San Diego Air & Space Museum

San Diego Air & Space Museum We are proud to be California's official air and space museum and education center located in Balboa Park. Preserve...Inspire...Educate...Celebrate!
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Visit our website at https://sandiegoairandspace.org and follow us on social media to join the fun. We respect all views, and we prefer to keep our religious and political opinions out of air & space. We ask that you do the same, and note that any disrespectful or excessively negative comments will be deleted.

Operating as usual

Happy National Week of Making! This week is about celebrating creativity, innovation, and imagination, plus a time to ge...
05/17/2021
SDASM Challenge - Roller Coaster

Happy National Week of Making! This week is about celebrating creativity, innovation, and imagination, plus a time to get hands-on and build. If you’re looking for inspiration, try our catalog of STEM Challenges, like this roller coaster project! 🎢https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cB6rO-bLXmE

Missing the amusement park? Build your own roller coaster! Grab a marble, a ping pong ball, anything that can roll, and create a series of ramps, loops, and ...

Astronauts are trained to use the restroom every few hours because in the microgravity of space, it can be hard to tell ...
05/15/2021

Astronauts are trained to use the restroom every few hours because in the microgravity of space, it can be hard to tell if they have to “go.” On Earth, the planet’s gravity pulls the urine to the bottom of your bladder and, as pressure increases, you start to feel the urge to relieve yourself. In space, the urine is dispersed in the bladder, and astronauts only feel pressure when the bladder is really full, which can lead to accidents.

Astronauts are trained to use the restroom every few hours because in the microgravity of space, it can be hard to tell if they have to “go.” On Earth, the planet’s gravity pulls the urine to the bottom of your bladder and, as pressure increases, you start to feel the urge to relieve yourself. In space, the urine is dispersed in the bladder, and astronauts only feel pressure when the bladder is really full, which can lead to accidents.

Brigadier General Robert L. “Bob” Cardenas, USAF (RET) has flown over 60 different aircraft in his career as a test pilo...
05/14/2021

Brigadier General Robert L. “Bob” Cardenas, USAF (RET) has flown over 60 different aircraft in his career as a test pilot, combat leader in bombers and fighters and Commander of the Air Force Special Operations Force. Gen. Cardenas began his military career as a private in the Army Cost Artillery. He became a pilot as a cadet in the Army Air Corps, and was commissioned a 2nd Lt. in July 1941. In 1942, he was sent to Twenty-nine Palms, CA to establish an Army Air Corps Glider School. His distinguished military career included flying combat missions in B-24 Liberators over Germany. Shot down on his 20th mission, he evaded capture and escaped. Gen. Cardenas has been a key figure in many of our foreign military operations, including Korea, India, the Himalayan Mountains, Pakistan, Thailand, and North Vietnam.

As a test pilot, he participated in the flight test evaluation of the German jet fighter ME-262 and the Arado 234 bomber. Cardenas was a key member of the X-1 supersonic project. He served as operations officer and command pilot of the B-29 that launched Captain Charles Yeager into the realm of supersonic flight. As the U.S. Deputy to Live Oak in Belgium his responsibility to SACEUR was to maintain open corridors to Berlin by calling the Soviets bluff to block travel to Berlin by land, air or rail. Prior to his retirement in June 1973, General Cardenas served as Chief of the JL Division of the Joint Strategic Target Planning Staff (JSTPS), where he was responsible for the development of the Joint Strategic Target List of the U.S. nuclear War Plan (SIOP). General Cardenas has many honors, including the Distinguished Service Medal, Distinguished Flying Cross, Purple Heart, Meritorious Service Medal, Joint Service Commendation Medal, and the Presidential Citation.

General Robert Cardenas was inducted into the International Air & Space Hall of Fame at the San Diego Air & Space Museum in 2008.

Brigadier General Robert L. “Bob” Cardenas, USAF (RET) has flown over 60 different aircraft in his career as a test pilot, combat leader in bombers and fighters and Commander of the Air Force Special Operations Force. Gen. Cardenas began his military career as a private in the Army Cost Artillery. He became a pilot as a cadet in the Army Air Corps, and was commissioned a 2nd Lt. in July 1941. In 1942, he was sent to Twenty-nine Palms, CA to establish an Army Air Corps Glider School. His distinguished military career included flying combat missions in B-24 Liberators over Germany. Shot down on his 20th mission, he evaded capture and escaped. Gen. Cardenas has been a key figure in many of our foreign military operations, including Korea, India, the Himalayan Mountains, Pakistan, Thailand, and North Vietnam.

As a test pilot, he participated in the flight test evaluation of the German jet fighter ME-262 and the Arado 234 bomber. Cardenas was a key member of the X-1 supersonic project. He served as operations officer and command pilot of the B-29 that launched Captain Charles Yeager into the realm of supersonic flight. As the U.S. Deputy to Live Oak in Belgium his responsibility to SACEUR was to maintain open corridors to Berlin by calling the Soviets bluff to block travel to Berlin by land, air or rail. Prior to his retirement in June 1973, General Cardenas served as Chief of the JL Division of the Joint Strategic Target Planning Staff (JSTPS), where he was responsible for the development of the Joint Strategic Target List of the U.S. nuclear War Plan (SIOP). General Cardenas has many honors, including the Distinguished Service Medal, Distinguished Flying Cross, Purple Heart, Meritorious Service Medal, Joint Service Commendation Medal, and the Presidential Citation.

General Robert Cardenas was inducted into the International Air & Space Hall of Fame at the San Diego Air & Space Museum in 2008.

Throwback to May 13, 1940, when the Vought-Sikorsky VS-300 made its first untethered flight. The VS-300 is considered by...
05/13/2021

Throwback to May 13, 1940, when the Vought-Sikorsky VS-300 made its first untethered flight. The VS-300 is considered by many to be the “grandfather” of today’s single rotor choppers! #tbt

Throwback to May 13, 1940, when the Vought-Sikorsky VS-300 made its first untethered flight. The VS-300 is considered by many to be the “grandfather” of today’s single rotor choppers! #tbt

In honor of Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month, we want to share this online exhibit highlighting a few ...
05/12/2021

In honor of Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month, we want to share this online exhibit highlighting a few trailblazing aviators and astronauts. Enjoy! https://sandiegoairandspace.org/exhibits/online-exhibit-page/asian-americans-in-aviation

In honor of Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month, we want to share this online exhibit highlighting a few trailblazing aviators and astronauts. Enjoy! https://sandiegoairandspace.org/exhibits/online-exhibit-page/asian-americans-in-aviation

On May 11, 1932, three sailors rose to great heights above Camp Kearny while holding onto a rope. Two of the sailors wou...
05/11/2021

On May 11, 1932, three sailors rose to great heights above Camp Kearny while holding onto a rope. Two of the sailors would fall to their deaths, but one would survive by holding onto the rope for over an hour before being rescued. What was this rope attached to? Watch it here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pF5_OLJGPQY

On May 11, 1932, three sailors rose to great heights above Camp Kearny while holding onto a rope. Two of the sailors would fall to their deaths, but one would survive by holding onto the rope for over an hour before being rescued. What was this rope attached to? Watch it here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pF5_OLJGPQY

Happy Astronomy Week! Have you heard of One Sky, One Postcard? Check out this project, run by Astronomers Without Border...
05/10/2021

Happy Astronomy Week! Have you heard of One Sky, One Postcard? Check out this project, run by Astronomers Without Borders, to engage your creativity and contribute to a collage of the night sky as seen from around the world. Link: https://my.astronomerswithoutborders.org/events/event-description?CalendarEventKey=24191226-5b1c-4378-9a48-6c2a9bc9bc1f&Home=%2fhigherlogic%2focapi%2fadmin%2fevents%2fManageCalendarEvents%2fGetEventsForCalendar

Happy Astronomy Week! Have you heard of One Sky, One Postcard? Check out this project, run by Astronomers Without Borders, to engage your creativity and contribute to a collage of the night sky as seen from around the world. Link: https://my.astronomerswithoutborders.org/events/event-description?CalendarEventKey=24191226-5b1c-4378-9a48-6c2a9bc9bc1f&Home=%2fhigherlogic%2focapi%2fadmin%2fevents%2fManageCalendarEvents%2fGetEventsForCalendar

Happy Mother’s Day to all the moms that help us soar and reach our dreams!
05/09/2021

Happy Mother’s Day to all the moms that help us soar and reach our dreams!

Happy Mother’s Day to all the moms that help us soar and reach our dreams!

Did you know that over 50,000 meteorites have been found on Earth? 99.8 percent of these come from asteroids, but the re...
05/08/2021

Did you know that over 50,000 meteorites have been found on Earth? 99.8 percent of these come from asteroids, but the rest have been traced back to Mars and the Moon. Scientists think that these meteorites were created by the impact of large meteorites on Mars and the Moon blasting fragments of each body into space. ☄️

Did you know that over 50,000 meteorites have been found on Earth? 99.8 percent of these come from asteroids, but the rest have been traced back to Mars and the Moon. Scientists think that these meteorites were created by the impact of large meteorites on Mars and the Moon blasting fragments of each body into space. ☄️

Fran Bera started flying in December of 1940 at Grand Rapids, Michigan while she was in high school, skipping class to t...
05/07/2021

Fran Bera started flying in December of 1940 at Grand Rapids, Michigan while she was in high school, skipping class to take lessons. Inspired by a dollar plane ride at the local fairgrounds, she saved her school lunch money to pay for these lessons. By the age of 16, she had flown her first solo flight and soon after, earned her commercial license and flight instructor rating. During World War II, Fran qualified as a free fall parachutist, and after the war, she ferried surplus-aircraft around the country. She became one of the first women FAA Pilot Examiners at the then minimum age of 24.

She was a Pilot Examiner for private, commercial, multi-engine and instrument ratings for more than 25 years, certifying more than 3,000 pilots. As an experimental test pilot for Lift Systems, Inc., Bera was the first woman to fly a helicopter with no tail rotor. She also was one of 25 women invited to participate in a week-long testing program of potential women astronauts at the Lovelace Clinic in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Bera was a seven-time winner of the All Woman Transcontinental Air Race (Powder Puff Derby), won the Palm to Pines All Women's Air Race in 1997, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2004, and 2005, and placed in other speed races, including the Reno Air Races and the International Air Race. For 31 years, she held the world altitude record for class C-l-d aircraft, established in June 1966 in Long Beach, California, in a Piper Apache. An active member of The 99s, Fran also was a member of Whirly Girls, Silver Wings, and AOPA. Bera passed away in San Diego on February 10, 2018. She was 94.

Fran Bera was inducted into the International Air & Space Hall of Fame at the San Diego Air & Space Museum in 2007.

Fran Bera started flying in December of 1940 at Grand Rapids, Michigan while she was in high school, skipping class to take lessons. Inspired by a dollar plane ride at the local fairgrounds, she saved her school lunch money to pay for these lessons. By the age of 16, she had flown her first solo flight and soon after, earned her commercial license and flight instructor rating. During World War II, Fran qualified as a free fall parachutist, and after the war, she ferried surplus-aircraft around the country. She became one of the first women FAA Pilot Examiners at the then minimum age of 24.

She was a Pilot Examiner for private, commercial, multi-engine and instrument ratings for more than 25 years, certifying more than 3,000 pilots. As an experimental test pilot for Lift Systems, Inc., Bera was the first woman to fly a helicopter with no tail rotor. She also was one of 25 women invited to participate in a week-long testing program of potential women astronauts at the Lovelace Clinic in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Bera was a seven-time winner of the All Woman Transcontinental Air Race (Powder Puff Derby), won the Palm to Pines All Women's Air Race in 1997, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2004, and 2005, and placed in other speed races, including the Reno Air Races and the International Air Race. For 31 years, she held the world altitude record for class C-l-d aircraft, established in June 1966 in Long Beach, California, in a Piper Apache. An active member of The 99s, Fran also was a member of Whirly Girls, Silver Wings, and AOPA. Bera passed away in San Diego on February 10, 2018. She was 94.

Fran Bera was inducted into the International Air & Space Hall of Fame at the San Diego Air & Space Museum in 2007.

Throwback to May 6, 1949, when San Diego based Pacific Southwest Airlines began service to Oakland in a DC-3. The “Poor ...
05/06/2021

Throwback to May 6, 1949, when San Diego based Pacific Southwest Airlines began service to Oakland in a DC-3. The “Poor Sailor’s Airline” would grow to have a reputation as one of the friendliest ones around!

Throwback to May 6, 1949, when San Diego based Pacific Southwest Airlines began service to Oakland in a DC-3. The “Poor Sailor’s Airline” would grow to have a reputation as one of the friendliest ones around!

One of the most significant artifacts in the San Diego Air and Space Museum’s collection is the moon rock on display nea...
05/05/2021

One of the most significant artifacts in the San Diego Air and Space Museum’s collection is the moon rock on display near the exit of the Space Exhibit. The rock was collected by the astronauts of Apollo 17, the last manned mission to the moon in 197. We have learned much about the history of the moon from rocks such as ours, which is on loan from NASA. https://sandiegoairandspace.org/collection/item/apollo-17-moon-rock

One of the most significant artifacts in the San Diego Air and Space Museum’s collection is the moon rock on display near the exit of the Space Exhibit. The rock was collected by the astronauts of Apollo 17, the last manned mission to the moon in 197. We have learned much about the history of the moon from rocks such as ours, which is on loan from NASA. https://sandiegoairandspace.org/collection/item/apollo-17-moon-rock

Are you ready for the Astronaut Challenge? Check out our NEW preschool lunar adventure game on Tuesday mornings, or join...
05/05/2021

Are you ready for the Astronaut Challenge? Check out our NEW preschool lunar adventure game on Tuesday mornings, or join us for Fun with Physics on Fridays to experiment with motion, gravity and lift! https://sandiegoairandspace.org/calendar/event/little-engineers-museum-days

Are you ready for the Astronaut Challenge? Check out our NEW preschool lunar adventure game on Tuesday mornings, or join us for Fun with Physics on Fridays to experiment with motion, gravity and lift! https://sandiegoairandspace.org/calendar/event/little-engineers-museum-days

On this date May 5, 1961, Alan B. Shepard, Jr. became the first American astronaut to travel to space aboard Mercury-Red...
05/05/2021

On this date May 5, 1961, Alan B. Shepard, Jr. became the first American astronaut to travel to space aboard Mercury-Redstone 3 in his spacecraft, Freedom 7. A graduate of the United States Naval Academy at Annapolis, Shepard saw action with the surface navy during World War II. He became a naval aviator in 1947, and a test pilot in 1950. He was selected as one of the original NASA Mercury Seven astronauts in 1959. After two years of extensive training, Shepard piloted the Mercury spacecraft through its first successful sub-orbital flight. Although the flight lasted only 15 minutes, the capsule reached an altitude of 16 miles and a speed of 5,180 miles per hour. This historic flight was the beginning of America’s manned space program. Shepard later walked on the Moon as Commander of Apollo 14 in February 1971. Shepard was inducted into the International Air & Space Hall of Fame at the San Diego Air & Space Museum in 1971.

On this date May 5, 1961, Alan B. Shepard, Jr. became the first American astronaut to travel to space aboard Mercury-Redstone 3 in his spacecraft, Freedom 7. A graduate of the United States Naval Academy at Annapolis, Shepard saw action with the surface navy during World War II. He became a naval aviator in 1947, and a test pilot in 1950. He was selected as one of the original NASA Mercury Seven astronauts in 1959. After two years of extensive training, Shepard piloted the Mercury spacecraft through its first successful sub-orbital flight. Although the flight lasted only 15 minutes, the capsule reached an altitude of 16 miles and a speed of 5,180 miles per hour. This historic flight was the beginning of America’s manned space program. Shepard later walked on the Moon as Commander of Apollo 14 in February 1971. Shepard was inducted into the International Air & Space Hall of Fame at the San Diego Air & Space Museum in 1971.

On May 4, 1936, this aviator started a journey on which a new United Kingdom to South Africa speed record of 3 days 6 ho...
05/04/2021

On May 4, 1936, this aviator started a journey on which a new United Kingdom to South Africa speed record of 3 days 6 hours 26 minutes was set. Who was it?

On May 4, 1936, this aviator started a journey on which a new United Kingdom to South Africa speed record of 3 days 6 hours 26 minutes was set. Who was it?

T-minus 7 weeks until the start of summer camp! Don’t miss out on small classes, safe practices, and tons of aerospace f...
05/03/2021

T-minus 7 weeks until the start of summer camp! Don’t miss out on small classes, safe practices, and tons of aerospace fun, with in-person and virtual options available. Registration is filling quickly, so grab your spot today!
https://sandiegoairandspace.org/calendar/event/summer-camps-2021

T-minus 7 weeks until the start of summer camp! Don’t miss out on small classes, safe practices, and tons of aerospace fun, with in-person and virtual options available. Registration is filling quickly, so grab your spot today!
https://sandiegoairandspace.org/calendar/event/summer-camps-2021

Address

2001 Pan American Plz
San Diego, CA
92101

SDMT Route 7, Get off at Park and Presidents Way

Opening Hours

Monday 10:00 - 16:30
Tuesday 10:00 - 16:30
Wednesday 10:00 - 16:30
Thursday 10:00 - 16:30
Friday 10:00 - 16:30
Saturday 10:00 - 16:30
Sunday 10:00 - 17:00

Telephone

(619) 234-8291

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Just got e-mail about summer camp opening soon. I hope you do well. Way to go pushing the stem programs. good luck. god speed.🤠
I am the person who sold the Ryan STA to Mr, Ryan so it can hang in the Museum He signed my log book and we spent time in his ofice and it was the best day of my life. I am now going on 88 years old and of course do not fly anymore but at least still drive my Corvette and have my log book hanging open to Ryans signatur on my office wall I then got into the Commerative Air force and helped start the wing in Mesa and have left seated the B-17 flown in the B-29 and miss flying till the day I die. I was also a commercial hot air balloon pilot and was the first to take off from Deer Valley Airport with my Balloon. I h kept an aircraft radio in it and also got to left seat the Good Year Blimp for about an half an hour as I had a commerial and muli-engine rarting also. The high light of my life was talking to Mr. Ryan for about an hour. I have pics of our landing at Lindberg field that day. My best wishes to all of you as the Museum is just wonderful and I have been back twice. Best regards to you and all the docents that were kind to me on my other trips to the Museum. Aaron Berkowitz 1425 E. Villa Rita Dr. Phoenix az. 602 404 5707
I visited in 1991 ,I remember seeing a Spitfire there and met a great guy who flew Stearman biplanes who also worked on the Sally B Flying fortress for the film at somewhere like Chino ? Excellent.
Convair 880 hand painted Not in great shape but thought I would share
The most fabulous Paradise Island in the mid-Atlantic Ocean, is the unknown Fernando de Noronha Archipelago, on the Equator. It was used by the USAAF in WWII as a 'fixed' Aircraft carrier deck. The USA stepped into the European War theater by early 1942 and began to stream thousands of aircraft to Africa with an unprecedented ferry via air corridors. A string of airfields was constructed or extended for this purpose to create a Central Atlantic route that went from Florida into the Caribbean, on along via the Brazilian North coast. Via Belem, the aircraft came to Natal, at the NE point of that continent. From there the longest leg had to be flown over the Atlantic to Monrovia, Liberia in W. Africa, a distance over an open ocean of 3100 km/ 1900 miles. For the single-engine fighters and twin-engine aircraft of that time quite a challenge. A solution to shorten that hop was presented by this tiny island, 350 km. NE off Natal's shore. It was in use as a prison island, the Brazilian version of Alcatraz. The US Military bulldozered in no time an airstrip, barracks, and port facilities to bring in fuel, mechanics, and spare parts for the planned influx of ferry pilots and aircraft. This aircraft stopover came in use in Spring 1942 and gave way for the aircraft sent to North Africa to push General Rommel's Army out of Africa. Later in the war, this route was also used for flights to the Middle East and Iran, to supply the Russian war effort with American aircraft. As the flight range of aircraft grew, the airfield was more used as an emergency station and in 1944, it became a Naval Air station. Operations were handed over to the US Navy, which flew anti-sub patrols over the mid-Atlantic with Catalina's PBY-5A as shown in this picture. For more information, see www.catalinabook.com Hans Wiesman www.dc3dakotahunter.com
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👨‍🚀Hello SD Air and Space Museum Friends! It's SO exciting for me to bring you this news! I'm the Associate Producer the multiple award-winning documentary 𝗖𝗵𝗲𝘀𝗹𝗲𝘆 𝗕𝗼𝗻𝗲𝘀𝘁𝗲𝗹𝗹: 𝗔 𝗕𝗿𝘂𝘀𝗵 𝘄𝗶𝘁𝗵 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗙𝘂𝘁𝘂𝗿𝗲 and our film JUST became available on 𝘼𝙈𝘼𝙕𝙊𝙉 𝙋𝙍𝙄𝙈𝙀 𝙑𝙄𝘿𝙀𝙊! I hope you'll watch the trailer for more information about 𝘁𝗵𝗶𝘀 𝗮𝗺𝗮𝘇𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝘀𝗽𝗮𝗰𝗲 𝗮𝗿𝘁𝗶𝘀𝘁 𝘄𝗵𝗼 𝗵𝗲𝗹𝗽𝗲𝗱 𝗶𝗻𝘀𝗽𝗶𝗿𝗲 𝗔𝗺𝗲𝗿𝗶𝗰𝗮'𝘀 𝗦𝗽𝗮𝗰𝗲 𝗣𝗿𝗼𝗴𝗿𝗮𝗺! If you like what you see in this trailer, perhaps you'll visit our Amazon Prime Video page in this Shared Post to watch the film! Thank you!😀 https://www.facebook.com/watch/?v=377630606693913
The census is a population count done by the federal government every 10 years. Your response helps to direct billions of dollars in federal funds to local communities for health care, emergency response, schools, education programs, roads, and other public services. Responding takes only a few minutes to complete. The census is 9 questions, takes 10 minutes and counts for the next 10 years. Your response is safe, secure, and confidential. Your information is protected by law. The last day to respond is October 15, 2020. Call 619-695-5657 for help responding to the census from the Downtown SD Area Census Office until 5pm or go to my2020census.gov to complete it now!
Sad to see the city council go ahead and tear out all of the Handicap parking in front of the air and space museum and the automotive museum. The walk to these two venues will now be a hardship for those of us that are limited in walking distance and is a big disappointment to me personally. This is just another huge roadblock for those of us that are mobility limited along with the elimination of dozens of handicap and regular parking that the council has deemed not necessary in the the park and downtown areas. I know that the council had all of these concerns brought to their attention but refused to change their minds because more lawns and flowers were more important than me and those of us with the same problem.
Happy Aviation day!!!! ✈️ we saw you on the news today and would love to come visit soon. Thanks for the mini tour and sharing about some of the people and aircraft from your exhibits.
For our kids, for ourselves, for the next 10 years. Lets ensure our communities receive the funding they deserve. Respond to the 2020 Census by calling the San Diego Area Census Office at 619-695-5657 Monday-Friday 9am-5pm Para nuestros niños, para nosotros, para los proximo diez años. Tenemos que asegurar que nuestras comunidades reciban los fundos que merecen. Responda a el Censo del 2020 llame a la Oficina del Census en San Diego al 619-695-5657. Se habla Español. Lunes a Viernes, 9am-5pm.