Vinyl Preservation Society of San Diego

Vinyl Preservation Society of San Diego Preservation and education of vinyl recording heritage, collecting, playing and all associated matters of analog musicology regardless of listening tastes
(4)

05/11/2024

RIP Sam Rubin, a true entertainment broadcasting ICON. Your knowledge, integrity and positivity will be missed, by millions.

https://youtu.be/kajfMTEU_oY?si=1X_6EH5Ejyyk4-fjI suggest everyone watch this video to better understand who the worlds ...
01/17/2024

https://youtu.be/kajfMTEU_oY?si=1X_6EH5Ejyyk4-fj

I suggest everyone watch this video to better understand who the worlds migrants are and what they are going through. Also seeing that the easiest part is being taken in by the USA. I don't claim to have the answers but I do know this is an education that everyone needs.

La Bestia, the train of death. To some, it's the world's deadliest train.It's a freight train that runs from Mexico's southern border up north. It's a lifeli...

Amazing information my friends, drink it up!!
01/14/2024

Amazing information my friends, drink it up!!

One of the myths about historical recordings relates to the sound quality: it is assumed that all old discs are scratchy and faded, with a limited dynamic range. In fact a lot of recordings from the 78rpm era have phenomenal sound and when well transferred the piano tone can be truly astonishing.

When Marcelle Meyer's recordings began to re-enter the catalogue about a quarter century after her 1958 death, the focus was on some of her superb LP recordings for Les Discophiles Fran├žais: cycles of Rameau, Scarlatti, Chabrier, and Ravel. As I've written extensively, I encountered her playing in the late 1980s and have been on a soapbox about her ever since, introducing her playing to the likes of Harold C Schonberg, and I am delighted that she is now much more widely known and appreciated.

In the early 90s, more extensive box sets started being released that included some of her performances on 78s, but the transfers of these generally did not showcase her sonority to its best advantage. While the comprehensive set released in 2008 was far better than most, a couple of uploads that I am sharing today demonstrate that even better transfers are possible.

I stumbled across a transfer of Meyer's May 19-20, 1947 recording of Bach's Partita No.6 in E Minor BWV 830 that captures her crisply defined articulation, beauty of tone, and fluid phrasing with more fidelity than I've ever heard in her 78s. Meyer had set down a few Bach premiere recordings at the time - the English Suite No.4, Partita No.3, and Toccatas in D Minor BWV 913 and F-Sharp Minor BWV 910 were the first piano performances of these works on record - and if this Partita isn't a world premiere, it certainly is a magnificent account worth revisiting, especially in this transfer, which I've shared in the comments thread.

Her Scarlatti was also superb, and while a lot of pianists record albums of his music now, it is a little known fact that Meyer recorded the most ample collections of his music to that date: a set of 27 in 1946 and 1948-49 and 32 in 1954 (the latter were until recently much more widely available). The same YouTube channel has shared a transfer of her 2nd cycle of 78s, 14 Sonatas set down on December 20, 1948 and May 10, 1949. While some of the discs are a little scratchier than in the Bach, by and large there is not much crackle here and the piano tone is absolutely superb.

If Meyer is new to you, you have a lot of amazing listening to catch up on - she was one of the most wide-ranging and phenomenal pianists to have left us recordings. I'll share, as I always do, a more detailed overview of her life and artistry from my website in the comments.

Astonishingly vibrant playing from an astounding pianist!

01/14/2024

One of the myths about historical recordings relates to the sound quality: it is assumed that all old discs are scratchy and faded, with a limited dynamic range. In fact a lot of recordings from the 78rpm era have phenomenal sound and when well transferred the piano tone can be truly astonishing.

When Marcelle Meyer's recordings began to re-enter the catalogue about a quarter century after her 1958 death, the focus was on some of her superb LP recordings for Les Discophiles Fran├žais: cycles of Rameau, Scarlatti, Chabrier, and Ravel. As I've written extensively, I encountered her playing in the late 1980s and have been on a soapbox about her ever since, introducing her playing to the likes of Harold C Schonberg, and I am delighted that she is now much more widely known and appreciated.

In the early 90s, more extensive box sets started being released that included some of her performances on 78s, but the transfers of these generally did not showcase her sonority to its best advantage. While the comprehensive set released in 2008 was far better than most, a couple of uploads that I am sharing today demonstrate that even better transfers are possible.

I stumbled across a transfer of Meyer's May 19-20, 1947 recording of Bach's Partita No.6 in E Minor BWV 830 that captures her crisply defined articulation, beauty of tone, and fluid phrasing with more fidelity than I've ever heard in her 78s. Meyer had set down a few Bach premiere recordings at the time - the English Suite No.4, Partita No.3, and Toccatas in D Minor BWV 913 and F-Sharp Minor BWV 910 were the first piano performances of these works on record - and if this Partita isn't a world premiere, it certainly is a magnificent account worth revisiting, especially in this transfer, which I've shared in the comments thread.

Her Scarlatti was also superb, and while a lot of pianists record albums of his music now, it is a little known fact that Meyer recorded the most ample collections of his music to that date: a set of 27 in 1946 and 1948-49 and 32 in 1954 (the latter were until recently much more widely available). The same YouTube channel has shared a transfer of her 2nd cycle of 78s, 14 Sonatas set down on December 20, 1948 and May 10, 1949. While some of the discs are a little scratchier than in the Bach, by and large there is not much crackle here and the piano tone is absolutely superb.

If Meyer is new to you, you have a lot of amazing listening to catch up on - she was one of the most wide-ranging and phenomenal pianists to have left us recordings. I'll share, as I always do, a more detailed overview of her life and artistry from my website in the comments.

Astonishingly vibrant playing from an astounding pianist!

https://www.ebay.com/itm/176102912156
12/21/2023

https://www.ebay.com/itm/176102912156

Crafted in the United States, the MXR EVH90 features a sturdy build and is compatible with synths, acoustic and electric guitars, and bass guitars. This sale includes the pedal itself, I have taken the battery out.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/176104251557
12/21/2023

https://www.ebay.com/itm/176104251557

Tone and Distortion: Frequencies sent through electronics; the frequencies distorted. This is not just another Boss distortion. Another cool thing about this pedal is the blend feature. I like mixing the two using about 3/4 OD 1/4 distortion.

11/03/2023
11/03/2023

Ray Charles & Buck Owens

1970

10/20/2023

Awesome!! What? You can't afford a horn? Make due!! Make it happen! and be better than the dude with a horn!!

Address

1939 Grand Avenue
San Diego, CA
92109

Opening Hours

Monday 10am - 5pm
Tuesday 10am - 5pm
Wednesday 10am - 4pm
Thursday 10am - 4pm
Friday 10am - 4pm
Saturday 10am - 4pm
Sunday 10am - 4pm

Telephone

+18584903961

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