Marston House Museum

Marston House Museum www.twitter.com/Marston_House One of California's finest examples of the Arts and Crafts movement. Constructed in 1905 for George W. Marston and his wife, Anna Gunn Marston.
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Designed and built by architects William H. Hebbard and Irving J. Gill.

Operating as usual

Sharing- This should be a very good series!
10/29/2020

Sharing- This should be a very good series!

The Roycroft Campus is offering a new History Course this Fall, all done virtually! 🧑‍💻

The course will look at the “Masters of the Arts & Crafts,” John Ruskin, William Morris, Gustav Stickley and Elbert Hubbard II. Think of it as the Mount Rushmore of the Movement!

Course Tuition: $20 for individual presentations, or save $10 and purchase the whole course for $70. Registration is required 👉 https://bit.ly/37sM2kt

Marston's 60-year active role in the founding, nurturing, and building of Pomona College included 26 years of chairmansh...
10/24/2020

Marston's 60-year active role in the founding, nurturing, and building of Pomona College included 26 years of chairmanship. His influence can be seen across the campus in a number of building projects he funded: the beautiful Marston Quadrangle, Smiley Hall, Florence Carrier Blaisdell Hall, and Lucien Frary Dining Hall.

George Marston would surely be happy to know that in 2018 Pomona was ranked as the most diverse college or university in the country; among enrolled students, 74% hail from out of state, 56% receive need-based financial aid, and 61% identify as a person of color or international student.

Image Marston Quadrangle/Pomona College - Ralph Cornell and Theodore Payne, Landscape Architects.
Courtesy Pomona College

"Museums represent the only educational system outside of our formal framework with the knowledge and people power to ba...
10/22/2020
American Alliance of Museums

"Museums represent the only educational system outside of our formal framework with the knowledge and people power to back up our teachers and parents on the front lines." -AAM President and CEO, Laura Lott.

"New resources are emerging to help teachers and families—but they’re not coming from Silicon Valley... Museums represent the only educational system outside of our formal framework with the knowledge and people power to back up our teachers and parents on the front lines." Read more in this op-ed from AAM President and CEO, Laura Lott, via artnet: https://news.artnet.com/opinion/schools-are-in-crisis-museums-can-help-fill-the-gap-but-only-if-they-survive-1916821

Explore EdCom's repository of over 1,000 museum education resources, tools, and initiatives—and growing! https://sites.google.com/view/museum-distance-learning/home
Plus, follow EdCom - Education Professional Network for AAM.

"George and I began housekeeping in a tiny cottage on the northeast corner of Sixth and C Streets. We lived in several o...
10/16/2020

"George and I began housekeeping in a tiny cottage on the northeast corner of Sixth and C Streets. We lived in several other rented houses before we built, in 1885, the house on Third and Ash streets in which we lived for twenty years.

There our five children grew up with many happy companions. In front was the broad lawn with its shade trees and in the back yard a tall swing and a big pepper tree with a platform in its branches, drygoods-box play-houses, and plenty of room for the digging of trenches and a fort and the building of a boat.

The most cherished indoor memories of the house center in the large living room, with grandmother’s chair in the big bay-window, and the fire-place bordered with the Shakespeare tiles which we rejoiced to purchase again when the house was recently torn down. (editors note.c 1907) -Anna Lee Gunn Marston

Image Marston family, c. 1898 in their Victorian cottage garden at Sixth and C.
Marston children Left to right Elizabeth, Mary, Harriet, Arthur, Helen; and Anna and George.
Image Courtesy Marston Family.

When George opened his very modern fifth store in 1912, people were still learning of breaking news on large chalkboards...
10/03/2020

When George opened his very modern fifth store in 1912, people were still learning of breaking news on large chalkboards, managed by newspapers like this fantastic image on April 16, 1912. (Courtesy National Archives)

On the north side of C Street between Fifth and Sixth Streets, George unveiled and dedicated to the people of San Diego the largest store of all, a bronze plaque proclaimed it "The Marston Company."

Designed by architects G. W. Kelham and Leonard T. Bristow, it was built in the Italian Renaissance style and of reinforced concrete, then considered to be the last word in retail store construction. Architects Mead and Requa contributed to interior design with a "Children's Corner" play area, and, in 1919, again commissioned for a drapery and hat room.

Marston House Museum
10/03/2020

Marston House Museum

Torrey Pines State Natural Reserve: Originally the pueblo lands of the Kumeyaay, George Marston purchased the first acre...
09/27/2020

Torrey Pines State Natural Reserve: Originally the pueblo lands of the Kumeyaay, George Marston purchased the first acreage for conservation, and along with botanists David Cleveland and Belie Angler he convinced the 1889 City Council to pass an ordinance preserving 364 acres. A like-minded friend and compatriot, Ellen Browning Scripps then took the lead, between 1908 and 1911, she acquired two additional pueblo lots and willed them to the people of San Diego. Today it is 1,500 acres of gorgeous and rare coastal wilderness.

Hats Off To Marston's!This was such a fun event, just two years ago- we look forward to the next one- so much had alread...
09/27/2020

Hats Off To Marston's!

This was such a fun event, just two years ago- we look forward to the next one- so much had already been planned for the 2020 version- 2021 will be worth the wait!

Group photo Top left to right Deirdre Lee, Jennifer MacDonald, Susan Whaley, Cat Frasier, Jennifer MacDonald Bottom left to right Susan Whaley, Cat Frasier, Debra Edmund, anonymous guests in Edwardian attire, Eva Miller. Photos by Paul Johnson

Cat Frasier looking stunning in her original Marstons dress and a view from above taken by Robert V.

Family Memories:"During my mother's childhood her home was next to the quaint and famous house of "Lord Timothy Dexter";...
09/22/2020

Family Memories:
"During my mother's childhood her home was next to the quaint and famous house of "Lord Timothy Dexter"; it (her mother's home) was large and furnished with taste and elegance, as shown by furniture and dishes which we possess...judging from the recipes in the family cookbook, the food was rich and abundant." -Anna Lee Marston

IMAGE:Lord Timothy Dexter's residence next door to the Stickney residence, Newburyport, MA

Yes... we do know its Fall! But some of us have been looking at plant and seed catalogs! A tradition every spring, Lilac...
09/20/2020

Yes... we do know its Fall! But some of us have been looking at plant and seed catalogs! A tradition every spring, Lilacs at Marston's, began in 1939 by vice president of the Marston Company, Tom Hamilton. Grown for Marston's in Pine Hills every year by the Barnes family, they began with two bushes, which eventually grew to three thousand!

From the "Presidio Park Plant Survey, by Parish Rye.In the late 1920s George Marston hired Percy Broell as park superint...
09/16/2020
Horticultural Development

From the "Presidio Park Plant Survey, by Parish Rye.

In the late 1920s George Marston hired Percy Broell as park superintendent, who held that position for ten years and was instrumental in the development of Presidio Park. And in 1937, he produced eight maps with botanical legends documenting what he had planted and what was present in the park at that time. And thus began Presidio Park's horticultural experiment. That document remains unpublished. The maps he produced are unknown, until now.

George Marston's efforts are the reason Presidio Park exists today. Because of his philanthropy, there is a Serra Museum, there exist roads, there are irrigation lines, there were personnel hired to do the work, there were governmental relationships built (much of the cobble stonework along roadside gullies, and other smaller structures were financed through WPA funding in the late 1930s thanks to Marston's influence) and there are plants that flourish there today.
George Marston sought advice from many, including famed Landscape Architect John Nolen as well as from the beloved "Mother of Balboa Park," Kate O. Sessions. These ideas trickled down to the "Man on the Ground," Percy Broell.

Mr. Broell was hired by George Marston and was Presidio Park's first park superintendent. He resided in the park in a house that no longer exists in what is today called the grotto, lying just upslope from the corner of Taylor Street and Presidio Drive. He is directly responsible for the original horticultural development and design.

Image: WPA workers at Presidio Park, 1937. Photo courtesy San Diego History Center http://www.sohosandiego.org/presidio/horticulturaldevelopment.htm

The landscape that can be seen today in and around Presidio bears no resemblance to the land as the indigenous peoples saw it, save topography, and in some case not even the height and shapes of the hills are the same. San Diego's coastal landscape varies naturally, by location.

129 years ago: “Bought a sunbonnet & a belt at Marston’s.”—Lillian Whaley, September 14, 1891.Image: Marston’s Departmen...
09/14/2020

129 years ago: “Bought a sunbonnet & a belt at Marston’s.”—Lillian Whaley, September 14, 1891.

Image: Marston’s Department Store, Fifth and F Streets in San Diego, 1892. Built in 1881 by the architecture firm Stewart Brothers in the Italianate style, this was the third of Marston’s stores. The building is still standing.
Photo courtesy Marston Family Collection.

129 years ago: “Bought a sunbonnet & a belt at Marston’s.”—Lillian Whaley, September 14, 1891.

Pictured is Marston’s Department Store at the corner of Fifth and F Streets in San Diego, 1892. Built in 1881 by the architecture firm Stewart Brothers in the Italianate style, this was the third of Marston’s stores. The building is still standing.

Photo courtesy Marston Family Collection.

George Marston led the effort for city planning in San Diego. Over three decades he sponsored two plans by one of the co...
09/12/2020

George Marston led the effort for city planning in San Diego. Over three decades he sponsored two plans by one of the country's preeminent planners, John Nolen of Chicago. These plans, published in 1908 and 1926, ultimately guided San Diego's expansion and attention to abundant natural resources into the post-World War II era.
Book covers-Images Courtesy David Swarens

As he (father) got older he became very much interested in playing golf; after he was 70 he played golf every Saturday a...
09/09/2020

As he (father) got older he became very much interested in playing golf; after he was 70 he played golf every Saturday afternoon. And he was a very good player." -Mary Gilman Marston

Image: located in Old Town San Diego, this nine-acre golf course contains the Ruiz-Carrillo house, the first and oldest house in San Diego, c 1817.

In 1907 George underwrote the renovation of this historic property and the development of a golf course that would surround the site. Opened in 1932, the eighteen-hole course is one of the oldest par-three golf courses in the country. Golf course architect William Park Bell designed the links. George later donated the park to the City of San Diego.
Photo courtesy Marston Family Collection

"These dye record cards reflect the efforts of the Deerfield Society of Blue and White Needlework, an embroidery collect...
09/08/2020
Preserving Knowledge, Preserving Color | Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum

"These dye record cards reflect the efforts of the Deerfield Society of Blue and White Needlework, an embroidery collective founded by Margaret Whiting (1869–1946) and Ellen Miller (1854–1929) in the 1890s in the historic New England hamlet of Deerfield, Massachusetts

...."The Arts and Crafts movement was, in part, a reaction against the synthetic dyes first invented by William Henry Perkin in 1856, and these dye cards show the Deerfield embroiderers experimenting with dyestuffs that had been used for millennia: madder (Gallium) red from the dye-filled roots of a perennial plant, indigo blue from the leaves of a number of different species of shrub, Logwood purple from the heartwood of swamp trees from the Yucatan in Mexico, and oak galls (with copper and alum, according to the notes on the card) for brown. They reflect a different type of historic preservation effort – one focused on recovering and retaining fading knowledge of the art of dyeing."

September is New York Textile Month, a citywide celebration of textile creativity. As in past years, the museum is collaborating with the Textile Society of America. A non-profit professional organization of scholars, educators, and artists in the field of textiles, TSA provides an international for...

Today we remember the many workers who constructed the Marston House. Ernest Pefley was the contractor who built the Heb...
09/07/2020

Today we remember the many workers who constructed the Marston House. Ernest Pefley was the contractor who built the Hebbard & Gill designed home. The contract details between George and Mr. Pefley:

W. S.Hebbard Irving J. Gill
Architects
Grant Building San Diego, California
MEMORANDUM OF CONTRACT.
GEORGE W. MARSTON, OWNER, with
ERNEST PEFLEY, CONTRACTOR
Dated December 5th, 1904, To be completed May 15th, 1905
PAYMENTS
$1000.00 When the foundation is in.
$1250.00 When the frame is up.
$1250.00 When the roof is up.
$1250.00 When ready to plaster.
$1250.00 When plastering is completed.
$1500.00 When standing finish is placed.
$3206.00 At the completion of the Contract.
$3569.00 35 days after the completion of Contract.
________
$14275.00 Total.
This contract includes everything except Plumbing, Heating,
Painting, Window screens, Brick for floors, Front door hardware,
Cistern and Iron Hood for fire-place.

Photo c1905-6. Newly completed.

Jane Addams -- the pioneering social reformer and women's rights activist who became the first American woman to win the...
09/06/2020

Jane Addams -- the pioneering social reformer and women's rights activist who became the first American woman to win the Nobel Peace Prize -- was born on this day in 1860.

In 1921, Jane Addams asked Helen Marston personally to attend the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF) Congress in Vienna.
"Writing home to her family to discuss plans, Marston emphasized twice that WILPF women were pacifists, not extremists, and that the trip would involve no personal danger to herself. She told her parents that she had wanted to do relief work in Europe since the beginning of the war and that once overseas she would like to stay to do relief work with the Quakers. Although now twenty-nine, Marston was asking parental permission to “do something rather different and have a little adventure.” The letter was twenty-seven pages long, the argument logical and reassuring. “Even in bed you may break a rib,” she coaxed. The permission was granted. Marston attended the conference, then worked for seven months for the Friends Mission in Vienna, helping distribute rations to the impoverished professional middle-class.."- Joan M. Jensen, When Women Worked.

A 1939 Pacific Beach Garden Club meeting was held in Balboa Park. The special guests were John Morley, George Marston, R...
09/05/2020

A 1939 Pacific Beach Garden Club meeting was held in Balboa Park. The special guests were John Morley, George Marston, Roland Hoyt, and Kate Sessions.
Mr. Morley, former superintendent of Balboa Park, said a few words about the park, and its “mother and father,” Miss Sessions and Mr. Marston.
Mr. Marston reminisced how, starting in 1903, our great park was developed. Mr. Marston said that Balboa Park is a cultural center, a hospitality center, and most importantly, a civic university. “The park, as one of the most distinctive features of San Diego, has a wonderful future, but conservatism must be practiced, especially in regard to the buildings in the park.”

Today these words are as true and important as they were then.

PHOTO/GETTY IMAGES

We are pleased to share with you this selection of images from four of our museums to use on your next chat, conference ...
09/01/2020
SOHO Museums Zoom Backgrounds!

We are pleased to share with you this selection of images from four of our museums to use on your next chat, conference call, or happy hour with one of these following free downloadable backgrounds.

As many of us continue to shelter at home, connecting with friends and family, or attending the work meetings a job requires, Zoom has become an important way to stay in touch and to manage our lives.

Lois deKock, one of our long-time Marston House docents, has donated an important collection of documents about the deve...
09/01/2020
Honoring David R. Roberts

Lois deKock, one of our long-time Marston House docents, has donated an important collection of documents about the development of Balboa Park from the mid-1950s through the 1980s. Her father, David R. Roberts, who passed away in 2019, compiled the collection.

Lois deKock, one of our long-time Marston House docents, has donated an important collection of documents about the development of Balboa Park from the mid-1950s through the 1980s. Her father, David R. Roberts, who passed away in 2019, compiled the collection.

A fun photo of Hamilton Marston in the empty formal garden fountain, with two unidentified women. If anyone can ID these...
08/30/2020

A fun photo of Hamilton Marston in the empty formal garden fountain, with two unidentified women.

If anyone can ID these ladies, we would love to know!
EDITED!: This is Annalee Marston Hargreaves - sister of Hamilton- is on the left. Elsa (Doonie) Marston Pettit on the right.
Image courtesy Marston Family Collection

More of Helen Marston's story and her dedication to the peace movement of which she was a part from 1917 to 1982, when s...
08/29/2020

More of Helen Marston's story and her dedication to the peace movement of which she was a part from 1917 to 1982, when she died at eighty-nine.

"The War Department had misjudged the sentiment of American people, in California as elsewhere. Despite the War Department’s attacks, Marston and the newly organized WILPF (The Women's International League for Peace and Freedom) in San Diego successfully presented their arguments against increased armaments at a 1924 joint Army-WILPF debate on Defense Day. Marston herself was a little unsure of launching the San Diego chapter with such a major undertaking so soon after its formation. Once decided on by the group, however, she helped ensure its success. This event is uniquely preserved in a typescript so that we know precisely what occurred when 3,500 San Diegans crowded into the Civic Auditorium on September 7, 1924. The debate began promptly at 3 P.M. with the singing of the National Anthem and “Dixie.” Marston then made a statement that WILPF opposed Defense Day and believed the best defense was not preparedness for war. The chairman announced he was for Defense Day and then the debate took place between a War Department representative, Colonel Charles M. Tobin, and WILPF’s speaker Paul B. Blanshard from the League of Industrial Democracy. Tobin said that some women wanted to destroy the government but that God, the law of nature, and the judgement of great men called for “reasonable preparation.” Blanchard kept his argument closer to home, noting what he loved (the California climate for one) and what he hated-child labor, slums, corruption, and the Ku Klux Klan. He said he was opposed to Defense Day not because he was a pacifist, rather because it had not been approved by Congress or the people but “foisted upon the people by a reactionary War Department.” He then named various governors, churches, and women’s clubs that opposed Defense Day. The second reason for his opposition was the effect it might have on other nations, that “the War Department is going on to use our emotions to further its imperialistic plans and send our soldiers and our sons to protect the American bankers and their foreign investments.” He concluded by arguing that it symbolized the international race for armament and that world peace could only be achieved by disarmament. Americans must, he urged, take up the task of extending justice instead of force to other nations. A show of hands after the debate showed overwhelming support for Blanchard’s position despite the attendance of a number of patriotic groups. Marston was elated."- Joan M. Jensen

Address

3525 7th Ave
San Diego, CA
92103

The Marston House Museum is located on the far west corner of Balboa Park. For driving directions, 7th Avenue can be accessed from Upas Street via 6th Avenue. For public transportation, go www.sdmts.com for trolley schedules, bus routes and times.

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The San Diego Urban Sketchers visited the garden today, and spend a couple delightful hours capturing the spring day. Here's a link to a video of the visit:
Hello, I'm a film producer. I would like to know who to speak to about using the marston house as a filming location for a 4 hour period. Not much use of furniture, if any.
Any photos of Marston's Dept. Store Christmas windows? I wonder if there is any footage of their wonderful mechanized displays that delighted & amazed us as kids?
Does anyone know when the house will be open again.