in use as a prison island, the Brazilian version of Alcatraz. The US Military bulldozered in no time an airstrip, barracks, and port facilities to bring in fuel, mechanics, and spare parts for the planned influx of ferry pilots and aircraft. This aircraft stopover came in use in Spring 1942 and gave way for the aircraft sent to North Africa to push General Rommel's Army out of Africa. Later in the war, this route was also used for flights to the Middle East and Iran, to supply the Russian war effort with American aircraft. As the flight range of aircraft grew, the airfield was more used as an emergency station and in 1944, it became a Naval Air station. Operations were handed over to the US Navy, which flew anti-sub patrols over the mid-Atlantic with Catalina's PBY-5A as shown in this picture. For more information, see www.catalinabook.com Hans Wiesman www.dc3dakotahunter.com
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👨‍🚀Hello SD Air and Space Museum Friends! It's SO exciting for me to bring you this news! I'm the Associate Producer the multiple award-winning documentary 𝗖𝗵𝗲𝘀𝗹𝗲𝘆 𝗕𝗼𝗻𝗲𝘀𝘁𝗲𝗹𝗹: 𝗔 𝗕𝗿𝘂𝘀𝗵 𝘄𝗶𝘁𝗵 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗙𝘂𝘁𝘂𝗿𝗲 and our film JUST became available on 𝘼𝙈𝘼𝙕𝙊𝙉 𝙋𝙍𝙄𝙈𝙀 𝙑𝙄𝘿𝙀𝙊! I hope you'll watch the trailer for more information about 𝘁𝗵𝗶𝘀 𝗮𝗺𝗮𝘇𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝘀𝗽𝗮𝗰𝗲 𝗮𝗿𝘁𝗶𝘀𝘁 𝘄𝗵𝗼 𝗵𝗲𝗹𝗽𝗲𝗱 𝗶𝗻𝘀𝗽𝗶𝗿𝗲 𝗔𝗺𝗲𝗿𝗶𝗰𝗮'𝘀 𝗦𝗽𝗮𝗰𝗲 𝗣𝗿𝗼𝗴𝗿𝗮𝗺! If you like what you see in this trailer, perhaps you'll visit our Amazon Prime Video page in this Shared Post to watch the film! Thank you!😀 https://www.facebook.com/watch/?v=377630606693913
The census is a population count done by the federal government every 10 years. Your response helps to direct billions of dollars in federal funds to local communities for health care, emergency response, schools, education programs, roads, and other public services. Responding takes only a few minutes to complete. The census is 9 questions, takes 10 minutes and counts for the next 10 years. Your response is safe, secure, and confidential. Your information is protected by law. The last day to respond is October 15, 2020. Call 619-695-5657 for help responding to the census from the Downtown SD Area Census Office until 5pm or go to my2020census.gov to complete it now!
Sad to see the city council go ahead and tear out all of the Handicap parking in front of the air and space museum and the automotive museum. The walk to these two venues will now be a hardship for those of us that are limited in walking distance and is a big disappointment to me personally. This is just another huge roadblock for those of us that are mobility limited along with the elimination of dozens of handicap and regular parking that the council has deemed not necessary in the the park and downtown areas. I know that the council had all of these concerns brought to their attention but refused to change their minds because more lawns and flowers were more important than me and those of us with the same problem.