Footsteps To Freedom

Footsteps To Freedom Since 1997 the Black Voice Footsteps To Freedom Underground Railroad Study Tour has retraced the steps of early freedom seekers from enslavement to freedom.
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Since 1997 the Black Voice Foundation has organized the Footsteps To Freedom Underground Railroad Study Tour teaching educators and others interested in learning more about one of America's most powerful freedom movements. Hundreds of teachers, administrators and parents from San Bernardino, Moreno Valley and Victorville have taken this life changing tour. They come back energized, engaged and ready to affect change in the lifes of African American students.

The Village of Ripley
12/28/2019

The Village of Ripley

On December 18th, the Rankin House received a 2019 Heritage Award from Ohio's Hill Country Heritage Area. The award was presented at a luncheon held at the Statehouse. Representative Doug Green was in attendance to present the award. Betty Campbell provided a nice presentation about the John Rankin House.

The John Rankin House is one of the best-documented and most active Underground Railroad “stations” in Ohio. Located in Ripley, Ohio, and built in 1825, The Rankin House was home to abolitionist and Presbyterian minister John Rankin, his wife Jean, and their 13 children. It’s estimated that over 2,000 slaves seeking freedom stayed with the Rankins, sometimes as many as 12 at a time. Here, visitors can learn how the Rankin family and their neighbors in Ripley and other nearby communities helped the enslaved on their path to freedom via the Underground Railroad.

Congratulations !! Footsteps to Freedom
12/11/2019

Congratulations !! Footsteps to Freedom

SPOTLIGHT - 100 Accomplished Black Canadian Women 2018 Recipient - SHANNON BETH PRINCE from North Buxton, Ontario is the
Curator of the Buxton National Historic Site & Museum
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Shannon's advice to the next generation: “Explore other cultures, religions and ways of thinking. Don’t take life for granted. Be thankful you have parents, a roof over your head and an opportunity to get an education.”
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Read more about her in the 2018 edition of the 100 Accomplished Black Canadian Women Book! Link in bio
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#100AccomplishedBlackCanadianWomen #100ABCWomen #100ABCWMotivates #100ABCWInspires
#2018ABCWomen #NorthBuxton #Ontario

“By leading tours on Detroit’s history, Jordan hopes to provide an alternative story about the role of African-Americans...
12/11/2019
Jamon Jordan teaches the hidden Black histories of Detroit

“By leading tours on Detroit’s history, Jordan hopes to provide an alternative story about the role of African-Americans in the city. He thinks that highlighting the creativity, activism, and resilience of Black Detroiters — from slaves in the early history of the city to business owners in the early twentieth century — is key to creating a more equitable city. “

Footsteps to Freedom

In 1999, Jamon Jordan became a public school teacher. Twenty years later, he’s a different kind of educator, leading tours about African-American history in Detroit...

On this day: The United States formally outlaws slaveryOn December 6, 1865, the 13th Amendment was ratified after the st...
12/07/2019

On this day: The United States formally outlaws slavery

On December 6, 1865, the 13th Amendment was ratified after the state of Georgia approved the amendment as it was proposed to the states by Congress. That act officially ended the practice of slavery in the United States.

“Freedom is national, for slavery is dead.”

On this day: The United States formally outlaws slavery

On December 6, 1865, the 13th Amendment was ratified after the state of Georgia approved the amendment as it was proposed to the states by Congress. That act officially ended the practice of slavery in the United States.

The brief, 47-word amendment abolished an institution that had its roots in the British Colonial era and dominated much of the political, social and economic life in the United States for more than two centuries.

The amendment reads as follows:
Section 1. Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction.

Section 2. Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.

The amendment was a top priority for the late President, Abraham Lincoln. In January 1863 Lincoln had issued the final version of the Emancipation Proclamation, which declared “all persons held as slaves within any State, or designated part of a State, the people whereof shall then be in rebellion against the United States, shall be then, thenceforward, and forever free.” With the rebellion ending, it became imperative to get the 13th Amendment ratified to outlaw slavery within the United States.

It was approved in the Senate on April 8, 1864, and by the House on January 31, 1865. On February 1, 1865, Lincoln approved the Joint Resolution of Congress submitting the proposed amendment to the states, a little more than two months before his death at the hands of an assassin who supported slavery.

Still, 27 of the 36 states had to ratify the amendment for it to become part of the Constitution, and some of those states had been in rebellion during the Civil War. Lincoln and the Radical Republicans struggled to get the House to pass the amendment, but they finally succeeded in securing a 119–56 vote.

It came down to a group of four Southern, former Confederate states, to ensure the 13th Amendment’s passage. Two Union states, Delaware and New Jersey, had already rejected the 13th Amendment, as had two Southern states, Kentucky and Mississippi. Three Western states, Iowa, California and Oregon, as well as Florida and Texas, had yet to vote on it.

However, South Carolina (November 13, 1865), Alabama (December 2, 1865), North Carolina (December 4, 1865) and finally Georgia (December 6, 1865) agreed to ratify the amendment. Secretary of State William Seward officially certified the amendment on December 18, 1865.

Subsequently, the nine states that rejected or didn’t act on the 13th Amendment approved it, but it took Mississippi until 1995 to do so.

The public reaction, as seen in contemporary newspapers, was strong. “We are certain, then, that slavery in the land is dead in the law and letter beyond hope of resurrection, and that it has been burled by the official sextons of twenty-seven States,” said the New York Tribune.

“A strange, grateful, and animated emotion beats in our veins at the thought of the United States Government declaring with its official lips that American slavery is no more forever,” said the New York Independent.

“Freedom is national, for slavery is dead. No more to be revived, no more to breed dissensions, no more to incite war, no more to clutch at the heart of the people, and steal the lifeblood of the fairest and noblest of the land,” said the Springfield (Mass.) Union.

But others saw another effect of the 13th Amendment’s ratification: signaling to the country that the former Confederate states would rejoin the United States as equal political participants.

The New York Times said the ratification and certification of the 13th Amendment “is the first official recognition by the government of the constitutional equality of the late insurrectionary states with the other states.”

“We may rightfully claim . . . that our state is fully entitled to be placed in that position in the Union where she will stand as the political equal of any other state under the Federal constitution,” said Alabama Governor Robert Patton in his inaugural address.

Patton lost two sons fighting for the Confederate side in the war. “How far governmental action may be able to promote the common interest of the two races in their suddenly changed conditions is a great problem that time alone can solve,” he said.

Within two years, Patton would be replaced in all but name by a military commander during Reconstruction, and it would take several years for the former Confederate states to be officially readmitted to the Union. Ratification of the 14th Amendment was a requirement for those states to gain representation again in Congress.

Source: National Constitution Center

Association of African American Museums
12/06/2019

Association of African American Museums

We’re sharing fantastic news out of D.C. for HBCUs! How phenomenal is this? 🏆. Now we need the House to do their job!

“The bipartisan bill known as the FUTURE Act (Fostering Undergraduate Talent by Unlocking Resources for Education) strives to strengthen HBCUs as well as other minority-serving institutions by providing $255 million annually. The amended bill now heads to the House for another vote, according to Senate Education Chairman Lamar Alexander.”

#BlackMuseums #HBCU #AfricanAmericanHistory #BlackHistory

https://www.cnn.com/2019/12/05/politics/hcbu-senate-bill-permanent-funding/index.html

So much great history of resilience and creativity to see and learn. Nashville, Tennessee.
11/23/2019
National Museum of African American Music | One Nation Under a Groove

So much great history of resilience and creativity to see and learn. Nashville, Tennessee.

DONATE BLACK MUSIC MONTH RIVERS OF RHYTHM Scheduled to open in Downtown Nashville in early 2020, the National museum of African American Music will be a 56,000-square-foot facility that will encourage visitors to discover the many connections and influences that composers have had on all genres of m...

Hmmmmm getting ideas.
11/23/2019
Tyler Perry Studios to Offer Tours in 2020

Hmmmmm getting ideas.

In an exciting announcement today, Tyler Perry Studios officially released the news that they will be offering tours beginning in 2020. The official tour dates and information will be released next…

11/22/2019
We are excited to announce the 2020 Footsteps to Freedom tour dates. We are diligently working with school districts to ...
11/18/2019

We are excited to announce the 2020 Footsteps to Freedom tour dates. We are diligently working with school districts to offer this ONCE IN A LIFETIME opportunity to walk in the footsteps of brave freedom seekers as they traveled the Underground Railroad toward freedom.

(Post your favorite picture of your tour in comments.)

Footsteps has launched our (16 graduate credit) certificate in EMPATHY. It was an honor to launch an idea that we have b...
11/15/2019

Footsteps has launched our (16 graduate credit) certificate in EMPATHY.

It was an honor to launch an idea that we have been thinking about since hearing all your amazing stories of impact on each one of the tours.

Thank you Cambridge College for your support and guidance through the accreditation process. Here are some pictures from the launch.

10/31/2019
Local 4 Paula Tutman

Congratulations Chef Tony, Melandie Hines and our entire Wayne Westland School district (Michigan/Footsteps) family.

This culinary program is taking the students out of the traditional classroom.

10/26/2019
Harriet Tubman Home in Auburn, New York

Harriet Tubman Home in Auburn, New York

Harriet Tubman Home in Auburn, New York Interview with Rev. Paul Gordon Carter filmed & edited by dante luna

ITS HERE!!Post Baccalaureate (Master Level) Certificate (16-Credits)RSVPhttps://www.eventbrite.com/e/empathy-certificate...
10/22/2019

ITS HERE!!
Post Baccalaureate (Master Level) Certificate (16-Credits)

RSVP
https://www.eventbrite.com/e/empathy-certificate-official-launch-party-tickets-77163077843

Join us for the unveiling of our exciting new program offering of a Certificate in Empathy. Learn about the unique opportunity offered to educators and past participants of Footsteps to Freedom Underground Railroad Study tour. Earn 16 graduate credits as we dive deep in the studies of the heroics of Freedom Movements including the Underground Railroad (completed in only 3 terms). Official Launch date Spring 2020.

Too often the study of history occurs from the perspective of looking at dates, and manipulated facts. This program utilizes an empathy pedagogy that focuses on constant teacher–student interaction and attentive listening. In this context, we will apply empathy and story telling as a means of analyzing the Underground Railroad from its historical sense. At the conclusion of this program students will be equipped to incorporate the content from this course and Empathy techniques into their classroom and develop new educational models for positive social change.

LAUNCH PARTY
November 14, 2019
Sheraton Ontario Airport Hotel
429 North Vineyard Avenue
Ontario, California

A sample of the Certificate outcomes:

Upon completing this graduate certificate program students will be able to:

* Explain and analyze the Underground Railroad as a key historical event

* Understand and evaluate the diversity of the human experience as influenced by religion, race, culture, and politics in US history

* Apply historical processes that shape individuals and communities, drawing on detailed knowledge about the history of the area under study

* Think critically about the complexity of experiences found in the historical record of the United States during the Underground Railroad, and utilize Empathy to explore diversity as a critical component of history

* Distinguish between primary and secondary sources, and understand how each are used to make historical arguments

* Embed social emotional learning into teaching practices.

Cambridge College
For more than 45 years Cambridge College has been a leader and pioneer in adult learning. With a main campus in Boston, Massachusetts, and four regional locations nationwide, we provide academically excellent, time-efficient, and affordable higher education to a diverse population of adult learners. A private, nonprofit institution, Cambridge College is accredited by the New England Commission of Higher Education (NECHE, formerly known as NEASC); our various degree and certificate programs enable students to earn the credentials they need to advance in their careers.

Black Voice Foundation Inc
The Black Voice Foundation was founded in 1988 with a mission to train and educate individuals in print media. With the digital revolution, the rapid growth of technology in the world of communications and media, and the need to impact lives through a diverse set of multi media platforms; the foundation has expanded its mission to include a new set of projects in the area of education,professional development, history, and the arts. The Black Voice Foundation has hosted over 2500 educators on the Footsteps to Freedom tour where they have walked the steps of freedom seekers from the 1800s for more than 23 years. This experience allows you to look at empathy through the eyes of the historic journey of the Underground Railroad.

10/09/2019
Tyler Perry Studios

Tyler Perry Studios

Presenting #ImagineThis. A celebration for the 2019 Grand Opening of the New Tyler Perry Studios! #TylerPerryStudios #TylerPerry #ImagineThis #TPSGrandOpening #TPSGala #GloryToGlory #SundayBrunch #TeamDreamFest

Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, New York Public Library
10/06/2019

Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, New York Public Library

“If we do not openly discuss slavery's impact on contemporary transatlantic societies, we are likely to continue to see new renovations of the institution pop up in ways that further disfranchise and dispossess our most vulnerable populations,” said Dr. Michelle Commander, associate director and curator of the Lapidus Center for the Historical Analysis of Transatlantic Slavery at the Schomburg Center.

Join us Oct. 10-12 for "Enduring Slavery: Resistance, Public Memory, and Transatlantic Archives," which will bring together scholars, visual artists, and writers to discuss the history of transatlantic slavery and its afterlives.

This event is FREE and open to the public. RSVP on Eventbrite, https://www.eventbrite.com/e/2019-lapidus-center-conference-tickets-68525173639

#SchomburgCenter #EnduringSlavery #Freeevent

10/02/2019
Moreno Valley Unified School District

Moreno Valley Unified School District

Last week, our community joined us in remembering the life of Diego. We thank the Moreno Valley Community for your continued support, and we thank the Landmark Middle School students and staff for their dedication to making this event so beautiful.

“In 1860, a majority of Americans were so appalled by the rise of a political cabal that they rejected it, giving such e...
10/01/2019
Historian warns today's America looks "eerily similar" to period before the Civil War, compares movement conservatives to slaveholder elite

“In 1860, a majority of Americans were so appalled by the rise of a political cabal that they rejected it, giving such extremists only a little more than 18% of the vote. As voters split over three other candidates, Abraham Lincoln, who vowed to stop the spread of slavery, won.”

The Boston College professor, an expert in 19th century America, said President Donald Trump "was onto something" with his Civil War tweets.

The Lincoln Memorial Shrine
09/03/2019

The Lincoln Memorial Shrine

Remembering Frederick Douglass’ escape from slavery

Frederick Douglass escaped from slavery on September 3, 1838, aided by a disguise and job skills he had learned while forced to work in Baltimore's shipyards.

frederickdouglassDouglass posed as a sailor when he grabbed a train in Baltimore that was headed to Philadelphia. He was also given papers from a freed black sailor to help in the journey.

“My knowledge of ships and sailor's talk came much to my assistance, for I knew a ship from stem to stern, and from keelson to cross-trees, and could talk sailor like an 'old salt,'” he later said in his autobiography.

Link: Read Quotes From Douglass about his escape

Once Douglass made the harrowing train trip to Philadelphia he was able to move on to New York City.

“My free life began on the third of September, 1838. On the morning of the fourth of that month, after an anxious and most perilous but safe journey, I found myself in the big city of New York, a a free man - one more added to the mighty throng which, like the confused waves of the troubled sea, surged to and fro between the lofty walls of Broadway,” he said.

The anniversary is also an occasion to note the 2013 publication of “TransAtlantic” by Colum McCann, who won the National Book Award for his previous novel “Let The Great World Spin.”

“TransAtlantic” is a lyrical novel about stories cutting across time, in Canada, Ireland, and the United States—and about how, as McCann’s website describes, “the most unassuming moments of grace have a way of rippling through time, space, and memory.”

National Public Radio reported that “TransAtlantic” was inspired by McCann learning that, in 1845, when Douglass was only 27 and still a slave, he went to Ireland to raise money for his anti-slavery campaign and to stir support for abolition. (This 1988 senior thesis at Yale tells more about that history.)

McCann told the NewsHour: “The real is imagined, in the sense that we shape our stories, so anything that even happens on the news gets shaped in a certain way and gets a texture …” He went on, “what I'm interested in is how the small anonymous moments, they can enter into the large narrative of the bigger, more public moments,” including when Frederick Douglass went to Ireland.

Image: Frederick Douglass
Source: National Constitution Center

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