Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego

Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego The Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego invites all audiences to experience our world, our region, and ourselves through the prism of contemporary art.
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Operating as usual

MCASD invites you to enjoy another Family ArtLAB: Take-Home Edition.A playful artmaking experience for the whole family ...
06/18/2021
MCASD Family ArtLAB: Land Art

MCASD invites you to enjoy another Family ArtLAB: Take-Home Edition.

A playful artmaking experience for the whole family will be available to pick up on Saturday, June 26 at Westfield UTC.

MCASD presents the work of American sculptor Beverly Pepper at Westfield UTC & invites you to make your own sculptures with these art kits!

ICYMI: Our 2021 Teen Advisory Group showcase is now on view digitally. This year, TAG members were given the opportunity...
06/15/2021
Teen Advisory Group (TAG) 2021 Culminating Digital Showcase — MCASD: Digital

ICYMI: Our 2021 Teen Advisory Group showcase is now on view digitally.

This year, TAG members were given the opportunity to explore topics they felt most passionate about as part of the overall theme of Art and Activism.

MCASD Teen Advisory Group (TAG) presents a Culminating Digital Showcase of student work from the 2020-2021 year focusing on Art and Activism.

06/13/2021
2021 Teen Advisory Group Showcase

The Teen Advisory Group (TAG) is part of the Museum's teen programming and convenes youth from across San Diego. Through the theme of Art and Activism, TAG members discussed social issues through an artistic lens and met with various local artists and community members to further discuss and explore how youth can express and create social change through art. The year-long work eventually resulted in a museum hybrid-exhibition, showcasing the culmination of the teens' exploration into diverse topics digitally and site-specific at the Museum’s downtown location.

During this chaotic year, TAG’s fantastic team of diverse San Diego teenagers were able to speak to topics they were passionate about, such as discrimination, COVID 19, feminism, women’s rights, LGBTQ+, and fast fashion. Through online learning, TAGsters were able to have explorative and productive conversations about their topics, learn about many artists and activists and make moving and bold statements through their created artwork about their passions. They watched videos, studied articles, explored MCASD artworks in the permanent collection relating to activism, met a few artists such as Audrey Chan, Michelle Montjoy, and Sarah Turner, and conversed about these critical issues.

This year, TAG members were given the opportunity to explore topics they felt most passionate about as part of the overall theme of Art and Activism. Our members highlighted issues such as women’s inequality, impacts of fast fashion, Asian hate crimes, Climate Change, and LGBTQ+ inequality. Since many of our members ended up being women, many of our projects speak on women’s rights. Everyone chose topics they deeply cared about, and it shows in all the pieces they produced.

As covid began, we had to adjust to a completely online world, and so did TAG. Starting in fall 2020, TAG members attended zoom meetings, and all work was conducted at home - which was not something that came easy. Days seemed to stretch for hours sitting in front of a computer, so of course, it wasn’t easy as everyone adjusted. We managed to rally for each meeting and created art as the year progressed, which was necessary for many people who were struggling.

Through TAG’s unique learning, we hope to inspire the rest of the young generations and others to speak on issues they are passionate about and to make a change.

The Teen Advisory Group (TAG) is part of the Museum's teen programming and convenes members from across San Diego. With ...
06/12/2021

The Teen Advisory Group (TAG) is part of the Museum's teen programming and convenes members from across San Diego. With this year's theme of Art and Activism, TAG members discuss social issues through an artistic lens and meet with various local artists and educated people to further discuss and explore how one can express and create social change through art. The year-long work eventually results in a museum exhibition, showcasing the culmination of the teens' exploration into diverse topics.

During this chaotic year, TAG’s fantastic team of diverse San Diego teenagers were able to speak on topics they were passionate about, such as discrimination, COVID 19, feminism, rights, and fast fashion. Through online learning, they were able to have productive conversations about their topics, learn about many artists and activists and make moving and bold artwork about their passions. They watched videos, studied articles, explored MCASD artworks relating to activism, met a few artists such as Audrey Chan, Michelle Montjoy, and Sarah Turner, and conversed about these critical issues.

For this year’s TAG, members were allowed to speak on topics they felt most passionate about as part of the overall theme of Art and Activism. Our members highlighted issues such as women’s inequality, impacts of fast fashion, Asian hate crimes, Climate Change, and LGBTQ inequality. Since many of our members ended up being women, many of our projects speak on women’s rights. Everyone chose topics they deeply cared about, and it shows in all the pieces they produced.

Through TAG’s learning, we hope to inspire the rest of the young generations and others to speak on issues they are passionate about and to make a change.

—Devon, Ellie, Fiona, Isa, & Lily

[Artwork from the 2021 Teen Advisory Group. View their showcase via the link our bio and hear directly from TAG tomorrow Saturday, Jbune 12 at 11 AM on via our page]

Art with a view. 👀 This is a snapshot from La Jolla this past spring as we steadily move forward with our expansion. Thi...
06/08/2021

Art with a view. 👀 This is a snapshot from La Jolla this past spring as we steadily move forward with our expansion. This 📸 was taken from the brand new Cohn Gallery that will feature artworks from our permanent collection alongside this picturesque view. We can’t wait to welcome you back here in Spring 2022! 🖼🌴🌊

Art with a view. 👀 This is a snapshot from La Jolla this past spring as we steadily move forward with our expansion. This 📸 was taken from the brand new Cohn Gallery that will feature artworks from our permanent collection alongside this picturesque view. We can’t wait to welcome you back here in Spring 2022! 🖼🌴🌊

In September 1965 Ruth Asawa ventured to the Tamarind Lithography Workshop where she was able to develop a significant b...
06/05/2021

In September 1965 Ruth Asawa ventured to the Tamarind Lithography Workshop where she was able to develop a significant body of work that ranged from abstractions to portraits and flower studies. Producing an unprecedented fifty-two lithographs during her fellowship, an impressive output accomplished because of the attention of seven printers, Asawa created numerous lithographs that varied in form, structure, and subject matter.

Here we see several images of Asawa working alongside her printers, emphasizing the collaborative nature that is necessary as part of the lithographic process.

See these images and more in our digital exhibition 𝘌𝘹𝘱𝘦𝘳𝘪𝘮𝘦𝘯𝘵𝘴 𝘰𝘯 𝘚𝘵𝘰𝘯𝘦 on view at mcasd.org/eos or via the link in our bio. @ruthasawaofficial

[#RuthAsawa at the Tamarind Lithography Workshop, 1965. Photograph by Hank Baum © Estate of @ruthasawaofficial]

"Material, space, and color are the main aspects of visual art. Everyone knows that there is material that can be picked...
06/03/2021

"Material, space, and color are the main aspects of visual art. Everyone knows that there is material that can be picked up and sold, but no one sees space and color. Two of the main aspects of art are invisible; the basic nature of art is invisible.“—Donald Judd, the American artist associated with minimalism, was #bornonthisday.

By the early 1960s, Judd had become known for his art writing and criticism. As he began exhibiting his own art, he was quickly associated with a group of artists exploring simplified geometries and working with industrial materials and processes. Often working with commercial fabricators, Judd removed the hand of the artist from his practice, breaking away from the painting traditions of the previous decades. He believed that painting was inherently representational and illusionistic, preferring to work in three dimensions; however, he maintained that his work was not traditionally sculpture, instead describing his visually austere and formally rectilinear works as “objects.” In 1965, Judd’s essay “Specific Objects” proposed a new category of practices that prioritized the three-dimensionality he developed in his own work.

This untitled object from that same year encapsulates these ideas in a simple yet nuanced protrusion that extends off the wall. A solid frame made of galvanized steel surrounds each side, while two sheets of deep green Plexiglas enclose the top and bottom. Installed with its top edge just over five feet from the ground, it stretches two feet into the room. Like many of his peers, Judd attended to the architectural space where his works are displayed. This single form seems like an isolated element from his series of “stacks,” in which multiple boxes—typically ten or more—are arranged vertically. Here, the lone shape invites the viewer to peer over, under, and into the space within the work. Against the gallery wall, light moves through and radiates from the translucent Plexiglas.

[#DonaldJudd 𝘜𝘯𝘵𝘪𝘵𝘭𝘦𝘥 1965 from the #MCASD Collection]

"Material, space, and color are the main aspects of visual art. Everyone knows that there is material that can be picked up and sold, but no one sees space and color. Two of the main aspects of art are invisible; the basic nature of art is invisible.“—Donald Judd, the American artist associated with minimalism, was #bornonthisday.

By the early 1960s, Judd had become known for his art writing and criticism. As he began exhibiting his own art, he was quickly associated with a group of artists exploring simplified geometries and working with industrial materials and processes. Often working with commercial fabricators, Judd removed the hand of the artist from his practice, breaking away from the painting traditions of the previous decades. He believed that painting was inherently representational and illusionistic, preferring to work in three dimensions; however, he maintained that his work was not traditionally sculpture, instead describing his visually austere and formally rectilinear works as “objects.” In 1965, Judd’s essay “Specific Objects” proposed a new category of practices that prioritized the three-dimensionality he developed in his own work.

This untitled object from that same year encapsulates these ideas in a simple yet nuanced protrusion that extends off the wall. A solid frame made of galvanized steel surrounds each side, while two sheets of deep green Plexiglas enclose the top and bottom. Installed with its top edge just over five feet from the ground, it stretches two feet into the room. Like many of his peers, Judd attended to the architectural space where his works are displayed. This single form seems like an isolated element from his series of “stacks,” in which multiple boxes—typically ten or more—are arranged vertically. Here, the lone shape invites the viewer to peer over, under, and into the space within the work. Against the gallery wall, light moves through and radiates from the translucent Plexiglas.

[#DonaldJudd 𝘜𝘯𝘵𝘪𝘵𝘭𝘦𝘥 1965 from the #MCASD Collection]

As we celebrate female printmakers' artistic practice in the exhibition 𝘌𝘹𝘱𝘦𝘳𝘪𝘮𝘦𝘯𝘵𝘴 𝘰𝘯 𝘚𝘵𝘰𝘯𝘦: 𝘍𝘰𝘶𝘳 𝘞𝘰𝘮𝘦𝘯 𝘈𝘳𝘵𝘪𝘴𝘵𝘴 𝘧𝘳𝘰𝘮 𝘵𝘩...
06/02/2021

As we celebrate female printmakers' artistic practice in the exhibition 𝘌𝘹𝘱𝘦𝘳𝘪𝘮𝘦𝘯𝘵𝘴 𝘰𝘯 𝘚𝘵𝘰𝘯𝘦: 𝘍𝘰𝘶𝘳 𝘞𝘰𝘮𝘦𝘯 𝘈𝘳𝘵𝘪𝘴𝘵𝘴 𝘧𝘳𝘰𝘮 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘛𝘢𝘮𝘢𝘳𝘪𝘯𝘥 𝘓𝘪𝘵𝘩𝘰𝘨𝘳𝘢𝘱𝘩𝘺 𝘞𝘰𝘳𝘬𝘴𝘩𝘰𝘱, we want to highlight female printmakers' work in our community. For over 25 years, Sibyl made fabric art for the interior design trade. She is the former proprietor of Bay Park Press, a small fine arts press specializing in limited edition artists’ books and fine intaglio prints. Sibyl is currently the manager of the Print Studio at the @athenaeummusicandarts.

Join Sibyl for a virtual tour of the Print Studio this Saturday, June 5 at 1 PM PST. She will show the several presses here that permit different types of printmaking and explain some of the basics of each kind: relief, intaglio, and letterpress. Following the tour, she will lead a printing workshop, learn how to make your monoprint images at home without a press. We will explore a few accessible forms of mono-printing using everyday materials. Visit the link in our bio to see the materials list and to register.

As we celebrate female printmakers' artistic practice in the exhibition 𝘌𝘹𝘱𝘦𝘳𝘪𝘮𝘦𝘯𝘵𝘴 𝘰𝘯 𝘚𝘵𝘰𝘯𝘦: 𝘍𝘰𝘶𝘳 𝘞𝘰𝘮𝘦𝘯 𝘈𝘳𝘵𝘪𝘴𝘵𝘴 𝘧𝘳𝘰𝘮 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘛𝘢𝘮𝘢𝘳𝘪𝘯𝘥 𝘓𝘪𝘵𝘩𝘰𝘨𝘳𝘢𝘱𝘩𝘺 𝘞𝘰𝘳𝘬𝘴𝘩𝘰𝘱, we want to highlight female printmakers' work in our community. For over 25 years, Sibyl made fabric art for the interior design trade. She is the former proprietor of Bay Park Press, a small fine arts press specializing in limited edition artists’ books and fine intaglio prints. Sibyl is currently the manager of the Print Studio at the @athenaeummusicandarts.

Join Sibyl for a virtual tour of the Print Studio this Saturday, June 5 at 1 PM PST. She will show the several presses here that permit different types of printmaking and explain some of the basics of each kind: relief, intaglio, and letterpress. Following the tour, she will lead a printing workshop, learn how to make your monoprint images at home without a press. We will explore a few accessible forms of mono-printing using everyday materials. Visit the link in our bio to see the materials list and to register.

Made by X: Sibyl Rubottom is this Saturday, June 5! Visit this link to register and learn more. Join Sibyl Rubottom, mas...
06/02/2021
Made by X: Sibyl Rubottom

Made by X: Sibyl Rubottom is this Saturday, June 5! Visit this link to register and learn more.

Join Sibyl Rubottom, master printer and manager of the Print Studio at the Athenaeum Music & Arts Library in Logan Heights, for a virtual tour of the Print Studio. Following the tour, she will lead a printing workshop, learn how to make your monoprint images at home without a press.

Join Sibyl Rubottom, master printer and manager of the Print Studio at the Athenaeum Art Center (AAC) in Logan Heights, for a virtual tour of the Print Studio. She will show the several presses here that permit different types of printmaking and explain some of the basics of each kind: relief, intag...

"My forms are geometric, but they don't interact in a geometric sense. They're just forms that exist everywhere, even if...
05/31/2021

"My forms are geometric, but they don't interact in a geometric sense. They're just forms that exist everywhere, even if you don't see them."—Ellsworth Kelly, one of the most renowned abstract artists of the twentieth century, was #bornonthisday.

Kelly abandoned traditional strategies of composition to create innovative explorations of color and form. Throughout his career, Kelly based his paintings on the “abstract visions” he saw in the world. These visions are drawn from the shadows cast by a building or the light emanating from a window. While Kelly’s painting remains entirely abstract, the artist’s bold color and geometric shapes remain connected to the everyday world.

[#EllsworthKelly, 𝘠𝘦𝘭𝘭𝘰𝘸/𝘉𝘭𝘢𝘤𝘬 1970 from the #MCASD Collection]

"My forms are geometric, but they don't interact in a geometric sense. They're just forms that exist everywhere, even if you don't see them."—Ellsworth Kelly, one of the most renowned abstract artists of the twentieth century, was #bornonthisday.

Kelly abandoned traditional strategies of composition to create innovative explorations of color and form. Throughout his career, Kelly based his paintings on the “abstract visions” he saw in the world. These visions are drawn from the shadows cast by a building or the light emanating from a window. While Kelly’s painting remains entirely abstract, the artist’s bold color and geometric shapes remain connected to the everyday world.

[#EllsworthKelly, 𝘠𝘦𝘭𝘭𝘰𝘸/𝘉𝘭𝘢𝘤𝘬 1970 from the #MCASD Collection]

Reposted from our friends at Balboa Art Conservation Center.・・・Is there anything more satisfying than seeing decades of ...
05/29/2021

Reposted from our friends at Balboa Art Conservation Center.
・・・
Is there anything more satisfying than seeing decades of grime lifted from a piece of artwork? Ahhh. (Make sure to check our second slide to see what we mean).

Our painting conservators have been busy cleaning the whimsical, exuberant work of French American artist Niki de Saint Phalle (1930–2002). Made with an inner metal wire skeleton, covered in layers of paper (and perhaps more metal?), and then painted, the Niki Charitable Art Foundation notes that de Saint Phalle used Flash paints which came in super vibrant colors but some of the more vibrant ones have significantly faded with light exposure. While the Foundation is ok with leaving the faded areas as they are, they did ask us to address dust and accretions, and some structural issues like flaking paint and losses, and repairing a broken leg.

Working on painted surfaces like this can be very similar to working on an easel painting in terms of the materials and how to clean them, but dealing with 3D structures makes for a more physically demanding treatment. You may see our conservators with heads upside down for parts of it. 🙃

The work at BACC will be headed to The Menil Collection in Texas but will return to San Diego in Spring 2022 for Niki de Saint Phalle in the 1960s at MCASD , the first exhibition to focus on the experimental and prolific work artist during a pivotal decade in the United States. Affirming the artist’s place in postwar art history, this show will highlight de Saint Phalle's prescient works of performance, participatory, and feminist art, as well as her many transatlantic projects and collaborations.

If you are in Southern California you can see the artist's work at the Escondido Arts Partnership--Municipal Gallery now until April 2022 in the exhibition Colorations, as well!
#balboaartconservationcenter #nikidesaintphalle #artconservation

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The Art of Manuel Miranda. Anterio/ Verissimo. Mixed Media on Paper, 6" x 12," 1981.
The Art of Manuel Miranda. Balbidio Rey. Mixed Media on Paper 9" x 6," 1981.
The Art of Manuel Miranda.
The Art of Manuel Miranda. Infinite Musician. Mixed Media on Paper, 7" x 10," 1985.
the romance of madeleine 1634 in loudun France oil on canvas
Tamiel and Araziel the exile
The monster is ours
the Art of Manuel Miranda. Ator Kel. Crayon on Paper, 10" x 6," 1980.
The Art of Manuel Miranda. Atra Kuty. Mixed Media on Paper, 10" x 6," 1991.
The Art of Manuel Miranda. Ario Chey. Ink on Paper, 5” x 8,” 1992.
My art # revenge of the fallen Angels ,blessings 🙏
The Art of Manuel Miranda.